Security Ignition Bypass Component Module for GM/Saturn Automobiles

 What some people had to say:

This week my 2002 Chev Malibu would not start - theft signal was flashing. I did the waiting for 10 minutes at the advice of my tow truck driver and it started right up. This same problem happened to me last year and I was told by a dealership it's the Passlock sensor. I had it replaced last year at a cost of $869 CDN because I didn't know about the 10 minute trick, although this isn't a fix according to GM, but the "trick" is in the owner's manual. Had this problem happened to me next week it would have cost me AGAIN because the warranty on the part and labour would have run out (after 1 year). I called GM this week and they don't care and will not attempt to help me. Just got the part replaced AGAIN this morning - at least it was under warranty. So I have to hope when it goes again it's within a year so I won't have to pay AGAIN. This is a common problem with GM vehicles and there should be a recall. I'm thinking of going to another automaker. I've been a loyal GM customer for years. I would get rid of my car right now except that it's only got 45k kilometres and bought out the lease last year. It's practically new.  Is there a way to bypass the passlock sensor?  Roger

 I have a 2000 Saturn sl sedan that cranks and starts but immediately turns off. I replaced the battery and crankshaft position sensor. I think it has something to do with the padlock system because the security symbol keeps flashing when I turn the key in acc. Normally it flashes 5 times and stays solid. I tried turning the key in run position for 10 minutes and the symbol became solid but it still would immediately shut off. Can someone please help?  Sara

I recently learned a TON about how the passlock systems work. My 96 Grand Am spazed due to a broken wire, and ended with a screwed up passlock system.. I got it fixed, but in trying to not spend a bunch of money - I researched bypassing it.
Basically in GMs (including saturn) - Passlock talked to the BCM (body control module) which sends a password to the ECM (engine control module). Since the BCM/ECM is tied to the whole running of the car, there is no short way to circumvent this. I hope someone comes up with a way to bypass this soon.  Bill

 I know, I've been there! Actually it was the final straw that had me get rid of my ION. I liked my car it was just that this was a repetitive problem. The car would just stall out.  Wish I had known about a bypass.  Alice

 

IS THIS YOU,
   WELL IT WAS MY DAUGHTER AND I, STRANDED IN THE GROCERY STORE PARKING LOT IN OUR 2001 SATURN SL1 AND IT JUST HAPPENED OUT OF NOWHERE.  THE CAR STARTED AND RAN FINE TO THE STORE.  THEN THE CAR WOULD ACT LIKE IT WAS GOING TO START AND THEN WOULD JUST DIE NO MATTER HOW MANY TIMES I CRANKED IT AND THE SECURITY LIGHT WAS FLASHING.  I CALLED MY HUSBAND TO COME GET US AND WE DID SOME RESEARCH ON LINE AND REALIZED WE WERE NOT ALONE.  THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE  ARE ONLINE TRYING TO GET HELP ON THIS ISSUE AND NO RECALL FROM GM.  WELL MY HUSBAND SHAWN IS AN ELECTRICAL ENGINEER AND HE WENT TO WORK ON OUR CAR AND DESIGNED A COMPONENT TO BYPASS THE SECURITY IGNITION SYSTEM AND IT WORKED GREAT.  NOW WE WANT TO HELP OTHERS OUT THERE WHO IS LOOKING TO BYPASS THEIRS.  WE OFFER A 100% MONEY BACK GUARANTEE AND A SIX MONTH WARRANTY ON OUR COMPONENT MODULE.  WE ARE ABSOULUTELY SURE IT WILL WORK BECAUSE WE ARE USING IT ON OUR CAR, AND IT IS STILL RUNNING GREAT.  IT ALSO SAVED US $1200.00 DOLLARS IN REPAIR AND TOW COSTS. YES THATS WHAT OUR GM DEALER SAID THE REPAIR WOULD COST.  WE CAN HELP YOU FOR SO MUCH LESS. FOR $29.95 PLUS SHIPPING AND HANDLING YOU CAN HAVE YOUR VEHICLE RUNNING AGAIN.  OUR SECURITY IGNITION BYPASS COMPONENT MODULE WILL ALSO WORK WITH REMOTE START INSTALLATIONS.  MY HUSBAND HAS HELPED  LOCAL INSTALLERS OUT AND THEY USE OUR COMPONENT ON ALL THEIR INSTALLS.  IT REALLY WORKS GREAT AND IS PRICED SO THAT THE AVERAGE FAMILY LIKE US CAN AFFORD IT.  I KNOW, WE UNDERSTAND HOW HARD IT IS WHEN AN UNEXPECTED EXPENSE HITS LIKE A CAR BREAKDOWN BECAUSE IT HAPPENED TO US.  THIS COMPONENT IS EASY TO INSTALL AND COMES WITH STEP BY STEP INSTUCTIONS AND CAN BE INSTALLED IN YOUR STEERING COLUMN BY YOUR IGNITION SWITCH OR UNDER YOUR DASH RIGHT ABOVE YOUR RIGHT KNEE OR CAN BE INSTALLED AT THE (BCM) ITSELF LOCATED BEHIND THE GLOVE BOX OR BY THE PASSENGERS LEG PANEL IN MOST MODELS. In the first picture the install location is where the black tape is located on the yellow and black wire below the factory ignition connector which is the easiest and quickest way to install 1 hour tops. The other picture is with our prototype security ignition bypass component installed, tested and operational on our Saturn SL1.
 
