Teachers I Remember - Part Three


Cyphering , History and Geography - Cijferen, Geschiedenis en  Aardrijkskunde

To return to The Forthuyse Homepage, click on: http://forthuyse.googlepages.com/

Map of the Netherlands, linking to the province pages; the red dots mark the capitals of the provinces and the black dots other notable cities or towns. 

De mussen vallen van het dak, the sparrows are falling off the roof! That's how hot it is here in generally cool San Francisco. It is horrible! The only really cool place to be is in the airconditioned spaces of a big shopping center. Even the Alliance Française is unairconditioned. But that's where I am, doing my heroic best telling you about the nitty gritty of life in Sungei Gerong, and so forthuyse, enzovoorthuijsen....

Before I go on, I want to stick around my old elementary school yard for just a moment to mention some more names I remember of teachers and classmates. After Mevrouw Jansen in third grade I remember having Meneer Hanegraaf in fourth and fifth grade and Meneer Hoogendorp in sixth grade. Hoogendorp was the school principle and when he left, Hanegraaf took over in sixth grade as well.

Fourth grade was when we started doing serious arithmatic, rekenkunde, or what we would also call cijferen, cyphering in Dutch--a subject I really hated and was never good at. Right after our cyphering session we always had swimming, next door to our school in the company pool, which was the joy of my life. Unfortunately,  I was always the last one in the pool for I had to finish my cyphering assignment in class: adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing endless series, eindeloze reeksen of meaningless numbers. Boooringgg! How I ever managed to become a mortgage broker at some point in my motley career is beyond me. But then, once you start putting dollar or €uro $igns in front of th€ numb€r$, th€y $udd€nly $€€m to b€com€ a whooool€ lot l€$$ boring.

I really liked Meneer Hanegraaf, however--he was a very easy going guy, a kind of male Mevrouw Jansen, unlike the more high strung and stern Principal, Hoofdonderwijzer Hoogendorp, whom I only had for a short while in the sixth grade. In the fifth grade we began to study geography--first the simple geography of the Netherlands--followed by the more complicated geography of the Indonesian archipelago, or Tanah Air Kita, our land and water, as it is called in the B.I., which is short for Bahasa Indonesia, the national language of Indonesia--also spoken in Malaysia, where it is called B.M. or Bahasa Melayu--as well as in Papua New Guinee, Melanesia, and much of the south-western Pacific, as a kind of lingua franca. Here is a nice video I found on YouTube - Indonesia Tanah Air--Note: air means water in the Bahasa Indonesia and is pronounced as ah-yer.

Interestingly enough, the original lingua franca was of course very early Dutch, for it was the language of the Franks, whose home base was in the Netherlands--but who eventually adopted vulgar Latin, the Latin of the people, for convenient administrative purposes until that was supplanted by the French which grew out of it--and which technically speaking had little to do with the language of the Franks, and more with Gallo-Roman Latin. But that is of course another story--and since I am bel et bien en Francophonie here at the Alliance, I'd  better be somewhat more circumspect. Besides, M. Proust, I do love your Gallo-Romance language! I can see you sitting up there hautainly looking down from your shelf and I don't want you to disapprove of me, but oh, what the heck, let me give you some more on the subject of the Frankish language anyway, to explain myself:

Salian Franks - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

From the early 7th century on the name Salian Franks (or Salii in Latin) is used to contrast with the Ripuarian Franks. Salii may have derived from the name of a river in the Netherlands: once called Isala, or Sal, currently named IJssel[3] signalling the people's movement and residence in that area of Gaul.[4] Even nowadays, this area is called Salland....The Salian Franks are one of the people that formed the foundation for early Dutch culture and society (along with for example the Frisians, Batavians and Saxons). According to modern scholars like Robinson their language evolved from Franconian into Dutch.

Old Frankish - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Old Frankish has introduced the modern French word for the nation, France, to mean "land of the Franks", but except from loanwords, French is not closely related to Frankish. By the year 900 Frankish had evolved into Old Low Franconian (including Old Dutch) in the area that was originally held by Franks of the 4th century, while in Valois and Île-de-France (Paris) it was replaced by Old French as the dominating language.

Old Dutch (aka Old West Low Franconian) is a branch of Old Low Franconian spoken and written during the early Middle Ages (c. 500 - 1150) in the Netherlands and the northern part of present-day Belgium (Flanders), as well as in areas of northern France along the North Sea coast and adjoining Belgium. This language represents the first attested stage of the Dutch language and its dialects, being succeeded by Middle Dutch in the later Middle Ages.

From the extensive Old Dutch  link I will quote the following excerpt:

The earliest sentence of what has clearly been identified as Old Dutch (as opposed to generic Old Frankish) comes from the "Lex salica", written in the early 6th century: "Maltho thi afrio lito" ('I say, I free you, half-free') This phrase was used to free a serf. Apart from this the Lex Salica also contains a number of loose Old Dutch words.

The Isala or IJsel is what we call the northern branch of the Rhine river, the one that flows into the old Zuyderzee now called IJselmeer since it has been dammed off from the North Sea and partially drained as shown on the map.

Note also that ij is a single letter in Dutch--just as the w, originally written vv or uu and hence still called a 'double u' is a single letter in English--so you capitalize it as IJ, never as Ij or Y. 

Vvhatever, ça n'importe, quoi? Uuhat does it matter anuuuau? Or is it anvvvav? Or anyyyay? Or anijijijaij?

In the Dutch Alphabet the IJ is found where you find the Y in other languages. Technically, we don't have a Y in the Dutch alphabeth--which doesn't prevent us from using it anyway whenever we see fit--and even where it isn't fit....We don't even have a Dutch name for the y --we call the y by its French name: y grec--which was the u-psilon in Greek, written as a u in lower case, but as a Y in upper case: Y-psilon. In Anglophonia the you is called a why, but don't u ask me y. The ij is generally called een lange ij (a long ij) by the Dutch, to distinguish it from de korte ei (the short ei), which is two letters with one sound, pronounced just like ij, which is one letter with the same sound. Ahi me! Que confusion.

As a word, ei means egg (but then we say 'het ei,' not 'de ei') while ij as a word means water (like eau it is derived from aqua > aa >ij) or bay. See: IJ - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia and again we would then say 'het IJ' not 'de IJ.' In summary: aqua = aa = eau = ij = water.

In modern Dutch we have two kinds of articles: the neuter (het) and the gender neutral (de). That may seem a fine distinction without a difference, except that we used to have bel et bien a masculine (den) and feminine article (de), but since the final n is rarely pronounced in modern Dutch, the two fell into each others arms and out came a gender neutral baby article, looking just like its mother (de) but often behaving pretty much like Dad (den) when the circumstances call for it. The morale of this sub-plot seems to be that like everything else,except perhaps religion (?), language evolves.

But lets go on. The town of IJmuiden - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia is the place where the IJ flows into the North Sea--through the Noordzeekanaal. Note also that the IJ is the name of the body of water or bay on which Amsterdam is located and into which the Amstel river used to flow freely, before they threw up that dam after which Amste(le)rdam was named.

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The Amstel River and the Munttoren, Amsterdam on Flickr - Photo ...

Confused?

Alright, lets just leave it at that and have ourselves a little Amstel Beer to clear our head.

And now, for another welcome change of pace, here is a little video from YouTube - Indonesia Tanah Air

Note: Air means land, not air in B.I., and is pronounced ah-yer. Sayah mau minum air: I want to drink some water.

But now back to class folks: I was fascinated by the shapes of the various provinces, each colored in vivid shades of red, green blue purple, and so on. Holland is compact, but unlike our southern neighbor, Belgium, it has a distinct and very recognizable shape, with a complicated coast line and numerous small islands.

In comparison, our closest neighbor, practically our twin, the Southern Netherlands or 2.1 Belgium , has only a very short coast line and no islands at all. But it has lots of beautiful ancient towns, very fine beer and its famous frites.

Belgium Map

Belgians claim that "French" fries are in fact Belgian, but definitive evidence for the origin is difficult to present. Belgian historian Jo Gerard recounts that potatoes were already fried in 1680 in the Spanish Netherlands, in the area of "the Meuse valley between Dinant and Liège, Belgium. The poor inhabitants of this region allegedly had the custom of accompanying their meals with small fried fish, but when the river was frozen and they were unable to fish, they cut potatoes lengthwise and fried them in oil to accompany their meals."[11][12][13]The Dutch concur with a Southern Netherlandish or Belgian origin when referring to Vlaamse frieten ('Flemish fries').

Anyway,  back in Sungei Gerong, amidst the steaming jungles of Sumatra on the 'pirate infested' Musi river, we learned, like so many generations of  young Dutch school kids over the centuries--that 'the Rhine comes at  Lobith into our country,' de Rijn komt bij Lobith ons land binnen--which now appears to have been all a mistake:

 Spijk a/d Rijn Rijnwaarden - De Rijn komt bij "Lobith" ons land binnen. "Wat een flauwekul", moppert een inwoonster van Rijnwaarden als ze deze gemeenplaats hoort, Lobith ligt helemaal niet aan de Rijn, maar het is Spijk waar de rivier ons land binnenkomt".

Translated: The Rhine comes at Lobith into our country. 'What nonsense,' mutters an inhabitant of Rijnwaarden when she hears this platitude--'Lobith doesn't lie on the Rhine at all, but it is Spijk where the river comes into our country.'

Well, shiver me timbers! Ik ben geschokt!--how could Meneer Hanegraaf in fifth grade have been so wrong! 

In checking the map, however, I noticed that Lobith and Spijk are really very close to each other and, because of shifting boundaries, perhaps at one time or another it may indeed have been Lobith that deserved the credit. These shifting national boundaries also affected another important and even more historic location, namely a place called Elten, which is nowadays just on the German side of the border--and since Elten is connected to the name and origins of our family, I will make a little excursion to that location:

First of all, here is a map of the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation in the early 1500's--i.e. before the beginning of the Religious Wars of the Reformation era--showing the various Imperial Circuits or Reichskreise:

Een kaart van het Heilige Roomse Rijk en zijn kreitsen aan het begin van de 16e eeuw. Landen die geen onderdeel uitmaakten van de kreitsen zijn weergegeven in wit.Reichskreis – Wikipedia Die Reichkreise waren übergeordnete, territoriale Einheiten des Heiligen Römischen Reiches Deutscher Nation, die mehrere Landesherrschaften umfassten. Translation: The Imperial Circuits were over-arching territorial units of the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation, which embraced numerous principalities.

Like I said, over many  centuries, Elten was pretty much considered to be a part of the Netherlands--but that was before 1648, when the Netherlands were still considered part--and in many ways the most important part--of the sprawling but highly dysfunctional German Empire, so the distinction then was really academic. With the rise of the nation states and their constant bickering,  the boundaries kept fluctuating and after the Second World War Elten was Dutch again for a while, but then given back to Germany after a referendum of the local inhabitants showed this to be their preference.

Hereunder is a map of the Empire after the 1648 Peace of Westphalia, better known in Dutch as de Vrede van Münster--which concluded the major religious wars of the preceeding century: The Eighty Years War or Tachtigjarige Oorlog between Holland and Spain (1568-1648) and the The Thirty Years War fought mostly in the rest of the Empire.

Afbeelding:Holy Roman Empire 1648.svg

The ancient history of the heerlijkheid ( demesne, domain or manorial estate) and castle *) (manor house) of Voorthuijsen in the area of Elten, goes back at least to the year 970, when the Emperor Otto I ]issued a decree from Ravenna in Italy, then of course also still a part of the Empire, granting 'Voirthusen'  to the  Abbey in Elten:

970,  3 aug.,   "concedimus ... Voirthusen" Gift van Voorthuizen door graaf Wichman aan het klooster te Elten. Transl.: August 3, 970, "we grant ...Voirthusen" Gift of Voorthuizen by Count Wichman to the Abbey in Elten.

