Florida TLSAE Course Module - Signs, Signals, and Markings

Signs, Signals, and Markings
Introduction

The Highway Transportation System (HTS) uses traffic control devices to visually communicate messages to drivers using signs, signals, and road markings. Traffic controls are necessary to ensure orderly, predictable movement of traffic.

Transportation professionals create traffic rules and regulations with careful consideration related to driver capabilities, roadway structure, and vehicle crash history.

Traffic controls in the state of Florida serve several purposes. Signs, signals, and markings warn you of changing road conditions, tell you what to do, and help guide your way.

To operate safely in the highway transportation system, all drivers must know, recognize, and obey the rules-of-the-road.

Responding appropriately to traffic signs and signals is a key factor in reducing driver risk. Be aware of new signs and signals and adjust to changing traffic patterns and roadways design.

Learning Objectives

This module introduces you to the benefits of obeying signs, signals, and markings. The topics that will be covered include:
  1. Signs
  2. Signals
  3. Markings
  4. Additional Pavement Markings
  5. Railroad Crossings


1. Signs

There is a national standard for signage, which uses symbols designed for quick and easy understanding; they utilize uniform colors and shapes so you can quickly interpret their meaning.

There are three categories of signs:
  • Warning
  • Regulatory
  • Guide
Signs also have specific colors and special shapes associated with their meanings. Signs are designed specifically for drivers to see and quickly recognize their messages and meanings.

Warning Signs

Warning signs "warn" drivers of road and traffic conditions and communicate hazards that lie ahead. Warning signs are diamond-shaped and usually yellow. Warning signs communicate danger and are read from the top to the bottom. Be prepared to slow or stop when you see a warning sign.

Warning signs do not tell you what to do, they warn you of approaching or potential danger. Warning signs with a speed posted on them indicate a reduction of speed may be necessary. These speeds are determined to be the safest speed to travel in good conditions. Do not assume you can safely travel faster than the sign indicates.

Construction Signs

Orange, diamond-shaped, or rectangular signs alert drivers of construction zones. Be ready to slow, stop, or drive around equipment and workers. Travel though construction zones carefully and follow the directions received from the construction workers. Be cautious about your position in the lane. Often construction zones have no shoulder or extra space in which you can maneuver.

Regulatory Signs

Regulatory signs communicate laws all drivers must understand and obey. Regulatory signs are usually red, black, or red on white. Stop signs and yield signs are regulatory signs that were given unique and distinctive shapes.

Orange, diamond-shaped, or rectangular signs alert drivers of construction zones. Be ready to slow, stop, or drive around equipment and workers. Travel though construction zones carefully and follow the directions received from the construction workers. Be cautious about your position in the lane. Often construction zones have no shoulder or extra space in which you can maneuver.

Stop signs are octagonal.

They are red with white letters and a white border. Stop signs are located on roads that cross a through street. Always come to a full and complete stop at a stop sign. A full stop means that you stop forward motion. If there is a white stop line painted on the road, stop behind the line. If there is no white stop line, stop before entering the intersection. When you have stopped, yield the right-of-way to pedestrians or other vehicles that are approaching or already in the intersection.

Yield signs are red and white inverted triangles. Yield signs are located where roads cross or merge. To yield means to allow others to use the intersection before you enter. The right-of-way means you accept the privilege of the roadway. To yield the right-of-way means you give the privilege of the roadway to another road user, such as allowing a pedestrian to use the road or allowing traffic approaching the intersection to continue without your vehicle interfering with their speed or path. When you approach a yield sign, you are not required to stop - you are required to yield, slow down, and always be prepared to stop. Proceed only when there is no traffic in the lane you are about to enter.

If you are given a yield sign or stop sign but another driver has to slow down or stop when you enter the intersection, you have not successfully yielded the right-of-way.

Other regulatory signs include speed limit signs, turning restrictions, lane use, and parking restrictions.

Guide Signs

Guide signs provide information about routes, exits, location, distances, points of interest, and services.

