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New Perspectives on Prison Masculinities

posted 17 Nov 2017, 07:39 by Julie W

Forthcoming with Palgrave Macmillan is the edited collection "New Perspectives on Prison Masculinities" (2018), edited by GPRN-member Matthew Maycock and Kate Hunt. The collection utilises recent advances in theories on masculinities to explore and analyse the ways in which prisons shape performances of gender, both within prison settings and following release from prison. The authors assess here how the highly gendered world of the prison (where the population is overwhelmingly male in most countries) impacts upon the performance of masculinities. Including original pieces from England, Australia, Scotland and the USA, as well as contributions which take a broader methodological and conceptual approach to masculinity, this engaging and original collection holds international appeal and relevance. Cumulatively, the chapters illustrate the importance of considering a nuanced understanding of masculinity within prison research, and as such, will be of particular interest for scholars of penology, gender studies, and the criminal justice system.
The book will be out in both e-book and hardcover, and can be purchased online here: https://www.palgrave.com/de/book/9783319656533

Program: Connecting Urban and Prison Ethnographies

posted 25 Oct 2017, 01:15 by Julie W   [ updated 30 Oct 2017, 10:57 ]

Connecting Urban and Prison Ethnographies:
Security and Confinement beyond the Limitations of Site
             

GPRN-Securcit Roundtable Meeting | 2-3 November @ University of Amsterdam

Time schedule:

Day 1: Thursday 2 November

Day 2: Friday 3 November

 

10.00-10.15 Registration and coffee

10.15-10.30 Introduction

 

10.30-12.30 Table 1: Rethinking the ‘carceral continuum’

10.00-12.00 Table 4: Rethinking prison-urban binaries, freedom and confinement

12.30-13.30 Lunch

12.00-13.00 Lunch

13.30-15.15 Table 2: Technology, securitization, and sites of ‘exception’

13.15-15.15 Table 5: Rethinking prisoner organization and governance

15.15-15.30 Coffee

15.15-15.30 Coffee

15.30-17.00 Table 3: Policy, transition and intransigence

15.30-16.30 Table 6: Final discussion

 


 

19.00 Conference dinner

 

17.30 Drinks at CREA


Please find the full program with all panelists and presentations as well as conference room details in the attachment.
This conference is organized by the Global Prisons Research Network in collaboration with the Securcit research group, and supported by the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences (KNAW), University of Amsterdam, and Danish Institute Against Torture DIGNITY.
Would you like to register as an auditor? Please e-mail us at globalprisonsnetwork@gmail.com by Tuesday 31 October.

CfP extended to 1 August for GPRN Urban & Prison Ethnographies Roundtable in Amsterdam

posted 15 Jul 2017, 03:09 by Julie W

Connecting Urban and Prison Ethnographies:

Security and Confinement beyond the Limitations of Site

 

Global Prisons Research Network & SECURCIT Roundtable Meeting

University of Amsterdam

2 - 3 November 2017

 

This two-day roundtable meeting intends to bring together urban and prison ethnographers to consider cross-cutting themes and issues at stake in both lines of research. Security and confinement seem to be inseparably tied up with one another through poverty and exclusion, its policing, ideas about justice and morality, and different forms of urban/prison governance. It has been argued that the urban margins and spaces of confinement have conflated to such an extent that we can speak of a carceral continuum (Wacquant). Research on the crossroads of these two spaces is increasing, as policies and techniques of confinement and surveillance, but also practices of subversion and informal organization reach out of prison into the urban, and from the urban well into prison (e.g. Fassin, Goffman, Moran, Skarbek). The ever-growing push for securitization arguably conditions the lives of those ‘trapped’ at the urban margins, subjected to profiling, and/or processed disproportionally through the criminal justice system. Much work on urban violence has emphasized these politics of surveillance and exclusion (e.g. Auyero, Bourgois, Goldstein, Rodgers). Relatedly, many prison ethnographies have underlined how prison deprives and dehumanizes inmates, thwarting and complicating the questions and processes of reentry, rehabilitation or reinsertion (e.g. Liebling, Maruna). Prison ethnographers have argued that analytical attention to the interfaces between governance, transition and survival may enable us to discern the unfolding history of the prison’s carceral grip as it concurrently mutates and persists in local contexts.

