SEND FLOWERS TO MASSACHUSETTS. TO MASSACHUSETTS

Send Flowers To Massachusetts. Shacklefords Florist Memphis.

Send Flowers To Massachusetts


send flowers to massachusetts
    massachusetts
  • A state in the northeastern US, on the Atlantic coast, one of the six New England states; pop. 6,349,097; capital, Boston; statehood, Feb. 6, 1788 (6). Settled by the Pilgrims in 1620, it was a center of resistance to the British before becoming one of the original thirteen states
  • one of the British colonies that formed the United States
  • a state in New England; one of the original 13 colonies
  • Massachuset: a member of the Algonquian people who formerly lived around Massachusetts Bay
    send flowers
  • Send Flowers is the debut album release from Black Lungs, the side project of Alexisonfire guitarist and backing vocalist Wade MacNeil. MacNeil's sound has been described as "the soundtrack for punk rockers, hip hoppers, pill poppers, young ladies and show stoppers."
send flowers to massachusetts - True Crime:
True Crime: Massachusetts: the State's Most Notorious Criminal Cases
True Crime: Massachusetts: the State's Most Notorious Criminal Cases
The harsh discipline of Puritan life bred the hard-bitten and hard-working people of Massachusetts, but did it also breed a unique type of criminal? This book explores the headline crimes of the state to find an answer. Included are the cases of the alleged axe-wielding Lizzie Borden, the executed anarchists Sacco and Vanzetti, the legendary Brink's robbery, the mysterious Boston Strangler, the Big Dan's spectator rape, the desperate college professor who murdered a young prostitute, and the fur salesman who slaughtered his wife and unborn child in cold blood.

