Florida TLSAE Course Module - Driver license revocation, suspension, and cancellation

Florida’s laws related to driver license revocation, suspension, and cancellation

In this module you learned about Florida’s laws related to driver license revocation, suspension, and cancellation.

The revocation of a license is defined as a formal action to terminate a license, which from then on cannot be renewed or restored, but can only be replaced when you apply for a new license. There are many violations that may result in your license being revoked.

Suspension is less severe. It is the temporary withdrawal of your license or driving privileges. Similar to revocation, there are multiple ways the court system can suspend your license. Your license can also be cancelled if it was issued by mistake or because fraud was discovered.

If you are under the age of 18 and accumulate six or more points within a 12-month period you are automatically restricted for one year to driving for business purposes only. There are also certain driving time restrictions that apply to a driver who is under the age of 17.

If your driving privilege is suspended or revoked, you may be eligible to apply for a hardship license or reinstatement. You need to check with your local Bureau of Administrative Reviews office.

You can also be charged with DUI if it is determined that you are under the influence of certain controlled substances such as prescription drugs. The State of Florida has a zero tolerance policy when it comes to driving under the influence of alcohol. You will have your license suspended if you are less than 21 and you have a BAL of .02 or higher.


Vehicle safety systems and equipment
 
Introduction

During a crash, three collisions occur:

The vehicle hitting an object (other car, tree, brick wall).

The occupant hitting the inside of the vehicle (driver thrown against windshield, passenger thrown from back to front seat).

The inside organs and tissue of the occupant hitting his/her skeletal structure (brain moving forward until it hits the skull, heart ripped from arteries until hitting the ribcage).

Whenever an object is in motion, it will continue to travel forward until it is stopped.

Automotive engineers designed your vehicle to help reduce injuries and fatalities resulting from crashes.

There are several impact and restraint systems installed in your vehicle to absorb the energy of a crash and act as a buffer so your occupants' injuries are reduced.

In addition to safety features, Florida requires other functional components in your vehicle. This module will introduce what is required and why these features are in place to lower your risk of injury or death if you are involved in a crash.

 
Learning Objectives

This module is about vehicle safety systems and equipment in your vehicle designed to reduce the risk of injury or death if you are involved in a crash. Seat belts are primary enforcement in Florida. Primary enforcement means law enforcement is allowed to ticket a driver for not wearing a seat belt. The topics that will be covered include:
  1. Safety Belts
  2. Head Restraints, Air Bags, and Child Passenger Restraints
  3. Required Safety Features
  4. Other Florida Equipment Standards
  5. The Braking System
 
1. Safety Belts

Safety belts are one of the most important safety features in your vehicle. They prevent or reduce injuries and fatalities by restraining you in your vehicle or preventing you from being thrown from your vehicle. Safety belts usually consist of a lap belt (which restrains your lower body) and a shoulder belt (which restrains your upper body.)

Florida Safety Belt Law

The Florida Safety Belt Law states:
  • It is unlawful for any person to operate a motor vehicle unless each passenger of the vehicle under the age of 18 years is restrained by a safety belt or by a child restraint device.
  • It is unlawful for any person to operate a motor vehicle in this state unless the person is restrained by a safety belt.
  • It is unlawful for any person, regardless of age, to be a passenger in the front seat of a motor vehicle unless such person is restrained by a safety belt (FS 316.614).
"Motor vehicle" means any passenger vehicle, but does not include a school bus, a bus used for the transportation of persons for compensation, a farm tractor, a truck of a net weight of more than 5,000 pounds, a motorcycle, moped, or bicycle.

This does not apply to a passenger or operator with a physically disabling condition or medical condition that would prevent appropriate restraint in a safety belt. If the condition is duly certified by a licensed physician and surgeon or by a licensed chiropractor who shall state the nature of the condition, as well as the reason the restraint is inappropriate, the passenger or operator will not be required to wear a safety belt.


2. Head Restraints, Air Bags, and Child Passenger Restraints

Head Restraints

According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, neck strains and sprains are the most serious injury reported in 30 to 40% of auto insurance claims. Proper positioning of head restraint can dramatically reduce neck injuries.

Proper Positioning and Adjustment

A head restraint should be at least as high as the head's center of gravity, about 3.5 inches (or nine centimeters) below the top. The backset, or distance behind the head, should be as small as possible. Backsets of more than 4 inches (about 10 centimeters) have been associated with increased symptoms of neck injury in collisions.

Air Bags

Air bags are a form of passive vehicle restraint that provide a cushion to reduce the force of impact in a collision and distribute it over a wider surface area of the body. Serious chest and head injuries often result when a driver or passenger slams into the steering wheel or rim during head-on collisions.

