VI. Gods of Rome‎ > ‎

6.05 Minerva

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Minerva
(also spelled Menerva) was the Roman goddess of art, commerce, crafts, defense, magic, medicine, music, poetry, school, trade, war, weaving and wisdom. She is often depicted with the "owl of Minerva", her sacred creature which symbolizes wisdom. In Greek mythology, Fasti and Ovid called her the "goddess of a thousand works". In order to disguise the fact that Minerva is based on Minos of Crete, modern historical accounts state that Menrva was an Etruscan goddess which contributed to the Roman character of Minerva. Minerva is also equated with the Greek goddess Athena, despite the fact that Minos of Crete was still alive during the time of Athena. The Romans hold a festival to Minerva from March 19 to March 23 which is called the neuter plural, Quinquatria, the fifth after the Ides of March. A lesser version, known as the Minusculae Quinquatria, was held on the June 13, the Ides of June. In 207 B.C., a guild of poets and actors was formed to meet and make votive offerings at the temple of Minerva on the Aventine Hill whose members included Livius Andronicus. The Aventine sanctuary of Minerva continued to be an important center of the arts for much of the middle Roman Republic. Neolassical Roman temples to Minerva include but are not limited to: the Temple of Minerva (Assisi); the Temple of Minerva Medica (Rome); and the Temple of Minerva Medica Nymphaeum (Rome).

Minerva Worldwide
As the Roman goddess of wisdom,
Minerva is featured in the seals, logos, and mottos of numerous colleges, schools, universities around the world. Her image is also included in numerous governmental and military institutions, including the Republic of Minerva, a micronation consisting of the Minerva Reefs in Australia. Although tributes to Minerva are expected in Greece and Italy, her likeness is found in almost every country on Earth. It’s not a meer coincidence that so many governments and universities just happen share the same taste in goddesses — it’s part of a much larger Roman conspiracy. In other words, since the world is run by Roman Empire in Greenland, the 206 collective countries of the underworld shares the same fetish for Roman gods and goddesses, especially Minerva. 


Minerva
(England)

The Greco-Roman goddess Minerva is found throughout the country of England, including but not limited to: the official cap badge of the Artists Rifles Territorial SAS Regiment of the British Army; the title of remote learning facility at Bath Spa University (Bath); the Briggate Minerva statue (Leeds); the official logo of the Chartered Society of Designers (London); the logo of the Girls Day School Trust in England and Wales; the title of the annual prize for the best political student at Liverpool Hope University (Liverpool); the Minerva statue atop the dome of Liverpool Town Hall (Liverpool); the Roman Minerva's Shrine (Chester); the Minerva Lodge, the oldest Masonic Lodge in England (City of Kingston Upon Hulls); the head of "Sulis-Minerva" found in the Roman ruins (Bath); the official logo of University of Lincoln (Lincoln); and the Minerva web interface of University of Sheffield Medical School (Sheffield).

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Minerva (Europe)
The Greco-Roman goddess
Minerva is found throughout Europe, including but not limited to: Austria: the sculptured work entitled "The Birth of Minerva" at the University of Vienna (Vienna); Bulgaria: the title of the Minerva language school (Ruse); Germany: the Minerva statue on the Alte Brücke (Heidelberg); the paintings at Old University's assembly hall and the Minerva statue in front of the New University building at Heidelberg University; and the official logo of the Max Planck Society; Italy: the Minerva statue and the official logo of La Sapienza University (Rome); the Temple of Minerva (Assisi); the Temple of Minerva Medica (Rome); the Temple of Minerva Medica Nymphaeum (Rome); the Minerva statue (Pavia); and the Minerva statue at the University of Turin (Turin); Netherlands: the official seal of Leiden University (Leiden); Norway: the Minerva statue at Bergen Museum (Bergen); Portugal: the official insignia of University of Porto (Porto); and Scotland: the Minerva statue and the building title at Dumfries Academy (Dumfries); the official seal of Kelvinside Academy (Glasgow); and the Minerva statue atop the dome of the Mitchell Library (Glasgow).


Minerva (Latin America)
The Greco-Roman goddess
Minerva is found in throughout Latin America, including but not limited to: Brazil: the official seal and patroness of Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Rio de Janeiro); and the official seal of Polytechnic School of the University of São Paulo (São Paulo); Cuba: the stained glass window at Jose Marti National Library (Havana); Guatemala: Manuel José Estrada Cabrera, former President of Guatemala, tried to promote a "Cult of Minerva" and subsequently erected the Temple of Minerva (Guatemala City); and Mexico: the official seal of Escuela Comercial Cámara de Comercio (Mexico City); and the Minerva statue at Minerva Roundabout (Guadalajara).


