Spend PESACH 2009 in Balaton, Hungary!

Spend Pesach in Balaton Hungay at the magnificent Four Star
Flamingo Hotel & Resort
 

Lake Balaton is one of Hungary's most precious treasures and most frequented resort. The "Hungarian Sea", is the people's name for the 50 mile long lake with silky green-yellow water in the middle of Transdanubia. The beach of Lake Balaton is one of Hungary's most popular holiday places. A beautiful marina serves as harbour for most Balaton sailing boats. Balaton is close to Austria and Slovakia, so you can tour all three countries...

 
  
   
 
Flamingo wellness Hotel:
Hotel Flamingó, is one of the highest standard four-star private hotel in Balatonfüred, situated on the very water’s edge alongside main route 71, 300 m from the town center. The hotel has a restaurant, an indoor swimming pool opened in the summer of 2000, a conference room accommodating 60 to 250 persons, its own car park and its own fishing jetty. The swimming hall has a 1.40 meter deep and 16 meter long swimming pool, a warm sitting-bath, and a 34-36 degrees Celsius Jacuzzi. Our guests can chose the peaceful isolation of the Finnish sauna, or a relaxing massage from our qualified masseur. The hotel coffee bar, accessible from both the swimming pool and the beach is suitable for drinking a coffee or a refreshment, reading a newspaper, or watching television.

The package includes:

  • Hotel accommodation from April 7th to April 19th, 2009
  • Luxurious accommodation
  • Full board, Artistic gourmet meals
  • Two full Seder nights
  • Free wine for Shabbath & Yom tov
  • Tea room (coffee & cake) open 24 hours
  • Glatt Kosher under the strict supervision of Rabbi D. Zoldan of Seret - Wishnitz community - Haifa
  • Shemureah matzah (hand & machine), non gebrokt food
  • Trips on Chol Hamoed - extra charge
  • Lectures and Activities for Adults & children  

Wellness, Pools & spa center:
You can find in the hotel one of the biggest spa & wellness center around the Balaton Lake.
In the wellness center there are many of attractive kinds of spa:

  • Indoor 16 meter long swimming poll (23-25 C0).
  • Sitting bath (32-34 C0), Outdoor jacuzzi, Indoor jacuzzi (34-36 C0).
  • In and outdoor fun pools with: Waterslides, Twisters, Massage corners, Cave Waterfalls.
  • Steam bath, Aroma chamber, Salt chamber, Steam chamber, Scottish shower, Ice cave,
  • Infrachamber, Sauna, Tepidarium, Kneipp Pool.
  • Massage, Beauty saloon, Solarium, bronzarium, Finnish sauna.
The team & the catering:
This coming Pesach, our highly experienced staff will be working to provide you with the finest traditional dishes. You'll enjoy quality gastronomic and elegant dinning. We are extremely pleased to have secured their services as they bring with them a wealth of experience and knowledge in menu design and planning, presentation and of course cooking knowledge and skills.
 
 

The hotel has different types & classes of rooms:

  • Senior double rooms without balcony (23-38 Sq.M)
  • Senior double rooms with panorama balcony (28-38 Sq.M)
  • Senior family rooms without balcony (48 Sq.M)
  • Superior city view double rooms with balcony (36 Sq.M)
  • Superior double rooms with panorama balcony (36 Sq.M)
  • Superior deluxe double rooms with balcony (36 Sq.M)
  • Superior family suites with panorama balcony (49 Sq.M)
  • Luxury apartments (96 Sq.M)
  • Exclusive apartments (116 Sq.M)
 
 
All Our Rooms are Air Conditioned and Non Smoking!
Contact us for prices:
Call us at: (718) 258 - 4865 or (718) 338 - 8798
                                  Toll free (866) 338 - 8798
                               Fax us at: (718) 338 - 1581
Email us at: GoTravel2C@aol.com
 
KIDS SPLASH ZONE 
 
  
 
Tours:, Keszthely-Tihany

9:00 A.M. – 3:30 P.M. 

Our trip will begin with a visit to the Festetics estate in Keszthely and a tour of the baroque-style Castle, where we will learn about the aristocratic lifestyle of 18th-19th century Hungary. We will then visit the still-functioning Keszthely Synagogue.

Our next stop will be the Tihany Peninsula to see the Open-air Ethnographic Museum, the charming houses of the old village, and the Potter's House.  We will also visit the unique Doll Museum, featuring hundreds of colorful dolls from all over the world.  There will be a short amount of time for shopping.

Price: € 20

Option 1: Budapest

8:30 A.M. – 8.30 P.M. 

The general part of our tour covers Budapest's major highlights, presenting its grandeur and Old World charm.  We will visit both sides of the city – the colorful hills of Buda and the bustling businesslike boulevards of Pest.  We will explore the magnificent House of Parliament, the elegant Andrassy Avenue, and the impressive Heroes Square.  We will stroll around the Castle District and enjoy the magnificent panoramic view of the city from Fishermen's Bastion. 

The Jewish interest part of the tour includes a visit to the Old Jewish Quarter in the heart of Pest, featuring the impressive Dohany Street Synagogue (Europe's largest synagogue), the Jewish Museum with its wealth of Judaica treasures, the unique Holocaust Memorial, the newly re-opened Rumbach Street Synagogue, the memorial statue dedicated to Carl Lutz (the Swiss Consul who saved thousands of Jews) and the beautifully restored Orthodox Kazinczy Street Synagogue.

Price: € 30

Option 2.  Underground adventure at the Balatonederics Csodabogyos Cave – for ages 10 and over.  For more information, visit http://www.csodabogyos.hu/ .

8:30 A.M. – 2:00 P.M.

This is a 2-3 hour adventure.  You will need to wear comfortable clothing and shoes or boots.  Caving overalls, helmets and headlamps are provided, but you should be generally physically fit.

Price: € 30 per person including  transportation.

Option 1: Herend –  Kapolcs - Veszprem.

9:30 A.M. – 5:00 P.M.

Herend is known for its world-famous porcelain factory founded in the early 19th century.  We will visit the Herend Porcelain Museum to learn about the factory's history, and enjoy the beauty of the exceptional porcelain pieces manufactured in the traditional manner.  The Museum also contains the world's largest collection of Herend porcelain.  Visitors will not only be shown how porcelain is manufactured, but will also take a lesson in the art of porcelain making.