*) Side note on the meaning of heerlijkheid (domein, demesne or domain) and kasteel (castello, castle or chateau): When we think of castles, we often have the impression that they were always huge fortifications. This is not true. The word castle, kasteel or chateau in fact comes from castello, which means little castra, i.e. a small fortification. Such a small fortification was also the place where the heer, (lord or seigneur) stayed. To reside or stay is manere in Latin. Hence the word manor was used for such a small fortification. Castra itself was a plural form of castrum and designated more or less what we would call today a military base.

Castra - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - The Latin word castra,[1] with its singular castrum, was used by the ancient Romans to mean buildings or plots of land reserved to or constructed for use as a military defensive position.

See also: Manor house - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

A manor house or fortified manor-house is a country house, which has historically formed the administrative centre of a manor (see Manorialism), the lowest unit of territorial organisation in the feudal system.

Manorialism or Seigneurialism was the organizing principle of rural economy and society widely practiced in medieval western and parts of central Europe. Manorialism was characterised by the vesting of legal and economic power in a lord supported economically from his own direct landholding and from the obligatory contributions of a legally subject part of the peasant population under his jurisdiction. These obligations could be payable in labor (the French term corvée is conventionally applied), produce ("in kind") or, rarely, money. In the Eastern parts of Prussia, the Rittergut manors of Junkers remained until World War II.

For an example of a well known small Dutch Manor house that had at least two notable residents, see:

5.2 Manors of The Netherlands: Huis Doorn (Doorn Manor) is a small manor house that lies outside Doorn, a small town near Utrecht, the Netherlands. The 15th-century house was radically rebuilt in the late 18th century in a conservative taste, then redecorated in the mid-19th century, when the surrounding park was laid out as an English landscape garden. Baroness Ella van Heemstra (b. 1900 - d. 1984), the mother of actress Audrey Hepburn, spent most of her childhood living in the house. The house was purchased in 1919 by William II, the last German Emperor, as his residence-in-exile (1920-1941) after World War I. During his years in exile the former emperor kept in shape by sawing down the estate's trees by the tens of thousands over the years and splitting the logs into vast stacks of firewood, denuding the matured landscape. Hence he was termed by his enemies the 'woodchopper of Doorn'. The Dutch government seized the manor house and its household effects in 1945 as German property. Many new trees were planted, so that after 60 years the wooded parkland is recovering.

And now it is time to roll back a bit for a reference to the first Kaiser and founder of the Holy Roman Empire--who made that land grant of Voirthusen to Elten Abbey: Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: Otto I the Great (23 November 9127 May 973), son of Henry I the Fowler and Matilda of Ringelheim, was Duke of Saxony, King of Germany, King of Italy, and arguably the first Holy Roman Emperor.[1] 

One might wonder why Otto I was in Italy when he made the grant of Voirthusen to Elten Abbey. Well, he was there for good reasons, for he had gone there to defend the papal states from the inroads of the Lombards ( a name which means de Langebaarden, Langobardi, or Longbeards) under Berengar and in return was crowned by a greatful Pope as the first Holy Roman Emperor of the German Nation. L'histoire se repete, for a similar scenario had taken some 162 years earlier when the Karel de Grote (Carolus Magnus or Charlemagne) King of the Franks, was crowned Roman Emperor--on Christmas day of the year 800, to be exact.

See also: King of Italy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, from which I quote:

In the 8th century, estrangement between the Italian Romans and the Byzantine Empire allowed the Lombards to capture the remaining Roman enclaves in northern Italy. However, in 774, they were defeated by the Franks under Charlemagne, who deposed their king and took up the title rex Langobardorum ("King of the Lombards"). Within the Frankish Empire, Italy was ruled by a rex Italiae. This Kingdom of Italy was integrated into the Holy Roman Empire by Otto I. All subsequent emperors used the title and most were crowned at some time in the ancient Lombard capital of Pavia before their imperial coronation in Rome.  

Now that we have that context, let's have some more on the Abbey in Elten, See: Sticht Elten - Wikipedia-

Het Sticht Elten was een adellijk sticht voor vrouwen in het Heilige Roomse Rijk, gelegen in Hoch-Elten, nu gemeente Emmerik. Het sticht was niet bij een kreits ingedeeld. In 968 sticht graaf Wichman van Hamaland op de Elterberg een adellijk sticht voor dames. Zijn dochter Liutgard is de eerste abdis. Keizer Otto I bevestigt de stichting hetzelfde jaar en keizer Otto II verleent het in 973 koninklijke bescherming.

Translation: The Elten Institute was an aristocratic institute for women in the Holy Roman Empire, situated in Hoch-Elten, now in the municipality of Emmerik. The Intitute was not part of a Circuit. In 968 Count Wichman of Hamaland establishes on the Elterberg (Mount Elten) an aristocratic institute for ladies. His daughter Liutgard is the first Abbess. Kaiser Otto I confirms the establishment that same year and Otto II grants it royal protection in 973.

For more on the history and origin of Voorthuijsen itself, 

click on: voorbeeld,  from which I will quote and translate the following few paragraphs:

deurklopper bij de ingang van Heerlijkheid Voorthuijsen

Translation: door knocker at the entrance to Domain Voorthuijsen

Sinds de aanleg van de autobaan is de oude Heerlijkheid Voorthuijsen van Stokkum afgesneden en alleen nog via omwegen bereikbaar. Maar nog tot na de Tweede Wereldoorlog vormde onze Voorthuizerweg de lijnrechte verbinding met het kasteeltje en de heerboerderij. De bewoners van Voorthuijsen hadden omgekeerd altijd nauwe betrekkingen met ons dorp. Zo werkten heel wat Stokkumers er als personeel in de huishouding, als koetsiers of op de boerderij. Ook werd de melk van het grote melkveebedrijf tot de komst van de autosnelweg via Stokkum geleverd aan de zuivelfabriek in Zeddam. Voorthuijsen is een oeroude woonplek, oorspronkelijk horend bij Stokkum.
 
Translation: Since the construction of the Autobahn the old Domain of Voorthuijsen has been cut off from Stokkum and can only be reached in a roundabout manner. But till after WWII the Voorthuizer Way formed a direct connection to the small castle and the manorial farm. In return, the occupants of Voorthuijsen always did have close ties to our village. Quite a few Stokkumers worked there as personel in the household, as coachmen, or on the farm. Until the arrival of the Autabahn the milk from the large dairy enterprise also got delivered through Stokkum to the dairy processing plant in Zeddam. Voorthuijsen is a very ancient habitation, belonging originally to Stokkum.
 
Note: Stokkum is still on the Dutch side of the border--but lost Elten and Voorthuijsen to the German side. The autobahn seems to have 'Westbanked' the area of Elten apart from Stokkum, the way the Apartheid Wall is doing to many ancient Palestinian areas in the Westbank today--cutting formerly integrated localities off from each other. 
 
heemkende - kapelaan akkerman- Stokkum schijnt op een hoogen ouderdom te kunnen bogen. Men beweert, niet zonder grond dat reeds de oude Germanen en Romeinen er zich hebben opgehouden. Als bewijs voor het verblijf der eersten haalt men aan de oude urnen, die hier in de loop der tijden gevonden zijn en al maakt ook hier één zwaluw nog geen lente, toch zal men de vondst moeilijk anders kunnen verklaren. Wellicht dat de oude Menapiërs het dan opgezocht hebben, deels omdat de dichtbeboste hoogten en laagten hun een geschikte schuilplaats boden tegen de Romeinsche legers, die hen voortdurend achtervolgden, zoals Ceasar in zijn "De bello Gallico" verhaalt, deels ook omdat zij in het dichte woud een geschikte bodem vonden om de assche hunner gestorven stamgenoten in aarden potten of urnen te begraven. Het verblijf der Romeinen, ook aan deze zijde van den Rijn verhaalt Wassenberg in zijn boek "Embrica", volgens Julius Ceasar's eigen beschrijving in "De bello Gallico". Wassenberg beweert ook, dat Drusus, met zijn Romeinse leger, nadat hij de Germaansche voikstammen verslagen had, te Emmerik een brug over de Rijn sloeg, en in deze streek vijftig kastelen of versterkten bouwde, waarvan hij o.a. met name noemt: Calcarberg, Cleef, Eltenberg, 's-Heerenberg.
 
Translation: Stokkum seems to be able to claim great antiquity. It is said, not without ground, that the ancient Germanic people and the Romans had already been staying in the area. As proof for the settlement of the afirst- mentioned the ancient urns are cited which have been found here through the years and even though one swallow doth not a spring make, it would nevertheless be difficult to explain the find in any other way. It is therefore likely that the ancient Menapii had visited the place, partly because the heavily forested lowlands and highlands offered them a suitable hiding place from the Roman armies which constantly pursued them, as Caesar relates in his De Bello Gallico, partly as well because they found in the dense woods suitable ground to bury the ashes of their deceased tribesmen in earthen pots and urns. The stay of the Romans, also on this side of the Rhine, is related by Wassenberg in his book 'Embrica' in following Julius Ceasar's own description in 'De Bello Gallico' Wassenberg also claims that Drusus built a bridge across the Rhine near Emmerik with his Roman armies, after having defeated the Germanic tribes, and also built in this region fifty castles or strongholds, of which he mentions by name among others: Calcarberg, Cleef, Eltenberg, 'sHeerenberg.
 
Note: the Menapii - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia were a Belgic [i.e. Gallic or Celtic] tribe of northern Gaul in pre-Roman and Roman times. Their territory according to Strabo and Ptolemy is located at the mouth of the Rhine and from there extending southwards along the Schelde. Their civitas was Cassel (northern France), near Terouanne.
 

Reconstruction of a Menapian dwelling at Destelbergen.

(A) Voorstelling van de nederzetting Staickheim
                                                                                                                    (B) Menapian dwelling at Destelbergen

(A) Sketch and (B) reconstruction of ancient Celtic dwellings at Staickheim (Stokkum) and at Destelbergen

To see aerial photography of the above areas, click on these links showing region with varying resolutions:
--first the general area showing Lobith, Spijk, Stokkum and Elten with Rhine river crossing the border
--then Voorthuysen Road and the Wildt river
--then the actual buildings at the Voorthuysen property
 
Notice by the way that in Germany they use the y, whereas in the Netherlands we use the ij spelling for the location near Elten. The village on the Veluwe is spelled Voorthuizen nowadays--reflecting modern Dutch spelling conventions.
 
 
 

Trandlation:  Farm of New-Voorthuijsen, drawn by Bernd Terhorst

In het jaar 970 na Christus wordt het al schriftelijk vermeld. Maar verondersteld wordt dat het al vele eeuwen eerder een verdedigbare plaats was. Zelfs in de prehistorie is er mogelijk al een nederzetting geweest, maar aan de vondst van oud aardewerk of urnen bij de bouw van de tuinbouwkassen is rond 1960 helaas door archeologen geen aandacht besteed. In 970 was Voorthuijsen een koningshof, door gouwgraaf Wichman van de burcht op de Elterberg geschonken aan keizer Otto 1. In 1134 kwam de ‘Wasserburg' terug in handen van de abdij op Elten, die inmiddels uit de burcht was voortgekomen.

Translation: It [Voorthuijsen]  is already mentioned in writing in the year 970 CE. But it is assumed that it was a defendable location already many centuries earlier. Even in prehistoric times there may already have been a settlement, but unfortunately no attention was paid by archeologists to the discovery of ancient pottery or urns during the construction of the hothouses around 1960. In 970 Voorthuijsen was a royal court given to the Emperor Otto I by count Wichman from the fortress on the Elterberg. In 1134 the 'Wasserburg' reverted into the hands of Elten Abbey, which had meanwhile developed out of the fortress.

