BEING A RESPONSIBLE
BEACH VISITOR

  Access the beach by using the walkways and boardwalks only 

  Please stay out of the dunes. Set up your lawn chairs and blankets on the beach

  Do not take motorized vehicles on the dunes or onto the beach

  Look but don't touch the wildflowers and or plants. The dune grasses are not weeds.
     The wild flowers you pick may be rare. Both help to anchor the sand in place

  Do not bring pets to the beach

  Carry out your garbage or place it into garbage cans provided, leaving only your footprints
 
 

Select from the links below for a full overview of the reports on this plan, prepared by Geoff Peach of the Lake Huron Centre for Coastal Conservation


 

 
 
This management plan follows a similar plan undertaken for the south Sauble Beach (Main St. to Sixth St.) in 2004. Both plans were commissioned by the Friends of Sauble Beach. The plan was prepared by Geoff Peach, Coastal Resources Manager with the Lake Huron Centre for Coastal Conservation. The area from Sixth St. north to the Sauble River is the focus of this plan.

Components of this plan were completed by experts contracted by the Coastal Centre. Dr. Jane Bowles provided a vegetation inventory and assessment. Mr. Larry Porter, OALA, assisted with the determination of access points which he identified on a map of the project area. He also provided cost estimates for the implementation of the access trails. (85 pages). 


 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
  • Beach Grasses?

    The wet grasses are a result of a wet beach. Grasses normally found in healthy dunes do not like wet areas but rather the drier raised sand dunes. Invasive species are able to colonize these wet areas resulting in swamp-like conditions.

  • Boardwalks: Who installed them and who maintains them?

    FSB, with the permission of the Town of South Bruce Penninsula, raised funds and contracted the building of boardwalks and the FSB Lookout at 6th Street. The TSBP is responsible for the ongoing cleaning and maintenance. To correct any misinformation, signs have been placed on the newest/best boardwalks at Sauble Falls Road, 11th, 8th and Essex Streets identifying FSB as the doners. We have plans in place to improve 2 more boardwalks south of 6th St. but in 2011 received no support from the Town.

  • Black Sand: Is this pollution showing up on our beach?
  • You may have walked along the beach and noticed patches or streaks of black on the sand's surface and wondered, is it pollution, an oil spill, top soil? Actually, these black sand streaks that accumulate along our beaches are the mineral magnetite. The gentle waves of summer pile fresh sand onto the shore. As the sand dries, winds blow finer, lighter grains into the dunes, leaving the heavier minerals behind. By summer's end, the heavy iron-rich grains of magnetite have accumulated to the point that some stretches of beach appear quite black. Magnetite can be easily collected by using a magnet. More information on Magnetite.

  • Cars on the beach: Why are there cars allowed on the beach at the archway?

    The Town of South Bruce Peninsula's Dynamic Beach Bylaw 64-2004 (DBB) specifically exempts two properties from their DBB. The two properties exempted are both located at the Archway area of the beach.

  • Cars on the beach: Why can we not have cars on the north end of the beach?

    As an organization with a strong environmental focus, Friends of Sauble Beach is absolutely against any motorized vehicle on the beach. Concerns such as safety, pollution, congestion, racing, beach compaction and noise are some of the issues which will exist should vehicles be allowed on the beach. The Town of South Bruce Peninsula passed a by-law in 2004 called the
    Dynamic Beach ByLaw that regulates a series of uses on the beach including driving/parking. FSB support the concept that parking not be allowed on the beach, as well as the other issues dealt with in the By-law. If you have concerns about this by-law, contact the Town of South Bruce Peninsula at 519-534-1100






  • Garbage: There is an excess of garbage in our area of the beach/dunes.

    Friends of Sauble Beach is not involved in the collection of garbage on the beach. We have, however, established an 'Dopt A Dune program in which concerned people check their areas of the dune for litter. If you feel your area of the beach needs attention, please contact the Town of South Bruce Peninsula. Please contact Friends of Sauble Beach if you feel your area of the dune needs attention.

  • Garbage Cans: We need more in our area of the beach.

    Friends of Sauble Beach is not involved in the placement, the number nor the collection of garbage from cans on the beach. We have, however, been instrumental in raising money for Garbage Can Lids which have significantly reduced the amount of garbage distributed by the gulls and our strong NW winds. If you feel your area of the beach needs attention, please contact the Town of South Bruce Peninsula

  • Garbage Can Lids:   We need one on a can(s) in our area of the beach.

    Friends of Sauble Beach has donated over $2,500.00 towards the purchase of lids for garbage cans on the beach. Each lid costs approximately $100.00. The municipality matches the FSB funds resulting in 40 lids being purchased. Our goal is to continuously reduce the amount of litter on the beach. Most cans on the beach are now covered, protecting the contents from the gulls and our strong NW winds. If a lid has gone missing please contact the Town of South Bruce Peninsula. Please contact Friends of Sauble Beach if you know of a can which needs a lid and has never had one.
    The money donated by the FSB was raised by its annual raffle. The goal is to reduce the amount of litter on the beach. Nearly all the cans now have a cover protecting the contents from the wind and gulls.

  • Invasive Species:  How do I confirm that I found an invasive species?

    Information on the Common Reed well as many other invasive species can be found at Lake Huron Centre for Coastal Conservation. In the fall of 2008, Dr. Janice Gilbert of the Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) from London started an experimental test program on eliminating the Common Reed at Sauble Beach. [updated-Apr 2009] To further assist you in identifying other Invasive Species, Peter Seibert of FSB has prepared a fact sheet covering more invasive species
    .

