8.04 Islam

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Islam
is a monotheistic and Abrahamic religion articulated by the Qur'an, a book considered by Muslims to be the verbatim word of God. Islam is based on the teachings of Muhammad who is considered by Muslims be the last prophet of God. Islam has approximately 1.6 billion followers, roughly 23% of the Earth’s population. It is currently the second-largest religion in the world as well as the fastest-growing. In a religious context, Islam means "voluntary submission to God" (i.e., Greenland of Denmark). Muslim is also spelled Moslem (M+S+L+M), a term which almost identical to “mausoleum” (M+S+L+M), meaning tomb or grave. Mausoleum in Greek literally means "city of the dead”. Therefore, the term “Muslim” equates to death and dying as evidenced by the Islamic diet of dead animals (minus pigs), Islamic male and female circumcision, as well as the wrapping of the female body like a mummy. In Islam heaven is known as Jannah, a place of joy and bliss. Qurʼanic references describe it as a place where the physical pleasures of life will finally be experienced. The term “Jannah” (G/J+N+H) acronymically equates to “Greenland North Forever”, a place where Romans indulge in the physical pleasures of life every day.
Lastly, each year, Muslims perform the “Hijra” which is representative of Muhammad’s pasr "emigration" to the city of Medina. The term “Hijra” (H+G/J+R) acronymically equates to “Forever Greenland Rome”, a direct reference to the previous emigration of the Roman Empire from the underworld (i.e., hell) to Greenland (i.e., heaven).


De-Romanization of Middle East
After the alleged Fall of Rome, most Roman churches and temples were subsequently converted into mosques in order to hide the Roman Empire’s ongoing subjugation of the Middle East and Asia, hence the term “mosque” or “mask”. A mosque is a place of worship for Muslims which is sometimes spelt “Mosk” (M+S+K), a term which is consonantly the same as “mask” (M+S+K). Minus the colorful paint, tiles, and minarets, most mosques exhibit the Greco-Roman architectural features (e.g., arches, archways, columns, domes, phallic symbols, twin towers, etc.) found on Roman Catholic basilicas, cathedrals, churches and temples around the world. This is because Greco-Roman places of worship were converted to mosques and their phallic symbols renamed minarets. According to early Muslim historians, towns that surrendered without resistance to invading Islamic armies gave the Muslims permission to take their churches and synagogues and convert them into mosques. One of the earliest examples of this kind of conversion took place in 705 AD when the caliph Al-Walid I allegedly bought the church of St. John in Damascus, Syria from the Christians and rebuilt it as a mosque. Overall, Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan (Al-Walid 's father) is said to have transformed 10 churches in Damascus into mosques. The Abbasid caliph al-Ma'mun also turned many churches into mosques. After capturing Constantinople in 1453, the Ottoman Turks converted nearly all churches, monasteries, and chapels into mosques, including the famous Hagia Sophia. The conversion of non-Muslim places of worship into mosques occurred primarily during the life of Muhammad and continued during subsequent Islamic conquests. As a result, countless originally Roman basilicas, cathedrals, churches and temples have been converted into mosques.

Roman Dome-ination in the Middle East
Prior to the alleged fall of the Roman Empire, openly Roman domes could be found all across Europe, Africa, the Middle East and Asia. However, after the Roman Empire faked its own death and decided to go undercover, proxy governments and other Roman religions, namely Christianity, Islam, and Judaism, took over these once Roman domes and made them their own, at least cosmetically speaking. According to modern historical accounts, “The conversion of non-Muslim places of worship into mosques occurred primarily during the life of Muhammad (570 A.D. – June 8, 632 A.D.) and continued during subsequent Islamic conquests and under historical Muslim rule. As a result, numerous Hindu temples, churches, synagogues, the Parthenon and Zoroastrian temples were converted into mosques”. According to early Muslim historians, towns that surrendered without resistance and made treaties with the Muslims gave the Muslims permission to take their churches and synagogues. The conversion of Roman domes from one religious domination to another has continued even in modern times and shows fluid continuity between allegedly competing Roman religions. For example, the Tripoli Cathedral (Tripoli, Libya) was built in 1928 as a Roman Catholic Church, only to be later turned into a mosque in 1970. Minus the colorful paint, tiles and minarets, mosques generally exhibit the same Greco-Roman architectural features (e.g., arches, columns, domes, minarets, phallic symbols, and twin towers) generally found in Roman Catholic basilicas, cathedrals and churches around the world. It is imperative to note that first the Roman Catholic Church served as the official government up until only a few hundred years ago. Therefore, their churches, mosques and synagogues served (and still do) as an integral part of the Roman intelligence network which used minarets and church steeples for secret electronic communication, most likely with the use of two-way radios using AM and FM-like frequencies.

Islamic Double-cross
Similar to Judaism, the circumcision of the male offspring is also practiced in Islam. In some Islamic tribes, female circumcision (i.e., clitorectomies) are practiced as well. The process of male circumcision (removal of the foreskin) within various cultures is symbolic of dome of the Earth (i.e., Greenland) and the Roman Dome on which it is based. Consequently, a foreskin-less penis is indicative of a dome and is a permanent reminder of Rome’s domination over that particular race or religion.  Also, circumcision is highly traumatic for boys and makes sex less pleasurable, resulting in a less peaceful male and a lower population rate. Like all Roman religions, caveats are built in just in case one particular group needs to be attacked or pressured. For example, in Islam, usury is strictly forbidden. That being said, no government in the Middle East conforms to Islamic economic jurisprudence as they all currently deal in usury and government bonds. If and when the banks and/or governments get out of line, passages in respect to usury will be preached until the people are outraged and enough political pressure is levied in order to enact the desired change. The same goes for jihad, the only form of warfare permissible in Islamic law. Since jihad can be declared against apostates, criminal groups, illegal works, leaders, rebels, states or terrorists who allegedly oppress Muslims, Rome can manipulate the Islamic population to effectively attack, blackball or vilify and person or organization they deem a potential threat. Since jihad is slated to continue until "all mankind either embraced Islam or submitted to the authority of the Muslim state", holy war can be re-declared at any given moment. Although truces can be reached, there can never be a permanent peace.

Islam & Christianity
Similar to Catholicism and Christianity, both of which were admittedly spawned by the Roman Empire (the most evil and vile organization ever to exist), Muslims believe that Adam, Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Lot, Ishmael, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, Job, David, Solomon, Elijah, Elisha, Jonah, Aaron, Moses, Zechariah, John the Baptist as well as Jesus and his apostles are prophets of God as dictated by the Quran. Islam teaches that God gave the Torah to Moses, the Psalms to David and the Gospel to Jesus. This is key because although Muslims do not subscribe to the notion that Jesus was the son of God, they accept the characters depicted in the Bible to be authentic, thus verifying the fraudulent history of the Holy Bible.
Although they differ in detail, the Quran recounts events, people and stories recounted in Jewish and Christian books such as the Tanakh and Bible. For example, Moses is mentioned more in the Quran than any other individual while Jesus is mentioned more often than Muhammad. Muslims believe the common elements between the Bible, Quran and Tanak were the result of authentic divine revelations given to each respective religion’s prophets. In other words, the authenticity and validity of these writings is never questioned—just the trivial non-consequential details.

