8.03 Hinduism


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Hinduism
is the dominant religion of India and the Indian subcontinent which coincidentally has numerous Greco-Roman connotations, especially in respect to its gods, holidays and symbols. Unlike other religions, Hinduism is a categorization of distinct intellectual or philosophical viewpoints rather than a rigid, common set of beliefs. It also grants absolute and complete freedom of belief and worship and has no single founder. Hinduism has been called the "oldest religion" and currently has roughly one billion followers, the world's third largest religion, after Christianity and Islam. Similar to Catholicism and Christianity and the "Hindu synthesis" emerged around 000 AD (i.e., Anno Domini) when Greenland was either discovered, conquered or established as the new home of the Roman Empire. Consequently, it may have been the first religion created after the Fall of Rome, hence the aforementioned reference to being the “oldest religion”. Many practitioners refer to Hinduism as “Sanātana Dharma”, "the eternal law" or the "eternal way". The term “Sanātana Dharma” (S+N/X+T+N+D+R+M) acronymically equates to “System North Ten Day Rome” or “Six Ten Day Rome”, an apparent reference to rituals, rites or sacrifices. According to Knott, “Sanātana Dharma” also “refers to the idea that its origins lie beyond human history, and its truths have been divinely revealed (shruti) and passed down through the ages to the present day in the most ancient of the world's scriptures, the Veda”. The reason Hinduism’s origins “lie beyond human history” is because the Line of Man, the ruling family of the Greco-Roman Empire, do not consider themselves “human”, meaning “colored man”, but rather “Man”. Consequently, said origins of Hinduism lie within the history of Man as evidenced by the gods, holidays and symbolism of Hinduism.

Hindu Ideology
Hinduism contains
many diverse traditions, including Shaivism, Shaktism, Smartism and Vaishnavism. Shaivites worship “Shiva” as the supreme god; Shaktas worship “Shakti” (power) personified through a female divinity or Mother Goddess “Devi”; Smartas believe in the essential oneness of five (panchadeva) or six (Shanmata) deities as personifications of the Supreme; and Vaishnavas worship “Vishnu” as the supreme God. Consequently, most Hindus adhere to the concept of the Trimurti "in which the cosmic functions of creation, maintenance, and destruction are personified by the forms of Brahma the creator, Vishnu the maintainer or preserver, and Shiva the destroyer or transformer." The term “Trimurti” (T+R+M+R+T) acronymically equates to “Tri Rome Rite”, an apparent reference to three sacrifices of Rome. This reference is corroborated by that the god of Shiva is intimately linked to the country of Switzerland (the destroyer of the underworld) as evidenced by the fact that Judaism has its own god of Shiva. Hinduism does not have a unified system of belief encoded in a declaration of faith or a creed; it is an umbrella term encompassing the multifaceted religious phenomena of India. According to the Supreme Court of India, “Unlike other religions in the World, the Hindu religion does not claim any one Prophet, it does not worship any one God, it does not believe in any one philosophic concept, it does not follow any one act of religious rites or performances; in fact, it does not satisfy the traditional features of a religion or creed. It is a way of life and nothing more". One of the key aspects of Hinduism is Karma, a concept which in lay man’s term means that what one does to others eventually come back around, either in this life or the next. The term “Karma” (K+R+M) acronymically equates to “Kill Rome”. The true meaning of Karma is likely based on the notion that if the Roman Empire does do not routinely commit genocide on an industrial scale, life as they know it in Greenland will end. It’s a convenient excuse to justify the slaughter of innocents, nothing more. In Hinduism, Karma also states that a souls are reincarnated, meaning that during a cycle of rebirth, one may come back as animal, human or plant. The cycle of birth and death on Earth is said to be formed from 8.4 million forms of life, but only as a human can one exit from this cycle. The number “84”, which numerically equates to “Forever Fear” or “Forever Fire”, is a Roman number of death that often associated with genocide and tyranny (e.g., “1984” (1949), a book by George Orwell, “Rex 84”, the blueprint for fascism in the U.S., etc.). This particular numerology suggest that the Karma aspect of Hinduism has Greco-Roman origins as well.

