Goya

The following video presentaion was created for the exhibit

 "GOYA’S CAPRICHOS: DREAMS OF REASON AND MADNESS"

at San Jose Museum of Art in the Spring of 2008. It ncludes several images and information about the artist and his work.  The video is just over four minustes long, and is well worth viewing.  For more information on Goya see artlicle by Kyla Ward Tabula-Rasa website.

Home / Index

About

Adaptations

Frankenstein Text

Works Cited

The image below reminded me of Henry Fuseli's painting "The Nightmare," which was one of Mary Shelley's insirations for Frankenstein. The caption below the sleeping person reads "The sleep of reason produces monsters." (Photo Source)

 

 

Home /Index

About

Adaptations

Frankenstein Text

Works Cited

The information about Goya is included because it appears that  in the film adaptaion of Frankenstein  the creature is modled after a Goya paingting.  San Jose Museum of art had an exhibition in Spring of 2008.  The following is from the San Jose Museum of Art web page. 

"Utilizing satire and a dark imagination, Spanish painter and printmaker Francisco Goya published Los Caprichos, a series of 80 etchings in 1799. Goya was stone deaf; therefore he relied on his keen observation to represent Spain during a period of social and economic hardship. Los Caprichos portrays goblins and aristocrats alike, enacting the excesses of the nobility and the corruption of the church. Goya’s characters themselves exist somewhere between actuality and fantasy. In fact, in Spanish the term “capricho” means whim or an expression of the imagination. Goya used whimsy but also gross caricature to expose a nation rife with corruption and evil.
Born in Fuendetodos, Spain, in 1746, Goya began painting at the age of 14. His career was solidified when he was appointed court painter to King Carlos III, and a handful of royal commissions led to numerous portraits of the Spanish aristocracy. In this context, Goya was particularly courageous in critiquing the foibles and hypocrisy of his own patrons. By doing so, he set a precedent for the art of dissent, a core credo of avant-garde modernism. This particular suite of Los Caprichos originally belonged to the Duke of Osuna and at one point was in the collection of the Prado. Goya’s Caprichos: Dreams of Reason and Madness was organized by Landau Traveling Exhibitions, in association with Denenberg Fine Arts, West Hollywood, CA. "