Home


Ex neo-Nazi visits FHS

Kaycee Smith 
Of The Flathead Arrow

    Christian Picciolini, a former white supremacist, visited Flathead high school on Monday April 24. He came to FHS to spread his message to take a stand against those who think they are racially superior.
    Picciolini is from Chicago, when he 14 he joined a neo-Nazi group. He talked about his experiences from not having a group of friends to having a family of skinheads by his side.
    Years later the man who recruited him was arrested in jail, because he beat a women in their group because she stood at a bus stop next to an African American. He was charged with Aggravated assault. So Piccioloi was next in line to lead the group.
    He started to recruit younger members of the community and promised them paradise. After several years of touring being the first hate band in the US, he fell in love and had two children.
    He talked about his ideology going from a white supremacist to becoming a father.
    Piccoiloi started a record store trying to make money for his family selling white power music along with all other genres, but after it failed his family left him. He then decided to leave the group in 1995, and got a job at IMB.
    His first day on the job he was sent to a high school he got kicked out of, he ran into the African American security guard and the guard made him promise to tell his story.
    After this encounter Piccoiloi began writing a book about his story it took ten years to finish. With in the 10 years he started organizations called Life After Hate, and ExitUSA.com for people that were involved or want to get out of hate groups.


Montana ID is under question

Ryan Daub
of The Flathead Arrow 

    There has been a lot of confusion over Montana driver’s licenses lately. Is it considered a valid form of identification?
    The Real ID Act was passed by Congress in 2005 and went into effect in 2017. It is a federal law that was in response to the lack of identification when people entered federal facilities. After 9/11, security within the United States needed to be shored up. According to the Department of Homeland Security, Montana is not in compliance with the act with its driver’s licenses.
    “Montana remains noncompliant and has not been granted an extension,” said the Deputy Press Secretary for the Department of Homeland Security Scott McConnell. “Currently, Montana licenses may not be used to enter federal facilities or nuclear power plants, but can be used to fly, until January 2018.”
    That means that come January, 2018, Montanans won’t be able to use their license to get through airport security. However, a passport – or other federal identification – will work.
    “Secure driver's licenses and identification documents are a vital component of a holistic national security strategy,” according to the DHS. “Law enforcement must be able to rely on government-issued identification documents and know that the bearer of such a document is who he or she claims to be. REAL ID is a coordinated effort by the states and the federal government to improve the reliability and accuracy of state-issued identification documents, which should inhibit terrorists’ ability to evade detection by using fraudulent identification.”
    This does not mean Montana drivers are not legal to drive. The Montana driver’s license is still valid for driving. However, Montanans will not be able to use their licenses to access federal facilities, like when Transportation Security Agents check boarding passes and IDs at airports.
    “I will be traveling a lot with my future job, so it would effect me a lot while traveling by plane.” said senior Riley Odem.
    Until Montana complies with the federal government and accepts the Real ID Act, Montana citizens will need an alternate form of identification to access federal facilities and fly domestically.
    “Montana wouldn’t be a part of the Real ID act because they didn’t want the federal government to be in charge of Montana drivers licenses,” said Rachael Mitchell a courthouse employee. “So legislatively we are barred from being a part of the Real ID Act, so in order for us to get any of the Real ID Act, it has to be passed though legislation.”