The Bear of Hinduism
The religion of
Hinduism if filled with gods and terms affiliated with “Bear” (B+R), which acronymically equates to both Babylon Rome, the former capital of the Roman Empire, and the “Bear”, otherwise known as the Beast of Greenland. Thus far, four prominent titles have been identified in Hinduism which reference the “Bear”. Firstly, Bhairava or Kala Bhairava is the fierce manifestation of Lord Shiva that associated with annihilation. He is also also known as the “Guard God”. The terms “Bhairava, (B+R+V) and “Kala Bhairava” (K+L+B+R+V) appear to acronymically equate to “Bear Victoria” or “Kill Bear Victoria”, a reference to personality of Shiva. Secondly, Brahmā is the Hindu god of creation and part of the Trimūrti along with Vishnu and Shiva. The term Brahmā (B+R+M) acronymically equates to “Bear Rome” or “Bear 13” as the letter “M” is representative of the 13 Bloodlines of Rome. In the Rāmāyaņa (R+M+N), a term which acronymically equates to “Rome North”, Brahmā is referred to as the progenitor or great grandsire of all human beings, for the 13 Bloodlines have created the current world in which we live. Thirdly, Brahman is the one supreme, universal Spirit that is the origin and support of the phenomenal universe. The term Brahman (B+R+M+N) acronymically equates to “Bear Man”, an apparent reference to the Line of Man who now reside on the “Bear” of Greenland (i.e., the Beast of Greenland). Consequently, Brahman is referred to as the Godhead which is the Divine Ground of all matter, energy, time, space, being, and everything in and beyond this universe. The sages of the Upanishads teach that Brahman cannot be seen or heard while the Isha Upanishad states that Brahman is infinite and that the infinite remains alone. That is because the Bear Man or Brahman has lived alone behind a veil of secrecy in Greenland where he was invisible, until now. Fourthly, the Mahabharata is one of the two major Sanskrit epics of India, the other being the Ramayana. The term “Mahabharata” (M+B+R+T) acronymically equates to “13 Bear Rite”, an apparent reference to the rites or blood sacrifices of the 13 Bloodlines of Rome which are symbolized by the letter “M”. Consequently, the Mahabharata contains references to a 12-year sacrifice to the king Saunaka Kulapati in the Naimisha Forest, the snake sacrifice of Janamejaya, and the Ashvamedha, a horse sacrifice conducted by Yudhisthira. Lastly, Para Brahman is a term often used by Vedantic philosophers as to the "attainment of the ultimate goal". The term “Para Brahman” (F/P+R+B+R+M+N) acronymically equates to “Four Bear Man”, an apparent reference to “Fear”, “Fire” or “Four” (or all three) and the Line of Man who now reside on the “Bear” of Greenland (i.e., the Beast of Greenland).

Hindu Blood Sacrifices

Because Hinduism is a predominantly Greco-Roman religion, it contains numerous blood sacrifices (i.e., rites), including that of humans. Many of these blood sacrifices are contained within the Vedic texts which were admittedly texts of the elite. Since India likely didn’t have an “elite” while under the rule of the former Roman Empire, the Vedic texts were likely based on the rituals of the Imperial Cult of Rome who routinely performed blood sacrifices. Consequently, the Vedas worship deities such as “Indra”, “Varuna” and “Agni” while drinking the “Soma” (i.e., blood). These terms can be acronymically deciphered as such: “Indra” (N+D+R), an apparent reference to “North Druids”, a mascot of the aforementioned Imperial Cult; “Varuna” “V/B+R+N”, an apparent reference to either “Bear Kill (X)” or “Burn” as in a fire sacrifice; “Agni” (G+N), an apparent reference to “Gen” or the beginning of something, likely the blood sacrifices; and “Soma” (S+M), an apparent reference to the “same” (S+M) ritual of drinking a victim’s blood during sacrifice, a tradition likely started at the dawn of the Greco-Roman Empire. Many Rigvedic hymns contain the fire ritual known as the Agnihotra, as well as the offering of Soma which is both an intoxicant and a god itself, as is the sacrificial fire, Agni. In Hinduism, fire-sacrifices are called “yajña” and are performed by chanting the Vedic mantras. Ethics in the Vedas are based on the concepts of “Satya” (S+T) and Rta” (R+T), two terms are acronymically deciphered as “State” and Rite” (i.e., sacrifice), or “State’s Rite”. This is because human sacrifices were done in the name of the state, the state of Rome. Consequently, Satya is the principle of integration rooted in the Absolute while Ṛta is the expression of Satya, which regulates and coordinates everything within it. Interestingly, the term "Asha" in the Avestan language is the term corresponding to Vedic language "ṛta", for all that is left after a rite or sacrifice is ash. The earliest text of the Vedas is the Rigveda, a collection of poetic hymns used in the sacrificial rites of Vedic priesthood. The Yajurveda is considered the Veda of sacrifices and rituals and therefore contains a number of mantras and procedures for blood sacrifices, including that of a white goat to Vayu, a calf to Sarasvati, a speckled Ox to Savitr, a Bull to Indra, a castrated Ox to Varuna, etc. Other blood sacrifices in Hinduism include but are not limited to: the sacrifice of a goat in the Vedas, the sacrifice of a horse in the Ashwamedha, the sacrifice of a human sacrifice Purushamedha, the sacrifice of a royal horse in the Ashvamedha, a central rite in the Yajurveda, and the three animal-sacrifices performed in the Jyotistoma, namely the Agnisomiya, Savaniya and Anubandhya,

Hindu Symbolism
Because Hinduism is predominantly Greco-Roman in origin, it contains numerous symbols found in Greek, Roman and Norse mythology.  The syllable “om”, which represents the Para Brahman or “Four Bearman”, is a unique character which appears to have undergone a makeover. The original “Om” symbol was likely similar to the Balinese version which depicts a Roman dome to the north along with the letter “M”, the 13th letter in the Roman –English alphabet which is indicative of the 13 Bloodlines of Rome. The swastika is a symbol which represents auspiciousness or good fortune Hinduism. Aside from its use in Nazi Germany, the swastika is intimately connected with the Greco-Roman gods of Thor and Isis. In essence, the swastika is an “SS” symbol, superimposed. Although not yet confirmed, it appears that the “tilaka”, the red dot painted on one’s forehead to symbolize their allegiance to Hinduism, is yet another religious tribute to Greco-Roman blood sacrifices. Victims of the Imperial Cult of Rome would have their throats cut while being hung upside down from a tree. Consequently, due to gravity, the blood would gush out, providing a blood bath for those participating in the sacrifice, hence the red dot.

