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55 Ways to Have Fun With Google. Go to Table of Contents. Visit Gifcom.

Google’s “define” operator allows you to look up word definitions. For example, define:nasa yields “National Aeronautics and Space Administration” along with many more explanations. You can also enter what is nasa for similar results.

Google searches for all of your words, whether or not you write a “+” before them. Therefore, writing queries +like +this is not really necessary.

Sometimes, Google seems to understand “natural language” queries and shows you so-called “onebox” results. This happens for example when you enter goog, weather new york, ny, war of the worlds (for this one, movie times, move ratings and other information will show), or beatles (which yields an instant discography).

Not all Googles are the same! Depending on your country, Google might forward you to a different version of Google with potentially different results to the same query. For example in Germany and France, certain results are censored for a long time now. In early 2006, Google decided to self-censor Chinese search results (such as web pages of human rights organizations) in compliance with Chinese government requests – which not only resulted in an oddly skewed Google.cn, but also a public outcry from both diehard fans and organizations such as Reporters Without Borders.

For some search queries, Google uses its own search result advertisement system to offer jobs. Try entering work at google and sometimes, you find job offers straight from Google.

Some say that whoever turns up first for the search query president of the internet is, well, the President of the internet. Take a look at the results for this search to find out who’s currently ruling you!

Can you guess why the Disney homepage is in a top 10 search result position when you enter “Exit”, “No”, or “Leave” into Google? Try it out, you’ll be surprised (I won’t spoil here why this is happening, but it has something to do with adult websites).

Google doesn’t have “stop words” anymore. Stop words traditionally are words like “the”, “or” and similar which search engines tended to ignore. Nowadays, Google includes all of your words, even the former stop words.

You can use the wildcard character “*” in phrases. This is helpful for finding song texts – let’s say you forgot a word or two, but you remember the gist, as in "love you twice as much * oh love * *." You can