Though it is important to distinguish the particularities of the prison and the urban, in order to be able to understand what particular configurations of security and confinement mean in the daily lives of our research participants, and what limits we face as researchers in either space, we propose here an analytical transgression of these socio-spatial boundaries. More often than not an established and dominant narrative around crime and recidivism either pathologizes individuals or proposes lists of ‘criminogenic factors’, which are frequently institutionalized in the policy debate and prompt dubious ‘interventions’. Pushing back against this narrative – suggesting, for example, that policy is ambiguous and that violence can be productive – and moving beyond the limitations of site, we propose a comparative ethnographic discussion that includes different sites of securitization and confinement. We welcome papers and presentations that may consider any of the following themes:

 

  • Radicalization (or mobilization), targeted securitization and deportation;

  • New measures and technologies of incarceration and confinement;

  • Prison-urban binaries: public/private, visible/invisible, social death/navigation, fixity/fluidity;

  • Gangs, prison movements, informal organization and ‘criminal governance’;

  • Politics and sites of ‘exception’;

  • Policing, marginality and exclusion;

  • Policy, transition and intransigence.

     

    We encourage contributions from research conducted across the globe. The roundtable meeting will consist of five to seven roundtable panels and serve as the start of a publication project.

     

    Please submit your 250-word abstract and a short biography to us by 1 AUGUST 2017 (globalprisonsnetwork@gmail.com). You will be expected to provide a paper before the meeting.  

Prison States and Political Embodiment - Call for Papers

posted 31 May 2017, 01:52 by Julie W

September 7-8, 2017 [see conference website]

Centre for Comparative Studies, Faculty of Arts, University of Lisbon

Prisons are commonly considered institutions of secondary importance, as something that stays on the fringes of society rather than being an integral part of it. If prisons offer «a grotesque mirror of society» (Bernault 2003), the image they reflect is one that many people do not wish to look at. Carceral architecture contributes to this perception since, despite some exceptions, prisons are usually built far from the populace. As a matter of fact, not only does imprisonment extirpate detainees from the body of society, but it also conceals them from its view, so that citizens can live virtually ignoring them and the institution that keeps them in custody.

Yet, in spite of the apparent invisibility of the prison in the public sphere, its spectre haunts the collective imaginary and it does materialise frequently in visual and literary contemporary culture. What is more – and certainly more important –, numbers on imprisonment worldwide show a shocking reality of mass incarceration, further worsened by the fact that rates keep on growing appallingly fast. In the United States, for example, the rate of incarceration more than quadrupled since 1970, while in Brazil there was an increase of 1306% between 1969 and 2006 and the trend upward has not been reverted in the past ten years.

Academia has shown an increasing interest on the subject in the last decades, especially since Michel Foucault launched his work on the birth of the prison in 1975. Discipline and Punish had the merit of fostering the study of prisons as modern institutions: since its publication, more and more scholars of different areas have engaged in historical, sociological, political and cultural analysis of prisons. Powerful critical accounts have additionally emerged from the work of canonical critical thinkers such as Deleuze (with his reflection on the society of control), Derrida (with his writings on the death penalty) or Loïc Wacquant, among others. Despite the different questions which these studies add to the overall discussion, they all counteract the popular perception that prisons are marginal or minor institutions. The prison is still a potent instrument for the maintenance of state power and social hegemony.

A critique and a reappraisal of the work of Foucault and his peers is vital for the further theoretical and political development of carceral studies. To generate a more complete and potent canon of critical literature, attentive to various intersecting political issues, it is necessary, for instance, to consider the history of practices of punishment in colonial territories and those practices’ relation   with the institution of slavery, and to acknowledge the importance of African American anti-racist intellectuals, such as Angela Davis, whose thought had a large influence on Foucault (Weheliye 2014). This will also imply renewing our awareness of how carceral institutions and practices have actively contributed to the oppression and exclusion of people not conforming to the social, economic and political norm, including the poor, non-white people, LGBTQ subjects and political dissidents of various kinds – to name but a few examples. In fact, the establishment of detention as the primary form of punishment has been essential to nurture the interests of dominant social groups and to determine their success. This has only been intensified by the economic interests that characterise contemporary carceral institutions, especially given the visible trend towards privatisation, which reinforces the social structure of mass incarceration with notable social and political consequences.