Afterwards, we will visit the Miniature Park in Kapolcs. See the most beautiful buildings in Hungary in miniature.

We will then continue on to Veszprem, one of the area's largest cities, with its zoo and shopping center.  We will arrive back at the hotel at around 5:00 P.M.

 Price: € 30

Option 2: Bob Park and Serpa Adventure Park. Fun for kids!

(For more information, visit http://www.balatonibob.hu/  and  http://www.serpakalandpark.hu/ .

9:30 A.M. – 3:00 P.M.

Transfer price: €15 (the payment for rides, on clients cost)

Option 1. Sopron-Eisenstadt  

8:00 A.M. – 8:00 P.M.

The earliest traces of a Jewish community in Western Hungary, dating back to the 13th century, are found in Sopron. The Jewish merchants who settled in Sopron probably came from Austria and Bavaria, like other settlers at that time. Sopron is known for its wealth of historic buildings.  The Old Synagogue (built around 1300) is one of the most interesting, a rare relic of a medieval Jewish culture whose other material remains have almost entirely vanished.

In the Middle Ages, Eisenstadt was probably the only town in the western Hungarian region of Burgenland (Austria) to have a fully developed Jewish community, complete with a synagogue, mikveh and rabbinate.  The privilege of self-governance was made possible because large landowners and smaller nobility were granted the right to settle Jews on their land at that time.  This led to the establishment of the Seven Communities in western Hungary, on the estate of the Esterhazy family. The Seven Communities was the first multi-community Jewish organization in Hungary. The communities included Eisenstadt (Kismarton), Mattersdorf (Nagymarton), Deutschkreutz (Sopronkeresztur), Frauenkirchen (Boldogasszony), Kittsee (Kopcseny), Lackenbach (Lakompak), and Kobersdorf (Kabold).  They were headed by the chief rabbinate of Eisenstadt and had their own internal administration.  As a result of their relative freedom, they flourished as a rich Jewish cultural center that was famous throughout Central and Eastern Europe.

The itinerary for the full-day tour is as follows:

We will arrive in Eisenstadt, the capital of Burgenland (Austria), and visit the Judengasse (Jewish Street) where we will explore the Austrian Jewish Museum, housed in the historic home of Samson Wertheimer, Hungary's Chief Rabbi in the late 17th and early 18th century.  We will tour Samson Wertheimer's private

synagogue, the most extraordinary attraction of the Jewish Museum. This beautiful synagogue is one of the very few in Austria to have escaped Nazi vandalism.

Our next stop is Sopron, one of the oldest and most charming cities in Hungary, built on the ruins of a Roman town called Scarbantia.   We will explore the almost intact medieval inner city, including the former Jewish street (today called Uj utca – New Street) where a Jewish community had existed until the beginning of the

6th century. The two highlights will be the two unique synagogues built around 1300 that have been saved

from oblivion.

Price: € 30

Option 2: Vienna.

Vienna is a remarkable city.  Its important place in history, its stunning architecture, its art and music combine to embody the phrase “Old World Charm.”  We will see the Belvedere palace, the State Opera House, and the Parliament building.  We will tour the Hofburg Palace – the residence of the Habsburgs – enjoy the Imperial Apartments, the Sisi Museum and the Imperial Silver Collection.

The Jewish interest part of our tour includes a stroll along the Judengasse and a visit to the ruins of the Medieval Synagogue.

Price: € 50

Option 1:  Boat ride to Siofok

9:30 A.M – 3:00 P.M.

Our day will begin with an hour-long pleasure boat ride across Lake Balaton.

We will visit Siofok, the capital of the southern shore.  Arriving at Szantodpuszta at noon, we will see an exquisite embroidery collection and tour the Lake Balaton Aquarium where we will learn about the 18 different types of fish which inhabit the lake.  Afterwards, we will take a ferry ride back to the northern shore. We will arrive at the hotel at 3.00 P.M.

Price: € 25

Option 2: Balaton Uplands National Park. A 2-3 hour guided walking tour. For more information, please visit  http://www.bfnpi.hu/index.php?pg=sub_341 .

9:30 A.M. – 2:00 P.M.

Price: € 15 transportation + € 5 guided tour

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE JEWS OF HUNGARY
Jews had settled in Hungary as early as the 3rd century CE, when the area was part of the Roman Empire´s province of Pannonia. Written documents from the 11th century indicate the existence of Jewish settlement and the creation of Jewish communities in the nascent Hungarian state. Increasingly, Jews settled in the towns, leading to the emergence of the "historical Jewish communities" of Buda, Esztergom, Sopron, Tata and Old Buda.
In the 16th-17th centuries, Hungary was occupied by the Turks. Following the expulsion of the Turks, the re-settlement of the devastated country began. Along with Germans, Slovaks and others, Jews too arrived in increasing numbers - first from Bohemia and Moravia, and later also from Galicia, after it had been incorporated into the Monarchy. The number of Hungarian Jews increased from 20,000 in 1769 to approximately 80,000 in 1787. The period between the two World Wars was a time of prosperity and accomplishment for Hungarian Jewry. This period saw the emergence of Jewish intellectuals, well-trained professionals, and merchants, who regarded Hungary as their homeland and had no problems reconciling their Hungarian and Jewish heritage. Hungarian Jewry played a key role in the creation and development of Hungarian trade and industry. World War II, German fascism and the reign of terror caused by the Hungarian Arrow-Cross brought unimaginable suffering to Hungarian Jewry. Six hundred thousand out of nine hundred thousand Hungarian-speaking Jews perished in the Holocaust. Hungarian Jewry has still not recovered from the losses occasioned by the mass deportations and interment in forced labor camps.

Budapest through Jewish Eyes
Learn about Central Europe´s largest Jewish Community, walk through the former Ghetto, visit the Dohany Synagogue, the Jewish Museum, the Kazinczy Orthodox Shul and "see" the city´s hidden Jewish treasures. 29/38.- Budapest, Synagogue
This is Europe´s largest synagogue, with capacity for seating a congregation of 3,000. Next to the synagogue is the Jewish Museum (which houses a Holocaust memorial room) and the Hall of Heroes (with the Monument of Hungarian Jewish Martyrs). The two towers that you see are 43 meters high. Special concerts are held in the synagogue on weekdays.

