PhD Studies & Graduates



The ThM and PhD at
Fuller Theological Seminary


Fuller Seminary's ThM and PhD programs in theology are housed in the Center for Advanced Theological Studies (CATS). Students choose among the following concentrations: New Testament, Old Testament, and Theological Studies (integrative work in Christian Ethics, Liturgical Theology, Practical Theology, Public Theology, Theology, and Theology & Culture).

The PhD program in CATS comprises seminars in Stage One (usually about two years), research language and comprehensive exams, and research for and writing the dissertation in Stage Two.

Joel Green supervises students working in New Testament studies (especially Luke-Acts and theological interpretation of Scripture) and in Theology (especially theological interpretation of Scripture).




Graduates Supervised

Practical Theology

  • Joy J. Moore, “Narrating a Canonical Witness: A Homiletic for the Twenty-First Century” (London School of Theology / University of Brunel, 2007).
    • Currently vice president for academic affairs, academic dean, and professor of biblical preaching, Luther Seminary, St. Paul, Minnesota.


Theological Studies

  • Christopher D. O'Brien, “Reading Scripture with Wesley’s Analogy of Faith: A Proposal for a Wesleyan Theological Hermeneutic of Scripture” (Fuller Theological Seminary, 2020).

  • Currently Director of Field Education and Adjunct Professor, Roberts Wesleyan College, Rochester, New York; Adjunct Instructor of Theological Studies, Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, California
    • Currently lecturer in biblical and theological studies/systematic theology, Ethiopian Graduate School of Theology, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
  • Seth Heringer, “Worlds Colliding: A Theological Critique of the Historical Method” (Fuller Theological Seminary, 2016).
    • Currently assistant professor of theology and Scripture, Toccoa Falls College, Toccoa Falls, Georgia.
  • Thomas Andrew Bennett, The Cross as the Labor of God: A Theology of the Atonement (Fuller Theological Seminary, 2015).
    • Currently pastor, Coast Bible Church, San Juan Capistrano, California; affiliate assistant professor of theology, Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, California.
  • Steven Joe Koskie Jr., “Reading the Way to Heaven: A Wesleyan Theological Hermeneutic of Scripture” (London School of Theology / University of Brunel, 2010).
    • Awarded the Wesley Theological Society Dissertation of the Year (2013).
    • Currently lecturer in Philosophy, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, Louisiana.
Graduates Supervised

New Testament Studies
  • Renee Dutter Miller, “Acts and the Psalter: Tracing the Psalmic Threads through the Narrative of Acts” (Fuller Theological Seminary, 2019).
    • Currently visiting assistant professor of religious studies, Westmont College, Santa Barbara, California; director of Greek studies and affiliate assistant professor of New Testament, Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, California.
  • Timothy W. Reardon, “The Politics of Salvation: Lukan Soteriology, Atonement, and the Victory of Christ” (Fuller Theological Seminary, 2019; passed with distinction).
    • Currently Minister of Preaching and Leadership, Pasadena Mennonite Church, Pasadena, California; adjunct instructor in New Testament, Azusa Pacific University, Azusa, California; affiliate assistant professor of New Testament, Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, California.
  • Richard Hicks, “‘Emotion’ Made Right: The Markan Jesus’s (Un)emotional Characterization as Exemplar of Moral Progress in Hellenistic Thought” (Fuller Theological Seminary, 2019).
    • Forthcoming in the Beihefte zur Zeitschrift für die neutestamentliche Wissenschaft series (Berlin: de Gruyter).
    • Currently adjunct instructor in New Testament, Vanguard University, Costa Mesa, California.
  • James Pendleton, God's Kenotic Economy of Space in the Gospel of Mark (Fuller Theological Seminary, 2018).
    • Currently adjunct instructor in New Testament, Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, California; adjunct instructor in New Testament, Asuza Pacific University, Asuza, California.
  • Craig Saunders, “A Mediator in Matthew: An Analysis of the Son of Mans Function in the First Gospel” (London School of Theology / Middlesex University, 2017).
  • Forthcoming as A Mediator in Matthew: An Analysis of the Son of Mans Function in the First Gospel (Eugene, OR: Wipf and Stock).
  • Currently adjunct faculty in New Testament, Asbury University, Wilmore, Kentucky.
  • W. Gil Shin, The  ‘Exodus’ in Jerusalem (Luke 9:31): A Lukan Form of Israel’s Restoration Hope (Fuller Theological Seminary, 2016).
    • Selection published as “Integrated Stories and Israel’s Contested Worship Space: Exod 15.17 and Stephen’s Retelling of Heilsgeschichte (Acts 7),” New Testament Studies 64, no. 4 (2018): 495–513.
    • Currently program director, Korean Doctor of Ministry Program, and affiliate assistant professor of New Testament, Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, California.
  • Hannah Kirsch, “The Parable of the Sower as a Mise en abyme of Luke-Acts” (London School of Theology / University of Brunel, 2016).
  • James Tedford, “The Agony of Indeterminacy: Sotah Tradition and the Surplus Meaning of the ‘Cup’ Metaphor in Matthew’s Gethsemane Narrative” (Fuller Theological Seminary, 2013; passed with distinction).