The primary aim of this seminar is to critically discuss the role(s) of prison and of prison-like institutions, such as asylums, reformatories, centres for the detention of immigrants and so on. We wish to focus on the bodily experiences of people caught up in the carceral system, drawing particular attention to dissident subjects who materially and discursively embody modes of resistance to it. In fact, although the purpose of the prison is to create disciplined, ‘docile and submissive bodies’ (Foucault 1975), inmates have always put into action multiform practices of resistance and dissidence. Art, music and literature originated in the prison, for example, have reached the outside public and spread throughout society, attesting to inmates’ capacity to resist and survive carceral logics. We thus hope to complement critical and theoretical depictions of the carceral space with a keen sense of the precarious and dissident voices which affectively, somatically and creatively articulate themselves from within it.


Key-note speakers:

Ruth Gilmore Wilson (The City University of New York)

Zakaria Rhani (Université Mohamed V of Rabat)


We welcome papers from various disciplines and topics including, but not limited to, the following:

• Theories of political embodiment: the politics of the incarcerated body.

• Logics of punishment: violence, incarceration and other forms of penalty.

• Aesthetics of the carceral: representations of the prison and the prison-like in contemporary visual and literary culture.

• Prison writings: writing of and beyond the self

• Embodiment and affectivity in the carceral space: experiences and narratives of resistance.

• Carceral culture and racism: race, biopolitics and incarceration.

• Same-gender dynamics: homosociality, homosexuality and homoeroticism in the carceral space.

• The gendered logics of incarceration: male contexts, female contexts, and the struggles of transgender subjects.

• Refugee and migrant detention camps in the European context: the politics of policing borders and bodies.

• The colonial history of practices of bodily monitoring and repression: experiences, trajectories, transports in and out of the metropolis

The Conference’s working language is English.

Please send the Organizing Committee 300-word abstracts for 20-minute presentations, as well as a brief biographical note (circa 200 words), to prisonstatecilm@gmail.com by July 1st 2017, Notification of acceptance will be given by July 24th 2017.

Price for participation: 35 Euros (includes coffee breaks, one lunch, handbook & conference kit as well as certificate of participation).

Upcoming GPRN-Securcit Roundtable Meeting in Amsterdam!

posted 12 May 2017, 05:45 by Julie W

Connecting Urban and Prison Ethnographies:

Security and Confinement beyond the Limitations of Site

 

Global Prisons Research Network & SECURCIT Roundtable Meeting

University of Amsterdam

2 - 3 November 2017

 

This two-day roundtable meeting intends to bring together urban and prison ethnographers to consider cross-cutting themes and issues at stake in both lines of research. Security and confinement seem to be inseparably tied up with one another through poverty and exclusion, its policing, ideas about justice and morality, and different forms of urban/prison governance. It has been argued that the urban margins and spaces of confinement have conflated to such an extent that we can speak of a carceral continuum (Wacquant). Research on the crossroads of these two spaces is increasing, as policies and techniques of confinement and surveillance, but also practices of subversion and informal organization reach out of prison into the urban, and from the urban well into prison (e.g. Fassin, Goffman, Moran, Skarbek). The ever-growing push for securitization arguably conditions the lives of those ‘trapped’ at the urban margins, subjected to profiling, and/or processed disproportionally through the criminal justice system. Much work on urban violence has emphasized these politics of surveillance and exclusion (e.g. Auyero, Bourgois, Goldstein, Rodgers). Relatedly, many prison ethnographies have underlined how prison deprives and dehumanizes inmates, thwarting and complicating the questions and processes of reentry, rehabilitation or reinsertion (e.g. Liebling, Maruna). Prison ethnographers have argued that analytical attention to the interfaces between governance, transition and survival may enable us to discern the unfolding history of the prison’s carceral grip as it concurrently mutates and persists in local contexts.

Though it is important to distinguish the particularities of the prison and the urban, in order to be able to understand what particular configurations of security and confinement mean in the daily lives of our research participants, and what limits we face as researchers in either space, we propose here an analytical transgression of these socio-spatial boundaries. More often than not an established and dominant narrative around crime and recidivism either pathologizes individuals or proposes lists of ‘criminogenic factors’, which are frequently institutionalized in the policy debate and prompt dubious ‘interventions’. Pushing back against this narrative – suggesting, for example, that policy is ambiguous and that violence can be productive – and moving beyond the limitations of site, we propose a comparative ethnographic discussion that includes different sites of securitization and confinement. We welcome papers and presentations that may consider any of the following themes:

 

  • Radicalization (or mobilization), targeted securitization and deportation;

  • New measures and technologies of incarceration and confinement;

  • Prison-urban binaries: public/private, visible/invisible, social death/navigation, fixity/fluidity;

  • Gangs, prison movements, informal organization and ‘criminal governance’;

  • Politics and sites of ‘exception’;

  • Policing, marginality and exclusion;

  • Policy, transition and intransigence.