12 Islamic-Roman Months
In order to confuse the Islamic world after the alleged Fall of Rome, the 13-month lunar calendar was scrapped in the Middle East and replaced by the 12-month Hijri calendar (i.e., the Islamic calendar). Its 12 months are: Muḥarram: Muḥarram is the first month in the Islamic calendar which allegedly means “forbidden” because war was forbidden during this month. The term “Muḥarram” (M+H+R+M) acronymically equates to “13 Forever Rome”, as the letter “M” is indicative of the 13 Bloodlines of Rome; Ṣafar: Ṣafar is the second month in the Islamic calendar which allegedly means “void”. The term “Safar” (S+F/P+R) acronymically equates to “System/Sacrifice Four/Fear/Fire”, an apparent reference to Roman blood sacrifices and the number “4” which equates to the Roman Cross; Rabīʿ I: Rabīʿ I is the third month in the Islamic calendar which allegedly means “the first spring”. The term “Rabi” (R+B/V) acronymically equates to “Rome Victory”, an apparent reference to Victoria, the Roman goddess of victory. The number “3” generally equates to the third and final den or home of Rome—Greenland; Rabīʿ II: Rabīʿ II is the fourth month in the Islamic calendar which allegedly means "the second or last spring". The term “Rabi” (R+B/V) acronymically equates to “Rome Victory”, an apparent second reference to Victoria, the Roman goddess of victory. The number “4” generally equates to the Roman Cross; Jumādā I: Jumādā I is the fifth month in the Islamic calendar which allegedly means “the first month of parched land”. The term “Jumada” (G/J+M+D) acronymically equates to “Greenland 13 Day/Die”, an apparent reference to the 13 Bloodlines of Rome who live in the 24/7 daylight (Day) of Greenland; Jumādā II: Jumādā II is the sixth month in the Islamic calendar which allegedly means “the second or last month of parched land”. The term “Jumada” (G/J+M+D) acronymically equates to “Greenland 13 Day/Die”, an apparent second reference to the 13 Bloodlines of Rome who live in the 24/7 daylight (Day) of Greenland; Rajab: Rajab is the seventh month in the Islamic calendar which allegedly means “"respect" and/or "honor" because war was forbidden during this month. The term “Rajab” (R+G/J+B/V) acronymically equates to “Rome Greenland 13” or “Rome Greenland Victory”. The letter “B” (1+3=B) is also indicative of the 13 Bloodlines of Rome who live in Greenland; Shaʿbān: Shaʿbān is the eighth month in the Islamic calendar which allegedly means "scattered". The term “Shaʿbān” (S+H+B+N) acronymically equates to “System Forever 13 North/Kill”. The number “8” numerologically speaking represents “forever” or “infinity”, hence the reference to non-stop war; Ramaḍān: Ramaḍān is the ninth month in the Islamic calendar which allegedly means “scorched”. The term “Ramadan” (R+M+D+N) acronymically equates to “Rome Den”, an apparent reference to the den or home of Rome in Greenland; Shawwāl: Shawwāl is the tenth month in the Islamic calendar which allegedly means “raised”. The term “Shawwal” (S+H+V/W+L) acronymically equates to “System Forever Veil”, an apparent reference to the veil of secrecy from which behind the Roman Empire operates in Greenland; Dhū al-Qaʿda: Dhū al-Qaʿda is the eleventh month in the Islamic calendar which allegedly means “the one of truce”. Aside from being almost identical in name to the state-sponsored terror group known as Al Qaeda, the term “Dhū al-Qaʿda” (D+H+L+K/Q+D) acronymically equates to “Day/Die Hell/Heel Kill Day/Die”, hence name of the aforementioned terror group; Lastly, Dhū al-Ḥijja: Dhū al-Ḥijja is the twelfth month in the Islamic calendar which allegedly means “the one of pilgrimage”. The term “Dhū al-Ḥijja” (D+H+L+H+J/G) acronymically equates to “Day/Die Hell/Heel Forever Greenland”.

Ramadan
Ramadan is the ninth month in the Islamic calendar which is generally observed by Muslims as a month of fasting. This annual observance is regarded as one of the Five Pillars of Islam. Ramadan lasts 29–30 days depending on the visual sightings of the crescent moon, a Greco-Roman symbol of death. Although modern historical accounts state that the term “Ramadan” comes from the Arabic root “ramiḍa” or “ar-ramaḍ”, the term “Ramadan” (R+M+D+N) acronymically equates to “Rome Den”, an apparent reference to the third and final den or home of Rome in Greenland. Consequently, Ramadan was originally known as a pagan festival which was observed by many pagan societies throughout Arabia, Egypt, Turkey, Iraq and even Persia. The festival was held in honor of the moon god (likely Luna) and featured a fast from moon-rise to moon-set. Therefore, Ramadan was likely a Roman festival which was celebrated throughout their empire in the underworld, including Africa, Asia, the Mediterranean and the Middle East. Ramadan as later adopted by Muhammad who subsequently changed the fast rules from sunrise to sundown.