Vishnu
Vishnu is a Vedic Supreme God in Hinduism that is venerated as the Supreme Being in Vaishnavism. Vishnu is described by modern historical sources as the all-pervading essence of all beings, the master of—and beyond—the past, present and future, the creator and destroyer of all existences, one who supports, sustains and governs the universe and originates and develops all elements within. In other words, Vishnu is all knowing. The term “Vishnu” (B/V+S+H+N) acronymically equates to “Babylon System Forever North (Kill)”, an apparent reference to the god’s destructive nature. Consequently, Vishnu incarnates on Earth from time to time “to eradicate evil forces”, to restore the dharma, and liberate the devotees from the cycle of births and deaths. In some of the Puranas and Vaishnava traditions, Vishnu's eye is considered to be situated at the infinitely distant Southern Celestial Pole. Aside from the fact that the single eye is a direct reference to the one-eyed Beast of Greenland, the South Pole (which doesn’t exist) wasn’t allegedly discovered until 1820, which is what the Celestial South Pole is based on. Therefore, the traditional reference was evidently created in respect to the North Pole (i.e., Mt. Olympus) in Greenland. Because Vishnu is the Supreme God of Greenland, he lives in the “highest celestial region”, contrasted with those who live in the atmospheric or terrestrial regions (i.e., underworld). According to verse 1:154:4 in the Rigveda, “Him whose three places that are filled with sweetness, imperishable, joy as it may list them, Who verily alone upholds the threefold, the earth, the heaven, and all living creatures”. This passage is evidently in reference to the earth (underworld), the heaven (Greenland) and all beings which inhabit them. According hymn 7:99:2 in the Rigveda, “…Viṣṇu, has attained the utmost limit of thy magnitude, by which thou hast upheld the vast and beautiful heaven, and sustained the eastern horizon of Earth”. The passage is evidently a reference the vastness of Greenland (i.e., heaven) which is larger than the U.S., Mexico and most of Canada, while the term “Eastern” (S+T+R+N) acronymically equates to “Steer North”. Therefore, the northern horizon of the Earth is off limits to all. After the Island of Crete and the Island of Sicily, the Island of Greenland is the final den or home of the Roman Empire. Consequently, it is referenced numerous times in respect to Vishnu. Hymn 7.100 in the first Mandala (book) of the Rigveda celebrates the “three steps” of Vishnu (as Trivikrama) which he strode over the universe, planting his step (foot) in three places. According to Vishnu Suktam, hymn 1.154 in the first Mandala, the first and second of Vishnu's strides are visible to men (in Europe) while the third is located in the heights of heaven (Greenland). Consequently, the last place (Greenland) is described as Vishnu's supreme abode in hymn 1.22.20. In hymns 1.22.17, 1.154.3 and 1.154.4, Vishnu strides across the earth with three steps, while in hymns 6.49.13 and 7.100.3, he strides across the earth three times. In hymns 1.154.1, 1.155.5 and 7.29.7, Vishnu strides vertically (northward) with a final step into heaven (Greenland). Consequently, Vishnu is known as the triple-strider with names such as “Trivikrama” and “Urukrama”. The term “Trivikrama” (T+R+B/V+K+R+M) acronymically equates to “Tri (Three) Back (Balk or Fake) Kill Rome”, while “Urukrama” (R+K+R+M) acronymically equates to “Rock Rome”, a reference to the Rock of Ages, otherwise known as Greenland.

Vishnu Symbology
In Hindu texts, Vishnu is generally described as a blue being whose four arms hold the padma (lotus flower) in the lower left hand, the Kaumodaki gada (mace) in the lower right hand, the Panchajanya shankha (shell) in the upper left hand, and the the Sudarshana Chakra (discus weapon) in the upper right hand. The four arms of are symbolic of the letter “D” which is an acronym for “Day” (the 24/7 sunlight of Greenland), “Die” and “Death”, while the 24 forms of Lord Vishnu according to the Siddhartha-samhita are indicative of the letter “X”, meaning “Kill”. The Kaumodaki (mace) is likely indicative of the Eternal Flame of Rome while the Sudarshana Chakra appears to be symbolic of the disc-like shape of Earth. The term “Sudarshana” (“S+D+R+S+N/X) acronymically equates to “System Day Rome Shun (SX)” or “South Rome Shun (SX). The term “SN” or “SX” equates both fire (the Sun) and the number “6” which is routinely used in Roman blood sacrifices. Vishnu rests on Ananta Shesha, the king of the serpent deities which is commonly shown with a thousand heads. This is an apparent reference to the snakes or dragons (i.e., Roman gunships with dragon heads) which formerly encircled Greenland. Vishnu wears a crown for all the world is under the dominion of the Roman Empire. Vishnu rides on an eagle known as Garuda. The term “G+R+D” acronymically equates to “Greenland Rome Day (Die)”. The Roman eagle was the official symbol of the Roman Empire and as well as the United States. Coincidentally, because the letter “W” equates to the letter “V” In the Roman Score (i.e., the Roman alphabet), the name of the U.S. Capitol is Washington, D.C. (V+S+H+N+G+T+N) which equates acronymically to “Vishnu Greenland Ten” or Vishnu Greenland To Kill”. Lastly, 4034 Vishnu is an Apollo asteroid, 0.4 kilometers in diameter, whose numerology “44” equates to death and genocide.