 HERE ARE SOME THINGS YOU CAN TRY THAT MAY HELP:

Passlock
  • system fault code B2960
  • Security light flashing
  • Engine starts and dies

If you find yourself stranded, your engine won't start, and the security light is flashing, wait ten minutes. The flashing light should go off or illuminate without flashing. When it does, turn the ignition off, wait twenty seconds, and then try to start the engine. If it starts and runs, you should be able to make it home. Please remember that this is only a temporary fix; the fault will happen again.  Our bypass component module will fix this problem permanantly.

VATS

  • (Vehicle Anti-Theft System) VATS
  • Security light on steady
  • Engine won't crank—all other systems functioning normally

If you find yourself stranded and the engine won't crank over, turn the ignition off and wait four minutes. Then, try again. If the engine starts, you should be able to make it home. Please remember that this is only a temporary fix; the fault will happen again. Our bypass component module will fix this problem permanantly.

History

  • The Passlock I system was introduced in mid 1990s
  • Passlock II and Passlock III (PK3) systems were introduced shortly after
  • VATS system were introduced in mid 1980s

Anti-Theft Systems

Depending on the make and model, there are various factory and aftermarket anti-theft systems. In this article, we are concentrating on factory-installed GM starter interrupt systems. This type of anti-theft system is designed to prevent the vehicle from starting unless the correct ignition key is used.

These systems used a dash-mounted "security" or "theft" light which can be yellow or red in color. Depending on the current status of the system, the warning light will be off, on steady, or flashing.

Although they may share the same dash-mounted warning light, these "starter interrupt" anti-theft systems work separately from and independently of the "content theft" systems available from factory and aftermarket suppliers. Content theft referrers to anti-theft systems that sound an alarm when a vehicle is broken into.

Two Types of Systems

Passlock

In the mid 1990s, the first Passlock systems were introduced and are still used to this day. The Passlock I and Passlock II systems use a sensor in the ignition lock cylinder, which looks for proper rotation of the lock cylinder with the correct key. Upon successful rotation of the ignition lock cylinder, a code will be sent to the Passlock module.

The Passlock III system uses a transponder located under the plastic covering of the key. In most cases, these keys are stamped "PK3" on the metal blade near the plastic covering. An antenna located at the entry point of the ignition lock cylinder reads the transponder data from the key and sends a code to the Passlock control module. This system is very similar to the immobilizer system used by many other manufactures.