Islamic Holidays
Similar to
Jewish holidays, almost all Muslim holidays fall on Roman holidays or have Roman connotations. The saying “When in Rome do as the Romans” is literally true as Rome’s pagan holidays, which generally involve human sacrifices, are celebrated the world over, especially in Islamic countries. Islamic holy days fall on fixed dates on the Islamic lunar calendar, meaning that they occur in different seasons and in different years in the Gregorian calendar. The most important Islamic festivals are Eid al-Fitr which marks the end of Ramadan, and Eid al-Adha which coincides with the pilgrimage to Mecca. The Muslim calendar’s first year is known as 1 AH (i.e., “Anno Hegirae”) or 622 AD.  The term “Anno Hegirae” (N+H+G+R), which is based on Anno Domini, acronymically equates to “North Forever Greenland Rome”. Roman-Muslim holidays include but are not limited to: Alī ibn Abī Ṭālib: In 2013, the Islamic holiday marking the birthday of ‘Alī ibn Abī Ṭālib (13 Rajab) was celebrated on May 23, 2013, which coincided with the Roman holidays known as the second Tubilustrium, on May 23, and the Feriae for Volcanus on May 23. In 2017, the birthday of Alī ibn Abī Ṭālib will be celebrated on April 10, 2017, which will coincide in part with the Roman Ludi Megalenses held in honor of the Magna Mater or Cybele on April 4-10; Arba'een: In 2013, the Islamic holiday known as Arba'een (20 Ṣafar) was celebrated on December 23, 2013, which coincided with the Roman holidays Larentalia, a commemoration for the temples of Diana and Juno Regina in the Circus Flaminius on December 23, the Tempestates on December 23, and Sigillaria, the last day of the Saturnalia devoted to gift-giving on December 23. In 2016, Arba'een will be celebrated on November 20, 2016, which will coincide in part with the Roman holiday Mercatus on November 18-20; Chaand Raat: In 2015, the Islamic holiday known as Chaand Raat (29 or 30 Ramaḍān) will be celebrated on July 16, 2015, which will coincide in part with the Roman holiday Mercatus on July 14-29. In 2016, Chaand Raat will be celebrated on July 5, 2016, which will coincide with the Roman festival of Poplifugia on July 5. In 2017, Chaand Raat will be celebrated on June 24, 2017, which will coincide with the Roman festival of Fors Fortuna on June 24; Day of Arafa: In 2013, the Islamic holiday known as Day of Arafa (9 Dhū al-Ḥijja) was celebrated on October 14, 2013, which coincided with the Roman ceremonies to mark a restoration of the Temple of the Penates Dei on October 14. In 2014, the Day of Arafa will be celebrated on October 3, 2014, which will coincide in part with the Roman Ludi Augustales (based on Augustalia) on October 3-12. In 2015, the Day of Arafa will be celebrated on September 22, 2015, which coincides in part with the Roman anniversary of the Temple of Apollo on September 22, the Roman honoring of Latona on September 22, and the Roman Mercatus on September 20–23. In 2016, the Day of Arafa will be celebrated on September 10, 2016, which will coincide with the Roman Ludi Romani, the “oldest and most famous” of the ludi on September 5-19; Day of Ashura: In 2013, the Islamic holiday known as the Day of Ashura (10 Muḥarram) was celebrated on November 13, 2013, which coincided with the Roman holiday Epulum Jovis and the ceremonies for Feronia and Fortuna Primigeniae on November 13. In 2016, the Day of Ashura will be celebrated on October 11, 2016, which will coincide in part with the Roman Meditrinalia festival on October 11, and the Ludi Augustales (based on the Augustalia) on October 3-12; Eid al-Adha: In 2013, the Islamic holiday known as Eid al-Adha (10 Dhū al-Ḥijja) was celebrated on October 15, 2013, which coincided with the Roman October Horse sacrifice to Mars on October 15, and the Roman Feriae of Jupiter  on October 15. In 2014, Eid al-Adha will be celebrated on October 4, 2014, which will coincide with the Roman holiday Ieiunium Cereris on October 4. In 2015, Eid al-Adha will be celebrated on September 23, 2015, which will coincide with the Roman anniversary of the Temple of Apollo on September 23, the Roman honoring of Latona on September 23, and the Roman Mercatus on September 20–23. In 2016, Eid al-Adha will be celebrated on September 11, 2016, which will coincide in part with the Roman Ludi Romani, the “oldest and most famous” of the ludi on September 5-19. In 2017, Eid al-Adha will be celebrated on September 1, 2017, which will coincide with Roman ceremonies for Jupiter Tonans on the Capitolium on September 1, and Roman ceremonies for Juno Regina on the Aventine on September 1; Eid al-Fitr: In 2014, the Islamic holiday known as Eid al-Fitr (1 Shawwāl) was celebrated on July 28, 2014, which coincided in part with the Roman Ludi Victoriae Caesaris on July 20-30. In 2015, Eid al-Fitr will be celebrated on July 17, 2015, which will coincide with the Roman anniversary of the Temple of Honos and Virtus that features a sacrifice to Victory on July 17. In 2016, Eid al-Fitr will be celebrated on July 6, 2016, which will coincide in part with the Roman anniversary of the Temple of Fortuna  on July 6, and the Roman Ludi Apollinares held in honor of Apollo on July 6-13. In 2017, Eid al-Fitr will be celebrated on June 25, 2017, which will coincide in part with the Roman Taurian Games on June 25–26; Eid al-Ghadeer: In 2014, the Islamic holiday known as Eid al-Ghadeer (18 Dhū al-Ḥijja) will be celebrated on October 12, 2014, which will coincide with the Roman sacrifice to Fortuna Redux on October 12, and the Roman Ludi Augustales (based on the Augustalia) on October 3-12. In 2015, Eid al-Ghadeer will be celebrated on October 1, 2015, which will coincide with the Roman ceremonies for Fides and Tigillum Sororium on October 1. In 2016, Eid al-Ghadeer will be celebrated on September 19, 2016, which will coincide in part with the Roman Ludi Romani, the oldest and most famous of the ludi, on September 5-19. In 2017, Eid al-Ghadeer will be celebrated on September 9, 2017, which will coincide in part with the Roman Ludi Romani, the “oldest and most famous of the ludi” on September 5-19; Hajj: In 2013, the Islamic holiday known as Hajj (8–13 Dhū al-Ḥijja) was celebrated on October 13-18, 2013, which coincided in part with the Roman holidays of Fontinalia on October 13, the ceremonies of the Temple of the Penates Dei on October 14, the October Horse sacrifice to Mars on October 15, and the Feriae of Jupiter on October 15; In 2014, Hajj will be celebrated on October 2-7, 2014, which will coincide in part with the Roman holidays of Ludi Augustales (based on the Augustalia) on October 3-12, Ieiunium Cereris, on October 4, Mundus on October 5, the anniversary of the battle of Arausio on October 6, and rites for Jupiter Fulgur and Juno Curitis on October 7; In 2015, Hajj will be celebrated on September 21-26, 2015, which will coincide in part with the Roman anniversary of the Temple of Apollo on September 23, the honoring of Latona on September 23, Mercatus on September 20–23, and the anniversary of the Temple of Venus Genetrix on October 26; In 2016, Hajj will be celebrated on September 9-14, 2016, which will coincide in part with the Ludi Romani, the “oldest and most famous” of the ludi on September 5-19, the anniversary of the Temple to Jupiter Optimus Maximus on September 13, and the Equorum probatio ("Approval of the Horses"), a cavalry parade on September 14; In 2017, Hajj will be celebrated on August 30–September 4, 2017, which will coincide in part with the Roman ceremonies for Jupiter Tonans ("the Thunderer") on September 1, and Juno Regina on the Aventine on September 1; Islamic New Year: In 2012, the Islamic New Year (1 Muḥarram) was celebrated on November 15, 2012, which coincided in part with the Roman Plebeian Games on November 4–17. In 2013, the Islamic New Year was celebrated on November 4, 2013, which coincided in part with the Roman Plebeian Games on November 4–17. In 2015, the Islamic New Year will be celebrated on October 14, 2015, which coincides with the Roman ceremonies to mark a restoration of the Temple of the Penates Dei on the Velian Hill on October 14; Laylat al-Bara'at: In 2013, the Islamic holiday known as Laylat al-Bara'at (15 Sha‘bān) was celebrated on June 24, 2013, which coincided with the Roman festival of Fors Fortuna on June 24. In 2014, Laylat al-Bara'at was celebrated on June 13, 2014, which coincided in part with the Roman Feriae of Jove (Jupiter) on June 13, and Quinquatrus minusculae (the lesser Quinquatrus) on June 13-15. In 2017, Laylat al-Bara'at will be celebrated on May 11, 2017, which will coincide in part with the Roman holiday Lemuria, a festival of the dead with a sacrifice to Mania on the May 11; Laylat al-Mi'raj: In 2013, the Islamic holiday known as Laylat al-Mi'raj (27 Rajab) was celebrated on June 5, 2013, which coincided with the Roman anniversary of the Temple of Dius Fidius on June 5; Laylat al-Qadr: In 2013, the Islamic holiday known as Laylat al-Qadr (19, 21, 23, 25, 27, or 29 Ramaḍān) was celebrated on July 28 through August 6, 2013. It coincided in part with the Roman Ludi Victoriae Caesaris on July 20-30, the Roman anniversary of the Temple of the Fortune of This Day (Fortunae Huiusque Diei) on July 30, the Roman anniversary of the Temple of Spes on August 1, the Roman holiday Supplicia canum (a dog sacrifice) on August 3, and the Roman public sacrifice (sacrificium publicum) at the Temple of Salus on August 5; In 2014, the Islamic holiday known as Laylat al-Qadr was celebrated on July 17 through July 26, 2014. It coincided in part with the Roman holidays known as the anniversary of the Temple of Honos and Virtus featuring a sacrifice to Victory on July 17, “dies ater” ("black day") to mark the anniversary of the battle of Arausio on October on July 18, Mercatus on July 14-29, the Lucaria festival on July 19 and 21, the Ludi Victoriae Caesaris on July 20-30, the anniversary of the Temple of Concordia on July 22, Neptunalia on July 23, and Furrinalia held in honor of Furrina on July 25; In 2015, the Islamic holiday known as Laylat al-Qadr will be celebrated on July 7-16, 2015. It coincides in part with the Roman holidays known as Nonae Caprotinae on July 7, Vitulatio (Roman Thanksgiving) on July 8, Ludi Apollinares held in honor of Apollo on July 6-13, Mercatus on July 14-29, and the Transvectio equitum, a procession of cavalry on July 15; In 2016, the Islamic holiday known as Laylat al-Qadr will be celebrated on June 25-July 4, 2016. It coincides in part with the Roman holidays known as the Taurian Games on June 25–26), the observance of the Lares on July 27, the anniversary of the Temple of Jupiter Stator on July 27, the anniversary of the Temple of Hercules Musarum on June 29, and the anniversary of a temple to Juno Felicitas on July 1; In 2017, the Islamic holiday known as Laylat al-Qadr will be celebrated on June 15-24, 2017. It coincides in part with the Roman holidays known as Vestalia on June 7-15,  Quinquatrus minusculae (the lesser Quinquatrus) on June 13-15,  the commemoration of the Temple of Minerva on the Aventine on June 19, the anniversary of the Temple of Summanus on June 20, and the festival of Fors Fortuna on June 24; Mawlid an-Nabī: In 2013, Sunni Muslims celebrated the Islamic holiday known as Mawlid an-Nabī (12 Rabī‘ al-Awwal) on January 24, 2013, which coincided in part with the Roman holiday Sementivae, a feriae conceptivae of sowing on January 24-26. In 2014, Mawlid an-Nabī was celebrated on January 3, 2014, which coincided with the Roman holiday Compitalia, a feriae conceptivae on January 3-5. In 2015, Mawlid an-Nabī will be celebrated on December 23, 2015, which will coincide with the Roman holidays Larentalia, a commemoration for the temples of Diana and Juno Regina in the Circus Flaminius on December 23, the Tempestates on December 23, and Sigillaria, the last day of the Saturnalia devoted to gift-giving on December 23. In 2016, Mawlid an-Nabī will be celebrated on December 11, 2016, which will coincide with the Roman holidays Agonalia for Indiges on December 11, and Septimontium on December 11; Muhammad al-Mahdī: In 2013, the Islamic holiday marking the birthday of Muhammad al-Mahdī (15 Sha‘bān) was celebrated on June 24, 2013, which coincided with the Roman festival of Fors Fortuna on June 24. In 2014, the birthday of Muhammad al-Mahdī was celebrated on June 13, 2014, which coincided in part with the Roman Feriae of Jove (Jupiter) on June 13, and Quinquatrus minusculae (the lesser Quinquatrus) on June 13-15. In 2017, the birthday of Muhammad al-Mahdī will be celebrated on May 11, 2017, which will coincide with the Roman holiday Lemuria, a festival of the dead with a sacrifice to Mania on the May 11; and Ramaḍān: In 2013, the first day of the Islamic month of Ramaḍān (1 Ramaḍān) was celebrated on July 9, 2013, which coincided in part with the Roman Ludi Apollinares held in honor of Apollo on July 6-13. In 2014, the first day of Ramaḍān was celebrated on June 29, 2014, which coincided with the Roman anniversary of the Temple of Hercules Musarum on June 29.