     

    We encourage contributions from research conducted across the globe. The roundtable meeting will consist of five to seven roundtable panels and serve as the start of a publication project.

     

    Please submit your 250-word abstract and a short biography to us by 15 July 2017 (globalprisonsnetwork@gmail.com). You will be expected to provide a paper before the meeting.  

Carceral Geography Conference 2016 at the University of Birmingham : Confinement, Crossings and Conditions

posted 13 Sep 2016, 02:18 by Julie W

The School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Birmingham will host the first dedicated conference for Carceral Geography, on Tuesday 13th December 2016.

Call for Papers

Abstracts are invited for papers which address the themes of this conference: Confinement, Crossings and Conditions. These themes pertain to the nature and experience of carceral confinement, broadly interpreted; the notion of crossing of an assumed or contested boundary both between spaces of confinement and 'other' spaces,  and to the ways in which carceral experiences persist after periods of custody have ended - both for those confined, and for affected others. During ESRC research projects to which the conference is linked, (focused on the experience of carceral spaces) issues of absence, intimacy, choreography and the microscale emerged as significant, and prospective speakers are invited to engage with (but are by no means limited to) these notions. Papers which discuss methodological or theoretical approaches for carceral geography, and those exploring the 'place' of carceral geography in relation to human geography/criminology/carceral studies more generally are also welcome.

Abstracts from postgraduate and early career researchers are particularly welcome.

As well as providing a forum for dissemination and discussion of new and recent research in carceral geography, this event is intended provide a 'springboard' for the development of an organisational structure for this subdiscipline: there will be formal and informal opportunities to discuss and plan actions and activities around this topic.

A limited number of travel and accommodation bursaries will be available for paper presenters.

Please use this URL to:

  • Register to attend as a speaker, and submit your abstract
  • Register to attend as a non-presenting delegate

If you are submitting an abstract, please note that the closing date to do so is 8am (GMT) on Friday 7th October. Selection decisions will be communicated by Friday 14th October.

The Howard League for Penal Reform - Conference

posted 12 Apr 2016, 02:45 by Julie W

GPRN Member Sacha Darke organized a panel at the Howard League conference this year, with scholars contributing to the Prison Service Journal special issue about prisoner self-governance in Latin America.

Justice and Penal Reform: Re-shaping the penal landscape

International three-day conference

16–18 March 2016

Keble College, Oxford

This was a timely conference. Western societies are grappling with how to manage social institutions, not least those impacting on the penal system, in a time of austerity. The same jurisdictions are also experiencing the potentially conflicting phenomenon of crime drops while supporting policies of penal expansion.

This conference formed part of the symposium What is Justice? Re-imagining penal policy which is charged with generating intellectual debate that can act as a springboard to contest the conventional role of the penal system, ultimately promoting a new, achievable paradigm that will deliver a reduced role for the penal system while maintaining public confidence, fewer victims of crime and safer communities.

Part of the Howard League’s 150th anniversary celebrations.

Conference programme

Three days of plenary sessions with keynote speakers, ample opportunity for questions and debate, a range of parallel sessions covering leading academic research and practice, exhibition and networking opportunities. The sessions themes included among others: inspection as a catalyst for penal reform, public perceptions of penal reform, economics and impact on penal policy, human rights law and penal reform, terror and penal reform and beyond mass incarceration.

Conference programme

Speakers

Dr Tim Bateman, Office of the Children's Commissioner
Professor Mary Bosworth
, University of Oxford
Professor Neil Chakraborti, University of Leicester
Peter Clarke CVO OBE QPM, HM Chief Inspector of Prisons
Dr Todd Clear, Rutgers School of Criminal Justice, Newark NJ
Tom Gash, Senior Fellow, Institute for Government & Visiting Senior Fellow at the LSE
Michael Jacobson, CUNY Institute for State and Local Governance
Professor Alison Liebling, University of Cambridge
Phillippa Kaufmann QC, MatrixChambers
Professor Lisa L Miller, Department of Political Science, Rutgers University
Dame Anne Owers, Chair, IPCC
Yvonne Roberts, journalist and Chair of Women in Prison
Dame Glenys Stacey, HM Chief Inspector of Probation (taking up the post on 1 March)
David Strang QPM, HM Chief Inspector of Prisons for Scotland
Professor Dirk van Zyl Smit, University of Nottingham
Professor Dr Tom Vander Beken, Ghent University
Professor Richard Wilkinson, University of Nottingham
Sir Thomas Winsor, HM Chief Inspector of Constabulary
Professor Lucia Zedner, University of Oxford

See the full list of keynote speakers and expert contributors.