Roman-Hindu Festivals
Similar to
Jewish holidays, most of the Hindu festivals fall on Roman holidays or have Roman connotations. The saying “When in Rome do as the Romans” is literally true as Rome’s pagan holidays which generally include human sacrifices are celebrated all over the world, especially in India. Roman-Indian holidays include but are not limited to: Bhau-beej: In 2013, the Hindu holiday of Bhau-beej was celebrated on November 5, 2013, which is coincidentally also Guy Fawkes Night. The term Guy Fawkes (G+F+KS) acronymically equates to “Greenland Fakes” for it celebrates the fakery of state-sponsored terrorism; Chhath: In 2013, the Hindu holiday of Chhath was celebrated on November 6-9, 2013, which coincided in part with the Roman Plebeian Games of November 4–17, as well as the third of the three days when the “mundus” ritual pit was opened in Rome on November 8. In 2014, Chhath will be celebrated on October 27-30, 2014, which coincide in part with the Roman holidays of Ludi Victoriae Sullanae "Victory Games of Sulla" which are held on October 26-November 1. In 2015, Chhath will be celebrated on November 15-18, 2015, which coincide in part with the Roman Plebeian Games on November 4–17, as well as the Roman mercatus”, a celebration of markets and fairs on November 18-20; Diwali: In 2015, the Hindu holiday of Diwali will be celebrated on November 11, 2015, which coincidentally coincides with Armtice Day and Veterans Day on November 11, and in part with the Roman Plebeian Games of November 4–17; Durga Puja: In 2013, the Hindu holiday of Durga Puja was celebrated on October 10-14, 2013, which coincided in part with the Roman ceremonies to mark a rededication of the Temple of Juno Moneta on October 10, the Roman Meditrinalia festival on October 11, the Roman festival of Ludi Augustales on October 3-12, the Roman festival Augustalia on October 12, the Roman sacrifice to Fortuna Redux on October 12, the Roman Fontinalia held in honor of Fons on October 13, and the Roman ceremonies to mark a restoration of the Temple of the Penates Dei on the Velian Hill on October 14. In 2014, Durga Puja will be celebrated on September 29-October 3, 2014, which coincides in part with the Roman ceremonies for Fides and the Tigillum Sororium  on October 1, and the Roman festival of Ludi Augustales on October 3-12; Ganesh Chaturthi: In 2013, the Hindu holiday of Ganesh Chaturthi was celebrated on September 9, 2013, which coincided in part with the Ludi Romani or Ludi Magni, "the oldest and most famous" of the ludi, on September 5-19. In 2015, Ganesh Chaturthi will be celebrated on September 17, 2015, which once again coincides in part with the Ludi Romani; Gudi Padwa: In 2014, the Hindu holiday of Gudi Padwa was celebrated on March 31, 2014, which coincidentally coincided with the Roman anniversary of the Temple of Luna on the Aventine on March 31; Guru Purnima: In 2013, the Hindu holiday of Guru Purnima was celebrated on July 22, 2013, which coincidentally coincided with the anniversary of the Roman Temple of Concordia at the foot of the Capitol on July 22. In 2014, Guru Purnima was celebrated on July 12, 2014, which coincides in part with the Ludi Apollinares, Roman games held in honor of Apollo on July 6-13; Hanuman Jayanti: In 2013, the Hindu holiday Hanuman Jayanti was celebrated on April 25, 2013, which coincidentally coincided with the Roman holiday Robigalia, an agricultural festival involving a dog sacrifice on April 25. In 2014, Hanuman Jayanti was celebrated on April 15, 2014, which coincided with the Roman holiday Fordicidia that features the offering of a pregnant cow to Tellus ("Earth") on April 15. In 2015, Hanuman Jayanti will be celebrated April 4, 2015, which will coincide in part with the Roman holiday Ludi Megalenses or Megalesia, held in honor of the Magna Mater or Cybele on April 4-10; Holi: In 2014, the Hindu holiday Holi (H+L), which acronymically equates to “Hell” or “Heel”, was celebrated on March 17, 2014, which coincidentally coincides with the Roman holidays of Liberalia and Agonalia on March 17. In 2016, Holi will be celebrated on March 23, 2016, which will coincide with the Roman holiday Tubilustrium, known as the purification of the trumpets, on March 23; Karthikai Deepam: In 2013, the Hindu holiday Karthikai Deepam was celebrated on November 17, 2013, which coincidentally coincided in part with the Roman Plebeian Games on November 4–17. In 2014, Karthikai Deepam will be celebrated on December 5, 2014, which will coincide with the Roman country festival Faunus held in the “pagus” on December 5; Kartik Poornima: In 2013, the Hindu holiday Kartik Poornima was celebrated on November 17, 2013, which coincidentally coincided in part with the Roman Plebeian Games on November 4–17. In 2014, Kartik Poornima will be celebrated on November 6, 2014, which will once again coincide in part with the Roman Plebeian Games on November 4–17; Krishna Janmastami: In 2014, the Hindu holiday Krishna Janmastami was celebrated on August 17, 2014, which coincidentally coincided with the Roman holiday Portunalia and the anniversary of the Temple of Janus on August 17; Kumbh Mela: In 2015, the Hindu holiday Kumbh Mela will be celebrated on August 29-September 18, 2015, which coincidentally will coincide in part with the Roman ceremony for Jupiter Tonans ("the Thunderer") on the Capitolium on September 1, the Roman ceremony for Juno Regina on the Aventine on September 1, the Roman Ludi Romani or Ludi Magni, "the oldest and most famous" of the ludi on September 5-19, the Roman anniversary of the Temple to Jupiter Optimus Maximus, an Epulum Iovis to the Capitoline Triad, on September 13, and the Roman holiday Equorum probation” ("Approval of the Horses") which features a cavalry parade on September 14. In 2016, Kumbh Mela will be celebrated on April 22-May 21, 2016, which will coincide in part with Earth Day on April 22, “Vinalia Priora”, a Roman festival held for the previous year's wine on April 23, the Roman holiday Robigalia, an agricultural festival involving dog sacrifice on April 25, the Roman Ludi Florales held in honor of Flora on April 28-May 3, May Day on May 1, the Roman Games of Flora, which features a sacrifice to Maia on May 1, the anniversary of the Temple of Bona Dea on the Aventine on May 1, the rites for the Lares Praestites of the city of Rome on May 1, Lemuria, a Roman festival of the dead on May 9, a Roman sacrifice to Mania on May 11, the Roman anniversary of the Temple of Mars Invictus on May 14, the Roman procession of the Argei on May 14, the Roman holiday Mercuralia held in in honor of Mercury (“Feriae of Jove” ) on May 15, and the Roman festival Agonalia, for Vediovis on May 21; Makar Sankranti: In 2014 and 2015, the Hindu holiday Makar Sankranti will be celebrated on September 14, which coincidentally will coincide with the Roman holiday Equorum probation” ("Approval of the Horses") which features a cavalry parade on September 14; Maha Shivaratri: In 2014, the Hindu holiday Maha Shivaratri was celebrated on February 27, 2014, which coincidentally coincided with the Roman holiday Equirria, the first of two horse-racing festivals to Mars held on February 27; Navratri: In 2013, the Hindu holiday Navratri was held on October 5-13, 2013, which coincidentally coincided in part with the Roman holiday Ludi Augustales, which is based on Augustalia, on October 3-12, the Roman holiday mundus” on October 5, the Roman holiday dies ater” ("black day"), the anniversary of the battle of Arausio, on October 6, the Roman sacrifices to Jupiter Fulgur and Juno Curitis on October 7, the Roman sacrifices to Genius Publicus, Fausta Felicitas, and Venus Victrix on the Capitolium on October 9, the Roman ceremony to mark the rededication of the Temple of Juno Moneta on October 10, the Roman Meditrinalia festival on October 11, the Roman sacrifice to Fortuna Redux on October 12, which is coincidentally also Columbus Day, and the Roman holiday Fontinalia held in honor of Fons on October 13. In 2014, Navratri will be held on September 25-October 3, 2014, which will coincide in part with the Roman anniversary of the Temple of Venus Genetrix on September 26, the Roman ceremonies for Fides and Tigillum Sororium on October 1, and the Roman holiday Ludi Augustales, which is based on Augustalia, on October 3-12; Nuakhai: In 2013, the Hindu holiday Nuakhai (N+K), whose name acronymically equates to that of the Greco-Roman god of Enki (Nike), was celebrated on September 10, 2013, which coincidentally coincided in part with the Roman Ludi Romani or Ludi Magni, "the oldest and most famous" of the ludi on September 5-19; Onam: In 2013, the Hindu holiday Onam was celebrated on September 16, 2013, which coincidentally coincided in part with the Roman Ludi Romani or Ludi Magni, "the oldest and most famous" of the ludi on September 5-19. In 2014, the Onam will be celebrated on September 7, 2014, which will once again coincide in part with the Roman Ludi Romani on September 5-19; Rama Navami: The Hindu holiday Rama Navami (R+M+N+V/B+M) acronymically equates to either “Rome North Victory 13” or “Roman Victory 13” via the Roman Score (i.e., the Roman alphabet). The letter “M” is the 13th letter/symbol in both Roman alphabets which is representative of the 13 Bloodlines of Rome; Sitalsasthi: In 2013, the Hindu holiday Sitalsasthi was celebrated on June 15, 2013, which coincidentally coincided with the Roman holiday Vestalia, which is held in honor of Vesta on June 7-15, and the Roman holiday “Quinquatrus minusculae”, the lesser Quinquatrus celebrated by “tibicines” on June 13-15. In 2014, Sitalsasthi was celebrated June 3, 2014, which coincided with the Roman anniversary of the Temple of Bellona on June 3. In 2015, Sitalsasthi will be celebrated on May 24, 2015, which will coincide with the Roman holiday known as QRCF on May 24; Ugadi: In 2014, the Hindu holiday known as Ugadi was celebrated on March 31, 2014, which coincidentally coincided with the Roman anniversary of the Temple of Luna on March 31; Vasant Panchami: In 2013, the Hindu holiday Vasant Panchami was celebrated on February 14, 2013, which coincidentally coincided with the Roman holiday Valentine's Day on February 14; Vijayadashami: In 2013, the Hindu holiday Vijayadashami was celebrated on October 13, 2013, which coincidentally coincided with the Roman holiday Fontinalia held in honor of Fons on October 13. In 2014, Vijayadashami will be celebrated on October 3, 2014, which will coincide in part with the Roman holiday Ludi Augustales, which is based on the Augustalia, on October 3-12; and Vishu: In 2015, the Hindu holiday Vishu will be celebrated on April 15, 2014, which will coincidentally coincide with the Roman holiday Fordicidia that features the offering of a pregnant cow to Tellus ("Earth") on April 15;

