Open Courses

2012



edstartup 101   Brigham Young (?) 

August 27, 2012 - facilitated by Richard Culatta, Todd Manwaring, Aaron Miller, and David Wiley

EdStartup is a roll-your-sleeves-up, get-to-work community built around accomplishing tasks that have value in the real world through social learning and collaborating with others. To get the most out of the class you need to sign up, let us know who you are and where we can find you online.

Networked Life   Coursera

September 2012 - Professor Michael Kearns

Networked Life will explore recent scientific efforts to explain social, economic and technological structures -- and the way these structures interact -- on many different scales, from the behavior of individuals or small groups to that of complex networks such as the Internet and the global economy.


Intro to Psychology   MITOpenCourseWare - OCW Scholar

Fall 2012 - Professor John Gabrieli

This course is a survey of the scientific study of human nature, including how the mind works, and how the brain supports the mind. Topics include the mental and neural bases of perception, emotion, learning, memory, cognition, child development, personality, psychopathology, and social interaction. Students will consider how such knowledge relates to debates about nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self, and society.


Intro to Openness in Education

started in March, 2012 - did 3 topics - see my Blog4Badges site)   David Wiley

This course provides a broad overview of the ways in which openness impacts many areas of education – curriculum, instruction, learning, policy, technology, research, and finance.

2011

Change: Education, Learning, and Technology!

September 12, 2011 - May 2012,  Dave Cormier, George Siemens, Stephen Downes

This course will introduce participants to the major contributions being made to the field of instructional technology by researchers today. Each week, a new professor or researcher will introduce his or her central contribution to the field.
Technologies Used: Through out this "course" participants will use a variety of technologies, for example, blogs, Second Life, RSS Readers, UStream, etc. Course resources will be provided using gRSShopper and online seminars delivered using Elluminate.

2010

EC&I 831:  Social Media & Open Education

September 14, 2010 - December 7, 2010, Dr. Alec Couros. This course is open to credit students (those taking the course for university credit) and to others, non-credit students, who would like to participate in a variety of non-formal ways.

An open access, graduate-level course offered by the University of Regina  It features openly available, live, and recorded presentations from notable educators & theorists.
The goals of this course follow. Participants will:
  • better understand the historical role technology and media have played in educational & social change;
  • become knowledgeable of social learning tools & FLOSS (Free/Libre and Open Source Software) as tools for teaching, facilitating learning, & designing educational environments;
  • become familiar with the wealth of open educational resources (OERs), learning-related content, & media available for teaching & learning;
  • become knowledgeable of relevant social learning theories and philosophies that respond to learning in the digital age;
  • better understand the many social, educational, political, cultural, and administrative issues often associated with technology & media in education and society;
  • become critical consumers and producers of digital media and information; and,
  • build sustainable, personal learning environments and networks.

2009

Connectivism and Connected Knowledge

September 14, 2009 - December 6, 2009,  George Siemens and Stephen Downes will co-facilitate. The support wiki for the course provides additional information.

This course will explore the concepts of connectivism and connective knowledge and explore their application as a framework for theories of teaching and learning. It will outline a connectivist understanding of educational systems of the future. This course will help participants make sense of the transformative impact of technology in teaching and learning over the last decade. The voices calling for reform do so from many perspectives, with some suggesting 'new learners' require different learning models, others suggesting reform is needed due to globalization and increased competition, and still others suggesting technology is the salvation for the shortfalls evident in the system today. While each of these views tell us about the need for change, they overlook the primary reasons why change is required.
Technologies Used:
Through out this "course" participants will use a variety of technologies. For example, participants will use blogs, Second Life, Page Flakes, attend UStream sessions, attend Elluminate sessions, participate in discussions in Moodle forums, and so on. Additional technologies will be introduced as is required to attend to concerns or opportunities arising over the next 12 weeks.


Syl Notes:  My Wordpress blog about learning in an open course - still need to decide whether to use it again or move ahead with the Google Blogger blog. http://sylvia909.wordpress.com/

2008


Connectivism and Connected Knowledge

September 8, 2008 - November 30, 2008George Siemens and Stephen Downes will co-facilitate this innovative and timely course. The support wiki for the course provides additional information.

This course will explore the concepts of connectivism and connective knowledge and explore their application as a framework for theories of teaching and learning. It will outline a connectivist understanding of educational systems of the future. This course will help participants make sense of the transformative impact of technology in teaching and learning over the last decade. The voices calling for reform do so from many perspectives, with some suggesting 'new learners' require different learning models, others suggesting reform is needed due to globalization and increased competition, and still others suggesting technology is the salvation for the shortfalls evident in the system today. While each of these views tell us about the need for change, they overlook the primary reasons why change is required.
Technologies Used: Through out this "course" participants will use a variety of technologies. For example, participants will use blogs, Second Life, Page Flakes, attend UStream sessions, attend Elluminate sessions, participate in discussions in Moodle forums, and so on. Additional technologies will be introduced as is required to attend to concerns or opportunities arising over the next 12 weeks.


2007

Introduction to Open Education
INST 7150, Fall 2007, David Wiley
the first open content course I participated in - got overwhelmed by the reading and blogging demands while working FT but he leaves the resources up on this wiki (don't think he offers this course anymore). The resources provide a good introduction to the history of open education.

EC&I 831: Social Media & Open Education  (see 2010 for details)



 
Comments