Criminologies of the Global South - Book project

posted 12 Apr 2016, 02:31 by Julie W

Extended deadline for chapter contributions here!

Call for Book Chapter Proposals

Almost 85% of the world’s population live in what might be termed the ‘global south’, comprising three continents . A large proportion of the world’s police and around half of the world’s 10.2 million prisoners are detained in the continents of the global south, across Asia, Africa, Oceania and South America (Walmsley, World Prison List (10th Edition). Yet mostly criminology has concentrated on problems of crime and justice in the Global North.  The division of the contemporary world into North and South loosely approximates  common ways of talking about global divisions. These familiar binaries all expressly privilege ideas of temporal succession: ‘developed’ and ‘developing’, ‘industrial’ and ‘industrializing’, ‘first’ and ‘second’ worlds and ‘the third world’.  In other words, the global North designates the normative benchmark to which the rest of the world will naturally aspire.

PortArthurPenitentiary

Port Arthur, Tasmania, Convict Prison

‘Southern’ may loosely reference a geographical region that reflects familiar global divides, but the seminal point is that there is no global North that is not also the product of centuries old interactions between regions and cultures spanning the globe. During the Age of Empires and the modern period, the global south has been a space of criminological and penal experimentation and transportation, which has produced failures and innovation. And yet, when it has not been plundered as a data-mine, the global south has remained largely invisible in criminological thinking.  This Handbook aims to rectafy this ommision by providing an expansive overview of criminologies of the global periphery and introduce readers to diverse contributions about the global south that challenge how we think and do criminology and justice. It argues that the primary challenge of contemporary criminology lies in redefining geographic and symbolic limits of the discipline to create globally connected systems of knowledge. Hence the idea of the South captures the fact that there are enclaves of the South within the North and unresolved North/South tensions within many societies (i.e. northern and southern Europe, Southern States of America). This is what we propose in speaking of something called ‘southern’ criminology. (See Carrington, Hogg and Sozzo, (2015) Southern CriminologyBritish Journal of Criminology).

Southern Criminology is both a metaphor for centre/periphery relations in crime and justice, in addition to being a reference to the global south – a largely overlooked field for knowledge production in criminology. The purpose of southern criminology is not to dismiss the conceptual and empirical advances that criminology has produced over the last century, but to more usefully de-colonise and democratise the toolbox of available criminological concepts, theories and methods.

Not all contributors are expected to be from the global south – as a critical part of southern criminology aims to transnationalise the discipline and to link northern and southern scholars in a collective project that will radically transform the discipline into the future. In this sense southern criminology is a step in the journey toward the development of a  trans-national criminology.

If you are interested in contributing to this exciting new development in criminology please send an abstract by 31 March 2016 to:

kerry.carrington@qut.edu.au

Name, Email  and Institutional Affiliation

Abstract (around 500 words)

In your abstract please state how your topic fits with, develops or compliments the project of southern criminology.

If your abstract is selected for inclusion in the handbook chapters of around 6-8000 words will be due early 2017.


Public Symposium - Carceral Worlds and Human Rights in the Americas

posted 25 Sep 2015, 18:41 by Julie W

Cornell University and the Stanford Human Rights Centre have co-organised a public symposium on Carceral Worlds and Human Rights in the Americas. The event takes place on Monday 5 October between 10.00-12.00 at the Africana Studies and Research Centre (310 Triphammer Road, Multipurpose Room). Speakers are: Jon Horne Carter (Appalachian University), James Cavallaro (Stanford Human Rights Centre and Inter-American Commission on Human Rights), Sacha Darke (Westminster University), Sofía Galván (Inter-American Commission on Human Rights), Janaina Homerin (Criminal Justice Network in Brazil), Fiona Macaulay (Bradford University), Mirte Postema (Stanford Human Rights Centre). The symposium is moderated by Chris Garces (Cornell University). 
Please see attached the symposium poster. 

New Book! The Palgrave Handbook of Prison Ethnography (eds Drake, Earle and Sloan)

posted 2 Jul 2015, 05:21 by Andrew Jefferson

Really proud to see this book out, not least because of the contribution made by GPRN members to the volume's international flavour. This was the kind of publication we hoped might be a concrete product of our networking activities. A must for all libraries!

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