 

  • Invasive Species:  What action should I take if I find some?

    If in doubt, it is best to contact Friends of Sauble Beach and a knowledgeable member will get back to you.

  • Paid Parking: Who controls the rates, hours, ticketing and how can it be justified?

    Friends of Sauble Beach has no control over any aspect of paid parking at Sauble Beach. This is strictly an initiative of the Town of South Bruce Peninsula. Our mandate is to preserve, protect, enhance and improve the natural resources and environment of the shoreline at Sauble Beach. Our area of concern encompasses from the water's edge to the road-side edge of the sand dunes.

  • People in the Dunes: Why is the town not not enforcing the by-law?  

    FSB makes yearly presentations to TSBP Council requesting a By-Law concerning the Sauble's dunes. At present there is still no legal means of enforcing co-operation. We are doing our best to educate the public but it is a slow process. The By-Law officer can request that people leave voluntarily but has nothing official to back him/her up. We encourage individuals to make their feelings known to your elected representatives

  • Ponding: Are ponds developing on some areas of the beach?

    Ponding is a natural phenomenon created as the sand builds up at the lake's edge over the summer. This hump of sand creates a depression behind it which tends to trap water flowing towards the lake. Ponds will disappear throughout the winter as the ice and snow scours the beach. Ponds will appear at various areas of the beach depending on the natural forces at work. eg: wind & wave action. A wet spring/summer can contribute to a rise in the water table which will add to the water collecting in the ponds.

  • Sand Dunes: What value are they? 

    Sand dunes are the first line of defence against storms and act as a buffer protecting property and natural habitats. They provide a flexible barrier to the movement of high lake levels and waves. If sand dunes are damaged or destroyed, coastal resources are likely to experience storm damage. During the high water levels of the late 1980's, millions of dollars were spent building structures to protect coastal properties and municipal waterfronts along Lake Huron. Due to the extensive sand dune community at Sauble Beach, the need to create man-made shore protection was minimal. The four kilometres of sand dunes found at Sauble Beach have a value of several million dollars simply as shore protection. Evidence of the power of Lake Huron was demonstrated on September 4-5, 2010 when waves reached the toe of the dunes in several locations. On calm days the distance between waters edge and the toe of the dunes can be as 100 metres at certain locations along the beach. The present level of Lake Huron is approximately one metre lower than it was during the high point of the 1980's.   Read our fact sheet for further information.   View photos of high water levels at Sauble
    Only seven significant sand dune communities exist along the shores of Lake Huron: one in the State of Michigan; one on Manitoulin Island; and five along the eastern shore of Lake Huron. The sand dune community at Sauble Beach is the second largest in size.
  • Sand Fencing: Why is there sand fencing being installed on the beach?

    Sauble Beach contains a finite amount of granitic sand laid down when the glaciers from the last ice age melted. No more sand is being created. The prevailing winds are a significant factor in the migration of sand into the dunes. Not only are the pleasing views of the beach obstructed as the dune heights grow, but more importantly, the beach area is losing sand. As the beach level drops it approaches the water table and becomes wet, encouraging non-native grasses to grow. This new food source and standing water attract birds including geese and gulls resulting in possible increased e. coli levels. In addition, this finite amount of sand is lost forever when it migrates beyond the dunes onto the roadways and adjacent properties. Permanent sand fencing has been installed from the FSB Lookout at 6th street north to the mouth of the Sauble river. 
    This continuous movement of sand scours the beach and is a significant problem for the dune-beach ecosystem. Migration of sand is further accelerated by the many blow-outs created when people do not use the designated walkways. FSB continues to enhance the boardwalks to minimize the impact on the dunes and control the blowing sand. Not only are the pleasing views of the beach obstructed as the dune heights grow, but more importantly, the beach area is losing sand. As the beach level drops it approaches the water table and becomes wet, encouraging non-native grasses to grow.  This new food source and standing water attracts birds including geese and gulls resulting in possible increased ecoli levels.  In addition, this finite amount of sand is lost forever when it migrates beyond the dunes onto the roadways and adjacent properties. In August of 2007 a permanent sand fence was erected at the northernmost entrance to the beach. In 2008 additional permanent sand fences were erected southwards to the FSB Lookout at 6th Street N. Efforts continued in October of 2009with the installation of additional permanent sand fences from Kinloss Lane northwards to 5th Street N. 

  • Sewers: What is FSB's position on the proposed sewers?
          FSB's position on the Sewer Study, is stated in a letter to the Town of South Bruce on July 27th, 2010.
 
  • Water Quality: What have been the E. coli levels at Sauble Beach since 2004?
     
    The Grey Bruce Public Health Unit tests the water 10 - 12 times a season. The results have been consistently very good - just one more reason Sauble Beach is one of the best beaches in the world... and we must work to keep it that way!

  • Wet Beach:  Why is there so much water on some areas of the beach?

    Some areas of the beach have had the sand removed to the point that its level is now very close to the water table. Friends of Sauble Beach has consistently advised against raking the beach. After raking, the sand dries out and our strong NW winds blow it towards the road where it is stopped by the dunes. This causes the level of the beach to lower creating a wet beach. As the sand is stopped, the height of the dunes rises blocking the views of our beautiful lake. Sand must be allowed to accumulate in these low wet areas. The plants will re-colonize the area and help trap the blowing sand. 
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