Route markers are posted on local, U.S., and interstate routes. Interstate route signs are red, white, and blue shields. Route signs vary according to the type of roadway. State and county signs vary from state to state. Route signs have the road number posted on them. Other guide signs include destination and mileage signs, roadside service signs, and signs that direct you to recreational areas. Service signs are blue. Recreational signs are brown.

Shapes also provide you with critical driving information. For example:
  • A STOP sign is an octagon.
  • A YIELD sign is a triangle.
  • A railroad crossing sign is round.
  • A regulatory sign is a vertical rectangle.
  • A school sign is a pentagon.
  • A NO PASSING sign is pennant-shaped.
  • A warning sign is diamond-shaped.
Information and guide signs are horizontal rectangles.

Every time vehicles travel in opposing directions and at different speeds, the potential for a crash exists. Traffic engineers use signals in combination with signs and markings to help control busy intersections. Signals are bright and are easier to see both day and night. They are positioned so they can be seen above and to the side of traffic flow. Signals sometimes are the only traffic controls that the driver can see because of darkness, weather, or glare.

2. Signals

Signals have lights with colors that have distinct and consistent meanings. Understand what each signal color means and always obey the signal, it is the law. When lights are not working, drivers should stop and follow the procedures used at an intersection controlled by a four-way stop.

Red Light

A red signal light means STOP. You must come to a full stop. A right turn can be made against a red light after you stop and yield to pedestrians and vehicles in your path. DO NOT turn if there is a sign posted for NO TURN ON RED. The fine for a red light violation is $158.

Yellow Light

A yellow signal light warns you that the red signal is about to appear. When you see the yellow light, you should stop, if you can do so safely. If you can’t stop, look out for vehicles that may enter the intersection when the light changes. Recognize that it is illegal to enter an intersection after the signal turns red.

Green Light

A green signal light means GO, but first you must let any vehicles, bicycles, or pedestrians remaining in the intersection clear the intersection before you move ahead. Make a left turn only if you have enough space to complete the turn before any oncoming vehicle, bicycle, or pedestrian becomes a hazard.

Red Arrow

A red arrow means STOP until the green signal or green arrow appears. A turn may not be made against a red arrow.

Yellow Arrow

A yellow arrow means come to a complete stop if you can do so safely. Be prepared to obey the next signal that could be the green or red light or the red arrow.

Green Arrow

A green arrow means GO, but first you must let any vehicles, bicycles, or pedestrians remaining in the intersection when your signal changes to green get through before you move ahead. Make the left turn only if you have enough space to complete the turn before any oncoming vehicle, bicycle, or pedestrian becomes a hazard.

Flashing Red

A flashing red signal light means exactly the same as a STOP sign: namely, STOP! After stopping, proceed when safe, observing the right-of-way rules.

Flashing Yellow

A flashing yellow signal light warns you to be careful. Slow down and be especially alert.

Lane Signals

Overhead lane-use signals tell you if it is clear for you to use the lane or whether the lane is open to oncoming traffic only.

Reversible lanes allow traffic on crowded roadways to go in one direction at certain times of day and in the opposite direction at other times of day.

Green Arrow

You may drive in the lane indicated when a green arrow is pointed downward.

Yellow X

As soon as you can do so safely, move over into a lane with a downward-pointing green arrow.

Flashing Yellow X

You can make a left turn at the intersection where the signal is located.

Red X

Stay out of this lane. It is open to oncoming traffic.


3. Intersection Safety

Drivers run red lights frequently. The most dangerous time to enter an intersection is immediately after the light has turned green - other drivers might be trying to “beat the yellow light.” Do not enter an intersection, even when the light is green, unless there is enough space to completely cross before the light turns red. If heavy traffic causes you to block traffic, you can be cited.

When you enter an intersection, scan for traffic controls, prohibitive signs, and potential hazards. If the light is yellow at a controlled intersection, stop safely before entering the intersection. If you are already in the intersection and cannot stop safely, proceed through at a constant speed and watch carefully for cross traffic.