    • Currently Instructional Design Supervisor, Digital Learning Department, Biola University; affiliate assistant professor of New Testament, Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, California.
  • Nina Heinrichs-Tarasenkova, “Luke’s Christology of Divine Identity” (London School of Theology / University of Brunel, 2013).

    • Currently instructor, Department of Theology, University of Portland, Portland, Oregon.
  • Samson L. Uytanlet, “Jewish Historiography and Luke-Acts” (London School of Theology / University of Brunel, 2013).

  • Jennifer Garcia Bashaw, “Martyrdom and Sacred Violence: Dying for God in Matthew and Ignatius” (Fuller Theological Seminary, 2012).

    • Currently assistant professor of ministry and New Testament, Campbell University, Buies Creek, North Carolina.

  • Joshua Marshall Strahan, “The Limits of a Text’s Meaning from an Ecclesially Located Perspective: A Study of Luke 23:34a” (Fuller Theological Seminary, 2011).

  • Külli Tôniste, “The Ending of the Canon: A Canonical and Intertextual Reading of Revelation 21-22” (London School of Theology / University of Brunel, 2010).

  • Abson Prédestin Joseph, “A Narratological Reading of 1 Peter: The Significance of the Epistle’s Christological Understanding of God’s Actions on Behalf of Israel for Its Suffering Audience” (London School of Theology / University of Brunel, 2009).

    • Published as A Narratological Reading of 1 Peter, Library of New Testament Studies 440 (London: Bloomsbury T&T Clark, 2012).

    • Currently dean and professor of New Testament, Wesley Seminary, Indiana Wesleyan University, Marion, Indiana.

  • Bruce Hansen, “‘All of You are One’: The Social Vision of Gal 3:28; 1 Cor 12:13; Col 3:11” (University of St. Andrews, 2007).

  • C. Jason Borders, “Place as Mission: Temple Ideology and Function in the Intertextual Relationship of Isaiah to the Temple Scroll and Acts” (London School of Theology / University of Brunel, 2004).

    • Currently chair of the department of religion and professor of religion, Huntingdon College, Montgomery, Alabama.

  • Tomohiro Omiya, “The Mission to the Marginal: The Gospel to the πτωχοί in the Acts of the Apostles” (London School of Theology / University of Brunel, 2003).

    • Abridged thesis published in Shingaku-Kenkyu 53 (2006).

    • Currently associate professor and chaplain, Nagoya Gakuin University, Nagoya, Japan.

  • Kenneth Duncan Litwak, “Echoes of Scripture in Luke-Acts: Telling the History of God’s People Intertextually” (Trinity College, University of Bristol, 2003; co-supervisor).

  • Kevin Anderson, “‘But God Raised Him from the Dead’: The Resurrection of Jesus in Lukan Historiography” (London School of Theology / University of Brunel, 2001).

  • Michael C. McKeever, “Sacred Space and Discursive Field: The Narrative Function of the Temple in Luke-Acts” (Graduate Theological Union, 1999).

    • Currently professor of biblical and theological studies, Fresno Pacific University, Fresno, California.

  • William Griffin, “Seeing and Perceiving: The Narrative Rhetoric of a Theme in Mark 15:20b-41” (Graduate Theological Union, 1996).

    • Currently associate professor of ministry and Bible, Simpson University, Redding, California.

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