4.01 Days of the Week

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_of_the_days_of_the_week
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Based on the very similar names for the days of the week which span over 50 languages from both the ancient and modern worlds, it's clear that the Roman days of the week were named after celestial bodies (e.g., the Sun, the Moon, Saturn, etc.) while the Roman months of the year were named after celestial constellations depicted in the Cross of the Zodiac (e.g., Aries, Taurus, Gemini, etc.).
Although modern historical accounts state that the Roman Empire had an 8-day week (i.e., the nundinal cycle), an overwhelming amount of evidence which suggests that the Romans used the lunar calendar which consists of fifty-two 7-day weeks. Since each of the 13 lunar months consist of a 28-day cycle, the lunar year equates to 364 days (+1 day), rendering the aforementioned 8-day week numerically inferior and mathematically impossible. The word month (M+N+T) is derived from the term moon (M+N) or Minos (M+N+S) as each new month was celebrated on the "new moon".

Roman & Post-Roman Names
The respective names for the 7 days of the Roman week have been divided into two respective catagories: a) "Roman Days", and b) "Post-Roman Days". After the alleged fall of the Roman Empire (despite never being defeated militarily), the days of the week (minus Saturday), the months of the year, and the names and titles for a majority of the Roman gods and goddesses were either given a grammatical make-over or a whole new identity in a calculated attempt to hide their affiliation to the Greco-Roman Empire. As evidenced, the given names for the 7 days of the Roman week (both past and present) are so grammatically similar that it shows overwhelming linguistic collusion between almost all languages and governments of the world. The gross grammatical similarities further solidifies the notion that English was in fact the official language of the Roman Empire and that its imperial domination was in fact worldwide, contrary to what modern history dictates.

Roman Days of the Week:

1. Lunaday (Monday)
2. Marsday (Tuesday)
3. Mercurday (Wednesday)
4. Joveday (Thursday)
5. Venuday (Friday)
6. Saturday (Saturday)
7. Doomday (Sunday)




Lunaday (Roman Monday)
"Monday" is the name for the 1st day of the Roman week although it was most likely entitled "Luna" or "Lunaday" prior to the alleged fall of the Roman Empire. In Greek mythology, "Selene" (S+L+N) was the goddess of the moon while Luna (L+N) was the Roman moon goddess whose chariot made her way across the night sky with the ever changing phases of the moon. The consonant letters of "L" and "N" found in the name of Luna (L+N) are evident today in the offical name for Monday in at least 19 languages originating out of Asia and Europe, including 3 intenational auxiliary languages (e.g., Spanish (lunes); Romanian (luni); French (lundi); Galician (luns); Catalan (dilluns); Asturian (llunes); Friulian (lunis); Neapolitan (Lunnerì); Filipino (Lunes); Sardinian (lunis); Interlingua (Lunedi); Ido (Lundio); Esperanto (lundo); Irish (An Luan and Dé Luain): Scottish Gaelic (Di-Luain and Di-Luain/Diluain); Welsh (dydd Llun); Cornish (Dy' Lun); Breton (Dilun); and Manx (Jelune).



Full MoonMonday (Modern)
"Monday" is now the name for the 1st day of the Roman week except in the United States, Canada, Japan and Israel where it is the second day. In modern times, Monday is most associated with the figure of “Minos” (see photo) who was in essence resonsible for founding what eventually became the Greco-Roman Empire. Because Minos died prior to the discovery of Greenland, the Moon, formerly known as Luna, was named after him for he will always remain in the darkness of the underworld. Despite the title of "Moon", the terms "luna" and "lunar" are scientifically associated with all things related to the moon. The consonant letters of "M" and "N" found in both the names of Moon (M+N) and Minos (M+N+S) are evident today in the offical name for Monday (M+N+D) in at least 19 languages originating out of Africa, Europe and Oceana (e.g., Proto Germanic (Mēniniz dagaz); Old English (Mōnandæg); Old Saxon (Mânundag); Old High German (Mânetag); Middle Low German (Manedag); German (Montag); Dutch (maandag); Scots (Monanday); Afrikaans (Maandag); West Frisian (Moandei); Old Norse (mánadagr); Faroese (mánadagur); Icelandic (mánudagur); Norwegian/Bokmål (mandag); Norwegian/Nynorsk (måndag); Danish (mandag); Swedish (måndag); Finnish (maanantai); and Maori (mane).



