14.08 Doggerland

GREENLANDTHEORY.COM
Doggerland
was the name that given to a former landmass in the North Sea which allegedly connected Great Britain's east coast with mainland Europe. In reality, Doggerland was a stretch of rocky dry land that connected Scotland to mainland Norway. The removal of Doggerland occurred shortly after Anno Domini (i.e., 000 AD/BC) and was accomplished by the use of Roman gunpowder (i.e., dynamite) and thousands of slaves. The remains of Doggerland were evidently dumped by ship off the coast of Norway, now known as the Afen and Storegga Slides. However, prior to the removal of Doggerland, the Roman Empire erected Antonine's Wall and Hadrian's Wall in northern England to prevent the people from seeing and hearing the use of explosives, a military secret which was not known at the time. Whether or not these walls preceded the Omega-shaped wall surrounding Greenland in northern Canada and Russia is not known, but they were built nonetheless. By the time the walls came down, maps had been altered and the local population had forgotten that Doggerland ever existed. The removal of Doggerland was executed by the Roman Empire in order to: a) destroy the Irish-Scottish-Norwegian coastline which reflects the coast of Greenland exactly (see photo); b), make an island out of Roman Britain (i.e., Britannia), allowing it to remain secure and separate from the rest of Europe; and c) cut off England, Ireland and Scotland from mainland Europe, stemming travel to those regions which are geographically closest to Greenland. As evidenced by the photo, the collective coastlines of Ireland, Scotland and Norway mimic the coastline of Greenland almost exactly. The island of Iceland also fits perfectly atop the nose of Greenland, inferring that it is much closer to Ireland than modern maps indicate. While the proximity between the coastline of Greenland and the coastline of mainland Europe is not to scale, Greenland is far closer to Europe shores than modern maps suggest . In short, Doggerland was destroyed in order sell the lie that Greenland is far across the Atlantic and covered in ice, both of which are patently false.

Scotland-Norway Connection
Branching off the northern coast of Scotland towards Norway is a series of small islands, including but not limited to: the
Orkney Islands (380 sq mi/990 sq km); the Fair Isle (2.97 sq mi/7.69 sq km); and the Shetland Islands (567 sq mi/1,468 sq km). Considering that the North Sea is only 970 kilometers (600 miles) long and 580 kilometers (360 miles) wide, it’s mathematically and geographically possible that these islands chains were at one time all connected, forming what was once Doggerland. The long chain of Scottish islands evidently ends with the islands of Lausingen and Spannholmane in Utsira, a municipality in Rogaland County, Norway. Interestingly, these islands are only depicted on Google Maps and have thus far not been identified on any published maps pertaining to Norway. The Lausingen and Spannholmane islands are located off the southern coast of Karmøy, a municipality which jetties out into the North Sea from Norway. The mysterious islands along with the jetty suggest that this may have been the most northern part of the former land bridge that connected Norway to Scotland, otherwise known as Doggerland.  



Afen & Storegga Slides
The
Storegga Slides, which are considered to be the world’s largest known landslides, are what remains of Doggerland today. These slides are found in the Norwegian Sea, roughly 100 km (62 mi) north-west of the Møre coast. The alleged collapse involved an estimated 290 km (180 mi) length of coastal shelf, resulting in a total volume of 3,500 km3 (840 cu mi) of debris. The equivalent volume wise is comparable to an area the size of Iceland covered to a depth of 34 m (112 ft). Since the phenomenon of the Storegga Slides is not replicated elsewhere on Earth, it is far more likely that the cause was man-made. In all likelihood, the rubble from Doggerland was shipped north and dumped off the east coast of Norway. This process was evidently repeated for decades, possibly even a century. Needless to say, if the aforementioned theory regarding the demolition of Doggerland is in fact true, the millions of tons of displaced rubble would have had to be dumped somewhere. Coincidentally, modern historical sources state that “At, or shortly before, the time of the last Storegga Slide, a land bridge known to archaeologists and geologists as "Doggerland" existed, linking the area of Great Britain, Denmark and the Netherlands across what is now the southern North Sea. This area is believed to have included a coastline of lagoons, marshes, mudflats, and beaches, and to have been a rich hunting, fowling and fishing ground populated by Mesolithic human cultures.” In other words, the Storegga Slides and the disappearance of Doggerland are intimately connected. Lastly, the Afen Slide, which is located north-west of the Shetland Islands, is roughly 2.48 miles (4 km) wide and 8.07 miles (13 km) in length, containing roughly 200 million m3 of displaced sediments. Like the Storegga Slides, the Afen Slide appears to be linked to Doggerland or another landmass that was removed, possibly between Ireland and Scotland, between Ireland and Great Britain, or between Scotland and Great Britain.








Walls of Hadrian & Antonine
In order to keep Brits from heading north by foot, Rome built Hadrian's Wall (122 A.D.) and Antonine Wall (142 A.D.) which ran from east to west (from the Irish Sea to North Sea), essentially cutting England in half, twice.