Het oude bruggetje over de Wildt bij Voorhuijsen, tekening R van de Pavert

Tr.: The old bridge over the Wildt near Voorthuijsen, drawing R. van de Pavert

In 1951 schreef Leo Gies in zijn boek Elten, Land und Leute, over de naam Voorthuijsen. Aan de belangrijke handelsweg Keulen-Nederland was een voorde of ondiepe plek, waar men door de Wildt kon waden toen er nog geen brug lag, vandaar huis aan de voorde oftewel Voorthuizen--(op de Veluwe ligt ook een dorp Voorthuizen).

Translation: In 1951 Leo Gies wrote in his book Elten, Land and People, about the name Voorthuijsen. Located on the important trading route Cologne - Netherlands was a ford or undeep place where one could wade through the Wildt river when there was not yet a bridge--hence the name 'house on the ford', or fordhouse, Voorthuizen--(On the Veluwe there is also a village called Voorthuizen).

Here is one more website referring to the Estate or Heerlijkheid Voorthuijsen, with some pictures:

heemkende - kapelaan akkerman

Behalve Voorthuysen lagen aan de Wild nog andere reeds lang verdwenen Kastelen, namelijk de “Linthorst”, verder op, oostelijk van ‘s-Heerenberg, de “Immenhorst” en nog verder de “Edelhorst”. Tusschen Emmerik en ‘s-Heerenberg dicht aan den grooten Emme- rikschen weg lag eens het oude riddergoed “Elsepasz”, wier vroe- gere grachten men nog duidelijk kan zien.

Translation: Besides Voorthuysen there were situated on the Wildt still other castles long since gone, namely the Linthorst, further on, east of 's Heerenberg, the Immenhorst and still further the Edelhorst. Between Emmerik and 's Heerenberg close to the great Emmerik road was once the old knight's estate Elsepasz, of which you can still clearly see the former moats. 

Heerlijkheid Voorthuijsen

Heerlijkheid Voorthuijsen

Let me add yet another reference regarding a new residential development in Voorthuizen on the Veluwe named after an early family member, my ancestor Blankert van Voorthusen: 

Van Blanckertsgoed tot Blankensgoed - Home-

Welkom bij Blankersgoed! Van Blanckertsgoed tot Blankensgoed 

Translation: Welcome to Blankersgoed! From Blanckertsgoed to Blankensgoed

Wednesday 07 July 2004

Omgeving Blankensgoed

De wijk Blankensgoed is gepland in Voorthuizen-Noord en wordt (globaal) begrensd door de  Rubensstraat, de Kerkstraat, de Prinsenweg en de sportvelden aan de Roelenengweg.

Translation: The neighborhood of Blankensgoed is planned in Voorthuizen-North [on the Veluwe] and is (approximately) bordered by Rubens Street, Kerk Street, Prinsen Road and the sport fields on Roeleneng Road.

De naam Blankensgoed is in 2006 door het gemeentebestuur aan de in ontwikkeling zijnde wijk toegewezen na een prijsvraag onder de bevolking en is gebaseerd op de historie van het gebied. Van oudsher is hier namelijk een boerderij gevestigd met als laatste bewoners de familie Van Galen aan de Kerkstraat 72/74. De oudst bekende bewoner is Blankert van Voerthusen , die al in 1330 een schatting in ponden moest betalen aan de Abdij van Elten. Zijn nakomelingen kregen doorgaans de naam (van) Blanckers, Blankerts of Blankers. Klik hier voor een fragment van de  genealogie van de familie Blankers. Vanuit historisch oogpunt zou de wijk dus eigenlijk Blankersgoed moeten heten. Dat is dan ook de reden voor deze naam voor deze website. 

Translation: The name Blankengoed was awarded by the municipal administration in 2006 after a competition among the population and was based on the history of the area. Anciently it was namely the location of a farm with as last inhabitants the Van Galen family on 72/74 Kerk Street. The oldest inhabitant was Blankert van Voerthusen, who as early as 1330 had to pay taxes in pounds to the Abbey in Elten. His descendants generally received the name of Blanckers, Blankert or Blankers. Click here, hier for a fragment from the Blankers family genealogy. From a histocial point of view this district should actually be called Blankersgoed. That is therefore the reason for the name for this website.

 

And here is a link to the tax assessment on the land of Blankert van Voerthusen by the abess of Elten ca. 1330

Schatting v.d lande Blankert van Voerthusen llll pond albahissa altihensi ca. 1330. 

Boerderij- en huisnamen in de kadastrale gemeenten Barneveld ... 

What follows now is the patrilinear ancestry of my own children, Saskia and Geoffrey (who added their mother's maiden name Meyer) going 25 generations all the way to Bernhardus (Berndt) van Voorthusen; to help you orient yourself, I'll highlight my own name, John Marinus, as well as Joan, Evert, Blankert and Bernhardus.

Saskia Margareta Meyer van Voorthuijsen (Nov 5 1967 - )
& Geoffrey Leon Meyer van Voorthuijsen (April 27 1970 - )
John Marinus van Voorthuijsen (Jan 7 1942 - )
Willem Marinus van Voorthuijsen (Nov  1916 - )
Otto Bruno Joan van Voorthuijsen (July 1887-1953)
Bruno Otto Adriaan Johan Thomas Joan (1861-1901)
Joan van Voorthuijsen (May 25 1827- Jan 22 1872)
Jan van Voorthuijsen (Sep 21 1787 - Jan 17 1835)
Evert Willemsen van Voorthuijsen (Jul 4 1753 - Sep 1 1821)
Willem Evertsen van Voorthuijsen ( ? - Mar 13 1784)
Evert Petersen van Voorthuijsen (c1680 - May 25 1737)
Peter Gerritsen van Voorthuijsen (c1629 - Aug 6 1684)
Gerrit Petersen van Voorthuijsen (c1605 - after Oct 15 1664)
Peter Gerrits van Voorthuijsen (c1585 - after April 15 1641)
Gerrit Cornelis van Voorthuijsen (1555 - ?)
Cornelis Gerritsz van Voorthuijsem (c1530 - before Feb 18 1597)
Gherridt Corneliss van Voorthuijsen (1505 - ?)
Cornelis Gherridtsz van Voorthusen (c1480 - ?)
Gherrit Evertsoen van Voorthuesen (c1435 -  after 1485)
Evert, ridder (knight) van Voorthusen (c1400 - ?)
Volquijn van Voorthusen die Olde (the Older) (c1355 - ?)
Arnt Blankerts van Voorthusen (c1312 - ?)
Blankart van Voorthusen (c1290 - ?)
Mathias van Voorthusen (c1265 - Jan 10 1310)
Scaken van Voorthusen (c1240 - ?)

Bernhardus van Voorthusen (c1200 - c1293)

Let me finally also add some of my own observations from earlier studies and reflections, just for the fun: 

1. The name Voorthuijsen could mean either fort-house (strong house) or ford-house (house at the ford or pass) which have a similar etymology, since a fortress or stronghold is usually built in, on, or near a pass or a ford, so the pass or ford can be properly defended--and as the above quotations show, Voorthuijsen was known from even prehistoric times as just such a defendable location, or verdedigbare plaats, i.e. a place suitable to build a fortress or stronghold, because it was a place where one could pass through difficult terrain of whatever kind. That's why you will find fjords (watery inlets) by which you can cross through mountainous terrain, as well as fords, voorden, where you can follow a land route across watery terrain. The Greek word poros, pore, is related--it is where substances can pass through your skin.

The Bosporos literally meant Oxford in English or Koevorden in Dutch--all three indicative of a place where cows could cross through watery terrain. Bous in Greek, or Bos/bovis  in Latin both mean ox or cow, the French boeuf and the English beef are both derived from it. Koevorden was a name from which the Candians derived Vancouver(den). See: Coevorden - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, from which I will quote:

Incidentally, the city of Coevorden may have indirectly given its name to the city of Vancouver, British Columbia, which is named after the 18th-century British explorer George Vancouver. The explorer's ancestors (and family name) originally came to England "from Coevorden" (van Coevorden > Vancoevorden > Vancouver).

On the other side of the globe, Singapore, Singha Pura,  literally means Lionfort or Lionford, Leeuwenvoort or Leeuwenvoorde Lionford. See: History of Singapore - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, from which I quote:

The earliest written record of Singapore was a Chinese account from the third century, describing the island of Pu Luo Chung (). This itself is transliterated from the Malay name "Pulau Ujong", or "island at the end" (of the Malay peninsula).[2] The quasi-mythological Sejarah Melayu (Malay Annals) contains a tale of a prince of Srivijaya, Sri Tri Buana (also known as Sang Nila Utama), who landed on the island during the 13th century. When he saw a lion, the prince took this as an auspicious sign and founded a settlement called Singapura, which means "Lion City" in Sanskrit.[3]

Actually the Early history of Singapore - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia tells us that: The first written records of Singapore date to the 2nd century, when the island was identified as a trading post in several cartographic references. The Greek astronomer, Claudius Ptolemaeus, located a place called Sabana in the area where Singapore lies and identified it as a nominon emporion or designated foreign trading port, as part of a chain of similar trading centres that linked Southeast Asia with India and the Mediterranean.[1] A 3rd century Chinese written record described the island of Pu Luo Chung (蒲罗中), probably a transliteration of the Malay Pulau Ujong, "island at the end" (of the Malay peninsula). [2]

I told you language and history can be fun....Now let's have another Singha, that Lion's beer!

Singha logo

But don't drink too much--we are not done yet! Since I was born in Palembang, former capital of the Empire of Srivijaya--which began around the time of Karel de Grote, Charlemagne (700 AD) and ended just around the beginning of the Renaissance (1300 AD)--let me give some more detail that ties in a lot of history:

Srivijaya - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia-or Sriwijaya was an ancient Malay kingdom on the island of Sumatra which influenced much of the Malay Archipelago.[1] The earliest solid proof of its existence dates from the 7th century; a Chinese monk, I-Tsing, wrote that he visited Srivijaya in 671 for 6 months.[2][3] The first inscription in which the name Srivijaya appears also dates from the 7th century, namely the Kedukan Bukit Inscription around Palembang in Sumatra, dated 683.[4] The kingdom ceased to exist between 1200 and 1300 due to various factors, including the expansion of Majapahit.[1] In Sanskrit, sri means "shining" or "radiant" and vijaya means "victory" or "excellence". [5]

Location of Srivijaya

Parameswara (13441414) was a Palembang prince of Hindu descent from Srivijaya that founded Malacca around 1402. Sejarah Melayu alleges that Parameswara was a descendant of Alexander the Great of Macedonia.[citation needed] In the year 1409 he married Malik ul Salih of Pasai's princess, and became a Muslim adopting the Persian title Shah and styled himself as Sultan Iskandar Shah.[1] Records of the Chinese Ming Dynasty Admiral Zheng He's visit to Melaka in 1409 indicate references to the ruler and his subjects as being already Muslims.

In 1414, Parameswara passed away at the age of 70. It is generally believed that he was buried on top of a hill at Tanjung Tuan (also known as Cape Rachado), near Port Dickson. A symbolic grave exists near Fort Canning in Singapore. Parameswara was succeeded by his son, Megat Iskandar Shah who in turn ruled Malacca until 1424.

In case you forgot, (Al) Iskandar is a version of Alexander. Arabic speakers misinterpreted Al to be the article.

In his latest book, Hot, Flat, and Crowded : Thomas L. Friedman : ISBN 9781410407078 ... the author forgot to mention perhaps one of the most important characteristics of today's world: it is fast. We seem to learn fast but forget even faster.

Pagoda in Srivijaya style in Chaiya, Thailand

 
Pagoda in Srivijaya style in Chaiya, Thailand

It could be argued that, even In the old days, the world was global, it's just that communications were slower, ideas spread more slowly, diseases and species spread slowly--and even fewer people then in today's fast paced world had a long enough attention span to deal with that kind of slowness. It took several years to go around the world once! Who had time to wait for news to come back? But eventually, it did, of course.