Air bags are usually located in the steering wheel and the dashboard but may also be found in side door compartments of some vehicles. They are designed to inflate instantly when an impact occurs over a certain speed and, when used in conjunction with a safety belt, can provide the driver and passengers of a vehicle with much better protection against serious injury or death from a collision.

Air bags are supplemental safety restraints and should never be considered as the only adequate safety measure. Air bags are designed to deploy only under certain conditions, usually in the event of a medium to severe frontal collision. Proper use of your vehicle's safety belt restraints is needed to offer protection in all other situations, such as a side or rear collision. Only when used in conjunction with your vehicle's safety belts can air bags be effective.

Special Air Bag Cautions:
Children and Small Adults

Air bags, while an efficient safety device, can be dangerous or fatal under certain circumstances. Adults should not sit closer than 10 inches from the steering wheel.

Small children and infants should NEVER ride in rear-facing vehicle carriers in front passenger seats equipped with air bags. If a child over one year old must ride in the front seat with a passenger side air bag, put the child in a front-facing child safety seat, a booster seat, or a correct fitting lap/shoulder belt and move the seat as far back as possible.

Child Passenger Restraints

Motor vehicle crashes cause about one of every three injury deaths among children of age 12 and younger. Among those age 5-12, crash injuries are the leading cause of death. Proper restraint use reduces crash risk for infants and children of all ages.

Florida law requires every child, five years of age or younger, properly use a crash-tested, federally approved child restraint device. For children aged three or younger, the restraint device must be a separate vehicle carrier or a vehicle manufacturer's integrated child seat. For children age four through five years, a separate vehicle carrier, an integrated child seat, or a seat belt may be used (FS 316.613).

NOTE: All passengers under the age of 18 must be restrained by a safety belt or child restraint device. If you are stopped for a safety belt violation for a person under 18 in your vehicle that is not secured in accordance with Florida law, you (the driver) will receive the citation. This can include a fine of $30 and additional court costs. You will also receive three points on your driving record (FS 318.18; 316.614).

Although you should always consult your owner's manual, here are some additional tips for using a child safety seat:

The back seat is generally the safest place in the vehicle for all children to ride.

Generally, children under 20 pounds and about one year of age should ride in a safety seat secured to the back seat facing the rear of the vehicle. Consult your owner's manual for specific recommendations. NEVER use a rear-facing safety seat in the front passenger seat if the vehicle is equipped with a passenger-side air bag. This could result in death or serious injury. If you must transport a child in the front passenger seat equipped with an airbag, make sure the child is facing the front and the seat is moved back as far as possible.

Be sure the vehicle's seat belt is correctly attached to the seat. If the seat is not correctly attached, the child could be injured during a collision.

Always consult your child restraint device owner's manual for the proper installation, positioning, and usage instructions. If your vehicle comes equipped with a manufacturer's integrated child seat, consult your vehicle owner's manual for proper usage instructions.

 
3. Required Safety Features

Florida law requires that your vehicle be equipped with certain safety features. These features must also be in good operating condition. Many of these features we take for granted, but they have been installed by vehicle manufacturers to reduce the risk of injury or death in a vehicular crash.

Lighting

Your vehicle must have the following lights:
  • Bright (high-beam) headlights which show objects 450 feet ahead.
  • Dimmed (low-beam) headlights which show objects 150 feet ahead.
  • Two red taillights mounted on the rear, visible from 1,000 feet.
  • A white light that makes the license plate visible from 50 feet (the plate must be kept clean).
  • Two red stoplights. They must be seen from 300 feet in the daytime, and must come on when the foot brake is pressed.
All vehicles, including animal-drawn vehicles, must have at least one white light visible from a distance of not less than 1,000 feet to the front. The vehicle must also have two red lights visible from a distance of not less than 1,000 feet to the rear, or one red light visible to the rear for a distance of 1,000 feet and two red reflectors visible from all distances from 600 feet to 1,000 feet (FS 316.229, FS 316.221, FS 316.400, FS 316.226).

Night Driving

You will need to drive with extra caution at night. You cannot see as far ahead or to the side, and glare from oncoming vehicles can reduce your vision even more. Follow these guidelines for driving at night:
  • Use your headlights (low-beam or high-beam) between the hours of sunset and sunrise.
  • Low-beam headlamps are only effective for speeds up to 20-25 mph. You must use special vehicle care when driving faster than these speeds.
  • Unless the road is illuminated with street lighting, you will only be able to see as far as the light provided by your headlights.
  • Drive at speeds slow enough to be able to stop or avoid hazards such as pedestrians and bicyclists as they emerge from the darkness ahead.
  • High-beam headlights can reveal objects up to a distance of at least 450 feet and are most effective for speeds faster than 25 mph.
  • Don't use high-beam headlights within 500 feet of oncoming vehicles.
  • Use low-beam headlights when you are within 300 feet of a vehicle ahead.
  • When leaving a brightly lit place, drive slowly until your eyes adjust to the darkness.
  • If a vehicle comes toward you with high-beams, flash your lights to high-beam and back to low-beam once.
  • Don't look directly at oncoming headlights. Instead, watch the right edge of your lane. Look quickly to be sure of the other vehicle's position every few seconds.
  • Drive as far to the right as you can if a vehicle with one light comes toward you (FS 316.217, FS 316.238).