Brown retiring after 40 years

Elijah Kigilyuk
of The Flathead Arrow

    After 40 years of teaching at Flathead High School, English teacher Mrs. Sue Brown is retiring at the end of the school year. She leaves behind a legacy of hard work, including the IB program.
    Mrs. Brown, 63, has been teaching since 1977 and worked at Flathead High School her entire career. She has been the English department chair for almost two decades. She has influenced Flathead High School in a number of ways and changed the way some classrooms are currently being taught. She was also critically important in bringing the International Baccalaureate program to Flathead. She has enjoyed working with students and making a difference in their lives.
    “I’m so blessed with such awesome students and colleagues,” Mrs. Brown said.
    Brown has been working at Flathead her entire career because she enjoys giving back to her students.
    “I love writing letters of recommendations, just to be helpful if they are read in a way that could mean something financially to well deserving students,” Mrs. Brown said.
    Others staff members agree.
    “Mrs. Brown always encourages kids to go above and beyond,” Assistant Principal Mrs. Michele Paine said. She is the one who encouraged me to things I didn’t think I could. She makes you believe in yourself… I’ve never known Flathead High School without Mrs. Brown.”
    “She is a great advocate for students and for solid education,” Mrs. Mary Ann Lidstrom said. Mrs. Lidstrom is the math department chair.
    Of the many great achievements that Mrs. Brown has reached, one stands above all. In 1990, Brown attended an AP and Honors conference in Washington state, where she was first introduced to a higher education program. She returned to Flathead and presented the idea of starting a program like it at Flathead, but was turned down because the school couldn’t find the funding that would allow such a program to exist. 
    “I’m kind of dangerous when you send me to a convention,” Mrs. Brown said. “I come back with many different ideas.”
    Throughout the course of 14 years, Brown and other students attended a number of other conferences, reintroducing the idea of IB to Flathead.
    “She was a great advocate for IB,” Mr. Sean O’Donnell said. Mr. O’Donnell is the social studies department chair.
    In 2004, Flathead became the first high school in Montana to offer an IB program to students.
    “I’m very proud to have been a part of the IB program,” Mrs. Brown said.
    Mrs. Brown has also made a significant impact on the way classes are taught today. She was the first teacher in the history of Flathead to share a classroom with a teacher of a different subject and work together as a one class. Mrs. Brown shared a classroom with Mrs. Hesslewood, a special services teacher and former special services department chair, and that model has resided ever since.
    “I learned the importance of firmness combined with patience,” Mrs. Brown said.
    “Being one of her students, I found Mrs. Brown is very tough… and I tested her a few times,” Mr. O’Donnell said.
    Among Mrs. Brown’s many feats, she was the second woman in the history of the Flathead High School to become a department head following Mrs. Hesslewood.
    Retiring this year, Mrs. Brown will leave her position as the head of the English Department. Mr. Ryan Malmin was chosen as her replacement.
    “I’m incredibly honored and blessed for this opportunity to take over for Sue,” Mr. Malmin said.
    “Mr. Malmin has many strengths that are much better defined than mine are,” Mrs. Brown said. “I’ve been very impressed with him. He is very systematic.”
    Many teachers are sad to see Mrs. Brown leave, and understand that it will take time to get accustomed to.
    “Anytime we have an icon like her leave, its definitely going to leave a difficult spot to fill in,” Mr. O’Donnell said.
    “There will be a period of adjustment,” Mrs. Lidstrom said.
    Mrs. Brown believes that the transition will go well.
    “The transition will go beautifully, but there will be some challenges along the way,” she said. “It will be much different, but sometimes change is good.”
    Mr. Malmin understands the legacy that is being left behind.
    “She is the epitome of what you want in a mentor and an advisor,” he said. “She truly leads by example. I’m trying to learn from the master as much as I can.”
    With retirement coming up soon, Mrs. Brown is making big plans for the near future.
    “I’m a person who tends to live in the moment,” she said. “My husband and I will be doing a little bit of traveling.”
    Her plans include traveling to the British Isles, touring France, and even visiting the Panama Canal, which is something that Mrs. Brown and her husband have always wanted to do. Mrs. Brown also has daughters living in Las Vegas and Portland which she will have time to visit and spend time with.
    “She is beginning a new adventure, but Flathead High School will never stop being a part of her,” Mr. O’Donnell said.
    Mrs. Brown will leave an admirable legacy behind at FHS and many teachers will remember her for what she has done.
    Mrs. Kitty Stoner, who is also retiring this year after working at FHS since 1990, said Mrs. Brown will leave behind the legacy of the interaction she has with the kids and the feeling that high school is only the starting point to something greater in the world. 
      

After 20 years at FHS, Fusaro going to FVCC.