Mars Marsday (Roman Tuesday)
"Tuesday" is the name for the 2nd day of the Roman week although it was most likely enitled "Mars" or "Mardsay" prior to the alleged fall of the Roman Empire. Mars was the the Roman god of war and therefore the consonant letters of "M" and "R" found in the name of Mars (M+R+S) are evident today in the official name for Tuesday in at least 24 languages originating out of Asia, Europe and the Middle East, including 3 international auxillery languages (e.g., Ancient Greek (hêméra Áreôs); Latin (dies Martis); Italian (martedì); Old Portuguese (martes); Spanish (martes); Romanian (marţi); French (mardi); Galician (martes); Catalan (dimarts); Asturian (martes); Friulian (martars); Neapolitan (Marterì); Filipino (Martes); Sardinian (martis); Interlingua (Martedi); Ido (Mardio); Esperanto (mardo); Irish (An Mháirt and Dé Máirt): Scottish (Di-Màirt and Dimàirt); Welsh (dydd Mawrth); Cornish (Dy' Meurth); Breton (Dimeurzh); Manx (Jemayrt); and Albanian (E martë).



Tuesday (Modern)
"Tuesday" is now the name for the 2nd day of the Roman week and is commonly represented by the letter "T" (i.e., the 20th letter in the English alphabet) and the number "two" which is by far the most favorite number of the Roman Empire. The term "Tuesday" was derived from Old English meaning "Tiwesdæg" and from Middle English meaning "Tewesday" or "Tīw's Day", the day of Tiw or Týr. In Viking mythology, Týr is the god of single combat, victory and heroic glory. Tiw was histroically equated with Mars in the interpretatio romana and Tiw is the translation of "dies Martis" in Latin. The Tiwaz rune symbol is named after Tyr and is coincidentally found in the sign for the planet Mars.The Latinised name for Týr is "Tius" or "Tio", while corresponding Germanic names are derived from Proto-Germanic (Tîwaz and *Tē₂waz) including Gothic (Teiws), Old English (Tīw), and Old High German (Ziu and Cyo). The consonant letters of "T" and "S" found in the name of Tuesday (T+S+D) are evident today in the official name for Tuesday in at least 13 languages originating out of Europe (e.g., Proto Germanic (Tīwas dagaz); Old English (Tīwesdæg); Old Saxon (Tiuwesdag); Scots (Tysday); West Frisian (Tiisdei); Old Norse (tysdagr); Faroese (týsdagur); Norwegian/Bokmål (tirsdag); Norwegian/Nynorsk (tysdag); Danish (tirsdag); Swedish (tisdag); Finnish (tiistai); and Estonian (teisipäev). The official name for Tuesday in the New Zealander language Maori is "tūrei". 



MercuryMercurday (Roman Wednesday)
"Wednesday" is the name for the 3rd day of the Roman week although it was most likely entitled "Mercurday" or "Mercuryday" prior to the alleged fall of the Roman Empire. Mercury was the Roman god of money and therefore the consonant letters of "M", "R" and "C/K" found in the name of Mercury (M+R+C/K) are evident today in the official name for Wednesday in at least 20 languages originating out of Europe (e.g., Latin (dies Mercuriī); Italian (mercoledì); Old Portuguese (mércores); Spanish (miércoles); Romanian (miercuri); French (mercredi); Galician (mércores); Catalan (dimecres); Asturian (miércoles); Friulian (miercus); Neapolitan (Miercurì); Filipino (Miyerkules); Sardinian (mercuris); Interlingua (Mercuridi); Ido (Merkurdio); Esperanto (merkredo); Welsh (dydd Mercher); Cornish (Dy' Mergher); Breton (Dimerc’her); and Albanian (E mërkurë).



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valknut Wednesday (Modern)
"Wednesday" is now the name for the 3rd day of the Roman week which means “Wōden’s” day. Wōden is an alleged Germanic god who is coincidentally “in all likelihood identical” to the Roman god identified as “Mercury”. According to modern historical accounts, "Wednesday" is Old English for "Wōdnesdæg", meaning the day of Wodan which was based on Latin "dies Mercurii", meaning "Day of Mercury."  The symbol of Woden/Odin is the Valknut which depictes 3 interwoven triangles, reprentative of the 3 dens or homes of Rome. The consonant letters of "W", "D" and "N" found in the name of Wōden (W+D+N) are evident today in the official name for Wednesday in at least 7 languages originating out of Europe (e.g., Proto Germanic (Wōdanas dagaz); Old English (Wōdnesdæg); Old Saxon (Wôdanesdag); Old High German (Wôdanstag or Wuotanstag); Middle Low German (Wodenesdag); German (older Wutenstag); and Scottish (Wadensday).