Fog or Smoke

It is best not to drive in fog or smoke. If you must, slow down, turn on your low-beam headlights, and be ready for a fast stop. Use windshield wipers in heavy fog. If the fog or smoke becomes so thick that you cannot see well enough to keep driving, pull all the way off the pavement and stop. Turn on your emergency flashers.

Rain

The first few drops of rain mean danger. Roads are most slippery just after the rain begins because oil dropped from vehicles has not been washed away. Slow down and plan for at least two times the normal stopping distance.

In a heavy rain, your tires can ride on a thin film of water, like skis. This is called hydroplaning. When your tires are not touching the road, you can easily lose control and skid. Keep your tires on the road by slowing down when it rains, and by having tires with the right air pressure and good tread.

Reduced Visibility

You must turn on your low-beam (dim) headlights when driving between sunset and sunrise, including the twilight hours between sunset and sunrise or between full night and sunrise. You must also use these lights during any rain, smoke, or fog.


4.  Other Florida Equipment Standards

Horn: Your vehicle must have a horn which can be heard from a distance of 200 feet (FS 316.271).

Windshield Wiper: Your vehicle must have a windshield wiper in good working order for cleaning rain, snow, or other moisture from the windshield.

Windshield: Must be safety glass and may not be covered or treated with any material which has the effect of making the windshield reflective or in any way non-transparent. It must be free of any stickers not required by law (FS 316.2952).

Side windows: May not be composed of, covered by, or treated with any material which has a highly reflective or mirrored appearance and reflects more than 35% of the light.

Rear windows: When the rear window is composed of, covered by, or treated with any material which makes the rear window non-transparent, the vehicle must be equipped with side mirrors on both sides.

Directional signals: You must have electrical turn signals if your vehicle measures more than 24 inches from the center of the top of the steering post to the left outside limit of the body, or when the distance from the steering post to the rear of the body or load is greater than 14 feet (FS 316.156).

Tires: Your tires should have visible tread of at least 2/32 of an inch across the base with no worn spots showing the ply. Smooth tires on wet roads contribute to thousands of serious crashes.

Mirrors: Your vehicle must have at least one rear-view mirror which gives a view of the highway at least 200 feet to the rear (FS 316.294).

Brakes: Check to see that the pedal stays well above the floor when you step on it. If the vehicle pulls to one side when you use the brakes or you hear any scraping or squealing noises, your brakes may need to be repaired.

Lights: Replace burned-out bulbs and clean lenses often. Dirty headlights can cut your night vision in half. Burned out signal lights or brake lights mean you can’t tell other drivers what you are doing. Keep your lights adjusted so that you don’t blind oncoming drivers.

Windows and Windshield: Keep the glass clean, inside and out, to reduce glare.

Keep your vehicle in good condition. No matter how well you drive, you are not safe unless your vehicle is in good condition. If it is not, you could have a serious crash.


Equipment Not Permitted

The following are illegal to have on or in your vehicle:
  • Red or blue emergency lights. These are for emergency and law enforcement vehicles only (FS 316.2397).
  • A siren, bell, or whistle (FS 316.271).
  • A very loud muffler or one that lets out smoke (FS 316.272).
  • Signs, posters, or stickers on the windshield or windows, except those required by law (FS 316.2004).
  • A television which the driver can see (FS 316.303).
  • More than two spotlights, cowl or fender lights, fog lights (in front), or other extra lights (in front) (FS 316.235).
  • Headsets worn by driver while operating a vehicle (FS 316.304).

 
5. The Braking System

The purpose of your vehicle's braking system is to provide you with the ability to slow or stop your vehicle.

Your vehicle may have standard or power brakes as well as parking brakes. Power brakes require less effort to operate than standard brakes, but they do not change the distance needed to stop your vehicle. Parking brakes keep your vehicle in place while it is parked and can be used in emergency situations when your normal brakes fail.

Required Brake System

Every motor vehicle must be equipped with a service brake system and every motor vehicle, other than a motorcycle, must be equipped with a parking brake system. Both the service brake and the parking brake must be separately applied.

If the two systems are connected in any way, they must be constructed so that failure of any one part, except failure in the drums, brake shoes, or other mechanical parts of the wheel brake assemblies, will not leave the motor vehicle without operative brakes.