Ryan Daub
of the Flathead Arrow

    Flathead High School Principal Mr. Peter Fusaro announced to the staff on Monday, April 24, morning before school in the large lecture hall that he is resigning his principal position at FHS for a job opportunity at Flathead Valley Community College.
    Mr. Fusaro will continue his education career at FVCC as the director of the trades and industrial arts. This includes manufacturing and electronics, firearms, and programs such as commercial drivers licenses.
    “Mr. Fusaro has put his heart and soul into FHS,” said assistant principal Mr. Mike Lincoln. “He has worked hard to make this the great place it is and he will be greatly missed. He will do a great job there.”
    Mr. Fusaro has been principal at FHS since 2007. Prior to becoming principal at FHS, he was the assistant principle for 10 years, starting in 1997.
    “I think he’s a great principal and really shows how to take pride in your school,” said senior Carolyn Brosten. “He’s always there so I think a lot of people are going to miss him.”
    The process of hiring a replacement begins on May 18, with interviews happening on May 25. If necessary, follow-up interviews for finalists will be held during the week of May 30. School District No. 5 Superintendent Mr. Mark Flatau will present is recommendation to the school board of trustees on Tuesday, June 13.
    Teachers are sad to see Mr. Fusaro move on.
    “I’m heartbroken that he is moving on before I am,” said Mrs. Mary Lidstrom. “I do think he will do well at FVCC. He has students’ best interests in mind.”
    Mrs. Melanie Daris agrees.
    “I’m very sad that he’s leaving, he’s brought great leadership here,” she said. “I think he will do great at FVCC, he is going to be missed terribly.”
    “I’m excited for him, for his start in a new chapter in his life,” said Mrs. Maureen Fanion. “However it’s a bittersweet moment for many people.”
    Mr. Fusaro feels both remorse and joy.
    “After 20 years I’m finally graduating and moving onto Flathead Valley Community College,” Mr. Fusaro joked. “I’m looking forward to it, although it’s kind of bittersweet. I’m going to miss the staff, the students, and all that we’ve done.”



Off-campus prom proves positive

Zephrey Holloway

of The Flathead Arrow

    Approximately 400 students attended Flathead High School’s prom on Saturday, March 18, at the Gardner’s auction warehouse.
    It was the first time prom was held off campus since 2006, FHS Assistant Principal Mrs. Michele Paine said. The theme of the prom was Great Gatsby, a high-class 1920s feel complete with a vintage automobile present.
    “We were worried about safety and security,” Mrs. Paine said. “When it’s somewhere else, just making sure everyone is safe and managed (was our concern). We had zero problems. Everybody was great. It was a great turnout. It’s always fun to see kids dressed up, just looking their best. It was a nice time.”
    Senior President Logan Thurston agreed with the positives.
    “I think it went well,” Thurston said. “I was happy to see that people could still have fun and enjoy themselves without grinding. And I believe it was still a positive experience for most.”
    Senior Jonas Nyman thought the prom was cool.
    “We did the Cuban Shuffle and I can almost guarantee you that about everyone got in a line together,” Nyman said. “It was cool to see everyone having fun with the huge no grinding policy.”
    After prom activities included various events. Signature Theatres open its doors to high school students for free between 11 p.m. and about 5 a.m. The theatre was packed. Students got to watch Beauty and the Beast, King Kong, and Before I Fall.
    But there were other after-hour festivities as well.
    “I went to Buffalo Wild Wings after prom and then went and spent the night at our huge suite with six beds inside,” senior Austin Brousseau said. “We decided to go swimming at 2:30 in the morning.”



Weight room receives a remodel

Alyssa Wisher
of The Flathead Arrow

    After beginning construction within the weight room in 2016, Flathead has about finished the over all structure.
    After breaking down the weight room walls in February Flathead began to plaster the walls.
    The construction workers first had to support the door that separates the weight room and the new locker room. Later during March Flathead began to plaster to walls, and finished on March 10.
    During the week of March 13, the walls will be painted as well as to accent features to match the weight room.
    During the next week the locker rooms will be furnished and ready for use, said Mr. Cheff.
    The construction area has been open for all to view. Though outlets, a new heating system as well as the reconstruction of the floor is still being finished Mr. Cheff states that the weight room will be finished not long after the locker rooms.
    With furnishing left Flathead has been working hard to finish before the bond construction begins.

 

   

Osweiler out in Houston QB traded to Cleveland… and beyond?