And just like with today's space exploration, when the news came back--it often was spectacular and everyone would marvel at the new discoveries. But looked at from outer space--we were already a single globe even then.

Its 'just' a matter of limited awareness. All right already, let's not drag this on. Are you still with me?

In English the versions Forthouse or Fordhouse are both appropriate translations of the name Voorthuijsen. Forthuyse, the name of my website, on the other hand is a transliteration, convenient for English and French speakers. Furthausen would be both a transliteration and a translation into German. To  add to all this confusion, Forthuso was sometimes used in Latin documents and is also useful for speakers of Italian and Spanish, Pertassan is the way Indonesians pronounce the name--my father used to be  known as Tuan  Pertassan to the Indonesians at work-- while a Chinese friend of mine told me that the characters Fu Tai Shan  府 泰 山 could be utilized in his language, meaning something like Prefect of the Holy Mountain. A prefect was of course a mandarin, a scholarly civil servant. Hey, don't laugh: you never know when such esoteric knowledge might come in handy to a fruity old prefect such as myself. Here is a picture of China's most holy Holy Mountain, called Tai San, or Tai Shan:

Mount Tai - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mount Tai is one of the "Five Sacred Mountains of Taoism".

I have been known to occasionally use also the name Forthusius, as my more scholarly nom de plume. That kind of latinizing of names was quite common in European academic circles when Latin was the international language. So you see forms like Althusius, Cartesisus, Linnaeus, and more recently, general David Petraeus--himself quite a scholar, and whose father, Sixtus Petraeus, as a Dutch immigrant - see: 1 Early years - from which I will quote:

Petraeus was born in Cornwall-on-Hudson, New York, the son of Miriam (née Howell) and Sixtus Petraeus. His mother was American and his father was a sea captain who had emigrated to the United States from the Netherlands during the initial phase of World War II.[18] Sixtus settled in Cornwall on Hudson, where David Petraeus grew up and graduated from Cornwall Central High School in 1970. Residents called him 'Peaches' in reference to his often-mispronounced last name[19] and the nickname stuck with him as a cadet.[20

2. Now we go one. The name Elterberg or Mount Elten is a bit of a tautology, since the name Elten appears to be derived from the Latin name Alta Mons--which already means  High Mountain--and was then probably contracted to Altamon, Altmon, Eltnon and finally: Elten. For the same reason, Hoog Elten, High Elten, another local name, also is tautological--Elterberg would mean: High Mountain Mountain, and Hoog Elten:  High High Mountain.

For the Eltnon spelling, on which I based my linguistic speculation, see for instance: Burgen und Schlösser im Kreis Kleve- [Tr.: Fortress and Castles in the Circuit of Cleve--a great resource on old castles in Germany--check this link for yourself!]

Eltenberg (Eltnon, Elten, Hochelten). abgegangene Stift. Erhalten: nichts. Ort und Lage: 46446 Emmerich-Niederelten; auf dem Eltenberg
 
[Translation.:  Elterberg (Elltnon, Elten, Hochelten, former Institue (i.e. abbey). Remaining: nothing. Place and location: 46446 Emmerik, Niederelten; on the Elterberg.]

3. Elten eventually became a Kaiserliches Frauenstift or Imperial Women's Abbey where high born ladies would live and work as part of a religious order--presumably copying bibles, doing artwork, working on translations, etc. important work, since the Saxons under Wittekind (Nuttall Encyclopædia), living in the adjacent regions had only recently been forced to adopt Christianity by the Franks under our Keizer Karel de Grote, aka Carolus Magnus or Charlemagne

4. Regarding the village of Voorthuizen on the Veluwe: just for the record let me include some quotes from the following document: Beschrijvinge van de Steeden, Dorpen, Adellijke Huizen enz. in ... 

Voorthuijsen, een dorp in de Veluwe, is voornaamlijk aanmerkingswaardig  door zijn wadde of ondiepe overtocht waervan het zijnen naem ook gekregen heeft. Transation: Voorthuijsen, a village in the Veluwe, is primarily notable for its ford or shallow crossing  from which it also derived its name.

Otto de Groote in zijn brief van t jaar DCCCLXX [i.e. 852, but this must be an error, since Otto the Great: 912-973 was still alive around 962!] behelzende de vereeringe aen de Abdeije van Elten gedaen maekt ook gewag van Voorthuijsen, doch in een brief van Otto de 3 van 't jaer 990. staat er voor Voorthuijsen verkeerdelijk houthuijsen, gelijk in een brief van Keizer Lotharius de 2 van t jaer MCXXXIV (i.e. 934) verkeerdelijk staat Werthuijsen. Translation: [Emperor] Otto the Great in his letter of the year DCCCLXX (852???? an error--see above) regarding the honor done to the Abby of Elten also refers to Voorthuijsen, but in a letter from (Emperor) Otto III Voorthuijsen erroneously is rendered as houthuijsen (which means "woodhouse" rather than "fordhouse "), as also in a letter from Emperor Lotharius II in the year MCXXXIV an erroneous reference is made to Werthuijsen. [I think that Werthuijsen probably was just an odd old spelling: Vverthijsen, or Uuerthuijsen, for Vuerthuijsen

NOTE: I am not sure anyone has ever really cleared up what the relationship was between the abovementioned two locations--Voorthuizen on the Veluwe and Voorthuijsen near Elten--perhaps they just happened to have the same name based on similar geographical characteristics--because they were each located on or near a defendable and passable location in difficult terrain--it is also possible that Voorthuizen on the Veluwe was actually named after the original older site near Elten, since Elten Abbey owned huge tracts of land throughout the Netherlands, especially on the Veluwe, which were at one time administered by the Van Voorthuijsen family residing in Voorthuijsen near Elten.

Because so many early mediaeval records were lost during the 80 Years War, when the important ancestral town of Zutphen was completely destroyed by the Spanish we may never know what the precise connection was between the two locations, or with our early family history. I have seen documentation that my earliest documented ancestor, Bernardus van Voorthusen, had been granted land by Elten Abbey--but at that time (around 1200 AD) he already had no direct connection anymore with either Voorthuijsen location, even though he already did carry  the van Voorthuijsen family name at the time. His descendant Blankert apparently did own land in Voorthuizen on the Veluwe (see below) 

There is also a reference to our ancestor Bernhardus van Voorthusen in the following link, but I have not been able to locate that website of A.J.W. (André) van Voorthuijsen--whom I once met in his summer place, an old farmhouse near an ancestral mill in Putten - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia on the Veluwe, when visiting my cousin Paul van Voorthuijsen in Doorwerth - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, near Arnhem - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

In Zutphen Van Voorthuijsen family members were regents for several generations till the Spanish burned this town.

Zutphen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

In the early Middle Ages, Zutphen was the seat of a line of counts, which became extinct in the 12th century. The town received city rights between 1190 and 1196, making it one of the oldest cities in the country. Only Utrecht, Groningen and Deventer preceded it in receiving city rights. Zutphen, in turn, granted city rights to several other cities, such as Arnhem, Doetinchem, Lochem and Harderwijk. The largest and oldest church of the city is the St. Walburgis (Saint Walpurga) church, which originally dates from the 12th century. The present Gothic building contains monuments of the former counts of Zutphen, a 13th century candelabrum, an elaborate copper font (1527), and a modern monument to the Van Heeckeren family. The chapter-house ("Librije") contains a pre-Reformation library which includes some valuable manuscripts and incunabula. The old books are still chained to their ancient wooden desk, a habit of centuries ago.

1649 map of Zutphen

Image:Zutphen 1649 Blaeu.jpg

 

Skyline of Zutphen with St. Walburgiskerk

Skyline of Zutphen with St. Walburgiskerk
A Geertruida van Voorthuijsen is buried in this church

Having been fortified the town stood several sieges, specially during the wars of freedom waged by the Dutch, the most celebrated fight under its walls being the one in September 1586 when Sir Philip Sidney was mortally wounded. Taken by the Spaniards in 1587 by the treachery of the English commander Rowland York, Zutphen was recovered by Maurice, prince of Orange, in 1591, and except for two short periods, one in 1672 and the other during the French Revolutionary Wars, it has since then remained a part of the Netherlands. Its fortifications were dismantled in 1874.

There is also a reference to our ancestor Bernhardus van Voorthusen in the following link, but I have not been able to locate that website of A.J.W. van Voorthuijsen--whom I once met in his summer place, an old farm near an ancestral mill in Putten - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia- on the Veluwe, when visiting my cousin Paul van Voorthuijsen in Doorwerth - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia-, near Arnhem - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

RootsWeb: NLD-HOEKSCHE-WAARD-L Re: [NLD-HOEKSCHE-WAARD] Adellijke ...- * VIII-a Mabilia van Batenburg
Trad in het klooster en werd abdis van Elten. Abbatisse Altinensi, de twaalfde abdes van Hoog-Elten, genaamd Mabilia Jonkvrouwe van Batenburg, 1308-22 december 1333. Het klooster Sint Vitus van Hoog-Elten had alleen al op de Veluwe 65 goederen of boerderijen, o.a. te Appel in de kerspel Voorthuijsen. Deze werden beheerd door het rentmeestershuis dat vervestigd was te Kemna ook Kemmenade vlakbij Nijkerk.Deze goederen werden door de Veluwse bevolking "Vrouwengoederen" genoemd omdat het Sint Vitus een klooster was uitsluitend voor hoogadelijke dames.
Bron: Internet, website van A.J.W. van Voorthuijsen met genelaogie Bernhardus van Voorthusen.

Translation: *VIII-a Mabilia van Batenburg Entered the Abbey and became Abbess of Elten. Abatissa Altinensi, the twelfth abbess of High-Elten, named Mabilia, Lady of Batenburg, 1308-22 december 1333. The St. Vitus abbey of High Elten had on the Veluwe alone already 65 estates or farms, among other in Apple in the parrish Voorthuijsen. These were administered by the land management firm established in Kemna or Kemnade near Nijkerk. These estates were called 'vrouwengoederen' or women's estates since St. Vitus was an abbey exclusively for ladies of the high nobility.  Source: Internet, website of A.J.W. van Voorthuisen with genealogy of Bernardus van Voorthusen.

On the current state of the family, my cousin Paul has this to say on his genealogical website: Holland Page

Although descendants of this family are now living throughout the Netherlands and other parts of the world, their origin lies in Gelderland, a province of The Netherlands. Places such as Voorthuizen, Ermelo, Scherpenzeel, Barneveld, Randwijk, Renswoude, Rhenen, Woudenberg, Nijkerk, Zutphen and others are frequently mentioned as their early places of abode. A Noord-Holland branch settled in places such as Amsterdam, Baambrugge, Vreeland, Loenen, Den Helder, Zijpe, Anna Paulowna, Breezand, Haarlem, etc. Overseas branches *) can be found in the US (Florida, Michigan, Utah etc., New Zealand (Wellington, Napier), Australia (Tasmania, Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia.) A branch from the former Dutch East Indies relocated in The Netherlands when the colony became independent.

*) A Forthuyse Webpage editorial note:  we can now add to the Overseas branches: San Francisco, California (myself) Stockholm, Sweden (my daughter Saskia)  and Ocean City, Maryland (my son Geoffrey)--as well as New York City (my brother Bob's children Amelia and Nick) and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (my brother Karel's daughter Marya)


The Gelderland Branch

There are a number of books that have been written by previous researchers of this family. Notably C. Hollaar of Beverwijk, Holland has spent 40 years researching the ancestors of his wife, a Van Voorthuijsen. These volumes can be seen in the various City archives and Municipal Libraries in The Hague, Amsterdam, Utrecht and Arnhem.

There are three publications dealing with the various branches of the family, i.e. :
Part 1, The 7 oldest generations (176 pages),
Part 2, The Ingen - Rhenen Branch (508 pages),
Part 3, The Ingen - Lienden Branch ( 308 pages).