Shiva
Shiva (“Siva”) is a popular Hindu deity who is considered the Supreme God within Shaivism which teaches that Shiva is the creator, preserver, destroyer, revealer, transformer and concealer of all that is. Shiva is also known as “The Auspicious One" which in essence means “future success is likely”. A total of 113 names have been attributed to Shiva, including, “Kailashadhipati”, meaning “Lord of Mount Kailash”, and “Kailashnath”, meaning “Master of Mount Kailash”. Shiva is described as the omniscient Yogi who lives an ascetic life on Mount Kailash (i.e., Greenland). Although there is a Mount Kailash in the Himalayas, this is an apparent reference to both Mt. Olympus and Mt. Zion which are located in Greenland. In Hindu mythology, Mount Kailāsa is depicted as a “Linga”, representing the center of the universe. This is likely another reference to Greenland which is located geographically speaking at the center of the Earth. Dakshinamurthy, an aspect of Shiva, literally means “one who is facing south” in Sanskrit, for all locations in the underworld are south from Greenland in the north. Many words in the English lexicon were evidently derived from Siva and Shiva (e.g., achieve, save, savvy, sever, shave, shiv, shiver, shivering, shove, etc.), including “chauvinist”, meaning “excessive or blind patriotism”, and “sovereign”, meaning supreme ruler as well as “Shiva reigns”. The latter terms define traits inherent to the Roman Empire now located in Greenland.

