Flight Jacket With Patches

    flight jacket
  • The flight jacket, or bomber jacket is a garment originally created for pilots, which eventually became part of popular culture and apparel. In the First World War most airplanes did not have an enclosed cockpit, which necessitated a garment that could keep pilots sufficiently warm.
    patches
  • Mend or strengthen (fabric or an item of clothing) by putting a piece of material over a hole or weak point in it
  • (patch) to join or unite the pieces of; "patch the skirt"
  • Correct, enhance, or modify (a routine or program) by inserting a patch
  • (patch) spot: a small contrasting part of something; "a bald spot"; "a leopard's spots"; "a patch of clouds"; "patches of thin ice"; "a fleck of red"
  • Place a patch over (a good eye) in order to encourage a lazy eye to work
  • (patch) plot: a small area of ground covered by specific vegetation; "a bean plot"; "a cabbage patch"; "a briar patch"
flight jacket with patches
PSD, Instructor Patch, Beale AFB, SR-71, U2R, TR-1A
PSD, Instructor Patch, Beale AFB, SR-71, U2R, TR-1A
This is the PSD patch, worn by SR-71 and U2R support personnel from the Physiological Support Division. The PSD personnel are the technicians who maintain the survival equipment, parachutes and Full Pressure Suits for the Reconnaissance Programs. PSD personnel also dress and undress pilots and RSOs, escort and integrate them into the aircraft system, and recover the flight upon termination. The PSD facility also contained the flight Kitchen, where a high protein, low residue meal was served before all missions to the crews. PSD personnel are recognized by their WHITE uniforms and (sometimes) Nomex flight jackets, at Beale they wore bright blue ball caps marked with a yellow PSD on the front. The white PSD vans (with a red stripe on each side) were used to bring the crews to the aircraft, all the while maintaining a close watch on their health. PSD was a part of the Hospital Squadron, and operated the Hyper and Hypo-baric Chambers, parachute swing-landing trainer, and provided survival training and ejection training to the crews. The OIC of PSD was usually a Colonel, and a Flight Surgeon. PSD had 125-135 personnel assigned from the Aircrew Life Support, and Physiological Training career fields. Training for certification at PSD took a full year, and the Special Experience identifier X399 was appended to the technician's AFSC upon completion. PSD assignments were locked under Code 41 and Code 52, for 3 and 5 years, requiring an extension of service to accept the assignment.
VMA-311 Vietnam Era Patch
VMA-311 Vietnam Era Patch
This is the Vietnam era re-production patch of VMA-311 Tomcats. The Tomcats were flying A-4 Skyhawk during the Vietnam conflict and the original design of this patch was brought to local embroidery shop in Japan by a marine. This patch was not specifically an official squadron patch but called as the "Friday Patch" or "Party Patch". Those patches were sewn on flight jackets of crew. "Screw with the Cat and get the claw" Yikes!
flight jacket with patches