Rydell Welk
of The Flathead Arrow 

    Former Flathead High School quarterback Brock Osweiler was traded to the Cleveland Browns on Thursday, March 9, 20 minutes before NFL free agency opened.The Flathead Wall of Famer was drafted by the Broncos in 2012 and groomed to be the heir apparent to Peyton Manning, when he retired. But following the 2015 Super Bowl victory and Manning’s retirement, Osweiler instead left Denver and signed a $72 million free agent contract with the Houston Texans. 
    Last season as a first-year starter, he struggled. He threw for 2,957 yards and 15 touchdowns with 16 interceptions. He was actually benched during the season, before leading the Texans to a playoff victory over the Oakland Raiders. But the Super Bowl champion New England Patriots ended the Texans’ season with a 34-16 playoff victory. 
    But the Texans decided to cut ties with Osweiler and his huge contract, paying his $16 million 2017 salary and trading him to the Cleveland Browns for a second round draft pick. The Browns now have two first-round draft picks,
including the No. 1 overall, two second-round picks, and third- and fourth-round pick, as well as five picks in the fifth and sixth rounds.
    Rumors are swirling about what the Texans and Browns are planning on doing. According to the Cleveland Plain Dealer, the Texans cleared up salary cap space to possibly sign the Dallas Cowboys QB Tony Romo. While the Browns, according to the same source, are getting ammunition to trade for the Patriots backup quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo. A lot of sources say that Osweiler will probably be traded by Cleveland soon.
    Osweiler, the three-time all-state quarterback and former Gatorade Player of the Year, ended his high school career leading the Braves to the state semifinals game in 2009.
    He played three years at Arizona State University, passing 5,082 yards and throwing 33 touchdowns in his college career. Osweiler later became the 57th pick in the second round of the 2012 draft to the Denver Broncos.
    Osweiler had a slow start to his professional career with the Broncos. His first three seasons he had a total of 159 yards, with one touchdown. In the 2015 season, Broncos star quarterback Payton Manning became injured, allowing Osweiler to get more playing time. He threw 1,967 yards and 10 touchdowns during his playing time.


New weight room under way 


Alyssa Wisher
of The Flathead Arrow

    After beginning construction within the weight room in 2016, Flathead has about finished the over all structure. After breaking down the weight room walls in February Flathead began to plaster the walls. The construction workers first had to support the door that separates the weight room and the new locker room. Later during March Flathead began to plaster to walls, and finished on March 10.
    During the week of March 13, the walls will be painted as well as to accent features to match the weight room. During the next week the locker rooms will be furnished and ready for use, said Mr. Cheff.
    The construction area has been open for all to view. Though outlets, a new heating system as well as the reconstruction of the floor is still being finished Mr. Cheff states that the weight room will be finished not long after the locker rooms.
    With furnishing left Flathead has been working hard to finish before the bond construction begins.storage room for information technology into visitor locker rooms due the fact Flathead students were being kicked out of their locker rooms for the whole day whenever FHS hosted events. 
    This will give visiting schools their own locker rooms. Construction workers started to furnish the boys locker room with a shower, toilet, and two sinks during 2016. Both the girls and boys locker rooms have been built and are waiting to be painted as well as furnished. 
    “I believe the new locker rooms will be very useful,” senior Lindsay Hinkle said. “It will be very nice to not be locked out of the locker room until the next morning.” Flathead’s weight room is being increased in size. The weight room use to be the cafeteria, which was later, turned in the weight room after the addition of the Commons in 2007. Once everything was moved up to the Commons, Flathead had three extra rooms--which used to be the kitchen--within their weight room that were blocked off. Now, the extra room is becoming functional. 
    On Feb. 3, construction workers demolished the area. A couple weeks later, they had the framing and drywall in place and waiting to be painted. Many students often hear stories about these old areas, which include the myths of the “underground pool”. 

Legends Stadium getting new turf

Ryan Daub
of the Flathead Arrow

    Flathead’s football field is home to many events and activities; and very soon it is getting an upgrade.
    The bond money is allowing the grass surface of the Legends Stadium is getting replaced with artificial turf. The purpose is to replace the easily destroyed grass with a more resilient, cost-efficient field. Plus, the playing surface is due for an upgrade.
    The project will start on May 25, said FHS Activities Director Mr. Bryce Wilson. FHS got bids back from five companies interested in completing the project. Those bids ranged from $964,000 to $1.8 million. FHS presented the recommendation to the school board that Shaw Sports Turf gets the job after bidding the lowest. Mr. Wilson said that Shaw also did the fields at Butte High School’s Naranche Stadium, as well as Montana Tech.
   “Not only does (Shaw’s bid) include the turf, but also redoing five of the track events as well,” Mr. Wilson said. “The project has to be finished by Aug. 11, but we are expecting to be finished by the end of July.”
    Football players are excited.“I’m super excited,” said junior Daniel Long. “I’ve played on the field for three years and going on my fourth year, and every year towards the midpart of the season with the rain and snow it’s always just destroyed. With the new turf, we won’t have to worry about it.” Junior Hunter Wellcome agreed.
   “It’s going to be a new addition to Flathead, and it will help our football team and the track team,” he said. “Our cleats will be nice and new. It hurts when you fall, but it’s a lot of fun because it’s nice and new.”
    Some health issue claims have been raised by parents of students at schools where these fields have been installed. They claim that their children have contracted cancer from playing on these fields. Flathead administration looked into this issue.
    “There is no scientific evidence that any cancer can be caused by playing on these fields,” Mr. Wilson said. “Study after study and all scientific reports have said no. Just because you play on the field then develop cancer doesn’t mean it came from the field.”