Kazinczy Street - Dob Street: The Orthodox Jewish Quarter of Budapest.
Among the other synagogues in Budapest, this building on Kazinczy Street and Dob Street reminds us of a typical European synagogue. The most important institutes are located around the Synagogue.
In the middle of the courtyard you can find the building of the Kazinczy Synagogue. In the front of the courtyard stands an iron Chuppah. Around it are the kindergarten, the Hanna kosher community kitchen, the Sasz-Chevra Synagogue, and the Bet Hamidrash. From the Dob street side there is the butcher´s and the community office, the Chevra Kadisha, and the Cultural Center. Just a few steps outside the courtyard, still on Kazinczy Street, you can find the bakery. and further on - the mikve.
The Kaziczy Synagogue was built in 1912-13 by the Loffler Brothers.

Budapest
Rabbi Yaakov Koppel Reich
was born in Verbe in 5588 (1838), and died on the 17th of Elul 5689 (1929). In 1890 he was elected rabbi of the Orthodox community in Budapest, was actively engaged in strengthening religion and established the Toras Emes School. In addition to his Talmudic erudition, he was involved in matters of society and was considered one of the leaders of Orthodox Jewry in Hungary. In 1905 he presided over the Convention of Orthodox Rabbis and Community Leaders. In 1927, at the age of 90, he was appointed Orthodox representative to the upper house of the Hungarian Parliament, and was its most elderly member.
He left no works, but was widely quoted by rabbis of his generation.

Rabbi Shimon Oppenheim was born in 5511 (1751) and died in 5611 (1851) at the age of 100. He served as rabbi of the Orthodox community of Budapest for over fifty years. He was known as a wonder worker, and guaranteed that whoever visits his gravesite and gives charity for his soul, " the All Merciful will hear his cry for help."

Uehal
Rabbi Moshe Teitlebaum,
author of the Yismach Moshe, was born in 5519 (1759) and died on the 28th of Tammuz, 5601 (1841) in Uehal (Staoraljaujlely). He was the scion of a family of rabbis descended from the great halakhic authority, Rabbi Moshe Isserlis (the Ramah). He was a disciple of "Hachozeh Mi-Lublin" - the "Seer of Lublin" and the Maggid of Kozienice. He also studied with his uncle, Rabbi Avraham Aryeh Leib of Strezenov. At the age of twenty-five he was appointed rabbi of Shineve (Sieniaws), and afterwards served as rabbi of Uehal in Hungary for the rest of his life. He became known in the Jewish communities of Galicia and Hungary as a wonder-worker, and multitudes of Jews crowded his doorstep to obtain his blessing. His descendants, as well, were prominent Admorim in Galicia and Hungary.
He was buried in Uehal, and his grave became a pilgrimage site for anyone seeking help in Hungary and its environs. He was the author of the Yismach Moshe.

Kaliv
Rabbi Yitzchak Isaac Taub
was born in 5504 (1744) and died in 5581 (1821). He was among the first rabbis to spread the Hassidic movement in Hungary. At an early age, he was already renowned for his great benevolence, and was one of the disciples of Rabbi Elimelech of Lisenks. He was buried in Kaliv. During the heyday of Hungarian Jewry, the 7th of Adar became a day of mass pilgrimage to his gravesite. He was renowned as a wonder-worker, and many stories are told of the wonders that resulted from praying at his grave.

Krestirer (Bodrogkereszur)
Rabbi Yeshaya Steiner
was born in 5612 (1852) and died on the 3rd of Iyar 5685 (1925). He was buried in his city of Krestirer. He was the faithful assistant of Rabbi Zvi Hirsch of Liske (Olaszliszka), and a disciple of Rabbi Chaim Halberstam of Santz (Nowy Sacz). Upon the death of Rabbi Zvi Hirsch, he began to be known as a miracle worker and thousands of chassidim flocked to him, including most of the disciples of his Rabbi. In spite of his greatness, he continued to conduct himself with the same simplicity as before, and even signed his name as the assistant of Rabbi Zvi Hirsch of Liske.
His picture with his signature is said to protect against mice in the home.

Liske (Olaszliszka)
Rabbi Zvi Hirsch Friedman
was born in Iyar 5550 (1790) and died on the 14th of Av 5634 (1874). He was a disciple of Rabbi Moshe Teitlebaum, author of the Yismach Moshe, and a disciple of Rabbi Zvi Hirsch of Bonyhad. He was also a disciple of Rabbi Chaim Halberstam of Santz, who gave an enthusiastic approbation to his book Akh Pri Tevu´ah. He was renowned as a Torah giant and a man of noble character, and was especially renowned for his love of Israel and love of peace. He was the first Admor of the Liske dynasty.

Mishkoltz (Miskolc)
Rabbi Meir Avraham
died on the 26th of Elul 5589 (1824). He was the author of Pri Tzaddik and served as the rabbi of Tashba. He was one of the disciples of the Maggid of Meseritz, and after his death frequented the "Chozeh of Lublin." His grandson, who published his book, testifies that many of his writings, which include his "chidushim" and a large treatise on the 316 mitzvas, have been lost.

Siget (Sighetul Marmatiei)
Rabbi Chananiah Yom Tov Lipa Teitelbaum,
author of the Kedushas Yom Tov, was born on the 6th of Nissan 5596 (1836). He died on the 29th of Shevat 5664 (1904). Upon the death of his father, Rabbi Yekutiel Yehudah of Siget he assumed his father´s rabbinic position. He too headed the yeshiva in Siget. The two-volume book Kedushas Yom Tov on the Torah and on the festivals was the only book that remained of his teachings. He had two famous sons - Rabbi Chaim Zvi of Siget and Rabbi Yoel of Satmar (Satu Mare).

Presburg (Bratislava)
Rabbi Moshe Sofer,
the Chasam Sofer, was born in 5523 (1763) and died on the 28th of Tishri 5600 (1840). He was one the greatest Jewish scholars living in the first half of the 19th century. He was a disciple of Rabbi Nasan Adler, Rabbi of Frankfurt, and the son-in-law (by second marriage) of Rabbi Akiva Eger. He was appointed rabbi of Presburg (the capital of Slovakia), a large Jewish metropolis, and retained this position throughout his life.
He founded the famous yeshiva in Presburg, which was attended by hundreds of students. He waged a fierce battle against the Reform movement, which was spreading throughout central and Western Europe, and stated both in writing as well as orally - that "Chadash Asur min Hatorah" - any innovation is strictly forbidden, according to the Torah.
He left a legacy of numerous manuscripts, many of which have been published. His important books include "Chasam Sofer (an acronym for "Chidushei Toras Moshe"), responsa (six volumes), Chasam Sofer Chidushim al Ha-Shas, Toras Moshe, and commentaries and drashos on the Talmud.
Not long ago, a supreme effort was made to save his grave from total destruction when the authorities planned to erect a central crossroads for the railway system. Careful planning left the place intact and it is a fitting site for people to gather together in prayer.