The Passlock III antenna and the Passlock I and Passlock II sensors in the lock cylinder are all commonly referred to as Passlock sensors. Upon receipt of the code from the sensor, the Passlock module will match the code received to previously learned values. If there is a match, the Passlock module will send a signal to the engine control module to allow the engine to start and run. The Passlock module is commonly part of the Body Control Module (BCM) or Instrument Panel Cluster (IPC).

VATS

In the mid 1980s, we first began to see the "VATS" (Vehicle Anti-Theft System). It is easily identifiable by the "resistor" mounted in the metal blade of the ignition key. There are fifteen different resistor values available. In order for the engine to start, the correct "resistor" must be read by the VATS control module via the ignition lock cylinder. Also, the ignition lock cylinder must be rotated to the "crank" position. If the incorrect code is read, the system will not allow the engine to start for four minutes—even if the correct code is received. The security light will remain on or a message will be displayed on the Driver Information Center (depending on the model) when this occurs. Our bypass component module will fix this problem permanantly.

What Does the Warning Light Mean?

 

 

Operating states of the warning light on Passlock systems should be:

  • On for bulb check
  • Off when engine is running
  • On steady if a fault occurs
  • Flashing in the learn mode

Under normal operation, you should see the warning light on during bulb check and off when the engine is running—no message displayed on the DIC.

When the system detects a fault, the warning light will illuminate or a message will be displayed on the DIC, depending on the model. If a fault occurs while driving, the engine may or may not start after turning the ignition off. If a fault occurs when trying to start the vehicle, it probably won't start. Our bypass component module will fix this problem permanantly.

The warning light on the VATS system is similar except it does not have the learn mode.

Common Problems

Most common problems related the the Passlock family involve the Passlock sensor. The sensor is part of the ignition lock cylinder on Passlock I and Passlock II systems. The antenna is the Passlock sensor on Passlock III systems. If these sensors fail, Our bypass component module will fix this problem permanantly, and then you just perform a theft system relearn procedure.

Relearn Procedures
This procedure must be performed after installing our bypass component to teach your computer the code of your new component.

The Passlock family has two basic relearn procedures—a ten-minute procedure and a thirty-minute procedure—and which one you use depends on the system and what components have been replaced. We strongly recommend you use the thirty-minute procedure with our security ignition bypass module.

The ten-minute procedure involves trying to start the engine. If nothing happens or the engine starts and dies, the security light will be flashing. Wait ten minutes. The flashing light should go off or illuminate without flashing. When it does, turn the ignition off, wait twenty seconds, and then try to start the engine. If it starts and runs, everything is okay. If you get the same result as previously—nothing happens or the engine starts and dies with the security light flashing—wait ten more minutes.

You will now begin the thirty-minute relearn procedure, which is turn the key just before the crank position the security light will be flashing wait ten minutes until the light goes out. Turn the ignition off for twenty seconds. Then repeat this step three times.  After turning the ignition off for the third time and waiting for twenty seconds, the engine should start and run. If it doesn't, there may still be something wrong with the system.  Depending on the system, replacement of key components will necessitate that a relearn procedure be completed. These include the ignition lock cylinder, Powertrain Control Module (PCM), Body Control Module (BCM), or Instrument Panel Cluster (IPC).

After the learn procedure is completed and the engine is running, the security light may stay on steady for a few minutes and then go off—this is normal.

Unless the VATS control module is replaced, there is no relearn procedure for the VATS system. A new VATS module will learn the security ignition bypass component module code the first time it is powered up. Once the module learns its code, there is no way to relearn it. New ignition keys must always be matched to the learned code in the VATS control module. If all keys are lost and the VATS code is unknown, then use trial and error to find the correct VATS code. (In some cases, the VATS code may be available from your local General Motors parts department.) If the incorrect VATS code is read by the control module, the system will not allow the engine to start for four minutes—even if the correct code is received.

We hope this has helped and you have ordered our Security Ignition Bypass Component Module, it will work, and it will fix these problems. We guarantee it.

It will also work with remote start installs.

ONLY $29.95 PLUS SHIPPING AND HANDLING