Graham Math Olympiad 2018-19


August 31, 2018:
  • First session! Looking forward to seeing everyone. Please see the General Information section for more information and to register.
  • Homework #1 is due by 10 p.m. on Thursday, September 6, 2018 (file attached)
  • Homework #1 answer form
  • For those students who could not attend today, a copy of the presentation is attached
  • Next session, we are requesting a $20 donation (cash) to cover contest entry fees and class materials. Thank you for your support.
September 7, 2018:
  • Great to see the continuing level of interest!
  • Please register using the link in the General Information section if you haven't done so already.
  • Homework #2 is due by 10 p.m. on Thursday, September 13, 2018 (file attached)
  • Homework #2 answer form
  • If you didn't do, or you didn't submit online, Homework #1, then in addition to Homework #2, please complete and submit Homework #1 by the same deadline. Remember that homework is mandatory - students who do not submit homework should expect to be dropped from the team.
  • We will continue to accept a $20 donation (cash) per student to cover costs. Thank you.
  • Please see the official Math Olympiad contest dates posted in the General Information section and try your very best to attend all contest sessions. The first official Math Olympiad contest will be on Friday, November 14, 2018.
September 14, 2018:
  • Homework #3 is due by 10 p.m. on Thursday, September 20, 2018 (email julian_ong@yahoo.com if you did not get a copy in class)
  • Homework #3 answer form
  • If you haven't completed and submitted Homework #2, then please do so by the same deadline in addition to Homework #3.
  • For those of you interested in the national and international math olympiad process and what it takes to succeed at higher levels, attached as "Tan answer" is an answer to a question on Quora from Ethan Tan, a gold medalist at the 2018 International Math Olympiad, which I thought was very good. His basic message is that to get good at solving problems, believe you can solve the problem, try really, really hard to do so yourself before looking at the solution or getting help, and of course practice solving lots and lots of problems.
  • Next week we will do a team attack so don't miss it!
  • Thanks to Valerie for this explanation of the divisibility rule by 7:
    • Any number can be represented as 10n + m, where m is the ones digit
    • If n=0, the rule clearly works for m = 0..9
    • Adding 7 to a number is the same as increasing n by 1 and decreasing m by 3
    • So 10n + m + 7 = 10(n+1) + m-3
    • Now we check | (n+1) - 2(m-3) | = | n - 2m + 7|
    • But if | n - 2m | is divisible by 7, then | n - 2m + 7| is divisible by 7. So the rule always works.



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Julian Ong,
Sep 7, 2018, 5:05 PM
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Julian Ong,
Sep 7, 2018, 5:04 PM
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Julian Ong,
Aug 31, 2018, 7:54 PM
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Julian Ong,
Sep 7, 2018, 5:02 PM
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Julian Ong,
Sep 7, 2018, 5:52 PM
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Julian Ong,
Aug 31, 2018, 11:07 PM
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Julian Ong,
Sep 7, 2018, 5:03 PM
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Julian Ong,
Sep 14, 2018, 7:14 PM
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Julian Ong,
Sep 14, 2018, 6:01 PM
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