Prague
Rabbi Yehudah Loew - the Maharal of Prague

Born in 5272 (1512) and died on the 18th of Elul 5369 (1609). The Maharal is engraved in the hearts of the Jewish people and is enveloped in miraculous stories. He was one of the greatest spiritual giants, original and unique in his thinking and in his commentaries on aggadah.
Some of his famous disciples include Rabbi Yom Tov Lipmann Heller, author of the Tosefos Yom Tov on the Mishnah, Rabbi David Ganz, author of the Tzemach Sus, and Rabbi Eliyahu Loanz.
He served as rabbi in Mikulov (Nikelsburg), Pozen and Prague. His writings include Gur Aryeh - a commentary on Rashi, Gevuros Hashem, Derech Chayim, Netivos Olam, Be´er Hagolah, Tiferes Yisrael, Nezach Yisrael, Or Chadash, Ner Mitzvah, Chidushei Maharal, Chidushei Gur Aryeh, Sefer Perushei Maharal MiPrague le-Aggadot Ha-Shas and drashos.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE JEWS OF HUNGARY
Jews had settled in Hungary as early as the 3rd century CE, when the area was part of the Roman Empire´s province of Pannonia. Written documents from the 11th century indicate the existence of Jewish settlement and the creation of Jewish communities in the nascent Hungarian state. Increasingly, Jews settled in the towns, leading to the emergence of the "historical Jewish communities" of Buda, Esztergom, Sopron, Tata and Old Buda.
In the 16th-17th centuries, Hungary was occupied by the Turks. Following the expulsion of the Turks, the re-settlement of the devastated country began. Along with Germans, Slovaks and others, Jews too arrived in increasing numbers - first from Bohemia and Moravia, and later also from Galicia, after it had been incorporated into the Monarchy. The number of Hungarian Jews increased from 20,000 in 1769 to approximately 80,000 in 1787. The period between the two World Wars was a time of prosperity and accomplishment for Hungarian Jewry. This period saw the emergence of Jewish intellectuals, well-trained professionals, and merchants, who regarded Hungary as their homeland and had no problems reconciling their Hungarian and Jewish heritage. Hungarian Jewry played a key role in the creation and development of Hungarian trade and industry. World War II, German fascism and the reign of terror caused by the Hungarian Arrow-Cross brought unimaginable suffering to Hungarian Jewry. Six hundred thousand out of nine hundred thousand Hungarian-speaking Jews perished in the Holocaust. Hungarian Jewry has still not recovered from the losses occasioned by the mass deportations and interment in forced labor camps.

Budapest through Jewish Eyes
Learn about Central Europe´s largest Jewish Community, walk through the former Ghetto, visit the Dohany Synagogue, the Jewish Museum, the Kazinczy Orthodox Shul and "see" the city´s hidden Jewish treasures. 29/38.- Budapest, Synagogue
This is Europe´s largest synagogue, with capacity for seating a congregation of 3,000. Next to the synagogue is the Jewish Museum (which houses a Holocaust memorial room) and the Hall of Heroes (with the Monument of Hungarian Jewish Martyrs). The two towers that you see are 43 meters high. Special concerts are held in the synagogue on weekdays.

Kazinczy Street - Dob Street: The Orthodox Jewish Quarter of Budapest.
Among the other synagogues in Budapest, this building on Kazinczy Street and Dob Street reminds us of a typical European synagogue. The most important institutes are located around the Synagogue.
In the middle of the courtyard you can find the building of the Kazinczy Synagogue. In the front of the courtyard stands an iron Chuppah. Around it are the kindergarten, the Hanna kosher community kitchen, the Sasz-Chevra Synagogue, and the Bet Hamidrash. From the Dob street side there is the butcher´s and the community office, the Chevra Kadisha, and the Cultural Center. Just a few steps outside the courtyard, still on Kazinczy Street, you can find the bakery. and further on - the mikve.
The Kaziczy Synagogue was built in 1912-13 by the Loffler Brothers.

Budapest
Rabbi Yaakov Koppel Reich
was born in Verbe in 5588 (1838), and died on the 17th of Elul 5689 (1929). In 1890 he was elected rabbi of the Orthodox community in Budapest, was actively engaged in strengthening religion and established the Toras Emes School. In addition to his Talmudic erudition, he was involved in matters of society and was considered one of the leaders of Orthodox Jewry in Hungary. In 1905 he presided over the Convention of Orthodox Rabbis and Community Leaders. In 1927, at the age of 90, he was appointed Orthodox representative to the upper house of the Hungarian Parliament, and was its most elderly member.
He left no works, but was widely quoted by rabbis of his generation.

Rabbi Shimon Oppenheim was born in 5511 (1751) and died in 5611 (1851) at the age of 100. He served as rabbi of the Orthodox community of Budapest for over fifty years. He was known as a wonder worker, and guaranteed that whoever visits his gravesite and gives charity for his soul, " the All Merciful will hear his cry for help."

Uehal
Rabbi Moshe Teitlebaum,
author of the Yismach Moshe, was born in 5519 (1759) and died on the 28th of Tammuz, 5601 (1841) in Uehal (Staoraljaujlely). He was the scion of a family of rabbis descended from the great halakhic authority, Rabbi Moshe Isserlis (the Ramah). He was a disciple of "Hachozeh Mi-Lublin" - the "Seer of Lublin" and the Maggid of Kozienice. He also studied with his uncle, Rabbi Avraham Aryeh Leib of Strezenov. At the age of twenty-five he was appointed rabbi of Shineve (Sieniaws), and afterwards served as rabbi of Uehal in Hungary for the rest of his life. He became known in the Jewish communities of Galicia and Hungary as a wonder-worker, and multitudes of Jews crowded his doorstep to obtain his blessing. His descendants, as well, were prominent Admorim in Galicia and Hungary.
He was buried in Uehal, and his grave became a pilgrimage site for anyone seeking help in Hungary and its environs. He was the author of the Yismach Moshe.