The Dutch East Indies branch was not known until I undertook to research this branch (of which I am a member). I was able to link the results with the  already existing ancestral tree. As it turned out we are descendants of the  Amsterdam branch of the family, which in turn had descended from the Ingen -  Rhenen (Betuwe) Branch.

The in-depth research of the Veluwe branch of the family by A.J.W. van Voorthuijsen has also contributed to this genealogy to some considerable extent.


The Amsterdam Branch

The Amsterdam branch of the family Van Voorthuijsen began with the arrival of the parents of Evert van Voorthuijsen in 1773. His parents had come from the  'Betuwe'  where his father was born in 1620 in Vreeland.The Betuwe  branch  consisted of millers and owned a number of windmills. One of these is still  standing and in working order in Rhenen, a village along the Rhine not far from  Wageningen. Evert had married Geesje Smit and they started to build a couple of  saw mills on the outskirts  of Amsterdam. Their descendants however became  merchants who flourished in those times. Sometime  during 1855 a descendant  (a grandson of Evert) left  Holland to try his luck in the Dutch East Indies now  Indonesia. He was the founder of a branch which eventually consisted of some  38 families numbering about 136 persons. Most of these returned to The Netherlands  during the 50's. De results of my quest are contained in a document :  'The Family van Voorthuijsen, The Dutch East Indies Branch' which has been issued to  the other members of the branch during November 1995. 

NOTE: My cousin Paul's genealogical website has often been called one of the very best.
vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv
 
 
Hereabove is a  Map of the Holy Roman Empire of German Nation 1789 --from around the time that the Amsterdam Branch of our family was living at 11 Kattenburgerplein in Amsterdam, right across from the head quarters and docks of the VOC (Verenigde Oostindische Companie), or The Dutch East India Company (Verenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie .... My ancestors were lumber merchants at that time and I imagine they may well have had something to do with the building of the ships that would sail to the Indies.
 
See:  www.e-lacrosse.com/2003/adam3/amsterdamguide.htm from which I will quote the following:
 
Nederlands < xml="true" ns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" prefix="st1" namespace="">Scheepvaart Museum  A major maritime museum housed in what was once one of the grand headquarters of the Dutch East Indies Company. It includes a full-scale replica of an 18th-century ship. Tuesday-Sunday 10 am-5 pm. 7 euros adults. Kattenburgerplein 1, Amsterdam. Phone 523-2222. http://www.scheepvaartmuseum.nl.
 
 
 One of these houses may have been 11 Kattenburgerplein, but I think the numbers were changed.
 
Joan van Voorthuijsen, our first Dutch ancestor who went to the East was born in 1827 in Amsterdam, probably on 12 Kattenburgerplein in the house of his father Jan, apparently no longer there--across the street from his grandfather Evert. He worked for De Nederlansche Handelmaatschappij, the Netherlands Trading Society, first in Padang, Indonesia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, Sumatra, then in Singapore but unfortunately drowned at the young age of 45 in 1872 off the coast of Java near Semarang - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, shortly after he had been appointed one of the two Batavia, Dutch East Indies - LoveToKnow 1911 based directors of this company, successor to the VOC, de Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie, or United East India Company. 
 
Note on the NHM: known in English also as the Netherlands Trading Society, descendant of the VOC, this company later morphed into the Algemene Bank Nederland, for which both I and my cousin Paul also worked at ine time or another--I on Wall Street (Cedar and Williams actually) as assistant legal advisor, in what used to be Nieuw Amsterdam (NYC)--Paul in old Amsterdam. The ABN has now merged into the ABN-AMRO-BANK--but is about to be taken over by either Barclays or Scottish-Belgian-Spanish consortium led by the Royal Bank of Scotland: RBS dwarfs Barclays ABN Amro takeover offer with new E71 billion ...
 
Zee times zay are achangin', as Bob Dylan was singing back in the time of the Woodstock Nation. Change didn't begin with the exultation of Obamanation. Evolution is a constant process, only apparently held up by religious regressives--usually the slowest to learn and the fastest to forget.
 
One of the most famous books of Dutch literature, the Max Havelaar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, was subtitled: De Koffieveilingen van de Nederlnsche Handelmaatschappij, or The Coffee Autcions of the Netherlands Trading Society and had to do with social injustice in the East Indies at the time. Joan van Voorthuijsen, the Grandfather of my Grandfather, also wrote reports after a trip to inspect the company plantations around Medan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia  in which his enlightened, reform-oriented opinions were quite apparent--and to which reports I hope to return some other time, because of their historical and family related interest. In fact, when he drowned he had been on yet another inspection trip to see the plantations in Borneo.
 
Joan's full cousin*), Evert du Marchie van Voorthuysen, Heer van Maarssen, Ter Meer, Bergesteyn, Poelgeest, Koudekerk, Zwammerdam, Schagen en Den Engh--born just before him in 1824, also did very well but was a bit luckier, for he didn't drown or die at a young age and accordingly was able to accomplish a lot more in his life.
 
*) Note: Joan's father Jan, and Evert's father Henricus (Jan's younger brother) were both sons of Willem Evertsen van Voorthuijsen and Aagje Rebel. Evert added part of the last name of his mother, Margaretha Du Marchie Sarvaas to his family name. There are also the Pijnappel van Voorthuysen  branch and the Van Eyk van Voorthuysen  branch, as well as more recently (with my children) the Meyer van Voorthuijsen branch--all of whom are related going all the way back to Bernhardus van Voorthusen (ca 1250)
 
It was an era, after the Congress of Vienna and the restoration of the various anciens regimes, when people liked to pile name upon name and title upon title--which could all be purchased with the domain or heerlijkheid and conferred certain traditional rights and privileges that came with the land--privileges nowadays severely restricted but which certainly were of great social and economic importance in the olden days. Today, last names are added for entirely different reasons having to do primarily with women's liberation and the recognition that mother's maiden names are important, the way they have always been in for instance Hispanic cultures. When it came to titles, folks could be real picky: Genreal Van Heutzs, who won the 50 year Atjeh warfor the Dutch colonial powers refused the title of Baron because he felt he had earned a higher one, like Graaf (Count). He was right of course, but he and his  family ended up with
 
none
 
Hereunder follows a link to Joan's cousin, Evert du Marchie van Voorthuijsen referring to his juris doctoral thesis on 'the direct imposts, including those on income--a thesis on political economy' and which also gives some additional biographical information:
 
 
Van Voorthuysen was grootgrondbezitter, hoogheemraad, plaatsvervangend kantonrechter in Maarssen en was aldaar lid van de gemeenteraad. Hij was actief in de politiek: hij was lid van de Provinciale Staten van Utrecht voor het kiesdistrict Breukelen (1856-1857), lid van de Eerste Kamer der Staten-Generaal voor de provincie Utrecht (1857-1858 en 1874-1883) en lid van de Tweede Kamer der Staten-Generaal voor het kiesdistrict Utrecht (1858-1873).
 
Translated: Van Voorthuysen was a large land owner, dike reeve, deputy district judge in Maarssen and was member there of the municipal council. He was active in politics: member of the Provincial Assembly of Utrecht for the district of Breukelen (1856 -1857), member of the First Chamber of the States General for the Province of Utrecht (1857-1858 and 1874-1883) and member of the Second Chamber of the Statest General for the electoral district of Utrecht (1858-1873)
 
His descendant, who was born a month after me, i.e. in February 1942,  dr. E.H. (Evert H) du Marchie van Voorthuijsen,  whom I met in Groningen, is currently  Director of the Foundation for Large Scale Solar Energy (GEZEN) which seeks to develop solar receptors in the Sahara desert on a very large scale:
 
Zon is de toekomst » Fact Sheet CSP In a Solar Thermal Power station the rays from the shining sun are concentrated by means of mirrors onto the boiler of a conventional power plant. The solar heat replaces the fire: CSP [Concentrated Solar Power]-plants are sustainable thermal power stations.
 
Sorry folks, that was quite a bit of a detour, een omgang through family history--but I am ready to back now to Sungei Gerong, where I was just being taught the political map of my ancient home country, which seemed far more important, and received more emphasis, than its natural geography--which is less colorful and interesting anyway, for in a generally flat country, it shows mostly shades of green and yellow, with very few other colors. In that respect Belgium, with the hilly region of the Ardennen is far more varied. Of course we do have the Veluwe with its sandy hills--and which is these days a prime tourist destination--and a place where I did a great deal of fietsen, bike riding in my day as a preppy gymnasiast at the Groen van Prinstererlyceum.
 
For a great site on fietstochten see: Alles over fietsen en volledig beschreven fietsroutes en GPS ... and if
you can't read Dutch, I am sorry for you, but you can find some info here: Cycle routes in the Netherlands

Veluwe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Veluwe is a forest-rich ridge of hills in the province of Gelderland in the Netherlands. The Veluwe features many different landscapes including woodland, heath, some small lakes and Europe's largest sand drifts. The Veluwe is the largest lateral moraine in the Netherlands, stretching 60 km from north to south, and reaching heights of over 100 m (the peak height is 110 m).

Of course we also have southern Limburg--but the highest 'mountain' in Limburg is only about a thousand feet:

Vaalserberg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Vaalserberg ("Mount Vaals") is a hill 322.7 metres (1,059 ft) in height, the highest point in the Netherlands. It is located in the province of Limburg, at the southeasternmost edge of the country in the municipality of Vaals, near the eponymous town, some three kilometres west of Aachen.

But all of that pales in comparison to the complex geography of an immensely rich and varied, vast region such as Indonesia, which stretches across 3000 miles east to west like een gordel van smaragd, a girdle of emeralds. 

Here is a small map of the country:  See full-size image.

 

The Bukit Barisan  Moutain Range on my native  island of Sumatra alone is well over thousand miles long:  

Barisan Mountains - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Bukit Barisan mountains are a mountain range on the western side of Sumatra, Indonesia, covering nearly 1,700 km (1,050 mi) of the island. The Bukit Barisan range consists primarily of volcanoes shrouded in dense jungle cover.[1] The highest peak of the range is Mount Kerinci at 3,800 metres (12,467 ft).[2] The Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park is situated towards the southern end of the range.

Modern Quaternary Research in Southeast Asia - Google Books Result

The plateau is dominated by the Gunung Dempo and its crater top, 3150 m high

For een reisbeschrijving, a travelogue, in Dutch, see: ArcadiA Reizen, avontuur met oog voor comfort:

Sumatra is een eiland waar het oerwoud nog niet geheel is teruggedrongen. Wanneer u van ruige natuur houdt is Sumatra zeer geschikt. In de lengterichting loopt een bergrug met bijna 100 vulkanen, waarvan er zeker 15 nog actief zijn.

Let me translate just that short passage: Sumatra is an island where the jungle has not yet been entirely pushed back. When you love nature in the rough Sumatra is excellent. In lengthwise direction there is a mountain range with nearly a 100 vulcanos, of which certainly 15 are still active.

Needless to say, with as many as 17,508 islands, of which only about 6000 are inhabited, Indonesia as the world's largest and richest eilandenrijk, island realm or archipelago (sea realm) is a whole world in itself:

Indonesia's Geography (Archipelago, Sumatra, Java/Madura ...

Indonesia is the largest archipelago in the world. It consists of five major islands and about 30 smaller groups. The figure for the total number of islands is 17,508 according to the Indonesian Naval Hydro-Oceanographic office. The archipelago is on a crossroads between two oceans, the Pacific and the Indian ocean, and bridges two continents, Asia and Australia. This strategic position has always influenced the cultural, social, political and economic life of the country.

One thing the Indonesians might thank the Dutch for is that we gave the enormous area of this widely spread out, linguistically, historically and culturally diverse archipelago (which literally does not mean eilandenrijk or island realm, but realm of the sea in the original Greek) its essential “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity in Diversity) which is still today the national motto of this wonderful country.