Joveday
(Roman Thursday)
"
Thursday" is the name for the 4th day of the Roman week
although it was likely enitled "Jove", "Joveday", "Jupiter" or "Jupiterday" prior to the alleged fall of the Roman Empire. In Roman mythology, the god of Jupiter or Jove was the king of the Roman gods and widely regarded as the equivalent of the Zeus. The symbol for the planet Jupiter is the number "4" which is symbolic for the 4th day of the Roman week. The consonant letters of "G/J" and "V" found in the name of Jove (G/J+V) are evident today in the official name for Thursday in at least 6 languages originating out of Europe, including 1 auxillerary language (e.g., Latin (dies Jovis); Italian (giovedì); Old Portuguese (joves); Spanish (jueves); Neapolitan (Gioverì); Interlingua (Jovedi); and Ido (Jovdio). Coincidentally, Jehovah (G/J+V) is the proper name of the God of Israel in the Hebrew Bible, which has also been transcribed as "Yehowah" or "Yahweh.
Post-Roman Days of the Week:

1. Moonday (Monday)
2.
Tīwsday
(Tuesday)
3.
Wōdensday
(Wednesday)
4. Thorsday (Thursday)
5.
Freyjasday (Friday)
6. Saturday (Saturday)
7. Sunday (Sunday)




http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thor#Swastikas Thursday (Modern)
"Thursday" is now the name for the 4th day of the Roman week and is named after Thor who is depicted in Norse mythology as the Viking god of thunder and lightning. The swastika symbol has long been identified with the hammer or lightning of Thor. According to Germanic paganism and Celtic paganism scholar Hilda Ellis Davidson, "The protective sign of [Thor's] hammer...seems to have been used by the warrior...in the form of the swastika". The consonant letters of "T" and "R" found in the name of Thor (T+R) are evident today in the official name for Thor in at least 5 languages originating out of Europe, all of which are close in proximity to Greenland (e.g., Norwegian/Bokmål (torsdag); Norwegian/Nynorsk (torsdag); Danish (torsdag); Swedish (torsdag); and Finnish (torstai).


VenusVenuday (Roman Friday)
"Friday" is the name for the 5th day of the Roman week although it was likely entitled "Venuday" or "Venusday" prior to the alleged fall of the Roman Empire. The consonant letters of "V" and "N" found in the name of Venus (V+N+S) are evident today in the official name for Friday in at least 13 languages originating out of Europe, including 1 auxillery language (e.g., Latin (dies Veneris); Italian (venerdì); Romanian (vineri); French (vendredi); Galician (venres); Asturian (vienres); Friulian (vinars); Interlingua (Venerdi); Ido (Venerdio); Esperanto (vendredo); Old Portuguese (vernes); Spanish (viernes); Catalan (divendres); and Neapolitan (Viernarì).



  Friday (Modern)
"Friday" is now the name for the 5th day of the Roman week meaning Freyja’s day. "Freyja", "Freya", or "Freja" is known as the Viking goddesses of fertility. The letter “F” (Fi) represents 3.14, the geometric number of creation while the letters "R" stands for Rome. The consonant letters of "F" and "R" found in the name of Friday (F+R) are evident today in the official name for Friday in at least 13 languages originating out of  Europe (e.g., Proto Germanic (Frijjōz dagaz); Old English (Frīgedæg); Old Saxon (Frîjadag); Old High German (Frîjatag); German (Freitag); Scots (Friday); West Frisian (Freed); Old Norse (frjádagr); Faroese (fríggjadagur); Norwegian/Bokmål (fredag); Norwegian/Nynorsk (fredag); Danish (fredag); and Swedish (fredag). In Roman English, the letter “F” is often replaced with the letter “P” and vice versa, although the pronunciation tends to stay the same. Therefore, the consonant letters of "F/P" and "R" found in the name of Friday (F/P+R) are evident today in the official name for Friday in at least 2 lanuages originating out of Europe and Oceana (e.g., Finnish (perjantai) and Maori (prairie).