Kaliv
Rabbi Yitzchak Isaac Taub
was born in 5504 (1744) and died in 5581 (1821). He was among the first rabbis to spread the Hassidic movement in Hungary. At an early age, he was already renowned for his great benevolence, and was one of the disciples of Rabbi Elimelech of Lisenks. He was buried in Kaliv. During the heyday of Hungarian Jewry, the 7th of Adar became a day of mass pilgrimage to his gravesite. He was renowned as a wonder-worker, and many stories are told of the wonders that resulted from praying at his grave.

Krestirer (Bodrogkereszur)
Rabbi Yeshaya Steiner
was born in 5612 (1852) and died on the 3rd of Iyar 5685 (1925). He was buried in his city of Krestirer. He was the faithful assistant of Rabbi Zvi Hirsch of Liske (Olaszliszka), and a disciple of Rabbi Chaim Halberstam of Santz (Nowy Sacz). Upon the death of Rabbi Zvi Hirsch, he began to be known as a miracle worker and thousands of chassidim flocked to him, including most of the disciples of his Rabbi. In spite of his greatness, he continued to conduct himself with the same simplicity as before, and even signed his name as the assistant of Rabbi Zvi Hirsch of Liske.
His picture with his signature is said to protect against mice in the home.

Liske (Olaszliszka)
Rabbi Zvi Hirsch Friedman
was born in Iyar 5550 (1790) and died on the 14th of Av 5634 (1874). He was a disciple of Rabbi Moshe Teitlebaum, author of the Yismach Moshe, and a disciple of Rabbi Zvi Hirsch of Bonyhad. He was also a disciple of Rabbi Chaim Halberstam of Santz, who gave an enthusiastic approbation to his book Akh Pri Tevu´ah. He was renowned as a Torah giant and a man of noble character, and was especially renowned for his love of Israel and love of peace. He was the first Admor of the Liske dynasty.

Mishkoltz (Miskolc)
Rabbi Meir Avraham
died on the 26th of Elul 5589 (1824). He was the author of Pri Tzaddik and served as the rabbi of Tashba. He was one of the disciples of the Maggid of Meseritz, and after his death frequented the "Chozeh of Lublin." His grandson, who published his book, testifies that many of his writings, which include his "chidushim" and a large treatise on the 316 mitzvas, have been lost.

Siget (Sighetul Marmatiei)
Rabbi Chananiah Yom Tov Lipa Teitelbaum,
author of the Kedushas Yom Tov, was born on the 6th of Nissan 5596 (1836). He died on the 29th of Shevat 5664 (1904). Upon the death of his father, Rabbi Yekutiel Yehudah of Siget he assumed his father´s rabbinic position. He too headed the yeshiva in Siget. The two-volume book Kedushas Yom Tov on the Torah and on the festivals was the only book that remained of his teachings. He had two famous sons - Rabbi Chaim Zvi of Siget and Rabbi Yoel of Satmar (Satu Mare).

Presburg (Bratislava)
Rabbi Moshe Sofer,
the Chasam Sofer, was born in 5523 (1763) and died on the 28th of Tishri 5600 (1840). He was one the greatest Jewish scholars living in the first half of the 19th century. He was a disciple of Rabbi Nasan Adler, Rabbi of Frankfurt, and the son-in-law (by second marriage) of Rabbi Akiva Eger. He was appointed rabbi of Presburg (the capital of Slovakia), a large Jewish metropolis, and retained this position throughout his life.
He founded the famous yeshiva in Presburg, which was attended by hundreds of students. He waged a fierce battle against the Reform movement, which was spreading throughout central and Western Europe, and stated both in writing as well as orally - that "Chadash Asur min Hatorah" - any innovation is strictly forbidden, according to the Torah.
He left a legacy of numerous manuscripts, many of which have been published. His important books include "Chasam Sofer (an acronym for "Chidushei Toras Moshe"), responsa (six volumes), Chasam Sofer Chidushim al Ha-Shas, Toras Moshe, and commentaries and drashos on the Talmud.
Not long ago, a supreme effort was made to save his grave from total destruction when the authorities planned to erect a central crossroads for the railway system. Careful planning left the place intact and it is a fitting site for people to gather together in prayer.

Prague
Rabbi Yehudah Loew - the Maharal of Prague

Born in 5272 (1512) and died on the 18th of Elul 5369 (1609). The Maharal is engraved in the hearts of the Jewish people and is enveloped in miraculous stories. He was one of the greatest spiritual giants, original and unique in his thinking and in his commentaries on aggadah.
Some of his famous disciples include Rabbi Yom Tov Lipmann Heller, author of the Tosefos Yom Tov on the Mishnah, Rabbi David Ganz, author of the Tzemach Sus, and Rabbi Eliyahu Loanz.
He served as rabbi in Mikulov (Nikelsburg), Pozen and Prague. His writings include Gur Aryeh - a commentary on Rashi, Gevuros Hashem, Derech Chayim, Netivos Olam, Be´er Hagolah, Tiferes Yisrael, Nezach Yisrael, Or Chadash, Ner Mitzvah, Chidushei Maharal, Chidushei Gur Aryeh, Sefer Perushei Maharal MiPrague le-Aggadot Ha-Shas and drashos.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE JEWS OF HUNGARY
Jews had settled in Hungary as early as the 3rd century CE, when the area was part of the Roman Empire´s province of Pannonia. Written documents from the 11th century indicate the existence of Jewish settlement and the creation of Jewish communities in the nascent Hungarian state. Increasingly, Jews settled in the towns, leading to the emergence of the "historical Jewish communities" of Buda, Esztergom, Sopron, Tata and Old Buda.
In the 16th-17th centuries, Hungary was occupied by the Turks. Following the expulsion of the Turks, the re-settlement of the devastated country began. Along with Germans, Slovaks and others, Jews too arrived in increasing numbers - first from Bohemia and Moravia, and later also from Galicia, after it had been incorporated into the Monarchy. The number of Hungarian Jews increased from 20,000 in 1769 to approximately 80,000 in 1787. The period between the two World Wars was a time of prosperity and accomplishment for Hungarian Jewry. This period saw the emergence of Jewish intellectuals, well-trained professionals, and merchants, who regarded Hungary as their homeland and had no problems reconciling their Hungarian and Jewish heritage. Hungarian Jewry played a key role in the creation and development of Hungarian trade and industry. World War II, German fascism and the reign of terror caused by the Hungarian Arrow-Cross brought unimaginable suffering to Hungarian Jewry. Six hundred thousand out of nine hundred thousand Hungarian-speaking Jews perished in the Holocaust. Hungarian Jewry has still not recovered from the losses occasioned by the mass deportations and interment in forced labor camps.