Hereunder is  a  Historical Netherlands East Indies Map - Malacca eventually went to the British, but as the map shows, it used to be Dutch as well--cf: The history of Dutch Malacca 1641-1795, 1818-1825. History of ...

Too bad for Indonesia, for if Malacca had stayed Dutch then, it would today also have been a part of Tanah Air Kita. since it was Dutch rule which over the centuries slowly gave Indonesia its unity. The region of Atjeh (nowadays spelled Aceh) was the last part to be integrated into Dutch East Indies, and remained recalcitrant even until recent years: it took a tsunami to finally bring the proud people of Aceh around. See: Aceh: Peacemaking after the Tsunami | Worldwatch Institute as well as:  Aceh Aceh.Net: Welcome to Aceh - About Aceh 

Even the Indonesian language, the Bahasa Indonesia, though based to great extent on the original Malay of the Riouw (or Riau) archipelago owes much to the work of Dutch scholars like Snouck Hugronje, who gave it its modern structure and usefulness. See: 2007-02-12 Snouck

 

The five major islands are of course the four great Sunda Islands of Java, Sumatra, Borneo (or Kalimantan) and Celebes (or Sulawesi) plus the island of New Guinea of which only the western half (west Irian) now belongs to Indonesia--but where the Papuan natives are still engaging in a struggle for independence:

Western New Guinea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The territory was renamed West Irian and then Irian Jaya. ..... ISBN 979-95898-8-6 · Online documentaries on the West Papuan struggle for independence, ...
 
But let's get back to our fifth grade class in Sungei Gerong. We also started studying Vaderlandse Geschiedenis then, the History of the Fatherland, meaning of course the Netherlands, and that traditionally starts out with a quick mention of the De Hunebedbouwers and Koepelgrafbouwers--cf:
In de Vlinderkes: historie - Voor de jaartelling [in prehistory]: Koepelgrafbouwers op de Hamert
 
Here's a famous depiction of the Hunebedbouwers of the Province of Drenthe:
 
Wat weten we eigenlijk van dit volk?. We weten dat de prehistorische Drent vanaf omstreeks 3400 vC. overging van jagen en verzamelen tot landbouw en veeteelt en dat hij boerderijen ging bouwen om in te wonen. Een ware culturele revolutie! 
 
Translated: What do we actually know about these people? We know that around 3400 BCE the prehistoric 'Drent' (inhabitant of Drenthe Province) changed over from  hunting and gathering to agriculture and animal husbandry and that he built farms to live in. A true revolution!  
 
The name of the Hunebedbouwers has to do with the kind of graves they built as shown in the image hereunder:
 
Koepelgraven also are ancient gravesites, but  where people are buried together in graves that can now be barely be recognized as low hilly areas in parts of the Netherlands, such as shown in the  picture herebelow:
 
but they recently discovered the oldest habitation in the Netherlands from that same period:
Oldest habitation in Netherlands

Oudste bewoning van Nederland

In de direkte omgeving van Vijlen zijn de oudste sporen van menselijke activiteit te vinden als koepelgraven. Dit zijn gemeenschappelijke graven van de bewoners van zo'n 5000 jaar geleden. De graven zijn nu te herkennen als met gras bedekte heuvels tegen de flanken van de Vijlener bossen. Ze hebben een doorsnede van 10 tot 20 meter en zijn 2 a 3 meter hoog (witte wandelroute).

Translated: In the direct environs of  of Vijlen are the oldest signs of human activity as cupola graves.
These are commonly shared graves of the inhabitants of some 5000 years ago. The graves are now recognizable as grass covered hills against the flanks of the Vijlener woods. They have a diameter of
10 to 20 meters and are 2 to 3 meters high. (White walking tour).
 
Talking of ancient habitations, when I was at the Groen van Prinstererlyceum in Vlaardingen, my biology teacher was part of a team that discovered the Vlaardingen Culture:

Overgang naar het boerenbestaan

Bij de aanleg van de Westwijk in 1958 werden voor het eerst in West-Nederland restanten gevonden van een nederzetting uit de periode 2900 tot 2600 voor Chr. De vondsten waren uitzonderlijk goed geconserveerd. Niet alleen ontdekten archeologen de houten staanders van boerderijen, maar ook troffen zij slacht- en consumptieafval aan van deze eerste boeren die de delta bewoonden. De restanten van de late steentijdbewoners baarden internationaal opzien en waren zo afwijkend dat ze een eigen naam kregen: Vlaardingen-cultuur. Vandaag de dag is het zelfs een heuse periode-aanduiding:

Vlaardingen-tijd (3500 tot 2500 voor Chr.).

Translation: During the construction of the Westwijk in 1958 evidence was found for the first time in the Western part of the  Netherlandsof a settlement from the period 2900-2600 BC. The discoveries were very well preserved. Not only did the archeologists detect wooden pillars of farms but also refuse of butchered and consumed animals from the first farmers inhabiting the Delta region. The remains of these paleolithic people were so distinct that they got their own name: The Vlaardingen Culture. Nowadays it is even an actual period name: the Vlaardingen period (3500-2500 BC)

Zo reconstrueerde men de Vlaardingen-cultuur in 1963
Zo reconstrueerde men de Vlaardingen-cultuur in 1963. (Bron: Het Vrije Volk, 5 januari 1963).

Translation: This is the way they reconstructed the Vlaardingen culture in 1963 (Source: Het Vrije Volk)

 
I can't remember the name of my biology teacher right now, but he was the one who once actually gave me a mark of 10+ (equivalent to an A+). My classmates had complained that one question was too hard--and he gave everyone that extra +, including me, even though I already had a 10. That event made up for what the Nonnetjes had done long ago! My teacher was amply rewarded the following year, 1958--with the discovery of the Vlaardingen culture.
 
Here is some more information on that culture from: The Coastal Guide to Vlaardingen:
Excavations show that Vlaardingen originates from 3900 BC. Archaeologists in the 1960-ies enriched Vlaardingen with the excavation of a complete settlement from the New Stone Age (ca. 3000 BC). This received the name "Vlaardingen Culture". Before 1000 BC Vlaardingen was a quite inaccessible swampy area consisting of mud, reed and water. Afterwards, it started to develop. The name Vlaardingen comes from a small river, Flardinge. In the year 1018, Vlaardingen gets known for the so-called Battle of Vlaardingen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia- where Count Dirk III of Holland defeats the German Emperor Hendrik II. In 1273 Count Floris V grants Vlaardingen with city privileges. Probably these privileges were only extensions of earlier city rights. See also: Vlaardingen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 
 
I realize that this is quite a grab bag of information, and I ought to be getting to the end of this journal entry, so let me close for now with two random links, just for entertainment: 
 
1. Layla's Wicca Site (website van Heksencafé Vlaardingen--website of a witches café in my old hometown of Vlaardingen) and
 
2. Oaksterdam University, located across the Bay from me in Oakland, where there is no there there, but which might be of great help in case you are struggling with your career choice.... 
 
I may yet edit this nonsense out, but if you see it, it's obviously still here as a limited time offer.
OK, I admit, may just be in a strange mood: the Dutch soccer team just got trounced by a very deserving Russian team in Basel--even though many Dutch supporters sang the Dutch Anthem Het Wilhelmus YouTube - Het Wilhelmus - The Wilhelmus much more vigorously than the Russians sang their national anthem, and even though the match was fought on Dutch turf, i.e. grass imported from the Netherlands for use in the Basel Stadium--and even though the Russian team was being coached by a Dutchman called Guus Hiddink--but then it was said that Soccer-Euro-Russia coach Hiddink aims to be Dutch "traitor" --he at least won: Oranje lost 3-1.
Oh well, Italy got messed up too, by Spain. And then there's that sad, sad fate of those French Blues, ces Blues de France, que dire de ceux--eh bien, let's just get drunk on champagne, pourquoi pas...et
 
 Mieux la Prochaine Fois!
 
Volgende Keer Beter!
 
Better next time!
 
 
 
 

 

What follows is just a pesky repetion I have not been able to delete so don't even bother reading further

 

 

 

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Wednesday 07 July 2004

Omgeving Blankensgoed

De wijk Blankensgoed is gepland in Voorthuizen-Noord en wordt (globaal) begrensd door de  Rubensstraat, de Kerkstraat, de Prinsenweg en de sportvelden aan de Roelenengweg.

Translation: The district of Blankensgoed is planned in Voorthuizen [on the Veluwe] and is (approximately) bordered by Rubens Street, Kerk Street, Prinsen Road and the sport fields on Roeleneng Road.

De naam Blankensgoed is in 2006 door het gemeentebestuur aan de in ontwikkeling zijnde wijk toegewezen na een prijsvraag onder de bevolking en is gebaseerd op de historie van het gebied. Van oudsher is hier namelijk een boerderij gevestigd met als laatste bewoners de familie Van Galen aan de Kerkstraat 72/74. De oudst bekende bewoner is Blankert van Voerthusen , die al in 1330 een schatting in ponden moest betalen aan de Abdij van Elten. Zijn nakomelingen kregen doorgaans de naam (van) Blanckers, Blankerts of Blankers. Klik hier voor een fragment van de  genealogie van de familie Blankers. Vanuit historisch oogpunt zou de wijk dus eigenlijk Blankersgoed moeten heten. Dat is dan ook de reden voor deze naam voor deze website. 

Translation: The name Blankengoed was awarded by the mnunicipal administration in 2006 after a prize questiuonnaire among the population and was based on the history of the area. Anciently it was namely the location of a farm with as last inhabitants the Van Galen family on 72/74 Kerk Street. The oldest inhabitant was Blankert van Voerthusen, who as early as 1330 had to pay taxes in pounds to the Abbey in Elten. His descendants generally received the name of Blanckers, Blankert or Blankers. Click here, hier for a fragment from the Blankers family genealogy. From a histocial poit of view this district should actually be called Blankersgoed. That is therefore the reason for the name for this website.

 

 

 

 

Let me finally also add some of my own observations from earlier studies and reflections, just for the fun: 

1. The name Voorthuijsen could mean either fort-house (strong house) or ford-house (house at the ford or pass) which have a similar etymology, since a fortress or stronghold is usually built in, on, or near a pass or a ford, so the pass or ford can be properly defended--and as the above quotations show, Voorthuijsen was known from even prehistoric times as just such a defendable location, or verdedigbare plaats, i.e. a place suitable to build a fortress or stronghold, because it was a place where one could pass through difficult terrain of whatever kind. That's why you will find fjords (watery inlets) by which you can cross through mountainous terrain, as well as fords, voorden, where you can follow a land route across watery terrain. The Greek word poros, pore, is related--it is where substances can pass through your skin.

Singapore, Singha Pura,  literally means Lionfort or Lionford Leeuwenvoort or Leeuwenvoorde Lionford.

I told you language can be fun....Now let's have another Singha, that Lion's beer!

Singha logo

In English the versions Forthouse or Fordhouse are both appropriate translations of the name. Forthuyse, the name of my website, on the other hand is a transliteration, convenient for English and French speakers. Furthausen would be both a transliteration and a translation into German. To  add to all this confusion, Forthuso was sometimes used in Latin documents and is also useful for speakers of Italian and Spanish, Pertassan is the way Indonesians pronounce the name--my father used to be  known as Tuan  Pertassan to the Indonesians at work-- while a Chinese friend of mine told me that the characters Fu Tai Shan  府 泰 山 could be utilized in his language, meaning something like Prefect of the Holy Mountain. A prefect was of course a mandarin, a scholarly civil servant. Hey, don't laugh: you never know when such esoteric knowledge might come in handy to a fruity old prefect such as myself. I have been known to occasionally use also the name Forthusius, as my more scholarly nom de plume.

Mount Tai - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mount Tai is one of the "Five Sacred Mountains of Taoism".

