images of the creature

drawings and the like

prometheus homepage

about this site

letter the fourth

chapter the fourth

an explication

contemporary authorship: m. a. lamb

shelley's letters

minor character analysis

modern adaptations: walt and warhol

existentialism: jean paul sartre

a review of a review

works cited

a wordy but helpful note about viewing this page: all the photos are clickable, and will automatically open a large-scale version of the file. you may also click on the hyperlink titled "the link" for the same effect, or to see the source material. additionally, if clicking on the photo itself does not open the file properly, it is likely because the website with the photo is framed, and the image is in fact connected to a file and not a website. clicking "the link" next to the photo should open the file's page properly. to see the website on which the picture may be found, click "the original context". for a complete list of other sources that have contributed to the creation of this website, please visit the works cited page, linked just above.


printable outline from a children's coloring book. perhaps the iconic form of frankenstein's creature, it appears here in a zombie-type stance, with a blocked head, equally-blockish haircut, torn clothes, and neck bolts.

the link 

the original context

 


cartoon strip by phil nelson, featuring frankenstein and his monster. and a shark.

the link

the original context

 

 

a feature illustration of dick briefer's comic book the monster of frankenstein
(1954). the comic's title gives the connotation that the monster is frankenstein's mignion, or prizefighter.

the link

the original context

                                                                        the full comic book 

 

two sketches of the creature's visage, created by illustrator george coghill. the distinct aggressive smile and glassy eye in these iterations of the creature make it look like decidedly maniacal, if cartoonish.

the original context

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a sketch of the creature, from the imagination of blogger/illustrator nikki, who calls this pencil drawing "extreme doodling" (16 september 2007). nikki highlights her attention to detail: she wished to make the creature's parts look disproportionate and mismatched. the result is much like the image of the iconic  helper, igor, or literary hunchback quasimodo, a famously sympathetic creature.  

 

                                                     the link

                                                     the original context (nikki's blog)

 

a gravesite from a jewish cemetary on union avenue in pennsauken, new jersey (28 december 2005), photographed and posted by the owner of the blog eCache.

the link 

the original context 

   

an ipod cover for second generation nanos, by designer cris01. greenish in hue and complete with wolfman-like fang, in this conception of the creature. only $6.99.

the link 

the original context

 

 

illustration from nighthawk comics contributor berni wrightson, titled chapter 23, page 171: "death of elizabeth". particularly odd about this drawing is elizabeth's noteably gangly arm, rather like a chimp's. (see the front-and-back view of the creature just down the page for an interesting comparison.)

the link

the original context 

 

sketch by charles roller, the creative director of the marketing deparment for the university of central florida. spot-on with the features of the iconic creature, but noteably advanced in age and comparatively stitchless.

the link

the original context 

 

illustration by artist scott morse for little book of horror: frankenstein. purchased in limited edition at comic con 2005. here, frankenstein looks contemplative, either in the process of thought or, having become self-aware, studying his brutish hands.

the link

the original context

rodin's statue (wikipedia)

 

homepage image from watershed online's frankenstein pages, entitled a frankenstein study: anatomy of a story. watercolor media aside, note the image's resemblance to da vinci's vitruvian man, a work thought to be a sketch of "the proportional man".

the link 

the original context

the vitruvian man (wikipedia)

   

illustrations by allan sanders, originally posted on his blog, loopland. the top image is simply a drawing of the creature. the bottom image, explains sanders in his blog entry, is a rough draft of a product for a national education client. interestingly, the two images appear to be disconnected, but are placed one below another on the same web page.

the link (top drawing)

the link (bottom drawing) 

the original context (loopland blog)






illustration of the creature at his most anthropomorphic, from the blog of writer michael may. note the creature's chisled, veiny, adonis body, almost like a superhero in towering build, and how its frame quite contrasts its rotting, skeleton-like face.

the link

the original context

 

  

from the blogspot of andi north, who reviews a literature challenge in which she has recently participated (31 october 2007). note the violin that the creature carries, and his apparent propensity to commune with nature.

the link

the original context

                                                                 st. francis of assisi (wikipedia)

 

a sketch with front and back views. of note are the creature's impish, ape-like qualities, such as scrawny legs, nearly dragging knuckles, and patchy hair; recall stevenson's alter-ego figure mr. hyde.

the link 

                                                                        the original context

 

while a cartoon, it is interesting to observe that "nature's call" does control frankenstein, making him an immediately sensitive to whom the reader may somehow relate in a visceral manner.

the link

                                                                        the original context

 

a musing for an alternate book cover illustration from classic comics, a website that translates classic novels into accessible graphic novels. the image evokes the feeling that the creature is filled with rage--or certainly,  with power--and is angry, vengeful, or worse: triumphant.

the link 

the original context

 

 a thoroughly sympathetic creature--with sad eyes, a pressed coat and haberdashery shirt, a crinkled frown, and a cherishing posture--cradles a wilting rose. the sentiment that the creature cares deeply about fragility, even as far as it is a champion of the weak, is evoked in this image. this image recalls tim burton's clay-mation style.

the link 

the original context 

 

a mask created by way of celebrating the "day of the dead" holiday. here, the frankenstein visage appears to be sewn onto an actual human face, implying either a synthesis of creature and human or perhaps that one underlies the other, and that one is beginning to emerge where the other once dominated; the image suggests either fusion or conflict, and celebration, regardless.

the link

the original context 


here is a full-head mask built for a costume of the creature; it is part of a larger, full-body costume. eerily reminiscent of the mask worn by michael myers, villain in the legendary halloween horror film series: note the lifeless eyes, tousled hair, and expressionless lips and jawline.

the link

the original context 



frankenstein poster design from david lance goines, a freelance designer. especially interesting is the skeleton's life-like possession and manipulation of a rose, and the flower's orientation at the exact place that classicaly denotes feeling and inter-human empathy: the heart.

the link 

the original context