Catholic Youth and Family Resources 

compiled by Fr. Raul M. Asuncion


 



INSPIRATIONS BASED ON THE

DAILY MASS READINGS


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PARENTS' TOOLKIT


Honoring Thy Fathers. Bradford Wilcox, a young University of Virginia sociologist, writes an article claiming that the practice of one's faith helps a man to put his family first. This implies that religion plays a crucial role in fostering the father-image. Wilcox shows it in another report he wrote for the Institute of American Values on fatherhood and religion. Although these articles are written in the American context, the article lets us think about the Philippine situation of a weak or absent father-figure.


PRAYERS AND DEVOTIONS




Our Lady of Sorrows. " Since the 16th century Catholic piety has assigned entire months to special devotions. Due to her feast day on September 15, the month of September has traditionally been set aside to honor Our Lady of Sorrows. All the sorrows of Mary (the prophecy of Simeon, the three days' loss, etc.) are merged in the supreme suffering at the Passion. In the Passion, Mary suffered a martyrdom of the heart because of Our Lord's torments and the greatness of her love for Him. "She it was," says Pope Pius XII, "who immune from all sin, personal or inherited, and ever more closely united with her Son, offered Him on Golgotha to the Eternal Father together with the holocaust of her maternal rights and motherly love. As a new Eve, she made this offering for all the children of Adam contaminated through his unhappy fall. Thus she, who was the mother of our Head according to the flesh, became by a new title of sorrow and glory the spiritual mother of all His members" (From catholicculture.org). For a history of this devotion, you may read this article.

THE WARP & WOOF OF HUMAN MATURITY

Why do people cheat? People cheat under the cloak of anonymity. Cheaters people blame others to avoid responsibility. Cheats do lack character. In this article Francis Kong provides us an explanation why people cheat.

BRAVE CATHOLICS



Irena Sendler: The "Angel of the Warsaw Ghetto" dies at the age of 98. As a nurse during the Nazi occupation of Poland, she saved 2,500 Jewish children from certain death at the hands of the Gestapo. Undaunted by dangers (including the moment she was arrested and brutally tortured), she continued her courageous effort. Like John Paul II, she was nominated to the Nobel Peace Prize. However, she did not get it, like John Paul II. Anybody knows how Al Gore got his?


CHURCH HISTORY

Great Moments In Church History
Episode 1: Christ to Constantine

Listen to the EWTN audio series of Fr. C. John McCloskey with Harry Crocker III, a convert to Catholicism and author of Triumph: The Power and Glory of the Catholic Church. A 2,000-Year History.

Crocker has worked as a journalist, speech writer and book editor, with a serious award for a comic novel he wrote. In this series, Fr. McCloskey interviews the author about the history of the Church and how the Church has shaped world history over the past 2000 years. These two master communicators bring history alive with verve, humor and insight.

THE BURNING EMBER OF THE SPIRITUAL LIFE

Avoiding Bad Situations.

Avoiding occasions of sin is a spiritual practice that aims to get a person out of his vices and evil inclinations. Occasions of sin may be impure relationships, certain places, specific occasions like being home alone, etc. Life Teen's Brooke Burns tells us how to avoid occasions of sin based on her personal experience. Life Teen is a US-based Catholic youth ministry.



THE SPLENDOR OF CATHOLIC DOCTRINE


Night of the Living Catechism.

The Catechism of the Catholic Church takes the primary teachings of the Catholic Church in just one book. It is thicker than some phone books. Is it readable? The Catechism of the Catholic Church is a big looking book, but is it as scary as it looks? Check out this video from That Catholic Show series for the answer! That Catholic Show is created by Greg and Jennifer Willits.


FILM REVIEW






Journey to the Center of the Earth.

A film based on the classic Jules Verne novel "Journey to the Center of the Earth," Journey to the Center of the Earth stars Brendan Fraser (Crash, The Mummy) as a science professor whose untraditional hypotheses have made him the laughing stock of the academic community. But on an expedition in Iceland, he and his nephew stumble upon a major discovery that launches them on a thrilling journey deep beneath the Earth's surface, where they travel through never-before-seen worlds and encounter a variety of unusual creatures. Journey to the Center of the Earth is directed by Academy Award-winning visual effects veteran Eric Brevig (Total Recall, Pearl Harbor) from a screenplay by Michael Weiss and Jennifer Flackett & Mark Levin. The film gives importance to male-bonding, family-style.

BOOK REVIEW

Embryo: A Defense of Human Life. Princeton professor Robert P. George and his co-author, University of South Carolina philosopher Christopher Tollefsen, make a compelling and rational case that the human embryo is, as a matter of scientific fact, a developing human being—i.e., a living member of the species Homo sapiens in the earliest stages of development—and thus, as a matter of basic justice, a possessor of inherent dignity and a right to life. In Embryo, the authors eschew religious arguments and make a purely scientific and philosophical case that the fetus, from the instant of conception, is a human being, with all the moral and political rights inherent in that status. For those who are involved or interested in the debates surrounding abortion, euthanasia, stem cell research, in vitro fertilization, cloning, etc., and for those interested in how natural law could be applied to such questions, Embryo by George and Tollefsen is an important contribution. Click on the book's image to listen to Professor Robert George in National Review Online's Between the Covers (hosted by John Miller).



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