Controlled intersections use some form of:
  • Signal lights
  • Flashing signal lights
  • Circular arrows
  • Right-turn-on-red signals
  • Designated lanes
4. Additional Pavement Markings

Bike Lanes

A bicycle lane is shown by a solid white line along either side of the street, four or more feet from the curb. The words “BIKE LANE” are painted at various locations in this lane. Near a corner, this line will usually be a broken line. Motor vehicles are permitted to enter the bike lane only where the line is broken and only in order to make a right turn. Roadways with bike lanes may also have green “BIKE ROUTE” or white “BIKE LANE” signs posted.

Large Broken Lines on the Freeway and City Streets

Lanes that are ending will usually be marked by large broken lines painted on the pavement.

Obstructions

These are white pavement markings that indicate an upcoming obstruction, such as a bump or dip.

Stop Lines

Stop lines or “stop bars” are solid white lines stretching across one or more lanes in the same direction, indicating the proper place to come to a stop at an intersection. Stop before your front bumper crosses this line.

Crosswalk Markings

Every intersection where streets with sidewalks meet “at about right angles” has a crosswalk for pedestrians to cross the street even though there may be no painted lines. Crosswalks are that part of the pavement where the sidewalk lines would extend across the street and are areas set aside for people to cross. They are often marked with white lines. Yellow crosswalk lines may be painted at school crossings. If you stop at an intersection, always stay clear of these crosswalks, stopping before your front bumper enters the path.

School Warning Markings

These white or yellow pavement markings read SCHOOL ZONE and indicate that you are approaching a school zone and should reduce your speed accordingly.

School Buses

When driving on a two-way street or highway, vehicles moving in either direction must stop for a school bus with red flashing lights. When yellow lights are flashing, prepare to stop because children are preparing to leave the bus. When red lights are flashing, stop, and remain stopped as long as the lights are flashing, since children will be crossing to or from the bus.

You need not stop when driving on a divided highway in the opposite direction of a school bus displaying flashing lights if there is an unpaved space at least five feet wide, a raised median, or a physical barrier. Remember, if you are driving in the same direction as the school bus, you must stop for flashing lights even on divided highways (FS 316.172).

As per Florida statutes, passing a stopped school bus with flashing lights will result in a $100 violation. For a second or subsequent offense within a period of five years, the Department shall suspend the driver license of the person for not less than 90 days and not more than six months. If a motorist passes a stopped bus with flashing lights on the side where children board or get off the bus, the fine doubles and the suspension increases to not less than 180 days and not more than one year. There will be an additional $65 fine that goes to the Department of Revenue for deposit into the Administrative Trust Fund of the Department of Health to be used for trauma payments (FS 316.172; 318.18; 322.27).

5. Railroad Crossings

Railroad crossings are one of the deadliest types of intersections. If a train is entering the railroad crossing, it always has the right-of-way. Railroad intersections have crossbuck signs posted, but not all are controlled with signals and gates.

Most collisions are the result of human error. People do not obey the warning signals, they try to outrun the train, or they ignore the crossing barriers. Never try to judge a train’s speed or distance. Expect a train on any track in any direction at any time.

Controls at railroad crossings include:
  • Warning signs
  • Crossing gates
  • Signals
  • Flashing lights
  • White pavement roadway markings
Guidelines to Rail-Crossing Safety:

Obey any controls at the crossing; if there are no controls, look and listen to the left, to the right, and back to the left again.

If a train is approaching, stop far away from the tracks (within 50 feet, but not less than 15 feet).

Proceed with caution after the train has passed; there may be another train coming.


Summary

1. Traffic controls are necessary to ensure the orderly, predictable movement of traffic. Traffic controls in the state of Florida serve several purposes. Signs, signals, and markings warn you of changing road conditions, tell you what to do, and help guide your way. To operate safely in the highway transportation system, all drivers must know, recognize, and obey the rules-of-the-road.

2. There is a national standard for signage, which uses symbols designed for quick and easy understanding; they utilize uniform colors and shapes so you can quickly interpret their meaning.

3. There are three categories of signs:
  • Warning
  • Regulatory
  • Guide
4. Warning signs “warn” drivers of road and traffic conditions and communicate hazards that lie ahead. Warning signs are diamond-shaped and usually yellow. Warning signs communicate danger and are read from the top to the bottom. Be prepared to slow or stop when you see a warning sign.

