Florida TLSAE Course Module - Licensing and Insurance Laws

Licensing and Insurance Laws

Introduction
This module will introduce you to the various licensing and insurance requirements that the State of Florida requires you to comply with.

Florida has implemented a graduated licensing law which contains certain curfew provisions with which you must be familiar. The graduated licensing law outlines the times you can drive if you hold a learner’s permit.

In Florida, there are two motor vehicle insurance laws:
  • Financial Responsibility Law
  • No-Fault Law
It is important that you understand these laws because if you do not have the proper insurance, you can lose your driver license and license plate(s) and have to pay large fees to get them back.

Your insurance company will issue you a Florida Insurance I.D. Card. This card must be kept in a place that is easy to reach from the driver’s seat in your vehicle. You must always be ready to show a law enforcement officer proof that you have the required insurance and it is current. The consequences for not having the card are substantial.

Insurance provides a method of paying for loss or damage if you are involved in a collision. Vehicle insurance is a critical part of your driving privilege. You must have the proper insurance coverage.

This module introduces licensing and insurance laws. The topics that will be covered include:
  1. Graduated Licensing
  2. Financial Responsibility Law
  3. Insurance Coverage
  4. No-Fault Law
  5. General Information
1.    Graduated Licensing:

In July 1996, Florida implemented a graduated licensing law which contained curfew provisions which restricted teenage driving at night. This is the period when alcohol-related crashes are most likely to occur. This change may have affected the number of alcohol-related crashes.

All drivers 15 to 17 years old must hold a learner’s license for at least one year before applying for an intermediate license.

During the learner’s license phase, 15 to 17 year old drivers must have a licensed driver over 21 years old in the front passenger seat.

If you have a learner's permit, you may only drive during daylight hours for the first three months. After three months, you may drive until 10:00 p.m.

Once you have had your learner's license for one year without any traffic convictions, you will receive an intermediate license.

If you have an intermediate license and are 16 years old, you may drive unaccompanied between the hours of 6:00 a.m. and 11:00 p.m. If you are 17 years old, you may drive unaccompanied between 5:00 a.m. and 1:00 a.m. If you have a passenger at least 21 years old sitting in the front passenger seat, you may drive at any time.

You will have an intermediate license until you turn 18 years old. After that, all restrictions are removed from your license and you have a full privilege license (7). These stages of the graduated driver licensing (GDL) system include specific components and restrictions to introduce driving privileges gradually to beginning drivers. Novice drivers who are 15 to 18 years old must required to demonstrate responsible driving behavior in each stage of licensing before advancing to the next level/stage of licensing.

2.    Financial Responsibility Law:

The Financial Responsibility Law states that owners and operators of motor vehicles must be financially responsible for damages and/or injuries they may cause to others when a motor vehicle crash occurs.
This law requires you to have bodily injury liability insurance during the following times:
  • A crash where you are at fault and injuries have occurred
  • A crash where your vehicle has caused damage to the property of others
  • A citation for DUI, which results in a revocation
  • A revocation for Habitual Traffic Offender
  • A revocation for any serious offense where the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles is required to revoke your license
Your driver license and/or license plates will be suspended for a period of up to three years if you do not have the proper insurance and are involved in one of these situations (FS 324).

3.    Insurance Coverage

You must have the following minimum insurance coverage:
  • $10,000 Bodily Injury Liability (BIL) (to one person).
  • $20,000 Bodily Injury Liability (to two or more persons).
  • $10,000 Property Damage Liability (PDL), or
  • $30,000 Combined single limits.
If you are involved in a violation and you do not have insurance to comply with the Financial Responsibility Law, your driver license and/or license plates will be suspended for up to three years. You will have to pay a $15 reinstatement fee and show the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles certified proof of full liability insurance on Form SR-22 for three years from the original suspension date to get your driving privilege back. In addition, if you are the driver or the owner of a vehicle which is in a crash that is your fault, this department can require you to pay for the damages before your driving privilege is reinstated (FS 324.021, FS 324.131, FS 324.121, FS 324.071).

Under this law, to protect yourself and others, you should have liability insurance on any motor vehicle you own or drive, including motorcycles. In addition, you must maintain insurance coverage throughout the vehicle registration period or you must surrender the license plate(s) to any driver license office.

4.    No-Fault Law

The Florida No-Fault Law requires owners of motor vehicles with four or more wheels (excluding taxis and limousines), that has been in Florida for at least 90 days or non-consecutive days during the past 365 days to purchase a policy delivered or issued for delivery in Florida.

The minimum coverage is:
  • $10,000 of Personal Injury Protection (PIP)
  • $10,000 of Property Damage Liability (PDL)
You cannot buy a license plate and registration for a car, or other four-wheel vehicle, without having coverage issued in Florida. Once you have this insurance, anytime you renew it, fail to renew it, cancel it, or the insurance company cancels it, the insurance company must notify the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles. The department will then notify you to provide proof of new coverage.
If you fail to provide proof of insurance, your driver license and license plates will be suspended for up to three years.

You must maintain insurance coverage throughout the vehicle registration period or you must surrender the license plate(s) to any driver licenses office.

If your driver license and license plates are suspended for not having insurance under the No-Fault Law, you will have to pay $150 and show proof of current insurance to get them back. If you are suspended for a second time within three years, you will pay $250. A third offense within three years, and you will have to pay $500. Also, if your driver license and plates have been under suspension for 30 days or more for a no-fault insurance violation, a police officer can seize your license plates immediately (FS 627.730-7405).