Allah
Allah is the Arabic word for God which coincidentally has cognates in other Semitic languages, including “Alah” in Aramaic, “Ēl” in Canaanite and “Elohim” in Hebrew. In other words, worship of Allah is worship of the Greco-Roman god of El. Similar to “Alah” (L+H) and El (L), the term “Allah” (H+L) contains the letter “L” which is indicative of the Line of Man that is comprised of the 13 Bloodlines of Rome. Corroborating this notion is the fact that the name Allah was previously used by pagan Meccans as a reference to a creator deity. The name “Allah” or “Alla” is found in the Epic of Atrahasis engraved on several tablets dating back to Babylon, Rome which shows that he was being worshipped as a high deity among other gods who were considered to be his brothers but were taking orders from him. This is because the aforementioned 13 Bloodlines of came out of Babylon, Rome and such all other gods are secondary in nature. Al-Ghazali explains this phenomenon: “[Allah] is the greatest of the 99 names [for God] because it indicates the essence that brings together all the divine attributes in such a way that no part of them is lacking.”  In other words, without the 13 Bloodlines there would be no other gods, hence Allah’s importance. Some archaeological excavations have led to the discovery of Pre-Islamic inscriptions and tombs in the ruins of a church at Umm el-Jimal in Northern Jordan, which contained references to Allah as the proper name of God. Interestingly, some of the graves contained names such as "Abd Allah" which means "the servant” or “slave of Allah". This is because all humans are in essence slaves of the 13 Bloodlines of Rome. In Islam, God is referred to by certain names, the most common of which are “Al-Rahman meaning "The Compassionate", and “Al-Rahīm” meaning "The Merciful". The term “Al-Rahmān” (L+R+M+N) acronymically equates to “Line of Roman” or “Lair of Man” while “Al-Rahīm” (L+R+M) acronymically equates to “Lair 13” or Line of Rome”.

Dīn
In the Qur'an, the act of submission to God (i.e., Greenland of Denmark) is always referred to as “Dīn”. The term “Din” (D+N) acronymically equates to “Day North” which is indicative of the third and final “den” (home) of the Roman Empire in Greenland. Consequently, the term “Din” has various forms and meanings (e.g., ascendancy, constitution, decision, definite, dominion, government, law, lordship, mastery, outcome, power, realm, reward/punishment, sovereignty, supremacy, system, etc.). The word can also be used in the sense of obedience, submission and allegiance. Alternatively, the Hebrew term "דין", transliterated as "dīn", means either "law" or "judgment". In the Kabbalah of Judaism, the term can, along with "Gevurah", refer to both "power" and "judgment”. Consequently, “Dīn” does not simply mean "religion" or "faith", but refers to actual "Governance". In Judaism, the word “Dīn” appears in the Tanakh a total of 24 times, a number which equates to the letter “X” meaning both “North” and “Kill”. Din often means “to judge”, or “execute judgment”, and “to vindicate”. The intransitive usage of the verb loosely means “to be obedient” and “submissive”, while the transitive verb usage denotes “requite”, “compensate”, “rule”, “govern”, “obedience”, “abasement”, “recompense”, “requite”, and “governor”. This terminology exists because the entire world is under the command and control of the “din” or “den” (home) of the Roman Empire in Greenland.