Symbology of Shiva
The god of Shiva has many symbols and traits, many of which are affiliated with the Greco-Roman Empire, the most recognizable being the third eye on his forehead, the snake around his neck (which is symbolic of Roman dragon ships which encircled Greenland), a crescent moon (a Greco-Roman symbol representing Cronus), and the trishula (i.e., Greco-Roman trident). Shiva is also equipped with a “Parashu” which he gave it to Parashurama whose name means "Rama with the axe" (i.e., Rome with the axe). The Parashu is a replica of the fasces axe which itself was modeled after the shape of the Island of Crete, the birthplace of the Greco-Roman Empire. Shiva is also portrayed with a sacred halo, an apparent reference to the glow of the aurora borealis which is seen around the underworld. Shiva smears his body with ashes (i.e., bhasma), due to the many blood sacrifices he partakes in. Shiva's is noted in the “Jatin” epithets as "the one with matted hair" that molten gold in color or being yellowish-white, very un-Indian like in nature. Lastly, the Pashupati seal, which is purported to be one of the earliest depictions of Shiva, is clearly depicted with twin ram (R+M) horns, an apparent symbolic reference to Rome (R+M) which if often characterized by a ram.

Numerology of Shiva
Shiva’s sacred number is “5” which equates to the “Ж” symbol (i.e., “Chi”) in the Roman Score (i.e., the Roman alphabet) as is indicative of the country of Switzerland. Consequently, Shiva’s most important mantra has five syllables (i.e., the “namaḥ śivāya”). Shiva's body is also said to consist of five mantras, called the pañcabrahmans. As forms of God, each of these have their own names and distinct iconography (i.e., Sadyojāta, Vāmadeva, Aghora, Tatpuruṣha and Īsāna). These are subsequently represented as the five faces of Shiva which that are associated in various texts with the five elements, he five senses, the five organs of perception, and the five organs of action. In Hebrew, “shiv'ah” literally means "seven" (S+V+N) which may translate to “Siva North”. In the Roman-English alphabet, the number “7” equates to the letter “G”, an acronym for Greenland.

Holidays of Shiva
Maha Shivratri, meaning the “Great Night of Shiva”, is an annual Hindu festival celebrated in reverence of the god Shiva. In 2013, Maha Shivratri was celebrated on March 10 in 2013. Coincidentally, March 9 is the Roman holiday known as “dies religiosus” (when the Salii carried the sacred shields around the city again). The 24-hour time difference in the holiday appears to have been instituted in order to confuse historians. Unlike the number “9”, THE number “10” is sacred in Greco-Roman lore and evidenced by the fact that it is depicted on the flag of Greenland. In the Roman lunar calendar, Zodiac is the 13th month. Consequently, the date of March 9 equates to Zodiac 7 (i.e., “13/7”) while March 10 equates to Zodiac 8 (i.e., 13/8). The latter number “38” equates to “CH” or “Chi” which is symbolic of the Switzerland, the life or “chi” of the Roman Empire. Therefore, the Roman holiday of “dies religiosus” is almost certainly celebrated on March 10 along with Maha Shivratri. Interestingly, “Religiosus” is defined as pertaining to the gods or marked out by them as theirs, qualities inherent to Switzerland, the main proxy (shill) state of the Roman Empire. In 2014, Maha Shivratri was celebrated on February 27 which is the same date that the Roman holiday “Equirria” (the first of two horse-racing festivals to Mars) is celebrated.