Budapest through Jewish Eyes
Learn about Central Europe´s largest Jewish Community, walk through the former Ghetto, visit the Dohany Synagogue, the Jewish Museum, the Kazinczy Orthodox Shul and "see" the city´s hidden Jewish treasures. 29/38.- Budapest, Synagogue
This is Europe´s largest synagogue, with capacity for seating a congregation of 3,000. Next to the synagogue is the Jewish Museum (which houses a Holocaust memorial room) and the Hall of Heroes (with the Monument of Hungarian Jewish Martyrs). The two towers that you see are 43 meters high. Special concerts are held in the synagogue on weekdays.

Kazinczy Street - Dob Street: The Orthodox Jewish Quarter of Budapest.
Among the other synagogues in Budapest, this building on Kazinczy Street and Dob Street reminds us of a typical European synagogue. The most important institutes are located around the Synagogue.
In the middle of the courtyard you can find the building of the Kazinczy Synagogue. In the front of the courtyard stands an iron Chuppah. Around it are the kindergarten, the Hanna kosher community kitchen, the Sasz-Chevra Synagogue, and the Bet Hamidrash. From the Dob street side there is the butcher´s and the community office, the Chevra Kadisha, and the Cultural Center. Just a few steps outside the courtyard, still on Kazinczy Street, you can find the bakery. and further on - the mikve.
The Kaziczy Synagogue was built in 1912-13 by the Loffler Brothers.

Budapest
Rabbi Yaakov Koppel Reich
was born in Verbe in 5588 (1838), and died on the 17th of Elul 5689 (1929). In 1890 he was elected rabbi of the Orthodox community in Budapest, was actively engaged in strengthening religion and established the Toras Emes School. In addition to his Talmudic erudition, he was involved in matters of society and was considered one of the leaders of Orthodox Jewry in Hungary. In 1905 he presided over the Convention of Orthodox Rabbis and Community Leaders. In 1927, at the age of 90, he was appointed Orthodox representative to the upper house of the Hungarian Parliament, and was its most elderly member.
He left no works, but was widely quoted by rabbis of his generation.

Rabbi Shimon Oppenheim was born in 5511 (1751) and died in 5611 (1851) at the age of 100. He served as rabbi of the Orthodox community of Budapest for over fifty years. He was known as a wonder worker, and guaranteed that whoever visits his gravesite and gives charity for his soul, " the All Merciful will hear his cry for help."

Uehal
Rabbi Moshe Teitlebaum,
author of the Yismach Moshe, was born in 5519 (1759) and died on the 28th of Tammuz, 5601 (1841) in Uehal (Staoraljaujlely). He was the scion of a family of rabbis descended from the great halakhic authority, Rabbi Moshe Isserlis (the Ramah). He was a disciple of "Hachozeh Mi-Lublin" - the "Seer of Lublin" and the Maggid of Kozienice. He also studied with his uncle, Rabbi Avraham Aryeh Leib of Strezenov. At the age of twenty-five he was appointed rabbi of Shineve (Sieniaws), and afterwards served as rabbi of Uehal in Hungary for the rest of his life. He became known in the Jewish communities of Galicia and Hungary as a wonder-worker, and multitudes of Jews crowded his doorstep to obtain his blessing. His descendants, as well, were prominent Admorim in Galicia and Hungary.
He was buried in Uehal, and his grave became a pilgrimage site for anyone seeking help in Hungary and its environs. He was the author of the Yismach Moshe.

Kaliv
Rabbi Yitzchak Isaac Taub
was born in 5504 (1744) and died in 5581 (1821). He was among the first rabbis to spread the Hassidic movement in Hungary. At an early age, he was already renowned for his great benevolence, and was one of the disciples of Rabbi Elimelech of Lisenks. He was buried in Kaliv. During the heyday of Hungarian Jewry, the 7th of Adar became a day of mass pilgrimage to his gravesite. He was renowned as a wonder-worker, and many stories are told of the wonders that resulted from praying at his grave.

Krestirer (Bodrogkereszur)
Rabbi Yeshaya Steiner
was born in 5612 (1852) and died on the 3rd of Iyar 5685 (1925). He was buried in his city of Krestirer. He was the faithful assistant of Rabbi Zvi Hirsch of Liske (Olaszliszka), and a disciple of Rabbi Chaim Halberstam of Santz (Nowy Sacz). Upon the death of Rabbi Zvi Hirsch, he began to be known as a miracle worker and thousands of chassidim flocked to him, including most of the disciples of his Rabbi. In spite of his greatness, he continued to conduct himself with the same simplicity as before, and even signed his name as the assistant of Rabbi Zvi Hirsch of Liske.
His picture with his signature is said to protect against mice in the home.

Liske (Olaszliszka)
Rabbi Zvi Hirsch Friedman
was born in Iyar 5550 (1790) and died on the 14th of Av 5634 (1874). He was a disciple of Rabbi Moshe Teitlebaum, author of the Yismach Moshe, and a disciple of Rabbi Zvi Hirsch of Bonyhad. He was also a disciple of Rabbi Chaim Halberstam of Santz, who gave an enthusiastic approbation to his book Akh Pri Tevu´ah. He was renowned as a Torah giant and a man of noble character, and was especially renowned for his love of Israel and love of peace. He was the first Admor of the Liske dynasty.

Mishkoltz (Miskolc)
Rabbi Meir Avraham
died on the 26th of Elul 5589 (1824). He was the author of Pri Tzaddik and served as the rabbi of Tashba. He was one of the disciples of the Maggid of Meseritz, and after his death frequented the "Chozeh of Lublin." His grandson, who published his book, testifies that many of his writings, which include his "chidushim" and a large treatise on the 316 mitzvas, have been lost.