Minerva (Popular Culture)
According to
John Robison's “Proofs of a Conspiracy (1798), the third degree of the Bavarian Illuminati was called “Minerval” or “Brother of Minerva”, in honor of Minerva. In the Harry Potter series, J.K Rowling named a leading female character Minerva McGonagall in light of the Roman goddess. Like Minerva, McGonagall’s main trait was that of wisdom and war. In the Percy Jackson & The Olympians and The Heroes of Olympus series by Rick Riordan, Athena (i.e., Minerva) is the mother of Annabeth Chase, one of the main characters. In the Assassin's Creed series, Minerva is depicted along with Juno and Tinia who were worshiped as a triad in Rome.



Minerva
(U.S. Academia)

The Roman goddess
Minerva is found throughout colleges, fraternities and universities within the United States, the Greco, including but not limited to: the official seal of American Academy of Arts & Sciences (Cambridge, Massachusetts); the patron goddess of Bryn Mawr College (Lower Merion Township, Pennsylvania); the Minerva statue at Columbia University (Manhattan, New York); the goddess and seal of Kappa Kappa Gamma fraternity; the title of online for-profit university Minerva University; the supercomputer of Mount Sinai School of Medicine (New York, New York); the main file server of Keystone College (Factoryville, Pennsylvania); the coat of arms and patron goddess of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity; the Minerva statue at State University of New York at Geneseo (Geneseo, New York); the café, the journal, and the Minerva statues at State University of New York at Potsdam (Potsdam, New York); the official seal and motto at Union College, New York (Schenectady, New York); the patroness of Union Philosophical Society of Dickinson College (Carlisle, Pennsylvania); the official seal of University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa, Alabama); the catalogue, the motto and the official logo of University at Albany (Albany, New York); the Minerva statue at University of California (Berkeley, California); the official seal of University of Louisville (Louisville, Kentucky); the Minerva statue and the official seal of University of North Carolina at Greensboro (Greensboro, North Carolina); official seal of University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma (Chickasha, Oklahoma); the official seal of University of South Carolina (Columbia, South Carolina); the official seal of University of Virginia (Charlottesville, Virginia); the official seal of Virginia Tech University (Blacksburg, Virginia); the Minerva statue at Wells College (Aurora, New York); and the Minerva statue at Yale School of Architecture (New Haven, Connecticut). 



Minerva
(U.S.)

Aside from academic based institutions, the Greco-Roman goddess
Minerva is found throughout the United States, including but not limited to: the Medal of Honor, the highest military decoration awarded by the United States government; the Minerva bust at the Boston Public Library (Boston, Massachusetts); the Minerva Foundation (Berkeley, California): the Minerva statue at Battle Hill (Brooklyn, New York); the Minerva statue at Green-Wood Cemetery (New York, New York); the Minerva statue at the Minneapolis Central Library (Minneapolis, Minnesota); the Minerva statue (Portland, Maine); the Minerva statue at the United States Capitol Visitor Center (Washington, D.C.); the Minerva statue atop the U.S. Capitol Building (Washington, D.C.); the Minerva statue at the library of the United States Military Academy (West Point, New York); the James Gordon Bennett Minerva Monument (New York, New York); the mosaic and the Minerva statue at the Library of Congress (Washington, D.C.); the Minerva Initiative at the Department of Defense (Arlington County, Virginia), the official seal of the State of California; U.S. $5 Stamp (1923); and the helmet of Minerva is depicted in the logo of Walter Reed Army Medical Center (Washington, D.C.).


Minerva (Other)
The Greco-Roman goddess
Minerva is found throughout the world, including but not limited to: Australia: the official seal of Ballarat Clarendon College (Ballarat, Victoria); the magazine and song of Hornsby Girls High School (Sydney, New South Wales); and the official logo of Mac.Robertson Girls' High School (Melbourne, Victoria); Canada: the seal of Kappa Kappa Gamma fraternity; the Minerva web interface of McGill University (Montreal, Quebec); India: Minerva Circle (Bangalore); the Minerva Institute of Management& Technology (Dehradun); the Minerva statue atop the Writer’s Building (Kolkata); South Africa: the coat of arms and newspaper University of Stellenbosch (Stellenbosch); and Tunisia: the Temple of Minerva (Sbeitla).