Iman
Iman in Islamic theology denotes a believer's faith in the metaphysical aspects of Islam. The term “Iman” (M+N) appears to be a direct reference to the Line of Man which acronymically equates to “13 North”, a reference to the 13 Bloodlines of Rome which reside in Greenland. The basic definition of Iman is belief in the six articles of faith known as the “arkān al-īmān” (R+C/K+N+L+M+N), a term which acronymically equates to “Rock North Line of Man” (Greenland is considered the Rock of Ages). In the Arabic language, “Iman” (M+N) denotes “faith” or certitude in the unseen, the invisible Line of Man in Greenland.
Abu Hurayrah narrated that the Prophet Muhammad once said: "Iman has more than 70 branches. The most excellent among these branches is the saying of "Laa ilaaha ill Allah" (there is no God but Allah), and the smallest branch is to remove an obstacle from the wayside”. This particular passage infers that there are now more than 70 branches on the family tree of the Line of Man which is celebrated via the Islamic god of Allah. Lastly, “77 Branches of Faith” is a collection compiled by Imam Al-Bayhaqi in his work entitled “Shu`ab al-Iman” in which he explains the essential virtues that reflect true faith (Iman) through related Qur'anic verses and prophetic sayings. Al-Bayhaqi’s reference suggests that there are now 77 branches on the family tree of the Line of Man.

Muhammad
Muhammad was a member of the Banu Hashim family, a well-respected branch of the prestigious Quraysh tribe. In essence therefore, he was a privileged child whose parents were likely well connected both financially and socially speaking. When Muhammad accompanied his uncle Abu Talib on a journey to Syria, he was suddenly “recognized” by a Christian monk named Bahira who prophesied about Muhammad's future career as a prophet of God. Although impossible to known, it appears that Bahira was agent of Rome who was instructed to nominate Muhammad as a forthcoming prophet. Since Muhammad’s family was extremely wealthy, they were likely part of the elite of their time and may have even agreed to allow their son to be used by the Roman Catholic Church (albeit disguised) in exchange for political favor. The timely deaths of Muhammad’s father (c. 569 AD), mother (c. 576), and grandfather (c. 578) within a 9-year span suggest that the family may have been double-crossed and assassinated so that Muhammad’s name and person could be used for political and religious purposes. Regardless, at the age of 40, Muhammad is said to have received his first verbal revelation in a cave named Mount Hira. The term “Hira” (H+R) acronymically equates to “Forever Rome” and is indicative of Mt. Olympus/Mt. Zion in Greenland where the revelations likely originated from. These revelations allegedly continued up until the end of Muhammad’s life. By the time he died in 632 AD, Muhammad’s teachings of Islam were allegedly adapted by almost all the tribes of the Arabian Peninsula.
Interestingly, in Sura 17 of Al-Isra in the Qur'an, Muhammad travels to Buraq, "the farthest mosque", where he leads other prophets in prayer. He then ascends to heaven where he speaks to God who subsequently gives him instructions to take back with him. References to “the farthest mosque", heaven, and God (i.e., Greenland of Denmark) are likely indicative of where the instructions Muhammad allegedly received actually originated. Lastly, the numerology regarding Muhammad is purely Greco-Roman in many respects. For example, the digital root of the number “40” (Muhammad’s age when he received his first revelation) is “4” which is indicative of the Roman Cross and the letter “D” which is representative of the terms “Day/Die/Death”. The fact that Muhammad received “revelations” from God for 23 years is rather curious as well because the number “23” equates to “BC” or BK” which is indicative of a “Fake” (i.e., balk) Therefore, numerologically speaking, it appears that Muhammad and the Qur'an were creations of Rome.

Muhammad the Illiterate
Although the historicity of Muhammad is controversial, scholars are in unison agreement that Muhammad himself did not write down his own revelations. The Quran describes Muhammad as "ummi", which is traditionally interpreted as "illiterate”. Medieval commentators such as Al-Tabari maintained that the term induced two meanings: a) the inability to read or write in general, and b) the inexperience or ignorance of the previous books or scriptures. They however, gave priority to the first meaning. Nevertheless, Muhammad's illiteracy was taken as a sign of the genuineness of his prophethood. According to Aisha bint Abu Bakr, a wife of Muhammad, the first Qur'anic revelation occurred when the angel Gabriel visited Muhammad and asked him to recite. Muhammad responded “ma aqra’u, meaning “I do not read”. Gabriel pressed him “until all the strength went out of me; thereupon he released me and said: ‘Read!’” This was repeated three times and upon the third time, Gabriel released him and said, “Read in the name of the Sustainer who created humankind from a clot! Read! And your Sustainer is the most Beautiful.” What is curiously not debated by Muslim and non-Muslin scholars alike is the authenticity of the sole source of the Qur’an—Muhammad. Since he was illiterate, he would have lacked the proper vocabulary to dictate a deep philosophical, political and religious book comprised of 77,430 words. Had he be been truly divinely inspired by God, it would stand to reason that God (who is all powerful) would also have given him the mental capacity to write down his prophetic revelations so that there was no possibility for misinterpretation or misunderstanding. Therefore, similar to Jesus, the character and likeness of Muhammad appears to be a Roman creation.


The Qur'an
Muslims believe that the verses of the Qur'an were revealed to Muhammad by God through the archangel Gabriel on multiple occasions between 610 AD until his death on June 8, 632 AD. The term Qur'an (K/Q+R+N/X) acronymically equates to “Crux” which is another term for “Cross”, as in the Roman Cross.
The adjective of "Quran" has multiple transliterations including "quranic," "koranic" and "qur'anic," or capitalized as "Qur'anic", "Koranic" and "Quranic." In other words, the term Qur'an equates to the English term “chronic” which is substantiated by the fact that prayer to Allah is required five times a day. The Quran consists of 114 chapters of varying lengths, each known as a sura. The total number of verses in the Quran is 6,236. Muqatta'at consist of 14 different letter combinations of 14 Arabic letters that appear in the beginning of 29 suras of the Quran. The meanings of these initials remain a mystery. According to one estimate the Quran consists of 77,430 words. Numerology in respect to the number “14” equates to both “North” and “Kill”, the respective location and motto of Rome. Interestingly, according to the Quran, Muhammad's first revelation was accompanied with a vision. The agent of revelation is mentioned as the "one mighty in power” and the one who "grew clear to view when he was on the uppermost horizon”. The references to “one”, “power” and “uppermost horizon” appear to be veiled mentions of Greenland which sits on the horizon of the earth over which it has complete political power. Lastly, the Qur'an defines “hudud” as the punishment for five specific crimes (i.e., unlawful intercourse, false accusation of unlawful intercourse, consumption of alcohol, theft, and highway robbery). The term “Hudud” (H+D+D) acronymically equates to “Forever Dead/Died” for the repression of sexual intercourse is damming to both Muslims personally and Islamic society as a whole.