Standard Versus Anti-Lock brakes (ABS)

When standard, non-ABS brakes are applied too hard, the wheels "lock" or skid, thus inhibiting directional control of the vehicle. ABS allows the driver to steer during hard braking, which in turn facilitates overall control of the vehicle. In the past, drivers had to know how to "pump" the brakes, or be able to sense the lock-up and release foot pressure in order to prevent skidding. This meant that if only one wheel lost traction and started to slip, the driver would have to reduce braking force to prevent a skid. The advantage of ABS is that the brakes on the wheels with good traction can be fully used, even if the other wheels should lose traction.

How to Use ABS

Experts believe that ABS is a good safety option, but most people are unfamiliar with its usage. It's important to remember the following when braking with ABS:

  • Apply steady pressure to the brake pedal at all times - don't let up!
  • The pulsating of the brake pedal as you hold it down indicates that the brakes are working.
  • Continue to apply the same level of pressure until the vehicle comes to a stop.
  • It is both incorrect and dangerous to pump anti-lock brakes.

Brakes often become wet after driving through deep water or driving in heavy rain. They may pull to one side or the other, or they may not hold at all. If this happens, slow down and gently push on the brake pedal until your brakes are working again.

Brake Maintenance

It is critical that you properly maintain your brakes. They are important communication and safety tools. Take the necessary precautionary measures to ensure that your brakes are functioning properly. If you notice that your brakes are getting worse, take your vehicle to a mechanic as soon as possible for an inspection. If repairs are needed, have them performed immediately.

Braking Distance

You must be able to stop your vehicle within the distance shown in the graph when you use the foot brake. For the safest driving, keep your brakes in such good condition that you can stop before these distances.

It is important to note that the graph illustrates the braking distance AFTER YOU HAVE APPLIED YOUR BRAKES. You must add a REACTION DISTANCE to this, which is the distance you travel from seeing the danger to putting your foot on the brake pedal. Since 3/4 of a second is the average reaction time, a motorist will travel 11 feet for each 10 mph of speed before hitting the brake. At 50 mph this distance would be 55 feet!

NOTE: Reaction times in laboratories are 3/4 of a second. In the driving environment, your reaction time would be closer to 1.5 seconds and the distance you would travel at 50 mph would be 110 feet.

Summary

Safety belts are one of the most important safety features in your vehicle. They prevent or reduce injuries and fatalities by restraining you in your vehicle or preventing you from being thrown from your vehicle.

Florida law requires you and your passengers to be properly restrained when the vehicle is in motion. Proper positioning of head restraint can dramatically reduce neck injuries.

Air bags are usually located in the steering wheel and the dashboard, but may also be found in side door compartments of some vehicles. They are designed to inflate instantly when an impact occurs over a certain speed and, when used in conjunction with a safety belt, can provide the driver and passengers of a vehicle with much better protection against serious injury or death from a collision.

Air bags, while an efficient safety device, can be dangerous or fatal under certain circumstances. Adults should not sit closer than 10 inches from the steering wheel.

Small children and infants should NEVER ride in rear-facing vehicle carriers in a front passenger seat equipped with an air bag. If a child over one year old must ride in the front seat with a passenger side air bag, put the child in a front-facing child safety seat, a booster seat, or a correct fitting lap/shoulder belt and move the seat as far back as possible.

Review and remember the specifics and importance of Florida child passenger safety laws.

Florida law requires certain safety features on your vehicle. These features must also be in good operating condition:
  • Lighting
  • Horn
  • Windshield wipers
  • Side windows
  • Rear windows
  • Directional signals
  • Tires
  • Mirrors
  • Brakes
Keep your vehicle in good condition. No matter how well you drive, you are not safe unless your vehicle is in good condition. If it is not, you could have a serious crash.


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Florida TLSAE/Drug & Alcohol 4 hour Course Online

Who is required to take this 4-hour drug and alcohol course?


This is a first-time drivers ed course for new aspiring drivers. The state of Florida requires all new drivers take a 4-hour drug and alcohol course. If you want your Permit License you must take this course. You can take the DATA course when you are 14 1/2. You can sign up right now at our website. Our course is easy and fun!
  •     Florida 4 hour first-time drivers course also referred as:
  •     TLSAE - Traffic Law and Substance Abuse Education
  •     DATA - Drug Alcohol Traffic Awareness course
  •     DATE Drug Alcohol Traffic Awareness Education course
  •     ADAPT - Alcohol Drugs Accident Prevention Training
  •     Drug & Alcohol Course or Drug and Alcohol Class
  •     Florida Permit Test or Florida Permit Exam Course
  •     The Permit Test is also known as the DMV Exam or DMV Test
Florida first time driver course required to get a Florida drivers license. Florida first time driver courses teach drivers how drugs and alcohol affect driving,. In that situation you have to go home, make a new appointment and return the DMV. Every new driver is required to take a Florida TLSAE course.

Enroll your Florida 4 hour drug and alcohol course online and meet your learner's permit requirement.

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