Folktales and Fairy Tales:  Translation, Colonialism, and Cinema


University of Hawaii at Manoa International Symposium:  Sept 23-26, 2008

 

NEWS and UPDATES:

 

9/21/08  More Press!

 
An interview with Jack Zipes aired on Thursday 9/18 at 7:30am and 4:30pm on 88.1fm and at 8:30am and 1:30pm on 89.3fm. It is available on the web at www.hawaiipublicradio.org (just go to their community calendar and search "Zipes").

 

9/19/2008  Program available for download

Click HERE for the complete symposium program.  

Also, check out Honolulu Weekly's coverage of our event:

http://honoluluweekly.com/entertainment/2008/09/into-the-woods/

 

9/16/2008  Poster -- spread the word!

Click here to download flier

 

 

9/1/2008 Preliminary Events, Sept. 15-18

The CTLCS Research Cluster has planned some movie showings and a group discussion of selected readings in preparation for the symposium.  For details, click on the "event calendar" link on the sidebar.

 

8/29/2008  New Announcement

“Folktales and Fairy Tales: Translation, Colonialism, and Cinema” September 23-26, 2008A

ANNOUNCEMENT:

This four-day international symposium at UH-Manoa proposes to explore the significance of folk and fairy tales within the contemporary world in a manner that is interdisciplinary and attentive to our location in the Pacific.

Featured presenters include: Donald Haase (Wayne State University), Vilsoni Hereniko (Center for Pacific Island Studies, UHM), Sadhana Naithani (Jawaharlal Nehru University), Noenoe Silva (Political Science and Hawaiian Language, UHM), Wazíyatawin (University of Victoria, B.C.), Steven E. Winduo (University of Papua New Guinea), and Jack Zipes (University of Minnesota).

Panelists who will lead discussions include: Leilani Basham, Heather Diamond, Wimal Dissanayake, ku‘ualoha ho‘omanawanui, Maria Kaliambou, S. Shankar, Caroline Sinavaiana, Robert Sullivan, Houston Wood, and John Zuern.

Whether you have an interest in oral narratives, film, children’s literature, or contemporary culture, we hope to involve you in conversations exploring how translation and colonialism have shaped the history of both folktales and fairy tales, and how cinema—from Disney to indigenous films—plays out in the production and reception of magic and wonder today.
 
Participation in and attendance at the symposium as a whole will be free. The evening events will be free and open to the public.

The organizers invite faculty to make this information available to students and, when appropriate, to include attendance at one of the evening or afternoon lectures in your syllabi.

CALL: We are also eager to hear from scholars (faculty and graduate students) ready to commit to attending the symposium. Please write to folkandfairytalesUHM@gmail.com by September 5, 2008.

If you are on our mailing list, you will receive information about the events leading up to the symposium and also about logistics and receptions during the week of the event.

We look forward to hearing back from interested colleagues and students.

Contact: folkandfairytalesUHM@gmail.com

These events are sponsored by the UHM English Department, co-sponsored by the UHM Center for Pacific Islands Studies, the Center for South Asian Studies, the Indigenous Politics Program in Political Science, the Pacific Islands Development Program, and the UHM Comparativism and Translation in Literary and Cultural Studies (CTLCS) Research Cluster.


The EWC-UH International Cultural Studies Program and UHM East-Asian Languages and Literatures, History, Indo-Pacific Languages and Literatures, Languages and Literatures of Europe and the Americas, Political Science, and Women’s Studies also support this symposium.

For their generous support, we thank the following at the University of Hawai‘i-Mānoa: the University of Hawai’i Endowment for the Humanities Conference Program, Diversity and Equity Initiative, University Research Council, and Distinguished Lecture Series; the UHM Center for Pacific Islands Studies, Center for South Asian Studies, Pacific Islands Development Program, College of LLL, Department of Political Science, and Department of English.

 

7/17/2008  Reading List Online

Click the "download readings here" link on the sidebar --
to access a list of readings our main speakers have chosen as helpful background and supplementary material to their presentations.