Shiva & Switzerland
Shiva if often
depicted with 10 arms which are symbolic of the geographic shape of Switzerland which appears to have 10 arms or legs. “Tripurantaka”, a manifestation of Shiva, is depicted with four arms wielding a bow and arrow. He holds an axe and a deer on the upper pair of his arms, and a bow and an arrow lower pair of the arms, respectively. Tripurantaka is symbolic of the four-armed cross of Switzerland which is responsible for executing Roman sacrifices, terror attacks and wars in the underworld. Shiva also rides on a bull, his vehicle, which is representative of Babylon, the former capitol of the Roman Empire. Coincidentally, Switzerland is responsible for managing and maintaining the “Babylon System” in the underworld. Nandī, also known as Nandin, is the name of the bull on which Shiva rides. Nandī, translated by Sharma, equates to "lord of cattle" which is quite similar to myth surrounding the god of Ra which finds that all humans are the "Cattle of Ra." Lastly, Shiva’s sacred number is “5” which equates to the “Ж” symbol (i.e., “Chi”) in the Roman Score (i.e., the Roman alphabet). Chi above all other symbols is indicative of the country of Switzerland. According to the Roman Score, the name of “Shiva” (S/C+H+V) acronymically equates to “Chi Forever/Infinity Victory”, since the letter “C” and “S” are interchangeable in Roman English (e.g., census, century, etc.). The English term “sieve” (S+V) is a device that separating wanted elements from unwanted material. Metaphorically speaking, Switzerland is the sieve of the world for it removes unwanted people and ideas from the underworld, especially in respect to the secret of Greenland.

Tributes to Shiva
Tributes to the Greco-Roman god of
Shiva can be found  in the names and titles of various corporations, cultures, places and scientific-related phenomenon around the world, including but not limited to: Culture: the Siwa culture, a Bronze Age nomadic culture in the Gansu Province, China; the Siwa language, a Berber language of Egypt; and Živa, the  Slavic goddess of fertility; Internet Technology:?shva=1", the code appended to the URL when loading Gmail (i.e., Google email),  and HTML5 Shiv, a JavaScript workaround; Media:Arutz Sheva”, an Israeli media network identifying with Religious Zionism; Places: Shiva, a village in Iran; Siva, Perm Krai, a village in Russia;  Sivat, a village in Russia; Siwa Oasis, an oasis in Egypt; and Živa, small settlement near Vajska, Serbia; Space: the 140 Siwa, an asteroid;  1170 Siva, an asteroid named after the Hindu god; the Shiva Hypothesis, a hypothesis that purports to explain an apparent pattern in mass extinctions caused by impact events; and the Shiva crater, an apparent impact crater in the Indian Ocean, possibly associated with the Cretaceous–Tertiary extinction event; Science:  “Siva”, a pro-apoptotic signaling protein; “Siva”, the monotypic bird genus of the blue-winged minla; “Siwa”, a spider genus in the Araneidae family; the “Shiva laser”, built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 1977 for the study of inertial confinement fusion (ICF); and the “Shiva Star”, a high-powered pulsed-power research device located at the Air Force Research Laboratory;

Shiva in Pop Culture
The Greco-Roman god of
Shiva can be found in numerous books, comics, films, games, music, television series, and video games throughout pop culture, including but not limited to: Films:Siva” (1989), a Tamil film starring Rajinikanth; “Siva” (1989), a Telugu film by director Ram Gopal Varma; “Shiva” (1990), a remake of the Telugu film in Hindi by director Ram Gopal Varma; “Shiva” (2006), another Hindi remake by Ram Gopal Varma; “Shiva” (2008), by siblings Ronit and Shlomi Elkabetz; and “Shiva” (2012), a Kannada film starring Shivrajkumar; Games: Shiva”, a summonable ice elemental in the “Final Fantasy” (1987-2014) franchise; “Shiva”, a character in the “Streets of Rage” series (1991-2013); “Shiv”, a fictional location in “Magic: The Gathering” (1994-Present); “Sheeva”, a character in “Mortal Kombat” (1995) games; “Shivans” are the main antagonistic race in the “Freespace” (1998-2001) series; “Shiva's Guard”, a powerful artifact in the “Warcraft III: Reign of Chaos” (2002) game “Defense of the Ancients”; and “Shiva”, a major boss in “Bonds of Blood of Neverwinter Nights” (2004); Literature:Lady Shiva”, a DC Comics character which first appeared in “Richard Dragon, Kung Fu Fighter #5” (1975); “Shiva”, a computer program that spawns robots to destroy Weapon X experiment subjects in “Wolverine vol. 2 #50” (1992); “Shiva”, a fictitious strain of Ebola virus from the novel “Rainbow Six” (1998) by Tom Clancy; and “Kaiyanwang”, a.k.a. “Shiva”, a fictional character from “3×3 Eyes” (1987-2002); Music: Siva Samoa”, a type of Samoan dance often performed at weddings; “Siva” (‘1991), a song by “The Smashing Pumpkins”; and “Shiva”, a song by “The Antlers” from their concept album “Hospice” (2009); Television Series: “Shiva”, the ultimate villain in the anime “Legend of Heavenly Sphere Shurato” (1989-1990); “Neosapien General Shiva” from the cartoon TV series “Exosquad” (1993-1994); “Shiv”, a villain in the animated series “Static Shock” (2000-2004); “Siva”, a character from “The Tribe” (2002-2003) series; “The Shiva”, an award given to the league winners on “The League” (2009-Present); and “Shiva”, an episode of the tenth season of “NCIS” (2013).