2. The name Elterberg or Mount Elten is a bit of a tautology, since the name Elten appears to be derived from the Latin name Alta Mons--which already means  High Mountain--and was then probably contracted to Altmon, Eltnon and finally: Elten.  For the same reason, Hoog Elten, High Elten, another local name, also is tautological--Elterberg would mean High Mountain Mountain, and Hoog Elten:  High High Mountain.

3. Elten eventually became a Kaiserliches Frauenstift or Imperial Women's Abbey where high born ladies would live and work as part of a religious order--presumably copying bibles, doing artwork, working on translations, etc. important work, since the Saxons under Wittekind (Nuttall Encyclopædia), living in the adjacent regions had only recently been forced to adopt Christianity by the Franks under our Keizer Karel de Grote, aka Carolus Magnus or Charlemagne

4. Regarding the village of Voorthuizen on the Veluwe: just for the record let me include some quotes from the following document: Beschrijvinge van de Steeden, Dorpen, Adellijke Huizen enz. in ... 

Voorthuijsen, een dorp in de Veluwe, is voornaamlijk aanmerkingswaardig  door zijn wadde of ondiepe overtocht waervan het zijnen naem ook gekregen heeft. Transation: Voorthuijsen, a village in the Veluwe, is primarily notable for its ford or shallow crossing  from which it also derived its name.

Otto de Groote in zijn brief van t jaar DCCCLXX [i.e. 852, but this must be an error, since Otto the Great: 912-973 was still alive around 962!] behelzende de vereeringe aen de Abdeije van Elten gedaen maekt ook gewag van Voorthuijsen, doch in een brief van Otto de 3 van 't jaer 990. staat er voor Voorthuijsen verkeerdelijk houthuijsen, gelijk in een brief van Keizer Lotharius de 2 van t jaer MCXXXIV (i.e. 934) verkeerdelijk staat Werthuijsen. Translation: [Emperor] Otto the Great in his letter of the year DCCCLXX (852???? an error--see above) regarding the honor done to the Abby of Elten also refers to Voorthuijsen, but in a letter from (Emperor) Otto III Voorthuijsen erroneously is rendered as houthuijsen (which means "woodhouse" rather than "fordhouse "), as also in a letter from Emperor Lotharius II in the year MCXXXIV an erroneous reference is made to Werthuijsen.

NOTE: I am not sure anyone has ever really cleared up what the relationship was between the two locations--perhaps they just happened to have the same name based on similar geographical characteristics--that they were each located on or near a defendable and passable location in difficult terrain--it is also possible that Voorthuizen on the Veluwe was actually named after the original older site near Elten, since Elten Abbey owned huge tracts of land throughout the Netherlands, which were at one time administered by the Van Voorthuijsen family residing in Voorthuijsen near Elten.

Because so many early mediaeval records were lost during the 80 Years War with Spain, we may never know what the precise connection was between the two locations, or with our early family history. I have seen documentation that my earliest documented ancestor, Bernardus van Voorthusen, had been granted land by Elten Abbey. My cousin Paul would have that.

But at that time (around 1200 AD) he already had no direct connection anymore with either Voorthuijsen location, even though he already did carry  the van Voorthuijsen family name at the time.

There is also a reference to our ancestor Bernhardus van Voorthusen in the following link, but I have not been able to locate that website of A.J.W. (André) van Voorthuijsen--whom I once met in his summer place, an old farm near an ancestral mill in Putten on the Veluwe, when visiting my cousin Paul van Voorthuijsen in Doorwerth, near Arnhem:

RootsWeb: NLD-HOEKSCHE-WAARD-L Re: [NLD-HOEKSCHE-WAARD] Adellijke ...- * VIII-a Mabilia van Batenburg
Trad in het klooster en werd abdis van Elten. Abbatisse Altinensi, de twaalfde abdes van Hoog-Elten, genaamd Mabilia Jonkvrouwe van Batenburg, 1308-22 december 1333. Het klooster Sint Vitus van Hoog-Elten had alleen al op de Veluwe 65 goederen of boerderijen, o.a. te Appel in de kerspel Voorthuijsen. Deze werden beheerd door het rentmeestershuis dat vervestigd was te Kemna ook Kemmenade vlakbij Nijkerk.Deze goederen werden door de Veluwse bevolking "Vrouwengoederen" genoemd omdat het Sint Vitus een klooster was uitsluitend voor hoogadelijke dames.
Bron: Internet, website van A.J.W. van Voorthuijsen met genelaogie Bernhardus van Voorthusen.

Translation: *VIII-a Mabilia van Batenburg Entered the Abbey and became Abbess of Elten. Abatissa Altinensi, the twelfth abbess of High-Elten, named Mabilia, Lady of Batenburg, 1308-22 december 1333. The St. Vitus abbey of High Elten had on the Veluwe alone already 65 estates or farms, among other in Apple in the parrish Voorthuijsen. These were administered by the land management firm established in Kemna or Kemnade near Nijkerk. These estates were called 'vrouwengoederen' or women's estates since St. Vitus was an abbey exclusively for ladies of the high nobility.  Source: Internet, website of A.J.W. van Voorthuisen with genealogy of Bernardus van Voorthusen.

On the current state of the family, my cousin Paul has this to say on his genealogical website: Holland Page

Although descendants of this family are now living throughout the Netherlands and other parts of the world, their origin lies in Gelderland, a province of The Netherlands. Places such as Voorthuizen, Ermelo, Scherpenzeel, Barneveld, Randwijk, Renswoude, Rhenen, Woudenberg, Nijkerk, Zutphen and others are frequently mentioned as their early places of abode. A Noord-Holland branch settled in places such as Amsterdam, Baambrugge, Vreeland, Loenen, Den Helder, Zijpe, Anna Paulowna, Breezand, Haarlem, etc. Overseas branches *) can be found in the US (Florida, Michigan, Utah etc., New Zealand (Wellington, Napier), Australia (Tasmania, Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia.) A branch from the former Dutch East Indies relocated in The Netherlands when the colony became independent.

*) A Forthuyse Webpage editorial note:  we can now add to the Overseas branches: San Francisco, California (myself) Stockholm, Sweden (my daughter Saskia)  and Ocean City, Maryland (my son Geoffrey)--as well as New York City (my brother Bob's children Amelia and Nick) and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (my brother Karel's daughter Marya)


The Gelderland Branch

There are a number of books that have been written by previous researchers of this family. Notably C. Hollaar of Beverwijk, Holland has spent 40 years researching the ancestors of his wife, a Van Voorthuijsen. These volumes can be seen in the various City archives and Municipal Libraries in The Hague, Amsterdam, Utrecht and Arnhem.

There are three publications dealing with the various branches of the family, i.e. :
Part 1, The 7 oldest generations (176 pages),
Part 2, The Ingen - Rhenen Branch (508 pages),
Part 3, The Ingen - Lienden Branch ( 308 pages).

The Dutch East Indies branch was not known until I undertook to research this branch (of which I am a member). I was able to link the results with the  already existing ancestral tree. As it turned out we are descendants of the  Amsterdam branch of the family, which in turn had descended from the Ingen -  Rhenen (Betuwe) Branch.

The in-depth research of the Veluwe branch of the family by A.J.W. van Voorthuijsen has also contributed to this genealogy to some considerable extent.


The Amsterdam Branch

The Amsterdam branch of the family Van Voorthuijsen began with the arrival of the parents of Evert van Voorthuijsen in 1773. His parents had come from the  'Betuwe'  where his father was born in 1620 in Vreeland.The Betuwe  branch  consisted of millers and owned a number of windmills. One of these is still  standing and in working order in Rhenen, a village along the Rhine not far from  Wageningen. Evert had married Geesje Smit and they started to build a couple of  saw mills on the outskirts  of Amsterdam. Their descendants however became  merchants who flourished in those times. Sometime  during 1855 a descendant  (a grandson of Evert) left  Holland to try his luck in the Dutch East Indies now  Indonesia. He was the founder of a branch which eventually consisted of some  38 families numbering about 136 persons. Most of these returned to The Netherlands  during the 50's. De results of my quest are contained in a document :  'The Family van Voorthuijsen, The Dutch East Indies Branch' which has been issued to  the other members of the branch during November 1995. 

NOTE: My cousin Paul's genealogical website has often been called one of the very best.
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Hereabove is a  Map of the Holy Roman Empire of German Nation 1789 --from around the time that the Amsterdam Branch of our family was living at 11 Kattenburgerplein in Amsterdam, right across from the VOC (Verenigde Oostindische Companie), or The Dutch East India Company (Verenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie .... My ancestors were lumber merchants at that time and I imagine they may well have had to do with the building of the great East India ships that would sail to the Indies. Joan, our first ancestor who went to the East was born in 1827 and unfortunately drowned at a still young age in 1872 off the coast of Java near Semarang, shortly after he had been appointed one of the two directors of the successor to the VOC, The Nederlandsche Handelmaatschappij in Batavia. Known in English also as the Netherlands Trading Society, this company has since morphed into the AMRO Bank, for which both I and my cousin Paul also worked at ine time or another--I in NYC, he in Amserdam. One of the most famous books of Dutch literature, the Max Havelaar, was subtitled: The Coffee Autcions of the Netherlands Trading Society and had to do with social injustice in the East Indies at the time. Joan, the Grandfather of my Grandfather, also wrote reports in which his reform-oriented opinions were quite apparent--and to which reports I hope to return some other time, because of their historical and family related interest.
 
Joan's cousin, Evert du Marchie van Voorthuysen, Heer van [Lord of] Maarssen, Ter Meer, Bergesteyn, Poelgeest, Koudekerk, Zwammerdam, Schagen en Den Engh--born just before him in 1824, also did very well and was a bit luckier, for he didn not drawn or die at a young age. It was an era, after the Congress of Vienna, when people liked to pile name upon name and title upon title--which could all be purchased with the domain or heerlijkheid and conferred certain traditional rights and privileges--nowadays mostly restricted to hunting and fishing--and definitely no longer including the Droit de seigneur - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

Droit de seigneur (pronounced [dʀwa d(ə) sɛɲœʀ]), French for the lord's right, is a term now popularly used to describe a legal right allowing the lord of an estate to take the virginity of the estate's virgins. It is also spelled droit du seigneur ([dʀwa dy sɛɲœʀ]), but native French prefer the term droit de cuissage or droit de jambage. A related term is ius primæ noctis (also jus primae noctis) (IPA: /juːs ˈpriːmaɪ ˈnɒktɪs/), Latin for law (or right) of the first night.[1][2]

Droit de seigneur is often interpreted today as a synonym for ius primae noctis, although it originally referred to a number of other rights as well, including hunting, taxation, and farming. Within popular culture, it has given a historical explanation to the term royally screwed.[3]

My contemprotary distant cousin Evert in Groningen told me he still is technically Heer van Maarsen, but only retains fishing and hunting rights, unlike his direct ancestor:  Voorthuysen, Everardus van: De directe belastingen, inzonderheid die op de inkomsten; eene staatshuishoudkundige proeve--though I can't be sure that Evert had or ever exercised his droit du seigneur....Hmmm.
Here is a painting by Vasily Polenov: called
Le droit du Seigneur (1874) 
but we might just as well call it:
Royally Screwed
a lesson in traditional family values

Vasily Polenov: Le droit du Seigneur (1874).An old man bringing his young daughters to the feudal lord.

An old man bringing his young daughters to the feudal lord
 
In any event, the above link on the 19th century Evert refers to his juris doctoral  thesis on 'direct imposts, including those on income--a thesis on political economy' and then gives some additional biographical information:
 
Van Voorthuysen was grootgrondbezitter, hoogheemraad, plaatsvervangend kantonrechter in Maarssen en was aldaar lid van de gemeenteraad. Hij was actief in de politiek: hij was lid van de Provinciale Staten van Utrecht voor het kiesdistrict Breukelen (1856-1857), lid van de Eerste Kamer der Staten-Generaal voor de provincie Utrecht (1857-1858 en 1874-1883) en lid van de Tweede Kamer der Staten-Generaal voor het kiesdistrict Utrecht (1858-1873).
 
