Lesson 3

Part 1 - Engage Students
(estimated time=10 minutes)
Have students fill in the what I know and what I want to learn sections of a K-W-L chart.  For those who chose this option for Lesson 1, ask students to add to the K-W-L from the previous lesson.  Have students pair-share one thing they know and one thing they want to learn and agree as a pair to share one of each with the entire class.  Have students share their responses.  Look for possible misconceptions within student responses, use them as teachable phrases.  Have students revise their K-W-L as some of the aspects of the game are reviewed.

Part 2 - Reviewing World 2
(estimated time=20 minutes)

SUMMARY OF WORLD 2

Harold is still at the nanoscale, but somewhat larger, as the shrinking machine’s effects have begun to wear off. As a result of his increased size, he is no longer under the grip of van der Waals forces, and he falls from the ceiling to the floor. Fortunately, a puddle on the floor (which at his scale appears to be a vast swamp), breaks his fall.

Below are the questions that were asked during the discussion from Lesson 2 followed by responses from Nikki's notebook pages as well as some game playing tips.
  • Where is Harold moving in the game? What can he do in this world?
    • He's in a puddle on the floor of his laboratory.  He can walk on water like a water strider!  Water molecules (H2O) are attracted to each other.  On the surface, the attraction is really powerful and causes water to have a strong “skin”.  Scientists call this “surface tension”. 
  • What are the green particles he finds in this environment?  What can Harold use them for?
    • Artists long ago put metals into molten glass to produce all of the colors we see in stained glass windows today.  Copper can look green just like the gold looked red before.   Harold can shoot these copper particles at the Nanoids and sink them into the puddle.
  • Are there different sized Nanoids?  How does size make a difference in this world?
    • There are different sized Nanoids.  What happens when you fill your bathtub with water and climb in?  The water rises or is “displaced”.  The key to floating is that you can’t weigh more than the amount of water you displace.  Because the innertubes are so large and light, they help displace more water and keep the heavy Nanoids afloat.
  • Does the surface that the game is played on change in world two?  How is it different?
    • Oil is very thick (like molasses), but its “skin” isn’t quite as strong as water’s.  Be careful!  It doesn’t take much additional mass to cause you to sink through the oil!
  • Does Harold's and the Nanoids' ability to walk on these surfaces change? How?
    • Buoyancy has to do with weight AND area.  If you were floating in a pool and curled up into a tight ball, you would sink.  If you stretched out, you would float.  Your mass didn’t change, but the amount of water that is pushing up against you did change.
  • What can Harold use to jump differently in this world?
    • A spring.  When you step on the spring and compress it, it has stored energy.  The energy is then changed to motion when the spring releases and you go soaring!
  • Are there ways that Harold can move more quickly through the liquid?  How?
    • On the small scale of bacteria, water seems like a very thick liquid.  Some bacteria move with the power of a spinning corkscrew tail.  They can even move in reverse!
  • What happens when you go through the charge shower?
    • The charge shower puts the same electrical charge on both you AND the green particles.  Now they won’t clump together and simply fall off!
Part 3 - Introducing World 3
(estimated time=20 minutes)
Remind students that you will have a discussion after 20 minutes of play and that at that time, all students must stop playing and participate in the discussion. 

Have students log on to the game. 

There are two secret pass codes to get past the levels in each world.  The first trick is when a player logs on after losing a life or logging on as the same player from the previous playing event, they mouse over and left-click the lower left hand corner of the world and levels hotbutton screen a little textbox appears. The player can enter the number of the level they want to enter the move the cursor over a little to the right and left-click.  They will reach that world directly, but without any points.  Another secret pass is the tab button on the key board.  Points ARE given for doing this. 

Whatever method you choose to tell them, have them move to world two (a puddle in the laboratory floor).

Part 4- Discussion of World 3
(estimated time=10 minutes)
Have students stop their game play, by either exiting the game, or not beginning a new level on the game.  Explain that the goal of the discussion is to help students improve how they play the game.  (You can review the scientific content of the game in Lesson 3. ) Then, conduct a classroom discussion that centers on the following questions:
  • Where is Harold moving in the game?
  • How is electrical charge used in this world?
  • What creatures does he find in this environment?  How can he temporarily immobilize them?
  • Are there different sized Nanoids?  How does size make a difference in this world?
  • Does the surface that the game is played on change in world three?  How is it different? 
  • Does Harold's and the Nanoids' ability to walk on these surfaces change? How?
  • What can Harold use to jump differently in this world?
HOMEWORK: Have students try to complete World 3 for homework.
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