Flathead Valley fights back

Ryan Daub
of The Flathead Arrow

    Drug Enforcement Agents, along with the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Flathead Valley Chemical Dependency Clinic, attempted a counterattack on drugs on Wednesday, Feb. 15, at the Kalispell Regional Medical Center.
    They joined together in a presentation about the effects of drug use on family, friends and community and to inform the public of the drug epidemic that is sweeping the country, as well as the valley. They also gave a presentation on Tuesday at Flathead Valley Community College as well as at the Red Lion Hotel on Thursday.
    “We know that we can’t make arrests to solve this problem,” said Michael Holsted, of the FBI. “We need to work with people to realize what they are taking and stop them before it starts.”
    Flathead County has been under attack by drug abuse among teens and the general public. Steps have been made to combat this issue, which could prevent many teens from hurting themselves and others.
    “The talk was very informative, the video was very tempestuous, I would recommend it to anyone,” said senior Marshal Bowen.
    Kalispell Police Officer and Flathead High School Resource Officer Cory Clarke said there are some of the problems at FHS, but not as bad as in the community.
    “At Flathead, the first drug problem would be marijuana, second would be alcohol, third would be prescription pills,” Officer Clarke said. “With the pills, it’s a felony if it’s not yours and you have it. As well as if you sell or give it away, it’s the same thing: It’s felony distribution.”
    The night started off with a video presented by the FBI called “Chasing The Dragon: The Life Of An Opiate Addict”. The documentary gave an insight to the harsh realities of what life is like as an opiate addict.
    "This film (is) difficult to watch," FBI Director James Comey said.
    Opiates are alkaloid compounds found in the opium poppy plant Papaver somniferum. This is a general category for drugs such as morphine, codeine, and heroin. The meeting was brought all together by Linda Ravicher, a Prevention specialist with the Flathead Valley Chemical Dependancy Clinic. As well as The Public Affairs Advisor for the FBI Micheal Holsted, and 2 DEA Special Agents based out of Missoula.