Siget (Sighetul Marmatiei)
Rabbi Chananiah Yom Tov Lipa Teitelbaum,
author of the Kedushas Yom Tov, was born on the 6th of Nissan 5596 (1836). He died on the 29th of Shevat 5664 (1904). Upon the death of his father, Rabbi Yekutiel Yehudah of Siget he assumed his father´s rabbinic position. He too headed the yeshiva in Siget. The two-volume book Kedushas Yom Tov on the Torah and on the festivals was the only book that remained of his teachings. He had two famous sons - Rabbi Chaim Zvi of Siget and Rabbi Yoel of Satmar (Satu Mare).

Presburg (Bratislava)
Rabbi Moshe Sofer,
the Chasam Sofer, was born in 5523 (1763) and died on the 28th of Tishri 5600 (1840). He was one the greatest Jewish scholars living in the first half of the 19th century. He was a disciple of Rabbi Nasan Adler, Rabbi of Frankfurt, and the son-in-law (by second marriage) of Rabbi Akiva Eger. He was appointed rabbi of Presburg (the capital of Slovakia), a large Jewish metropolis, and retained this position throughout his life.
He founded the famous yeshiva in Presburg, which was attended by hundreds of students. He waged a fierce battle against the Reform movement, which was spreading throughout central and Western Europe, and stated both in writing as well as orally - that "Chadash Asur min Hatorah" - any innovation is strictly forbidden, according to the Torah.
He left a legacy of numerous manuscripts, many of which have been published. His important books include "Chasam Sofer (an acronym for "Chidushei Toras Moshe"), responsa (six volumes), Chasam Sofer Chidushim al Ha-Shas, Toras Moshe, and commentaries and drashos on the Talmud.
Not long ago, a supreme effort was made to save his grave from total destruction when the authorities planned to erect a central crossroads for the railway system. Careful planning left the place intact and it is a fitting site for people to gather together in prayer.

Prague
Rabbi Yehudah Loew - the Maharal of Prague

Born in 5272 (1512) and died on the 18th of Elul 5369 (1609). The Maharal is engraved in the hearts of the Jewish people and is enveloped in miraculous stories. He was one of the greatest spiritual giants, original and unique in his thinking and in his commentaries on aggadah.
Some of his famous disciples include Rabbi Yom Tov Lipmann Heller, author of the Tosefos Yom Tov on the Mishnah, Rabbi David Ganz, author of the Tzemach Sus, and Rabbi Eliyahu Loanz.
He served as rabbi in Mikulov (Nikelsburg), Pozen and Prague. His writings include Gur Aryeh - a commentary on Rashi, Gevuros Hashem, Derech Chayim, Netivos Olam, Be´er Hagolah, Tiferes Yisrael, Nezach Yisrael, Or Chadash, Ner Mitzvah, Chidushei Maharal, Chidushei Gur Aryeh, Sefer Perushei Maharal MiPrague le-Aggadot Ha-Shas and drashos.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE JEWS OF HUNGARY
Jews had settled in Hungary as early as the 3rd century CE, when the area was part of the Roman Empire´s province of Pannonia. Written documents from the 11th century indicate the existence of Jewish settlement and the creation of Jewish communities in the nascent Hungarian state. Increasingly, Jews settled in the towns, leading to the emergence of the "historical Jewish communities" of Buda, Esztergom, Sopron, Tata and Old Buda.
In the 16th-17th centuries, Hungary was occupied by the Turks. Following the expulsion of the Turks, the re-settlement of the devastated country began. Along with Germans, Slovaks and others, Jews too arrived in increasing numbers - first from Bohemia and Moravia, and later also from Galicia, after it had been incorporated into the Monarchy. The number of Hungarian Jews increased from 20,000 in 1769 to approximately 80,000 in 1787. The period between the two World Wars was a time of prosperity and accomplishment for Hungarian Jewry. This period saw the emergence of Jewish intellectuals, well-trained professionals, and merchants, who regarded Hungary as their homeland and had no problems reconciling their Hungarian and Jewish heritage. Hungarian Jewry played a key role in the creation and development of Hungarian trade and industry. World War II, German fascism and the reign of terror caused by the Hungarian Arrow-Cross brought unimaginable suffering to Hungarian Jewry. Six hundred thousand out of nine hundred thousand Hungarian-speaking Jews perished in the Holocaust. Hungarian Jewry has still not recovered from the losses occasioned by the mass deportations and interment in forced labor camps.

Budapest through Jewish Eyes
Learn about Central Europe´s largest Jewish Community, walk through the former Ghetto, visit the Dohany Synagogue, the Jewish Museum, the Kazinczy Orthodox Shul and "see" the city´s hidden Jewish treasures. 29/38.- Budapest, Synagogue
This is Europe´s largest synagogue, with capacity for seating a congregation of 3,000. Next to the synagogue is the Jewish Museum (which houses a Holocaust memorial room) and the Hall of Heroes (with the Monument of Hungarian Jewish Martyrs). The two towers that you see are 43 meters high. Special concerts are held in the synagogue on weekdays.

Kazinczy Street - Dob Street: The Orthodox Jewish Quarter of Budapest.
Among the other synagogues in Budapest, this building on Kazinczy Street and Dob Street reminds us of a typical European synagogue. The most important institutes are located around the Synagogue.
In the middle of the courtyard you can find the building of the Kazinczy Synagogue. In the front of the courtyard stands an iron Chuppah. Around it are the kindergarten, the Hanna kosher community kitchen, the Sasz-Chevra Synagogue, and the Bet Hamidrash. From the Dob street side there is the butcher´s and the community office, the Chevra Kadisha, and the Cultural Center. Just a few steps outside the courtyard, still on Kazinczy Street, you can find the bakery. and further on - the mikve.
The Kaziczy Synagogue was built in 1912-13 by the Loffler Brothers.

Budapest
Rabbi Yaakov Koppel Reich
was born in Verbe in 5588 (1838), and died on the 17th of Elul 5689 (1929). In 1890 he was elected rabbi of the Orthodox community in Budapest, was actively engaged in strengthening religion and established the Toras Emes School. In addition to his Talmudic erudition, he was involved in matters of society and was considered one of the leaders of Orthodox Jewry in Hungary. In 1905 he presided over the Convention of Orthodox Rabbis and Community Leaders. In 1927, at the age of 90, he was appointed Orthodox representative to the upper house of the Hungarian Parliament, and was its most elderly member.
He left no works, but was widely quoted by rabbis of his generation.

Rabbi Shimon Oppenheim was born in 5511 (1751) and died in 5611 (1851) at the age of 100. He served as rabbi of the Orthodox community of Budapest for over fifty years. He was known as a wonder worker, and guaranteed that whoever visits his gravesite and gives charity for his soul, " the All Merciful will hear his cry for help."