5.    General Information

You will be issued a Florida Insurance I.D. Card from your insurance company. You must have this card ready to show to any law enforcement officer to prove that you have the required insurance. If you don’t, you may receive a citation for not having proof of insurance. If your driver license or license plates are suspended for not obeying either of these laws, you will not be able to get a temporary license for any reason, not even for work purposes. If you make a false statement or commit a forgery about your motor vehicle insurance, you can be guilty of a second degree misdemeanor.

The Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles will always provide you with an opportunity to prove insurance coverage or be heard before being suspended. You can comply by:
  • Purchasing a motor vehicle insurance policy from a company licensed to do business in Florida.
  • Obtaining a Financial Responsibility Certificate from the Bureau of Financial Responsibility after posting a satisfactory surety bond of a company licensed to do business in Florida.
  • Obtaining a Financial Responsibility Certificate from the Bureau of Financial Responsibility by depositing cash or securities with the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles.
  • Obtaining a Self Insurance Certificate from the Bureau of Financial Responsibility by providing satisfactory evidence of possessing a net unencumbered capital.
Remember: Automobile insurance is an important part of your driving privilege. Protect yourself and others by having and keeping the proper insurance coverage.

Summary:
  • In July 1996, Florida implemented a graduated licensing law which contained curfew provisions which restricted teenage driving at night. Any driver 15 to 17 years old must hold a learner’s license for at least one year and after that an intermediate license until they turn 18.

  • Florida’s Financial Responsibility Law requires owners and operators of motor vehicles to be financially responsible for damages and/or injuries they may cause to others when a motor vehicle crash happens. This law requires that you have bodily injury liability insurance.

  • The State of Florida mandates that you carry certain minimum insurance coverage amounts. If you are involved in a violation and you don’t have the proper coverage, your driver license and/or license plates will be suspended for up to three years.

  • The Florida No-Fault Law requires owners of motor vehicles with four or more wheels (excluding taxis and limousines), that have been in the state for at least 90 days or non-consecutive days during the past 365 days to purchase a policy delivered or issued for delivery in Florida. You cannot buy a license plate and registration for a car, or other four-wheel vehicle, without having coverage issued in Florida. There are serious consequences if you are involved in a collision and you don’t have the correct insurance coverage.

  • You will be issued a Florida Insurance I.D. Card from your insurance company. You must have this card ready to show to any law enforcement officer to prove that you have the required insurance. If you don’t, you may receive a ticket for not having proof of insurance. If you make a false statement or commit a forgery about your motor vehicle insurance, you can be guilty of a second degree misdemeanor.

  • Automobile insurance is an important part of your driving privilege. Protect yourself and others by having and keeping the proper insurance coverage.

  1. .    If you make a false statement or commit a forgery about your motor vehicle insurance you can be guilty of a  Second  degree misdemeanor.

  2. .     In Florida, when would you be required to have bodily injury liability insurance? A crash where your vehicle has caused damage to the property of others

  3. .     True or False: You cannot buy a license plate and registration for a car, or other four-wheel vehicle, without having liability No-Fault coverage issued in Florida. True

  4. .    True or False: If your driver license and plates have been under suspension for 30 days or more for a no-fault insurance violation, a police officer can seize your license plates immediately. True

  5. .    If your driver license and license plate(s) are suspended (the first time) for not having insurance under the No-Fault Law, you will have to pay  $150  and show proof of current insurance to get them back.

  6. .    Insurance  provides a method of paying for loss or damage if you are involved in a collision.

  7. .    The Financial  Responsibility  Law requires owners and operators of motor vehicles to be financially responsible for damages they cause when involved in a crash.

  8. .    After receiving a license, 16 year olds may not drive between  11 p.m. and 6 a.m. .

  9. .    Anytime you renew your car insurance, fail to renew it, cancel it, or the insurance company cancels it, the insurance company must notify: The Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles

  10. .    In July 1996, Florida implemented a  Graduated Licensing  law which contained curfew provisions which restricted teenage driving at night.



Florida TLSAE/Drug & Alcohol 4 hour Course Online

Who is required to take this 4-hour drug and alcohol course?


This is a first-time drivers ed course for new aspiring drivers. The state of Florida requires all new drivers take a 4-hour drug and alcohol course. If you want your Permit License you must take this course. You can take the DATA course when you are 14 1/2. You can sign up right now at our website. Our course is easy and fun!
  •     Florida 4 hour first-time drivers course also referred as:
  •     TLSAE - Traffic Law and Substance Abuse Education
  •     DATA - Drug Alcohol Traffic Awareness course
  •     DATE Drug Alcohol Traffic Awareness Education course
  •     ADAPT - Alcohol Drugs Accident Prevention Training
  •     Drug & Alcohol Course or Drug and Alcohol Class
  •     Florida Permit Test or Florida Permit Exam Course
  •     The Permit Test is also known as the DMV Exam or DMV Test
Florida first time driver course required to get a Florida drivers license. Florida first time driver courses teach drivers how drugs and alcohol affect driving,. In that situation you have to go home, make a new appointment and return the DMV. Every new driver is required to take a Florida TLSAE course.

Enroll your Florida 4 hour drug and alcohol course online and meet your learner's permit requirement.

Take Your FL Drug & Alcohol Test. FL DMV Authorized. Get Started Now!