 

 

5/7/2008  First Call for Participants

An International Symposium at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa
“Folktales and Fairy Tales: Translation, Colonialism, and Cinema”
September 23-26, 2008
UHM Organizers: Cristina Bacchilega, Noenoe Silva, Vilsoni Hereniko

Stories are central to who we are as human beings; and it is often through apparently simple and authorless stories that we learn that words (trans)form us. In the nineteenth century, folktales were relegated to the premodern past and fairy tales to the nursery. However, these “traditional” narratives continue to exercise their powers on us in contemporary culture in ways that escape those confines, as very different but globally popular films such as Whale Rider and Pan’s Labyrinth exemplify.

“Folktales and Fairy Tales: Translation, Colonialism, and Cinema,” an international four-day symposium at UH-Manoa, proposes to explore the significance of folk and fairy tales within the contemporary world in a manner that is interdisciplinary and attentive to our location in the Pacific. Thus, this symposium seeks to stimulate conversations among scholars of contemporary culture by discussing social practices—translation and colonialism—that have, in different ways, shaped the history of both folktales and fairy tales, and by focusing on the role of cinema—from Disney to indigenous films—in the production and reception of magic and wonder today.

Featured presenters will include: Donald Haase (Wayne State University), Vilsoni Hereniko (Center for Pacific Island Studies, UHM), Sadhana Naithani (Jawaharlal Nehru University), Noenoe Silva (Political Science and Hawaiian Language, UHM),
Wazíyatawin (University of Victoria, B.C.), Steven E. Winduo (University of Papua New Guinea), and Jack Zipes (University of Minnesota).

Panelists leading discussions include: Heather Diamond, Wimal Dissanayake, ku‘ualoha ho‘omanawanui, Maria Kaliambou, S. Shankar, Caroline Sinavaiana, Robert Sullivan, Houston Wood, and John Zuern.

The symposium is structured around afternoon and evening lectures as well as afternoon working sessions that will include UHM faculty and graduate students actively engaged in studying folk/fairy tales and/or problems of history, colonialism and cinematic representation. We hope to have a core of 50 some participants committing to the working sessions. These working sessions will begin with brief comments by scholars in various fields, followed by an open discussion amongst gathered participants.

The organizers invite scholars (faculty and graduate students) interested in these topics and issues, and ready to commit to attending the four-day symposium to write in with a brief paragraph indicating desire to participate and the nature of their interest in translation. Please write to:
folkandfairytalesUHM@gmail.com by June 15, 2008.

A preliminary program and further information about speakers is available on this website.

Participation in and attendance at the Symposium as a whole will be free. The evening events will be free and open to the public.

These events are sponsored by the UHM English Department, co-sponsored by the UHM Center for Pacific Islands Studies, the Center for South Asian Studies, the Indigenous Politics Program in Political Science, and Pacific Islands Development Program. To date it is also supported by UHM Comparativism and Translation in Literary and Cultural Studies (CTLCS) Research Cluster, East-Asian Languages and Literatures, EWC-UH International Cultural Studies Program, History, Indo-Pacific Languages and Literatures, Languages and Literatures of Europe and the Americas, Political Science, and Women’s Studies.

The symposium is made possible thanks to the generous support of the following at the University of Hawai‘i-Mānoa: UH Endowment for Humanites Conference Program, Diversity and Equity Initiative, University Research Council-UHM, and Distinguished Lecture Series; the UHM Center for Pacific Islands Studies, Center for South Asian Studies, Pacific Islands Development Program, College of LLL, and Department of English.

We look forward to hearing back from interested colleagues and students!

 

 RESOURCES

.........event calendar UPDATED!

 

...............download -->PROGRAM

 

....download readings here<--

 

.....................about

 

.......................bios

 

 

 

OTHER LINKS:

SurLaLune

Marvels & Tales

Oral Traditions, Folklore, and Cultural Studies, UHM Dept of English

Center for Pacific Islands Studies, UHM

 Honolulu Weekly

 

 

SPONSORS:

UHM Dept of English

Center for Pacific Islands Studies, UHM

Center for South Asian Studies, UHM

Indigenous Politics Program, Political Science UHM