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Academic CV

Gaurav Kampani

Email: gkampani@gmail.com




EDUCATION

2005-2013 (Expected): PhD Program, Department of Government, Cornell University, Ithaca NY

Degree Awarded: Masters of Arts in International Relations, Spring 2009
Major Field – International Relations
Minor Field – Comparative Politics



1995- 1997: School of International Studies, American University, Washington, DC

Degree Awarded: Masters of Arts in International Relations, Spring 1999
Major Field: International Peace & Conflict Resolution



1989-1991: Delhi University, Hindu College, New Delhi
Degree Awarded: Bachelors of Arts in History, May 1991


EMPLOYMENT

1998- July 2005: Senior South Asia Analyst
James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, Monterey, CA

July-December 1997: Research Assistant
United States Institute of Peace (USIP), Washington, DC

July-December 1996: Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellow
Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), Washington, DC

1994-1995: Research Assistant
Institute of Chinese Studies (ICS), New Delhi, India




DISSERTATION ABSTRACT

Threats, Institutions, and Outcomes: 
Understanding Three Decades of Lag in Indian Nuclear Learning 

When compared to other nuclear weapon powers why has India historically lagged in the development, deployment, and operational planning of its nuclear force despite unambiguous national security threats? My dissertation answers this question through a cross-sectional study of three decades of Indian nuclear decision-making from 1980 until 2010. Using a multi-disciplinary approach, which combines insights from New Institutionalism, organization theory and Cognitive Psychology with historical process tracing and elite interviewing methods, it argues that there are two interrelated  causes for the Indian state’s historic underperformance: (a) the absence of a strongly institutionalized “epistemic community” within the state; and (b) the absence of shared policy-planning and decision-making processes. The first cause is institutional while the second organizational. It argues that epistemic communities as knowledge brokers are necessary for socializing a state’s decision-makers into new learning practices. For learning to occur, epistemic communities must also operate in relatively open and non-monopolistic policy planning and decision-making environments. The latter reduce the scope for heuristics and cognitive biases among decision-makers; and are conducive for relatively rational and optimal policy outcomes. This dissertation presents evidence to show that Indian decision-makers partially mobilized a national security-centric “epistemic community” in the pre-1998 era; and only slowly institutionalized it within the state in the post-1998 decade. These base conditions when grafted on to highly centralized, compartmentalized and monopolistic policy planning and decision-making processes, attenuated the Indian state’s policy capacity. The net result has been policy outcomes riddled with heuristic and cognitive biases alongside the weak actualization of instituted policies.


F
IELD RESEARCH 

2009-2010 

One year in India divided between New Delhi, Bangalore, Mumbai, and Dehradun.


PUBLICATIONS

Peer Reviewed Journals:

“When Does A Nuclear Possessor State Become A Nuclear Weapons Power? Behind India's Veil Of Nuclear Ambiguity (1989-1998), International Security (Fall 2012 – Under Review).

Correspondence: Kennedy, Andrew B. Fall 2011. “India’s Nuclear Odyssey: Implicit Umbrellas, Diplomatic Disappointments and the Bomb,” International Security. Vol. 37 No.2 (Fall 2012).

“Threats, Institutions and Nuclear Learning: Behind India's Veil of Nuclear Ambiguity - 1989-1999,” Annual Review of Political and Military Sociology, 2012 (Forthcoming).

“Stakeholders in India’s Strategic Missile Program,” Nonproliferation Review, Fall/Winter 2003.

“Second-Tier Proliferation: The Case of Pakistan and North Korea,” Nonproliferation Review, Fall-Winter 2002.

“In Praise of Indifference Toward India’s Bomb,” Orbis, Spring 2001.

“From Existential to Minimum Deterrence: Explaining India’s Decision To Test, Nonproliferation Review, Fall 1998.



Chapters in Edited Works:

“Kashmir and India-Pakistan Nuclear Issues,” in Devin Hagerty ed., South Asia in World Politics, (Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2005).

“WMD Diffusion in Asia,” in Ashley J. Tellis and Michael Wills eds., Strategic Asia 2004-2005: Taking Stock of the War on Terrorism, (Seattle: National Bureau of Asian Research, 2004).


RESEARCH INTERESTS

Nuclear Proliferation, South Asia, Military Strategy and Doctrine, Sociology of Technology Construction, New Institutionalism, Cognitive Psychology, Qualitative Methods, Field Research Strategies.