Historicity of the Qur'an
While Muhammad was alive his revelations were reportedly written down by his companions (i.e., sahabah), although the prime method of transmission was orally through memorization. Since the Quran did not exist in book form at the time of Muhammad's death, his “revelations” may have been subject to third party interpretations. Consequently, there are disagreements among both Muslim and non-Muslim scholars as to how and when the Qur'an was compiled. Some believe that Muhammad compiled it before he died while others believe it was collected by either Ali ibn Abu Talib or Abu Bakr. Some scholars state that up to 48 scribes including Zayd ibn Thabit and Ubayy ibn Ka’b recorded verses of the Qur'an. According some Shia and Sunni scholars, Ali ibn Abi Talib, who died in 661 AD, compiled a complete version of the Quran shortly after Muhammad's death in 632 AD. Shiaite scholars are unanimous regarding the fact that Ali ibn Abu Talib possessed his own personal transcript of the Qur'an which he had collected personally 6 months after the death of the Muhammad. However, the present form of the Quran that is accepted by Muslim scholars to be the original text was allegedly compiled by Abu Bakr. Consequently, this text became the model from which copies were made and promulgated throughout the Muslim world, while all other versions were allegedly destroyed. That being said, Muslims agree that the Qur'an of today was canonized by Uthman ibn Affan between 653-656 AD. Upon the canonization of the Qur'an, Uthman ordered the burning of all personal copies of the Qur'an. The burning and destroying of prior copies of the Qur’an by both Bakr and Uthman suggests foul play. Has the original text not been drastically altered, there would be no reason to burn previous copies.

9th Century Qur'an
Although the Qur'an was allegedly compiled shortly after the death of Muhammad on June 8, 632 AD, historical evidence suggests that the Qur'an didn’t appear until roughly 250 years later. This particular theory is substantiated by the fact that the oldest existing full text copy of the Qur’an is from the 9th century. Also, the modern Arabic script of the Qur'an (i.e., the “scripta plena”) has pointed texts and was not fully vowelled until the middle of the 9th century. Since no diacritical points or vowel signs were included, the vocalization was left to the reader to interpret. Consequently, confusion set in as many cultures and communities in the expanding Islamic empire were unfamiliar with the language of Arabic. According to modern historical sources, “This meant that even when there was agreement on the consonants, some verbs could be read as active or passive, some nouns could be read with different case endings, and some forms could be read as either nouns or verbs”. In some instances, the alteration of a case ending or a slight change in vowelling would affect the meaning of a verse in the Qur'an significantly. Scholars such as John Wansbrough, Michael Cook, and Patricia Crone state  that there is “no hard evidence for the existence of the Qur'an in any form before the last decade of the 7th century...[and that]...the tradition which places this rather opaque revelation in its historical context is not attested before the middle of the eighth…There is no proof that the text of the Qur'an was collected under Uthman, since the earliest surviving copies of the complete Qur'an are centuries later than Uthman”. Naturally, these scholars contend that Islam was formed gradually over a number of centuries in response to Jewish and Christian challenges. This theory jives with the notion that Islam is a Roman religion and therefore, like Catholicism, Christianity and Judaism, has morphed with the times when politically expedient.  

Islamic Symbology
The most famous symbol in Islam is the Greco-Roman crescent (and star) which can be found on numerous flags through the Muslim world. The symbol, which was originally derived in Babylon, Rome, depicts a crescent moon indicative of the underworld along with a five-pointed star which represents the steering hand (five fingers) of Rome. Interestingly, regions which practice Islam today (e.g., the Balkans, North Africa and the Middle East form what appears to be a crescent shape south of Europe. Aside from the Roman Domes which top most mosques in the Africa, the Middle East and Asia (including the controversial Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem), the Minarets (which were likely named after Minos of Crete) which adorn these mosques are Greco-Roman phallic symbols appears to double as obelisks.





African Domed Mosques

A total of 31 Roman domed mosques have been identified in Africa thus far: Algeria: Great Mosque (Algiers); Great Mosque (Tlemcen); Ketchaoua Mosque (Algiers); Egypt: Abu Haggag Mosque (Luxor); Aqsunqur Mosque (Cairo); Al-Azhar Mosque (Cairo); Al-Hakim Mosque (Cairo); El-Mursi Abul Abbas Mosque (Alexandria); El-Tabia Mosque (Aswan); Mosque-Madrassa of Sultan Hassan (Cairo); Mosque of Amr ibn al-As (Fustat); Mosque of Ibn Tulun (Cairo); Mosque of Muhammad Ali (Cairo); Sidi Arif Mosque (Sohag); Eritrea: Sheikh Hanafi Mosque (Massawa); Morocco: Hassan II Mosque (Casablanca); Niger: Niamey Grand Mosque (Niamey); Nigeria: Abuja National Mosque (Abuja); Senegal: Central Mosque of Saintlouis (Saint-Louis); Great Mosque of Ouakam (Ouakam); Great Mosque (Touba); Somalia: Fakr ad-Din Mosque (Mogadishu); South Africa: Darul Uloom Zakariyya (Lenasia); Habibia Soofie Saheb Jamia Masjid (Cape Town); Ladysmith-Sufi Mosque (Ladysmith); Sudan: Masjid Al-Nilin (Omdurman); Tunisia: Al-Zaytuna Mosque (Tunis); Great Mosque of Mahdiya (Mahdiya); Mosquée Ennasr (Aryanah); Mosque of Uqba (Kairouan); and Uganda: Uganda National Mosque (Kampala).


Asian Domed Mosques
A total of 44 Roman domed mosques have been identified in Asia thus far: Bangladesh: Bibi Maryam Masjid (Killarpur); Chandanpura Masjid (Kaptai); Chawk Mosque (Chowk Bazaar); Khan Mohammad Mridha Mosque (Dhaka); Nine Dome Mosque (Bagerhat); Sixty Dome Mosque (Bagerhat); Sona Mosque (Chapai Nawabganj); China: Dongguan Mosque (Xining); Harbin Mosque (Harbin); Id Kah Mosque (Kashgar); Khotan Mezquita (Khotan); Kowloon Masjid and Islamic Centre (Kowloon, Hong Kong); Muslim Mosque (Lhasa, Tibet); Taichung Mosque (Taichung City); Taipei Grand Mosque (Taipei, Taiwan); Yarkand Calles Mezquita (Yarkand);  Yarkand Mosque (Hotan); Japan: Kobe Mosque (Kobe); Thailand: Ban Hoe Mosque  (Chiang Mai); Malaysia: An-Nur Jamek Mosque (Labuan); As Syakirin Mosque (Kuala Lumpur); City Mosque (Kota Kinabalu); Crystal Mosque (Wan Man); Jamek Mosque (Kuala Lumpur); Malacca Straits Mosque (Malacca Island); Putra Mosque (Putrajaya);  Sabah State Mosque (Kota Kinabalu); Sultan Abdul Samad Mosque (Selangor); Sultan Abu Bakar State Mosque (Johor); Sultan Ahmad Shah State Mosque (Pahang); Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Mosque (Selangor); Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Mosque (Shah Alam); Tengku Ampuan Afzan Mosque (Pahang); Tengku Tengah Zaharah Mosque (Kuala Terengganu); Tuanku Mizan Zainal Abidin Mosque (Putrajaya); Ubudiah Mosque (Kuala Kangsar); Zahir Mosque (Alor Setar); Philippines: Masjid Al-Dahab (Manila); Singapore: Masjid Al-Ansar (Singapore); Masjid Hajjah Fatimah (Singapore); Masjid Malabar (Singapore); Masjid Omar Kampong Melaka (Singapore); Masjid Sultan (Singapore); and South Korea: Seoul Central Mosque (Seol).