FHS Bond 

Kaycee Smith
of The Flathead Arrow


    
Although there is a lot of excitement revolving around the bond being passed and the demolishing of the old gym there is still a lot of unanswered questions.
    No decisions are set in stone. There have been drawings of the proposed ideas of the remodel. This summer has a hopeful task, the demolishing of the small gym along with the design of the mechanical/boiler room.
    Demolishing, construction, and renovation will begin in the spring with the construction starting in spring of 2018.
    With the half floors being taken down Flathead is losing 10 classrooms with the hope of adding 14 for the remodel.
    The expected finish date is projected to be in 2019 knowing that just the building process will take about a year to finish.
    Education bonds across the state have been passed making it hard to find the right company for the job putting the construction out for months. At the last board meeting it was decided that Morrison and Maierle are now the project managers for the construction at Flathead.
    There are many hoops to jump through before the actual process starts. Such as Flathead has to get evaluated for asbestos, relocating pipes and electrical, demolishing, and then actually starting the remodel.
    This next summer teachers are not expected to evacuate their classrooms, and the half floors will still be in use next year.
    It has not been decided yet where the teacher’s items will be held during the remodel.
    Some current classrooms will have to be shared, or even cut in half for more use during construction periods.
    The last remodel of Flathead in 2006 created the common area and the new lunchroom. Flathead’s principal Mr. Peter Fusaro remembers the past remodel, and knows the same process will work for this round of improvements. Blocking off the half-floor area will happen, and school will still continue.
    The drawings of the update to Flathead will bring in 14 classrooms, with new 21-century learning labs included, along with a new auxiliary gym with multiple purposes. Mr. Fusaro talked about possibly having a bridge over to the new classrooms, with another possibility for a tunnel or enclosed path to the classrooms across the street from Flathead’s main building.
    The half-floors and the small gym are the oldest parts of Flathead still in use, but Mr. Fusaro doesn’t see it as losing history. Bricks from the small gym are being given to staff to have a keepsake like they did with the 2006 remodel.
    “With the remodel it brings everything up to standard, if you look around it’s not an old building anymore,” Mr. Fusaro said. With the time line set, as it is now the update to Flathead should be completed before this years freshman graduate at Flathead.
    There are many hoops to jump through before the actual process starts. Such as Flathead has to get evaluated for asbestos, relocating pipes and electrical, demolishing, and then actually starting the remodel.
    This next summer teachers are not expected to evacuate their classrooms, and the half floors will still be in use next year.
    It has not been decided yet where the teacher’s items will be held during the remodel.
    Some current classrooms will have to be shared, or even cut in half for more use during construction periods.
    The last remodel of Flathead in 2006 created the common area and the new lunchroom. Flathead’s principal Mr. Peter Fusaro remembers the past remodel, and knows the same process will work for this round of improvements. Blocking off the half-floor area will happen, and school will still continue.
    The drawings of the update to Flathead will bring in 14 classrooms, with new 21-century learning labs included, along with a new auxiliary gym with multiple purposes. Mr. Fusaro talked about possibly having a bridge over to the new classrooms, with another possibility for a tunnel or enclosed path to the classrooms across the street from Flathead’s main building.
    The half-floors and the small gym are the oldest parts of Flathead still in use, but Mr. Fusaro doesn’t see it as losing history. Bricks from the small gym are being given to staff to have a keepsake like they did with the 2006 remodel.
    “With the remodel it brings everything up to standard, if you look around it’s not an old building anymore,” Mr. Fusaro said. With the time line set, as it is now the update to Flathead should be completed before this years freshman graduate.


Students suffer through car crashes

Hailey Gauthier
of The Flathead Arrow

    Everyone knows the saying, teenagers are the worst drivers because they can’t focus well, and they aren’t mature enough. When snow is added to the equation, it can make everything worse. And with winter in full effect, in the Flathead Valley, there are many stories of cars crashing, sliding, and drifting into the snow.
    Junior Gabbie Suton was driving down a hill a little to fast and hit black ice, slid into the ditch, and ended up 30-35 feet off the road. She hit a tree, which stopped her from rolling off a cliff.
    “It was very scary and honestly thought I was going to die,” Sutton said. “I missed two days of school because of injuries in my neck.”
    Montana’s weather these past couple of months has been brutal. The Flathead Valley experienced negative degree weather and a lot of snow. The valley got 33.6 inches in December, leading to the fifth snowiest month since 1899, according to The Daily Interlake. However, the massive amount of snow has not led to any snow days yet this school year.
    Senior Emily Brake got in a car accident on Monday, Jan. 2, when she lost control of her car around an icy corner and slammed into a truck and totaled her car.
    “I was really scared because I had my little brother in the back seat,” Brake said.


Housing Construction class going smooth

Zephrey Holloway

of The Flathead Arrow

    Mr. Brock Anderson started the housing construction class last year and it is going smoother and smoother as the class evolves in to a soon to be a self-sufficient jobs site. The house being built for this school year is coming along very nicely.
     The Framing of the house has been in for a few months now. The walls were mainly craned in excluding a few smaller walls in the interior.
    The Electrician let the students ran the wire and place boxes for plug-in and socket and lights. The process went slow but the students learned how to run wire from lights to switches.
    The Plumbing went quick with the sub contractors on the site making an easy job of it. Students were not really able to help but were able to watch and start to the basics of plumbing.
    The Sub contractors that did all of the vent installation had students help. This was a portion of building that the students were able to aid in installing duct work.
    The sub contractor for insulation made quick work of the house. They went through the house and placed insulation. Students were able to learn about the types of insulation and how to properly insulate a house with the right insulation.
     Mr. Scott Grayson helped with the drywall. He had his crew dry wall the house but the students did the garage all on there own with guidance by Mr. Anderson, Mr. Tim Mclean and Mr. Grayson. The same contractors did mudding and taping. Again the students got to learn and try it out inside of the garage.
    Brain Hagstad of Hagstad Painting helped the housing students paint the entire house on the inside. They learned how to primer, paint and touch up walls. The students and Mr. Hagstad taught the students how to evenly coat paint and make the walls a finished product.
    Mr. Anderson and Mr. Mclean are showing the students how to do finish carpentry including stairs, trim and doors. The treads on the stairs with be the finished treads but will be carpeted. The doors all around the house are put in excluding the front door and the garage entrance.
    The students are to a point of finishing the outside of the house including roofing, trim and siding. This will be difficult for the students with the resent weather being all over the place. The housing is coming along nicely with the students hard at work moving towards a finished house within the upcoming months.