LANGUAGES

Hindi (Spoken & Written: Advanced)

Punjabi (Spoken: Intermediate)

Urdu (Spoken: Beginner)



TEACHING

2006-2011: Teaching Assistant (Cornell University)

Spring 2012: Instructor, Introduction to International Relations, Auburn Correctional Facility, Cornell Prison Education Program

Fall 2011: Head Teaching Assistant, Introduction to International Relations with Professor Peter J. Katzenstein, Cornell University

Fall 2008: Teaching Assistant, Introduction to International Relations with Professor Jonathan Kirshner, Cornell University

Spring 2008: Teaching Assistant, Introduction to Comparative Politics with Professor Kenneth Roberts, Cornell University

Fall 2007: Teaching Assistant, US Foreign Policy with Professor Peter J. Katzenstein, Cornell University

Spring 2007: Teaching Assistant, US Foreign Policy with Professor J.J. Suh, Cornell University


Fall 2006: Teaching Assistant, Introduction to International Relations with Professor Peter J. Katzenstein, Cornell University


2004-2005: Instructor in Graduate Seminars (Monterey Institute of International Studies)


Spring 2005: Instructor, Emerging WMD Supplier Networks

Fall 2004: Instructor, WMD Proliferation in South Asia




PROSPECTIVE COURSE OFFERINGS

Undergraduate


Introduction to International Relations

Introduction to Comparative Politics

South Asian Politics

Power Shifts in the International System

Grand Strategy and Military Strategy through History

New Issues in International Politics



Graduate


Ideas, Institutions, and Foreign Policy

The Sociology of Building Large Technology Systems

The Politics and Culture of Nuclear Proliferation

Traditional and Non-Traditional Security Politics in South Asia

“Soak and Poke” - Doing Field Research 


STUDENT ADVISING

2012: Senior Advisor to Editor-in-Chief, Cornell International Affairs Review



AWARDS & HONORS

2012: Mellon Foundation Doctoral Completion Fellowship

2010-2011: Pre-Doctoral Stanton Nuclear Security Fellowship, Center for International Security & Cooperation, Stanford University

2010: Graduate Peace Fellowship, Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies, Cornell University

2010: Graduate School Travel Grant, Cornell University

2009: Graduate Peace Fellowship, Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies, Cornell University

2008: Travel Award for Summer Research, Mario Einaudi Center, Cornell University

2005-2006: Russell Sage Fellowship, Department of Government, Cornell University

1996-1997: Hall of Nations Scholarship, School of International Service, American University

1996: Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship




CONFERENCES & PRESENTATIONS 

2012
ISSS/ISAC Annual Conference, Triangle Institute of Security Studies, Chapel Hill, NC
Threats, Institutions and Nuclear Learning: Behind India's Veil of Nuclear Ambiguity

Conference on "Emerging Military Technologies and Prospects for Stability in the 21st Century," SIPRI, Colombo
The Indian State's Post-1998 Nuclear Agency: The Downside of Slow Institutionalization

International Studies Association (ISA), Annual Conference, San Diego
Some Like it Hot: Revisiting the Political Economy of Nuclear Proliferation

Conference on “The New Indian Military-II,” S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Singapore
The Gap between Theory, Operational Practice and Credibility in India’s Operational Nuclear Policy


2011

Stanton Foundation Nuclear Security Fellows Conference, Washington, DC 

Software: The Hidden Dimension of Nuclear Instability in South Asia 


Center for International Security & Cooperation, Stanford University CA
Understanding Three Decades of Lag in Indian Nuclear Decision-Making 


International Studies Association (ISA) Annual Conference, Montreal
Re-Problematizing Three Puzzles in Indian Nuclear Decision-Making 


Conference on Space, Science, & Security, New Delhi
Institutions & National Security Decision-Making in India


2009
United Services Institute, New Delhi
Institutions and Indian Nuclear Learning

2008

Cornell University Government Department Research Colloquium, NY
The Weaponization Paradox: Why Some Emerging Nuclear Weapon Powers Do Not Build Operational Forces 


Cornell University Government Department Research Colloquium, NY
The Grievance versus Opportunity Debate in Civil War Onset: The Case of the Iraq Insurgency

2007

Cornell University Government Department Research Seminar, NY
Discussant: Scott D. Sagan (Stanford University), The Evolution of Pakistani & Indian Nuclear Doctrine


2004 
National Bureau of Asian Research, Washington, D.C.
WMD Proliferation in Asia

James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, Monterey CA
Proliferation Unbound: Nuclear Tales from Pakistan

2003 

Arete Conference on South Asia, VA
Cognitive Frameworks, Cultural Values, Institutions, and Nuclear Command & Control

2002 
James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, Monterey CA
Ballistic Missiles and the Politics of Symbolism

Limited Conventional War Under Nuclear Conditions in South Asia

2001 
James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, Monterey CA
911 and the Crisis in South Asia

2000 
James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, Monterey CA
How a US Missile Defense Will Affect South Asia




PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT


2009: Institute on Qualitative Research Methods, Syracuse University

2008: Summer Workshop on Analysis of Military Operations & Strategy, Columbia University




PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS


American Political Science Association (APSA)
Sections: Comparative Politics, Foreign Policy, International History & Politics, International Security & Arms Control, Political Psychology, Qualitative & Multi-Methods Research, Experimental Research.

International Studies Association (ISA)




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Gaurav Kampani,
Dec 17, 2012, 7:16 PM
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