5. Orange, diamond-shaped, or rectangular signs alert drivers of construction zones. Be ready to slow, stop, or drive around equipment and workers.

6. Regulatory signs communicate laws all drivers must understand and obey. Regulatory signs are usually red, black, or red on white. Stop signs and yield signs are regulatory signs that were given unique and distinctive shapes.

7. Guide signs provide information about routes, exits, location, distances, points of interest, and services.

8. Traffic engineers use signals in combination with signs and markings to help control busy intersections.

9. Signals have lights with colors that have distinct and consistent meanings. Understand what each signal color means and always obey the signal; it is the law. When lights are not working, drivers should stop and follow the procedures used at an intersection controlled by a four-way stop.

10. Drivers run red lights frequently. The most dangerous time to enter an intersection is immediately after the light has turned green; other drivers might be trying to “beat the yellow light.” Do not enter an intersection, even when the light is green, unless there is enough space to completely cross before the light turns red. If heavy traffic causes you to block traffic, you can be cited.

11. Markings communicate the law and are painted on the road for your safety and to regulate the flow of traffic.

12. The following types of yellow lines tell you whether passing is allowed:
  • Broken line - passing is allowed if there are no oncoming cars.
  • Solid line next to broken line - passing is allowed if there are no oncoming cars and you are next to the broken line. Passing is not allowed if you are next to the solid line.
  • Double solid lines on two-lane roadways - no passing is allowed.
  • Double solid lines on four-lane roadways - no passing is allowed.
13. Solid white lines should never be crossed. Lanes that are ending will usually be marked by large broken lines painted on the pavement. Every intersection where streets with sidewalks meet “at about right angles” has a crosswalk for pedestrians to cross the street even though there may be no painted lines.

14. Stop before your front bumper crosses the “stop bar” at an intersection.

15. Crosswalks are often marked with white lines. Yellow crosswalk lines may be painted at school crossings. If you stop at an intersection, always stay clear of these crosswalks, stopping before your front bumper enters the path. Always yield the right-of-way to pedestrians.

15. School Warning Markings are white or yellow pavement markings that read SCHOOL ZONE and indicate that you are approaching a school zone and should reduce your speed accordingly.

16. If you are driving in the same direction as the school bus, you must stop if the red lights are flashing. In Florida, passing a stopped school bus with flashing lights will result in a 4 point violation. In addition to the points, the court shall impose a minimum civil penalty of $100 (FS 316.172; 318.18; 322.27).

17. Railroad crossings are one of the deadliest types of intersections. If a train is entering the railroad crossing, it always has the right-of-way. Railroad intersections have crossbuck signs posted but not all are controlled with signals and gates. Expect a train on any track in any direction at any time.





Florida TLSAE/Drug & Alcohol 4 hour Course Online

Who is required to take this 4-hour drug and alcohol course?


This is a first-time drivers ed course for new aspiring drivers. The state of Florida requires all new drivers take a 4-hour drug and alcohol course. If you want your Permit License you must take this course. You can take the DATA course when you are 14 1/2. You can sign up right now at our website. Our course is easy and fun!
  •     Florida 4 hour first-time drivers course also referred as:
  •     TLSAE - Traffic Law and Substance Abuse Education
  •     DATA - Drug Alcohol Traffic Awareness course
  •     DATE Drug Alcohol Traffic Awareness Education course
  •     ADAPT - Alcohol Drugs Accident Prevention Training
  •     Drug & Alcohol Course or Drug and Alcohol Class
  •     Florida Permit Test or Florida Permit Exam Course
  •     The Permit Test is also known as the DMV Exam or DMV Test
Florida first time driver course required to get a Florida drivers license. Florida first time driver courses teach drivers how drugs and alcohol affect driving,. In that situation you have to go home, make a new appointment and return the DMV. Every new driver is required to take a Florida TLSAE course.

Enroll your Florida 4 hour drug and alcohol course online and meet your learner's permit requirement.

Take Your FL Drug & Alcohol Test. FL DMV Authorized. Get Started Now!