SaturnSaturday (Roman & Modern)
"Satuday" is name for the 6th day of the Roman week and is the only day whose name has remained the same since the alleged fall of Roman Empire. Due to the fact that Saturn was the first god of the Rome's capitol Babylon (Rome, Italy), the name of Saturday was too important alter or change. Therefore, the consonant letters of "S", "T" and "R" found in the name of Saturn (S+T+R+N) are evident today in the official name for Saturday in at least 10 languages originating out of Africa and Europe, imncluding 1 auxillerary language (e.g., Latin (dies Saturnī); Ido (Saturdio); Irish (An Satharn and Dé Sathairn); Scottish Gaelic (Di-Sàthairne/Disathairne); Proto Germanic (Saturnus dagaz); Old English (Sæternesdæg); Old Saxon (Satarnesdag); Middle Low German (Satersdag); Scots (Seturday); Afrikaans (Saterdag); and West Frisian (Saterdei). In Roman English, the letter “Z” is often replaced with the letter “S” and vice versa, although the pronunciation tends to stay the same. This is also the case of Saturday in Dutch which is zaterdag (Z+T+R).


The Sabbath

Since Sunday is the first day of the Roman week in the United States, Canada, Japan and Israel, the Sabbath or the 7th day falls onto Saturday.
Since Saturn was the first and most important god of the Romans, the 7th day was considered "holy" and was heavily celebrated. After the alleged fall of the Roman Empire, Saturday became known as the Sabbath and became a mandatory day of rest made holy by "G.O.D." (Greenland of Denmark) as written in Genesis 2:2–3. The consonant letters of "S" and "B" found in name of Sabbath (S+B+B+T+H) are evident today in the offical name of Saturday in at least 11 languages originating out of Asia and Europe, including 1 international auxillery language (e.g., Asturian (sábadu); Esperanto (sabato); Filipino (Sábado); Friulian (sabide); Galician (sábado); Interlingua (Sabbato); Italian (sabato); Neopolitan (Sàbbatu); Old Portugese (sábado); Portugese (sábado); and Spanish (sábado). In Hebrew and Yiddish, the Shabbat or the Shabbos is the Jewish day of rest and seventh day of the Roman week. Since the Jewish people and most oother religions worship their "Lord" Rome on Saturday, the name Lord (L+R+D) is found in at least 4 languages originating out of Europe (e.g., Norwegian/Bokmål (lørdag); Norwegian/Nynorsk (laurdag); Danish (lørdag); and Swedish (lördag).

https://sites.google.com/site/greenlandtheory/architecture/domes

https://sites.google.com/site/greenlandtheory/architecture/domes  Domesday/Solday (Roman Sunday)
"Sunday" is name for the 7th day of the Roman week although it was likely entitled "Solday" and "Domesday" prior to the alleged fall of the Roman Empire. Sol was the solar god of Rome and therefore the consonant letters of "S" and "L" found in the name of "Sol" (S+L) are evident today in the official name for Sunday in at least 4 languages originating out of Europe (e.g., Latin (dies Sōlis); Welsh (dydd Sul); Cornish (Dy' Sul); and Breton (Disul). However, after the discovery of Greenland which is located in the dome of the Earth, the name of "Solday" was subsequently changed to "Domesday", otherwise known as "Doomsday". The consonant letters of "D" and "M" found in the name of Dome (D+M) are evident today in the official name for Sunday in at least 19 languages originating out of Africa, Europe, and the Middle East (e.g., Ecclesiastical Latin (Dominica); Italian (domenica); Old Portuguese (domingo); Portuguese (domingo); Spanish (domingo); Romanian (duminică); French (dimanche); Galician (domingo);  Catalan (diumenge); Asturian (domingu); Friulian (domenie); Neapolitan (Dummeneca); Filipino (Dominggo); Sardinian (dominiga); Interlingua (Dominica); Esperanto (dimanĉo); Irish (An Domhnach and Dé Domhnaigh); and Scottish Gaelic (Di-Dòmhnaich/Didòmhnaich). In Roman English, the letter “Z” is often replaced with the letter “S” and vice versa, although the pronunciation tends to stay the same. This is also the case of Sunday in Dutch which is zondag (Z+N).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunday

Sol
Sunday
(Modern)

"Sunday" is now the name for the seventh day of the Roman week which is named after Sol, the solar god of Rome. The consonant letters of "S" and "N" found in the name of Sunday (S+N) are evident today in the official name for Wednesday in at least 17 languages originating out of Africa, Europe, and the Middle East (e.g., Proto Germanic (Sunnōniz dagaz); Old English (Sunnandæg); Old Saxon (Sunnundag); Old High German (Sunnûntag); Middle Low German (Sunnedag); German (Sonntag); Scots (Sunday); Afrikaans (Sondag); West Frisian (Snein); Old Norse (sunnudagr); Faroese (sunnudagur); Icelandic (sunnudagur); Norwegian/Bokmål (søndag); Norwegian/Nynorsk (sundag); Danish (søndag); Swedish (söndag); and Finnish (sunnuntai).