Translated: Van Voorthuysen was a large land owner, dike reeve, deputy district judge in Maarssen and was member there of the municipal council. He was active in politics: member of the Provincial Assembly of Utrecht for the district of Breukelen (1856 -1857), member of the First Chamber of the States General for the Province of Utrecht (1857-1858 and 1874-1883) and member of the Second Chamber of the Statest General for the electoral district of Utrecht (1858-1873)
 
His descendant, who was born a month after me, i.e. in February 1942  dr. E.H. (Evert H) du Marchie van Voorthuijsen  whom I met in Groningen, is currently  Director of the Foundation for Large Scale Solar Energy (GEZEN) which seeks to develop solar receptors in the Sahara desert on a very large scale:
 
Zon is de toekomst » Fact Sheet CSP In a Solar Thermal Power station the rays from the shining sun are concentrated by means of mirrors onto the boiler of a conventional power plant. The solar heat replaces the fire: CSP [Concentrated Solar Power]-plants are sustainable thermal power stations.
 
It pleases me a lot to know that a member of our family is thus active in saving the planet from gobal warming.
 
Sorry folks, that was quite a bit of a detour, een omgang through family history--but I am ready to back now to Sungei Gerong, where I was just being taught the political map of my ancient home country, which seemed far more important, and received more emphasis, than its natural geography--which is less colorful and interesting anyway, for in a generally flat country, it shows mostly shades of green and yellow, with very few other colors. In that respect Belgium, with the hilly region of the Ardennen is far more varied. Of course we do have the Veluwe with its sandy hills--and which is these days a prime tourist destination--and a place where I did a great deal of fietsen, bike riding in my day as a preppy lyceist or lycéen at Groen van Prinster-- 
 
For a great site on fietstochten see: Alles over fietsen en volledig beschreven fietsroutes en GPS ... and if
you can't read Dutch, I am sorry for you, but you can find some info here: Cycle routes in the Netherlands

Veluwe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Veluwe is a forest-rich ridge of hills in the province of Gelderland in the Netherlands. The Veluwe features many different landscapes including woodland, heath, some small lakes and Europe's largest sand drifts. The Veluwe is the largest lateral moraine in the Netherlands, stretching 60 km from north to south, and reaching heights of over 100 m (the peak height is 110 m).

Of course we also have southern Limburg--but the highest 'mountain' in Limburg is only about a thousand feet:

Vaalserberg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Vaalserberg ("Mount Vaals") is a hill 322.7 metres (1,059 ft) in height, the highest point in the Netherlands. It is located in the province of Limburg, at the southeasternmost edge of the country in the municipality of Vaals, near the eponymous town, some three kilometres west of Aachen.

But all of that pales in comparison to the complex geography of an immensely rich and varied, vast region such as Indonesia, which stretches across 3000 miles east to west like een gordel van smaragd, a girdle of emeralds. 

Here is a small map of the country: for a very much larger version  See full-size image.

 

The Bukit Barisan  Moutain Range on my native  island of Sumatra alone is well over thousand miles long:  

Barisan Mountains - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Bukit Barisan mountains are a mountain range on the western side of Sumatra, Indonesia, covering nearly 1,700 km (1,050 mi) of the island. The Bukit Barisan range consists primarily of volcanoes shrouded in dense jungle cover.[1] The highest peak of the range is Mount Kerinci at 3,800 metres (12,467 ft).[2] The Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park is situated towards the southern end of the range.

Modern Quaternary Research in Southeast Asia - Google Books Result

The plateau is dominated by the Gunung Dempo and its crater top, 3150 m high

For een reisbeschrijving, a travelogue, in Dutch, see: ArcadiA Reizen, avontuur met oog voor comfort:

Sumatra is een eiland waar het oerwoud nog niet geheel is teruggedrongen. Wanneer u van ruige natuur houdt is Sumatra zeer geschikt. In de lengterichting loopt een bergrug met bijna 100 vulkanen, waarvan er zeker 15 nog actief zijn.

Let me translate just that short passage: Sumatra is an island where the jungle has not yet been entirely pushed back. When you love nature in the rough Sumatra is excellent. In lengthwise direction there is a mountain range with nearly a 100 vulcanos, of which certainly 15 are still active.

Needless to say, with as many as 17,508 islands, of which only about 6000 are inhabited, Indonesia as the world's largest and richest eilandenrijk, island realm or archipelago (sea realm) is a whole world in itself:

Indonesia's Geography (Archipelago, Sumatra, Java/Madura ...

Indonesia is the largest archipelago in the world. It consists of five major islands and about 30 smaller groups. The figure for the total number of islands is 17,508 according to the Indonesian Naval Hydro-Oceanographic office. The archipelago is on a crossroads between two oceans, the Pacific and the Indian ocean, and bridges two continents, Asia and Australia. This strategic position has always influenced the cultural, social, political and economic life of the country.

The five major islands are of course the four great Sunda Islands of Java, Sumatra, Borneo (or Kalimantan) and Celebes (or Sulawesi) plus the island of New Guinea of which only the western half (west Irian) now belongs to Indonesia--but where the Papuan natives are still engaging in a struggle for independence:

Western New Guinea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The territory was renamed West Irian and then Irian Jaya. ..... ISBN 979-95898-8-6 · Online documentaries on the West Papuan struggle for independence, ...
 
But let's get back to our fifth grade class in Sungei Gerong. We also started studying Vaderlandse Geschiedenis then, the History of the Fatherland, meaning of course the Netherlands, and that traditionally starts out with a quick mention of the De Hunebedbouwers and Koepelgrafbouwers--cf:
In de Vlinderkes: historie - Voor de jaartelling [in prehistory]: Koepelgrafbouwers op de Hamert
 
Here's a famous depiction of the Hunebedbouwers of the Province of Drenthe:
 
Wat weten we eigenlijk van dit volk?. We weten dat de prehistorische Drent vanaf omstreeks 3400 vC. overging van jagen en verzamelen tot landbouw en veeteelt en dat hij boerderijen ging bouwen om in te wonen. Een ware culturele revolutie! 
 
Translated: What do we actually know about these people? We know that around 3400 BCE the prehistoric 'Drent' (inhabitant of Drenthe Province) changed over from  hunting and gathering to agriculture and animal husbandry and that he built farms to live in. A true revolution!  
 
The name of the Hunebedbouwers has to do with the kind of graves they built as shown in the image hereunder:
 
Koepelgraven also are ancient gravesites, but  where people are buried together in graves that can now be barely be recognized as low hilly areas in parts of the Netherlands, such as shown in the  picture herebelow:
 
but they recently discovered the oldest habitation in the Netherlands from that same period:
Oldest habitation in Netherlands

Oudste bewoning van Nederland

In de direkte omgeving van Vijlen zijn de oudste sporen van menselijke activiteit te vinden als koepelgraven. Dit zijn gemeenschappelijke graven van de bewoners van zo'n 5000 jaar geleden. De graven zijn nu te herkennen als met gras bedekte heuvels tegen de flanken van de Vijlener bossen. Ze hebben een doorsnede van 10 tot 20 meter en zijn 2 a 3 meter hoog (witte wandelroute).

Translated: In the direct environs of  of Vijlen are the oldest signs of human activity as cupola graves.
These are commonly shared graves of the inhabitants of some 5000 years ago. The graves are now recognizable as grass covered hills against the flanks of the Vijlener woods. They have a diameter of
10 to 20 meters and are 2 to 3 meters high. (White walking tour).
 
Talking of ancient habitations, when I was at the Groen van Prinstererlyceum in Vlaardingen, my biology teacher was part of a team that discovered the Vlaardingen Culture:

Overgang naar het boerenbestaan

Bij de aanleg van de Westwijk in 1958 werden voor het eerst in West-Nederland restanten gevonden van een nederzetting uit de periode 2900 tot 2600 voor Chr. De vondsten waren uitzonderlijk goed geconserveerd. Niet alleen ontdekten archeologen de houten staanders van boerderijen, maar ook troffen zij slacht- en consumptieafval aan van deze eerste boeren die de delta bewoonden. De restanten van de late steentijdbewoners baarden internationaal opzien en waren zo afwijkend dat ze een eigen naam kregen: Vlaardingen-cultuur. Vandaag de dag is het zelfs een heuse periode-aanduiding:

Vlaardingen-tijd (3500 tot 2500 voor Chr.).

Translation: During the construction of the Westwijk in 1958 evidence was found for the first time in the Western part of the  Netherlandsof a settlement from the period 2900-2600 BC. The discoveries were very well preserved. Not only did the archeologists detect wooden pillars of farms but also refuse of butchered and consumed animals from the first farmers inhabiting the Delta region. The remains of these paleolithic people were so distinct that they got their own name: The Vlaardingen Culture. Nowadays it is even an actual period name: the Vlaardingen period (3500-2500 BC)

Zo reconstrueerde men de Vlaardingen-cultuur in 1963
Zo reconstrueerde men de Vlaardingen-cultuur in 1963. (Bron: Het Vrije Volk, 5 januari 1963).

Translation: This is the way they reconstructed the Vlaardingen culture in 1963 (Source: Het Vrije Volk)

 
I can't remember the name of my biology teacher right now, but he was the one who once actually gave me a mark of 10+ (equivalent to an A+). My classmates had complained that one question was too hard--and he gave everyone that extra +, including me, even though I already had a 10. That event made up for what the Nonnetjes had done long ago! My teacher was amply rewarded the following year, 1958--with the discovery of the Vlaardingen culture.
 
Here is some more information on that culture from: The Coastal Guide to Vlaardingen:
Excavations show that Vlaardingen originates from 3900 BC. Archaeologists in the 1960-ies enriched Vlaardingen with the excavation of a complete settlement from the New Stone Age (ca. 3000 BC). This received the name "Vlaardingen Culture". Before 1000 BC Vlaardingen was a quite inaccessible swampy area consisting of mud, reed and water. Afterwards, it started to develop. The name Vlaardingen comes from a small river, Flardinge. In the year 1018, Vlaardingen gets known for the so-called Battle of Vlaardingen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia- where Count Dirk III of Holland defeats the German Emperor Hendrik II. In 1273 Count Floris V grants Vlaardingen with city privileges. Probably these privileges were only extensions of earlier city rights. See also: Vlaardingen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 
 
I realize that this is quite a grab bag of information, and I ought to be getting to the end of this journal entry, so let me close for now with two random links, just for entertainment: 
 
1. Layla's Wicca Site (website van Heksencafé Vlaardingen--website of a witches café in my old hometown of Vlaardingen) and
 
2. Oaksterdam University, located across the Bay from me in Oakland, where there is no there there, but which might be of great help in case you are struggling with your career choice.... 
 
I may yet edit this nonsense out, but if you see it, it's obviously still here as a limited time offer.
OK, I admit, may just be in a strange mood: the Dutch soccer team just got trounced by a very deserving Russian team in Basel--even though many Dutch supporters sang the Dutch Anthem Het Wilhelmus YouTube - Het Wilhelmus - The Wilhelmus much more vigorously than the Russians sang their national anthem, and even though the match was fought on Dutch turf, i.e. grass imported from the Netherlands for use in the Basel Stadium--and even though the Russian team was being coached by a Dutchman called Guus Hiddink--but then it was said that Soccer-Euro-Russia coach Hiddink aims to be Dutch "traitor" --he at least won: Oranje lost 3-1.
Oh well, Italy got messed up too, by Spain. And then there's that sad, sad fate of those French Blues, ces Blues de France, que dire de ceux--eh bien, let's just get drunk on champagne, pourquoi pas...et
 
 Mieux la Prochaine Fois!
 
Volgende Keer Beter!
 
Better next time!