Central Asian Domed Mosques
A total of 91 Roman domed mosques have been identified in Central Asia thus far:Afghanistan: Abdul Rahman Mosque (Kabul); Friday Mosque (Herat); Jama Masjid (Herat); Khost Mosque (Khost); Lashkar Gah Mosque (Lashkar Gah); Mosque of Jalalabad (Jalalabad); Shrine of Hazrat Ali (Mazari Sharif); Shrine of the Cloak (Kandahar); Armenia: Abbas Mirza Mosque (Yerevan); Blue Mosque (Yerevan); Azerbaijan; Agdam Mosque (Agdam); Ali ibn Abi Talib Mosque (Buzovna); Bibi-Heybat Mosque (Baku); Haji Rufai Bey Mosque (Nakhichevan); Juma Mosque (Baku); Juma Mosque (Ganja); Mashadi Garib Mosque (Buzovna); Mustafa Qazdal Mosque (Qusar); Palace Mosque (Baku);  Taza Pir Mosque (Baku); Yukhari Govhar Agha Mosque (Shusha); Iran: Agha Bozorg Mosque (Kāshān); Al-Nabi Mosque (Qazvin); Blue Mosque (Tabriz); Fatima Masumeh Shrine (Qom);  Imam Mosque (Isfahan);  Imam Reza Shrine (Mashhad); Imamzadeh Hamzah (Tabriz); Imamzadeh Hashem (Amol); Imamzadeh Husayn (Qazvin); Imamzadeh Ja'far (Borujerd); Jameh Mosque (Bastak); Jameh Mosque (Borujerd); Jamkaran Mosque (Jamkaran); Jameh Mosque (Nain); Jameh Mosque (Qazvin); Jame Mosque (Yazd); Jameh Mosque (Zanjan); Jameh Mosque (Tabriz); Mausoleum of Khomeini (Tehran); Shah-Abdol-Azim Shrine (Rey); Shah Cheragh (Shiraz); Pakistan: Badshahi Mosque (Lahore); Bhong Mosque (Rahim Yar Khan District); Data Durbar Complex (Lahore); Golden Mosque (Lahore); Khizra Masjid (Lahore); King Mosque (Shahi Eid Gah); Lohari Gate Mosque (Lahore); Masjid Alkauthar (Islamabad); Masjid-e-Shohdah (Lahore); Masjid e Tooba (Karachi); Moti Masjid (Lahore); Shah Jahan Mosque (Thatta); Suneri Mosque (Lahore); Wazir Khan Mosque (Lahore); Turkey: Bayezid II Mosque (Istanbul); Bursa Grand Mosque (Bursa); Emir Sultan Mosque (Bursa); Eyüp Sultan Mosque (Istanbul); Fatih Mosque (Istanbul); Kocatepe Mosque (Ankara); Laleli Mosque (Istanbul); Mihrimah Mosque (Istanbul); Muğdat Mosque (Mersin); New Mosque (Istanbul); Nuruosmaniye Mosque (Istanbul); Ortaköy Mosque (Istanbul); Rüstem Pasha Mosque (Istanbul); Sabancı Merkez Camii (Adana); Şehzade Mosque (Istanbul); Selimiye Mosque (Edirne); Sinan Pasha Mosque (Istanbul); Süleymaniye Mosque (Istanbul); Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Istanbul); Tarsus Grand Mosque (Tarsus); Üç Şerefeli Mosque (Edirne); Yavuz Selim Mosque (Istanbul); and Turkmenistan: Ertuğrul Gazi Mosque (Ashgabat); Gökdepe Mosque (Gokdepe); Gurbanguly Hajji Mosque (Mary); and Türkmenbaşy Ruhy Mosque (Gypjak).


European Domed Mosques

A total of 71 Roman domed mosques have been identified in greater Europe thus far: Albania: Et'hem Bey Mosque (Tirana); Austria: Vienna Islamic Centre (Vienna); Bosnia and Herzegovina: Ali Pasha's Mosque (Sarajevo); Emperor's Mosque (Sarajevo); Ferhat Pasha Mosque (Banja Luka); Gazi Husrev-beg Mosque (Sarajevo); Karadzozbey Mosque (Mostar); Denmark: Hvidovre Mosque (Copenhagen); England: Al Mahdi Mosque (Bradford); Al-Rahma Mosque (Liverpool); Aziziye Mosque (London); Baitul Futuh (London); Birmingham Central Mosque (Birmingham); Bristol Jamia Mosque (Bristol);  Central Mosque (Manchester); Chesham Mosque (Chesham); Darul Barakaat Mosque (Birmingham); East London Mosque (London); Fazl Mosque (London); London Central Mosque (London); Nasir Mosque (Hartlepool); Shah Jahan Mosque (Woking); Suleymaniye Mosque (London); France: Mosque of Créteil (Créteil); Mosque of Nantes (Nantes); Germany: Anwar Mosque (Rodgau); Bait-ul Aziz (Riedstadt); Baitul Ghafur (Ginsheim-Gustavsburg); Baitul Hadi Mosque (Seligenstadt); Baitul Huda (Usingen); Baitul Momin (Münster-Hiltrup); Baitus Sami (Hanover); Bashir Mosque (Bensheim); Berlin Mosque (Berlin); Centrum Mosque (Rendsburg); Cologne Central Mosque (Cologne); DITIB-Merkez-Moschee (Duisburg); Ehsan Mosque (Mannheim); Fatih Mosque (Bremen-Gröpelingen); Fatih Mosque (Stadtallendorf); Freimann Mosque (Munich-Freimann); Große Moschee (Buggingen); Hamd Mosque (Wittlich); Islamic Centre (Hamburg); Khadija Mosque (Berlin); Mevlana Mosque (Eppingen); Mosque in Sendling (Munich); Nasir Mosque (Isselburg); Noor Mosque (Frankfurt am Main); Noor ud Din Mosque (Darmstadt); Salimya Mosque (Göttingen); Schwetzingen Mosque (Schwetzingen); Tahir Mosque (Koblenz-Lützel); Vatan Mosque (Bielefeld-Brackwede); Wesseling Mosque (Wesseling); Italy: Grande Mosquée (Rome); Kosovo: Sinan Pasha Mosque (Prizren) Netherlands: Mevlana Mosque (Rotterdam); Norway: World Islamic Mission Mosque (Oslo); Portugal: Central Mosque (Lisbon); Russia: Moscow Cathedral Mosque (Moscow); Qolşärif Mosque (Kazan); Serbia: Bajrakli Mosque (Belgrade);Scotland: Edinburgh Central Mosque (Edinburgh); Glasgow Central Mosque (Glasgow); and Sweden: Fittja Mosque (Stockholm); Gothenburg Mosque (Gothenburg); Malmö Mosque (Malmö); Stockholm Moské (Stockholm); Trollhättans Mosque (Trollhättan); and Uppsala Mosque (Uppsala).