Uehal
Rabbi Moshe Teitlebaum,
author of the Yismach Moshe, was born in 5519 (1759) and died on the 28th of Tammuz, 5601 (1841) in Uehal (Staoraljaujlely). He was the scion of a family of rabbis descended from the great halakhic authority, Rabbi Moshe Isserlis (the Ramah). He was a disciple of "Hachozeh Mi-Lublin" - the "Seer of Lublin" and the Maggid of Kozienice. He also studied with his uncle, Rabbi Avraham Aryeh Leib of Strezenov. At the age of twenty-five he was appointed rabbi of Shineve (Sieniaws), and afterwards served as rabbi of Uehal in Hungary for the rest of his life. He became known in the Jewish communities of Galicia and Hungary as a wonder-worker, and multitudes of Jews crowded his doorstep to obtain his blessing. His descendants, as well, were prominent Admorim in Galicia and Hungary.
He was buried in Uehal, and his grave became a pilgrimage site for anyone seeking help in Hungary and its environs. He was the author of the Yismach Moshe.

Kaliv
Rabbi Yitzchak Isaac Taub
was born in 5504 (1744) and died in 5581 (1821). He was among the first rabbis to spread the Hassidic movement in Hungary. At an early age, he was already renowned for his great benevolence, and was one of the disciples of Rabbi Elimelech of Lisenks. He was buried in Kaliv. During the heyday of Hungarian Jewry, the 7th of Adar became a day of mass pilgrimage to his gravesite. He was renowned as a wonder-worker, and many stories are told of the wonders that resulted from praying at his grave.

Krestirer (Bodrogkereszur)
Rabbi Yeshaya Steiner
was born in 5612 (1852) and died on the 3rd of Iyar 5685 (1925). He was buried in his city of Krestirer. He was the faithful assistant of Rabbi Zvi Hirsch of Liske (Olaszliszka), and a disciple of Rabbi Chaim Halberstam of Santz (Nowy Sacz). Upon the death of Rabbi Zvi Hirsch, he began to be known as a miracle worker and thousands of chassidim flocked to him, including most of the disciples of his Rabbi. In spite of his greatness, he continued to conduct himself with the same simplicity as before, and even signed his name as the assistant of Rabbi Zvi Hirsch of Liske.
His picture with his signature is said to protect against mice in the home.

Liske (Olaszliszka)
Rabbi Zvi Hirsch Friedman
was born in Iyar 5550 (1790) and died on the 14th of Av 5634 (1874). He was a disciple of Rabbi Moshe Teitlebaum, author of the Yismach Moshe, and a disciple of Rabbi Zvi Hirsch of Bonyhad. He was also a disciple of Rabbi Chaim Halberstam of Santz, who gave an enthusiastic approbation to his book Akh Pri Tevu´ah. He was renowned as a Torah giant and a man of noble character, and was especially renowned for his love of Israel and love of peace. He was the first Admor of the Liske dynasty.

Mishkoltz (Miskolc)
Rabbi Meir Avraham
died on the 26th of Elul 5589 (1824). He was the author of Pri Tzaddik and served as the rabbi of Tashba. He was one of the disciples of the Maggid of Meseritz, and after his death frequented the "Chozeh of Lublin." His grandson, who published his book, testifies that many of his writings, which include his "chidushim" and a large treatise on the 316 mitzvas, have been lost.

Siget (Sighetul Marmatiei)
Rabbi Chananiah Yom Tov Lipa Teitelbaum,
author of the Kedushas Yom Tov, was born on the 6th of Nissan 5596 (1836). He died on the 29th of Shevat 5664 (1904). Upon the death of his father, Rabbi Yekutiel Yehudah of Siget he assumed his father´s rabbinic position. He too headed the yeshiva in Siget. The two-volume book Kedushas Yom Tov on the Torah and on the festivals was the only book that remained of his teachings. He had two famous sons - Rabbi Chaim Zvi of Siget and Rabbi Yoel of Satmar (Satu Mare).

Presburg (Bratislava)
Rabbi Moshe Sofer,
the Chasam Sofer, was born in 5523 (1763) and died on the 28th of Tishri 5600 (1840). He was one the greatest Jewish scholars living in the first half of the 19th century. He was a disciple of Rabbi Nasan Adler, Rabbi of Frankfurt, and the son-in-law (by second marriage) of Rabbi Akiva Eger. He was appointed rabbi of Presburg (the capital of Slovakia), a large Jewish metropolis, and retained this position throughout his life.
He founded the famous yeshiva in Presburg, which was attended by hundreds of students. He waged a fierce battle against the Reform movement, which was spreading throughout central and Western Europe, and stated both in writing as well as orally - that "Chadash Asur min Hatorah" - any innovation is strictly forbidden, according to the Torah.
He left a legacy of numerous manuscripts, many of which have been published. His important books include "Chasam Sofer (an acronym for "Chidushei Toras Moshe"), responsa (six volumes), Chasam Sofer Chidushim al Ha-Shas, Toras Moshe, and commentaries and drashos on the Talmud.
Not long ago, a supreme effort was made to save his grave from total destruction when the authorities planned to erect a central crossroads for the railway system. Careful planning left the place intact and it is a fitting site for people to gather together in prayer.

Prague
Rabbi Yehudah Loew - the Maharal of Prague

Born in 5272 (1512) and died on the 18th of Elul 5369 (1609). The Maharal is engraved in the hearts of the Jewish people and is enveloped in miraculous stories. He was one of the greatest spiritual giants, original and unique in his thinking and in his commentaries on aggadah.
Some of his famous disciples include Rabbi Yom Tov Lipmann Heller, author of the Tosefos Yom Tov on the Mishnah, Rabbi David Ganz, author of the Tzemach Sus, and Rabbi Eliyahu Loanz.
He served as rabbi in Mikulov (Nikelsburg), Pozen and Prague. His writings include Gur Aryeh - a commentary on Rashi, Gevuros Hashem, Derech Chayim, Netivos Olam, Be´er Hagolah, Tiferes Yisrael, Nezach Yisrael, Or Chadash, Ner Mitzvah, Chidushei Maharal, Chidushei Gur Aryeh, Sefer Perushei Maharal MiPrague le-Aggadot Ha-Shas and drashos