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On the Terrace
On the Terrace
Frederick Arthur Bridgman Tuskegee, Alabama, 1847 - Rouen, France, 1928 Frederick Bridgman was born in Alabama, the son of an itinerant doctor from Massachusetts. His father died when Frederick was only three years old and, sensing the north-south tensions prior to the Civil War, his mother decided to return with her two sons to Boston in the north. However they soon moved to New York where Frederick, already showing artistic talent, joined the American Banknote Company as an apprentice engraver. But in spite of his progress and the opportunities for rapid promotion, he preferred to dedicate his time to painting, taking evening drawing classes first at the Brooklyn Art Association, then at the National Academy of Design. It is recounted that he even rose at 4 o'clock every morning to paint before going to work. Bridgman's studies soon produced results and in 1865 and again in 1866 he exhibited works at the Brooklyn Art Association. Encouraged by his success he gave up his job and in 1866, with the sponsorship of a group of Brooklyn businessmen, set out for Paris. However he soon found himself in Pont-Avent, the small village in Brittany which was home to an American artist colony under the charismatic leadership of Robert Wylie (1839-1877) who painted dramatic rural landscapes. He stayed there for two summers, thinking also of becoming a landscape painter like Wylie. In the autumn of 1866 Bridgman joined the atelier of Jean-Leon Gerome in Paris. But entry was not easy since, officially, the ateliers of the Ecole des Beaux-Arts were all full. His friend the painter Thomas Eakins went to great lengths pulling strings to enable entry of a group of American students, amongst whom were Eakins himself, Earl Shinn, the future Orientalist Harry Humphrey Moore, and Bridgman. He remained there for four years, spending his summers at Pont-Aven with Wylie. Bridgman was soon exhibiting at the Paris Salons and his A Provincial Circus had much success at the Salon of 1870, so much so that he then sent it to America for exhibition at the Brooklyn Art Association. At this time he also had one of his canvases engraved for reproduction in the journal Le Monde Illustre and began to sell some of his work to the dealer Goupil, Gerome's father-in-law. He spent the period of the Franco-Prussian War and the Paris Commune painting rural scenes in Pont-Aven and in Spain. The winter of 1872-3 he spent in Spain and North Africa accompanied by an unknown English painter friend. Starting first in Tangiers, which he found picturesque but was apalled by the poverty, they quickly moved on, first by boat to Oran, then by train to Algeria - a country he found more conducive. There they lodged at a hotel in Biskra whilst renting an atelier in the poor quarter. In the evenings they sampled the local nightlife and their afternoons they spent exploring the surrounding villages and oases on horseback. Here they found the local colour they were looking for - the crowds in the markets, the belly-dancers, even witnessing a fencing duel between two soldiers of the Biskra regiment. While there Bridgman worked assiduously, returning to Paris in the spring of 1873 with numerous painted canvases, oil sketches, pencil and ink drawings, together with some costumes and accessories he had used in his atelier. The favourable response to his Algerian scenes in Paris led him to plan another visit to North Africa the following winter. Accompanying him this time was Charles Sprague Pearce, a student of Bonnat, whom he had met in the south of France the previous winter. Arriving in Cairo in December 1873, they worked in the city producing numerous sketches of the Islamic monuments, but also the street life, which was Bridgman's main inspiration. Then, encouraged by an enthusiastic English couple they had met at the opera, they set off to travel up the Nile, a journey lasting three-and-a-half months. They sailed as far as the Second Cataract and visited Abu-Simbel. Bridgman brought back to Paris over three hundred sketches and studies and yet more studio accessories. In Paris he rented an atelier in the same building as Pearce and another American, E H Blashfield. There he commenced painting several ambitious reconstructions of antique Egyptian life, seeming to have forgotten his original ambition of being a landscape artist of the Bretan or Algerian countryside! The first, The Mummy's Funeral, was exhibited at the Salon of 1877 and was remarkably successful, becoming an exhibition favourite. It was engraved, copied and finally bought by the proprietor of the New York Herald, James Gordon Bennett. His reputation then made, he married a young heiress from Boston, Florence Mott Baker. The peak of his career probably came with the mounting of a personal exhibition displaying over three hundred of his works at the American Art Gallery, the major innovation of this exhibition being the inclusion of a large number of his sketches besides the usual new paintings an
Poison Ivy on the tree
Poison Ivy on the tree
Toxicodendron radicans, better known as poison ivy (older synonyms are Rhus toxicodendron and Rhus radicans), is a poisonous North American plant that is well known for its production of urushiol, a clear liquid compound found within the sap of the plant that causes an itching rash in most people who touch it. The plant is not a true ivy (Hedera). Poison ivy can be found growing in any of the following three forms: as a trailing vine that is 10–25 centimeters tall (4 to 10 inches) as a shrub up to 1.2 meters tall (4 feet) as a climbing vine that grows on trees or some other support Poison ivy grows throughout much of North America, including the Canadian Maritime provinces, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, and all U.S. states east of the Rockies, as well as in the mountainous areas of Mexico up to around 1,500 m (4,900 ft) (caquistle or caxuistle is the Nahuatl term), and is normally found in wooded areas, especially along edge areas. It also grows in exposed rocky areas and in open fields and disturbed areas. It also grows as a forest understory plant, although it is only somewhat shade tolerant. The plant is extremely common in suburban and exurban areas of New England, the Mid-Atlantic, and southeastern United States. Similar species, poison oak, and Toxicodendron rydbergii are found in western North America. Poison ivy rarely grows at altitudes above 1,500 m (4,900 ft), although the altitude limit varies in different locations. The plants can grow as a shrub up to about 1.2 metres (3.9 ft) tall, as a groundcover 10–25 cm (3.9–9.8 in) high, or as a climbing vine on various supports. Older vines on substantial supports send out lateral branches that may at first be mistaken for tree limbs. The deciduous leaves of poison ivy are trifoliate with three almond-shaped leaflets. Leaf colour ranges from light green (usually the younger leaves) to dark green (mature leaves), turning bright red in fall; though other sources say leaves are reddish when expanding, turn green through maturity, then back to red, orange, or yellow in the fall. The leaflets of mature leaves are somewhat shiny. The leaflets are 3 to 12 cm long, rarely up to 30 cm. Each leaflet has a few or no teeth along its edge, and the leaf surface is smooth. Leaflet clusters are alternate on the vine, and the plant has no thorns. Vines growing on the trunk of a tree become firmly attached through numerous aerial rootlets. The vines develop adventitious roots, or the plant can spread from rhizomes or root crowns. The milky sap of poison ivy darkens after exposure to the air. Poison ivy spreads either vegetatively or sexually. Poison ivy is dioecious; flowering occurs from May to July. The yellowish- or greenish-white flowers are typically inconspicuous and are located in clusters up to 8 cm above the leaves. The berry-like fruit, a drupe, mature by August to November with a grayish-white colour. Fruits are a favourite winter food of some birds and other animals. Seeds are spread mainly by animals and remain viable after passing through the digestive tract. It is not particularly sensitive to soil moisture, although it does not grow in desert or arid conditions. It grows in a wide variety of soil types, and soil pH from 6.0 (acidic) to 7.9 (moderately alkaline). It can grow in areas subject to seasonal flooding or brackish water. It is more common now than when Europeans first entered North America. Real estate development adjacent to wild, undeveloped land has engendered "edge effects," enabling poison ivy to form vast, lush colonies in such places. It is listed as a noxious weed in the U.S. states of Minnesota and Michigan and the Canadian province of Ontario. Poison ivy and its relatives are virtually unknown in Europe. The following three characteristics are sufficient to identify poison ivy in most situations: (a) clusters of three leaflets, (b) alternate leaf arrangement, and (c) lack of thorns. Although a number of other plants fit this simplified description, any plant with these criteria should be prudently avoided by people unfamiliar with identifying poison ivy. Identification by experienced people is often made difficult by leaf damage, leafless conditions during winter, and unusual growth forms due to environmental and/or genetic factors. The appearance of poison ivy can vary greatly between environments and even individual specimens within a single area. Various mnemonic rhymes describe the characteristic appearance of poison ivy: "Leaves of three, let it be." "Hairy vine, no friend of mine." Poison ivy vines are very poisonous. "Raggy rope, don't be a dope!" Poison ivy vines on trees have a furry "raggy" appearance. This rhyme warns tree climbers to be wary. Old, mature vines on tree trunks can be quite large and long, with the recognizable leaves obscured among the higher foliage of the tree. "One, two, three? Don't touch me." "Berries white, run in fright" and &quo

send flowers to massachusetts
send flowers to massachusetts
Moon Spotlight Massachusetts
Moon Spotlight Massachusetts is a 160-page compact guide covering the best of the state’s major locations, including Boston, Eastern Massachusetts, Cape Cod, and Western Massachusetts. Travel writers Michael Blanding and Alexandra Hall offer their firsthand advice on what sights are must-sees, and sightseeing highlight maps make planning your time easy. This lightweight guide is packed with recommendations on entertainment, shopping, recreation, accommodations, food, and transportation, making navigating this historical New England destination uncomplicated and enjoyable.

Moon Spotlight Massachusetts is a 160-page compact guide covering the best of the state’s major locations, including Boston, Eastern Massachusetts, Cape Cod, and Western Massachusetts. Travel writers Michael Blanding and Alexandra Hall offer their firsthand advice on what sights are must-sees, and sightseeing highlight maps make planning your time easy. This lightweight guide is packed with recommendations on entertainment, shopping, recreation, accommodations, food, and transportation, making navigating this historical New England destination uncomplicated and enjoyable.

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