Indian & Sri Lankan Domed Mosques
A total of 15 Roman domed mosques have been identified in India and Sri Lanka thus far: India: Asfi Mosque (Lucknow); Atala Masjid (Jaunpur); Central Mahallu Jama'ath (Kerala); Charminar Karachi (Hyderabad); Cheraman Juma Masjid (Kodungallur); Darul Uloom Deoband (Deoband); Fatehpuri Masjid (Old Delhi); Hazratbal Shrine (Srinagar); Jama Masjid (Delhi); Mecca Masjid (Hyderabad);  Moti Masjid (Delhi); Sir Syed Masjid (Aligarh); Tipu Sultan Mosque (Kolkata); Ziarat Shareef (Kakrala); and Sri Lanka: Jami Ul-Alfar Mosque (Pettah).


Middle Eastern Domed Mosques
A total of 57 Roman domed mosques have been identified in the Middle East thus far: Bahrain: Al Fateh Grand Mosque (Manama); Cyprus: Arabahmet Mosque (Nicosia); Büyük Han (Nicosia); Hala Sultan Tekke (Akykes); Kyrenia Mosque (Kyrenia); Lala Mustafa Pasha Mosque (Famagusta); Selimiye Mosque (Nicosia); Iraq: Abu Hanifa Mosque (Baghdad); Al Abbas Mosque (Karbala); Al-Askari Mosque (Sāmarrā); Al-Kadhimiya Mosque (Baghdad);  Great Mosque (Kufa); Imam Ali Mosque (Najaf); Imam Husayn Shrine (Karbala); Israel: Al-Aqsa Mosque (Jerusalem); Al-Khanqah al-Salahiyya Mosque (Jerusalem); Dome of the Rock (Jerusalem); Hassan Bek Mosque (Jaffa);  Jezzar Pasha Mosque (Acre); Mahmood Mosque (Haifa); Mahmoudiya Mosque (Jaffa); Sidna Ali Mosque (Herzliya); Jordan:  Abu Darweesh Mosque (Amman);  King Abdullah I Mosque (Amman); Kuwait: Al Maylem Mosque (Kuwait City); Al Othman Mosque (Hawalli); Grand Mosque (Kuwait City); Lebanon: Khatem Al-Anbiyaa Mosque (Beirut); Mansouri Great Mosque (Tripoli); Mohammad Al-Amin Mosque (Beirut); Oman: Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque (Muscat); Palestine: An-Nasr Mosque (Nablus); Jamal Abdel Nasser Mosque (Ramallah); Saudi Arabia: Al-Masjid an-Nabawi (Medina); King Saud Mosque (Jeddah); Quba Mosque (Medina); Syria: Al-Adiliyah Mosque (Aleppo); Al-Otrush Mosque (Aleppo); Al-Sahibiyah Mosque (Aleppo); Ar-Rahman Mosque (Aleppo); Great Mosque (Hama); Great Mosque (Maarrat al-Numan); Khusruwiyah Mosque (Aleppo); Khalid Ibn Al-Walid Mosque (Homs); Murad Pasha Mosque (Al-Midan); Nabi Habeel Mosque (Damascus); Sayyidah Ruqayya Mosque (Damascus); Sayyidah Zaynab Mosque (Sayyidah Zaynab); Tawhid Mosque (Aleppo); Tekkiye Mosque (Damascus); Umayyad Mosque (Damascus); Uwais al-Qarni Mosque (Ar-Raqqah); United Arab Emirates: Al Noor Mosque (Sharjah); Grand Mosque (Dubai); Jumeirah Mosque (Dubai City); Sheikh Zayed Mosque (Abu Dhabi); and Yemen: Saleh Mosque (Sana'a).


American Domed Mosques
A total of 25 Roman domed mosques have been identified in North and South America thus far: Argentina: King Fahd Islamic Cultural Center (Buenos Aires); Brazil: Mesquita Foz do Iguaçu (Foz do Iguaçu); Canada: Al-Rashid Mosque (Edmonton, Alberta); Baitul Islam (Toronto, Ontario); Baitun Nur (Calgary, Alberta); Islamic Center (Calgary, Alberta); Masjid-an-Noor (St. Johns, Newfoundland and Labrador); Ottawa Mosque (Ottawa, Ontario);  Salaheddin Islamic Centre (Scarborough, Ontario); Columbia: Mosque of Omar Ibn Al-Khattab (Maicao); Panama: El Centro Cultural Islamico (Colón); United States: Assalam Center (Boca Raton, Florida); BaitulSamee (Houston, Texas); Baitur Rehman (Silver Spring, Maryland); Dearborn Mosque (Dearborn, Michigan); Islamic Cultural Center (New York, New York); Islamic Society of Boston (Cambridge); Mosque Maryam (Chicago, Illinois); Mosque Tucson (Tucson, Arizona); Islamic Center of America (Dearborn, Michigan);  Masjid Al-Islam (North Smithfield, Rhode Island); Masjid DarusSalam (Lombard, Illinois); Mosque Foundation (Bridgeview, Illinois); Mosque No. 7 (New York, New York); and the Tucson Islamic Center (Tucson, Arizona).


Oceanic Domed Mosques

A total of 44 Roman domed mosques have been identified in Oceana thus far: Australia: Auburn Gallipoli Mosque (Sydney, New South Wales); Baitul Huda (Sydney, New South Wales); Sunshine Mosque (Melbourne, Victoria); Brunei: Sultan Omar Ali Saifuddin Mosque (Bandar Seri Begawan); Indonesia: Al Azhar Mosque (Jakarta); Al-Ittihad Mosque Jatibarang (Brebes); Baiturrahman Grand Mosque (Banda Aceh); Cut Mutiah Mosque (Jakarta); Great Mosque (Garut); GreatMosque of Banten (Banten); Great Mosque of Central Java (Semarang); Istiqlal Mosque (Jakarta); Masjid Agung Al-Karomah (Banjar); Masjid Agung An-Nur (Pekanbaru); Masjid Agung Baitul Makmur Meulaboh  (Kabupaten Aceh Barat); Masjid Agung Malang (Malang); Masjid Agung Natuna (Kabupaten Natuna); Masjid Agung Nurul Islam (Sawahlunto); Masjid Agung Sumenep (Sumenep); Masjid Al-Osmani (Medan); Masjid Azizi (Tanjung); Masjid Baiturrahim Ulee Lheue (Ulee Lheue); Masjid Baiturrahman Sungayang  (Nagari Sungayang); Masjid Ba'angkat (Hulu Sungai Selatan); Masjid Cheng Ho Palembang (Palembang); Masjid Dian Al-Mahri (Depok); Masjid Islamic Center Samarinda (Samarinda); Masjid Jami Banjarmasin (Banjarmasin); Masjid Jami Sungai Banar (Hulu Sungai Utara); Masjid Jami Tuhfaturroghibin (Banjarmasin); Masjid Muhammadiyah (Kelayan); Masjid Miftahul Jannah (Lamongan); Masjid Nurul Iman (Kota Padang); Masjid Raya Andalas (Kelurahan Andaleh); Masjid Raya Bandung (Bandung); Masjid Raya Darussalam (Samarinda); Masjid Raya Makassar (Makassar); Masjid Raya Sabilal Muhtadin (Banjarmasin); Masjid Raya Syekh Burhanuddin (Sumatera Barat); Medan Grand Mosque (Medan); Menara Kudus Mosque (Kudus); Menara Masjid Al Akbar Surabaya (Makassar); Syuhada Mosque (Yogyakarta); and New Zealand: Canterbury Mosque (Christchurch).