Shiva & Judaism
Because Switzerland was the first Jewish state, many Jewish names and entities share the name of Shiva, including but not limited to: “
Shiva”, the name for  the week-long mourning period after death which is derived from the Hebrew word “shiv'ah” which literally means "seven"; “Arutz Sheva”, an Israeli media network identifying with Religious Zionism; “Sh'va, a name for the “20(2)” decimal in the Jewish Gematria’s “Mispar gadol; “Shva”, a Hebrew niqqud vowel sign written as two vertical dots underneath a letter; Yeshiva, a Jewish institution that focuses on the study of traditional religious texts, primarily the Talmud; Yeshiva University, a private university with four campuses in New York City; and Yeshiva.co, a Jewish website which is part of the institutions of Yeshivat Beit El. 

SIV Virus
Simian immunodeficiency viruse (SIV) is a retroviruse which has infected at least 45 species of African non-human primates. Based on analysis of strains found in four species of monkeys from Bioko Island, it has been concluded that SIV has been present in monkeys and apes for at least 32,000 years. Virus strains from two of these primate species (SIVsmm in sooty mangabeys and SIVcpz in chimpanzees) are believed to have crossed the species barrier into humans, resulting in HIV-2 and HIV-1 (i.e., AIDS). Although it has been stated that the route of transmission of HIV-1 to humans was due to contact with the blood of chimps, vaccines from the Red Cross are the most likely cause. Interestingly, the structure of HIV-1 protease (which was derived from the SIV virus) and that of the Pashupati seal, which is purported to be one of the earliest depictions of Shiva, are almost identical in nature. Consonantly speaking, “Siva” (S+V) is the same as “SIV” (S+V), and both are affiliated with destruction and death. Since the letter “H” is pronounced “aitch" or “aich”, the term “HIV” is pronounced “aich-eye-vee”. Therefore, “HIV” (C/S+H+V), consonantly speaking, equates to “Shiva” (C/S+H+V) because the letters “C” and “S” are routinely interchangeable in Roman English (e.g., census, century, etc.). Considering that the AIDS virus wasn’t discovered until 1983, and the Pashupati seal is purported to be thousands of years old, their striking similarity does not make sense inside the historical framework of the status quo. Therefore, in all likelihood, the SIV virus was discovered hundreds of years ago in Rome and subsequently used to kill off millions of people in the underworld via vaccines. In order to celebrate their scientific discovery in bio-terrorism, Shiva, the god of destruction, is depicted on the Pashupati seal in the form of the deadly virus. In what appears to be an inside joke of sorts, “Shiva” is a strain of the deadly Ebola virus in the novel “Rainbow Six” (1998) by Tom Clancy.

Shiva & Rudra
Rudra” and Shiva are viewed as the same personality in Hindu scriptures and therefore are used synonymously. Rudra, whose name is derived from the Sanskrit root “śarv-”, meaning to “injure” or “to kill", is usually portrayed as a fierce and destructive deity. Rudra is also the “One who can kill the forces of darkness", an apparent reference to the slaughter of humans who live in the underworld devoid of 24/7 sunlight. In other contexts, Rudra can simply mean "the number eleven”. The number “11” is represented in the Roman-English alphabet by the letter “K”, an acronym for “kill”. According to Indian scholar R. G. Bhandarkar, Rudra discharges "brilliant shafts which run about the heaven and the earth". This is an apparent reference to the lines of communication between Greenland and the country of Switzerland. Rudra was believed to cause diseases, something that the Red Cross located in Switzerland is notorious for. In Sanskrit, Rudra is known as “paraṃ vyoma sahasravṛt”, meaning “The upper world is similarly desired by the thousands of devas”, an apparent reference to Greenland (i.e., the upperworld). Rudra is also known as “śukraṃ vãmanyadyajataṃ vãmanyat”, meaning “Among your forms, one is the day with white hue, the other is the night with dark hue”. This is an appearance reference to the 24/7 light of  Greenland and the shadow of death and darkness which covers the underworld. Similar to Shiva, Rudra also bears a Greco-Roman trident.

Shiva Sheaves
Although only conjecture, it appears that Shiva-related genocides are symbolically represented by a
sheaf (plural: sheaves), a large bundles of cereal plants which are bound together after reaping. Since Shiva is the god of destruction, the sheaves evidently represent a certain amount of deaths (possibly 100,000 or 1 million) which were cut down by the hand of the Roman Empire. Consequently, sheaves are depicted within the Coat of Arms of various nation, (i.e., Armenia, Bolivia, New Zealand, Pakistan and Venezuela), on the flags of the numerous U.S. states (i.e., Delaware, Idaho, Nebraska, Pennsylvania and Vermont), on the Great Seals of U.S. states (i.e., Arkansas, Delaware, Idaho, Iowa, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Tennessee, Vermont, Washington D.C.), and on the Coat of Arms of U.S. (i.e., Delaware, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Vermont).