Flathead High celebrates MLK day
Alyssa Wisher
of The Flathead Arrow     
    
    To celebrate Martin Luther King Jr day Flathead High School held a MLK concert on Tuesday, Jan. 17, in the Flathead Auditorium.
   During the event there were many students who spoke to the president about the world and what they wanted to change. They also had the Vice Governor of Whitefish come and speak about what has been happening with the discrimination within Whitefish. As well as watching the Martin L
uther King Jr speeches.
    We had a total of six students from Flathead High School present. As well as having a senior from Turkey come and address the aspect of having a new president.
Senior Carolina Sierra had brought up some of the differences be
tween Martin Luther King's Speech and President Donald Trumps. She mostly conveyed that though she was of a different background she still loves America the same and that everyone no matter the background are still making the world a better place.
    “Due to the social injustices and being a Hispanic woman I have a lot of opinions,” Sierra said. “When I thought about it I knew that this would be a good chance to voice my opinion and emotions about what has been happening.”
    Later through the event the Vice Governor of Whitefish and a woman went up to speak about what has been happening.
At the very end two men went up and sang about what they had truly felt about MLK. they had later gotten the whole crowd to join in at the very end. The night had ended with everyone being united sing a song

District 5's unwanted visitor caught

Hailey Gauthier/ Kaycee Smith
of The Flathead Arrow

    Flathead High School, along with Linderman Education Center, experienced a disturbing visitor.
    A 21-year old male named Joshua Bryant was driving around both Linderman Education Center and Flathead High School, exposing himself and masturbating while using derogatory words as a hope to lure girls to his car.
    Flathead High School security cameras caught Bryant’s vehicle on tape and put out many public service announcements to warn the public and to try and help catch him.
    On Dec. 29, the police said that Bryant was caught. Former Flathead student Jada Jackson shared the police report on Facebook, asking girls to comment if Bryant personally victimized them. Twenty-eight girls around the valley commented on the post, saying they had been. Several personal stories surfaced from the post. His crimes dated back to when Bryant was in middle school.
    Bryant has been charged with two felonies on the counts of indecent exposure and two counts of misdemeanor indecent exposure, according to the Flathead Beacon.
    His bail was set at $75,000, according to NBC Montana. He is currently being held in Flathead County Detention Center until his case hits the court.
    On Dec. 20, FHS Principal Mr. Peter Fusaro broadcasted a school-wide announcement about the incident, which then led to the entire public searching for the perpetrator.
    Senior Lauren McCafferty was personally victimized by Bryant. It started during her seventh-grade year. Bryant messaged her on Facebook.
    “He just texted me ‘hey’ and it was a normal conversation,” she said.
    McCafferty said that the conversation went to the subject of their age, and Bryant refused to reveal his age. McCafferty’s older sister, who went to high school with Bryant, warned her of his behavior, which caused her to stop replying. A couple of years later, he sent her an inappropriate picture. But, again, she did not reply. McCafferty said that when she talked about it with her friends, they said his behavior was due to the fact that his parents were dead.
    McCafferty wasn’t the only FHS student to be victimized.
    Senior Serenah Covert was the victim of Bryant’s most recent actions. Covert was walking to school from three blocks south of the school. She heard Bryant yell at her. She turned around and noticed his movements. Covert then tried to get inside the school as fast as she could.
    “I didn’t figure it out until the day after,” said Covert.
    Senior Katie Haas witnessed the event. She was behind Covert, walking toward the school. When Haas passed Bryant’s truck, he also yelled at her, making a masturbating gesture that she couldn’t quite figure out because she was far away from him. She said she ran inside before anything else happened. The temperature during the incident was around 14 degrees, and Haas remembered that her hands were frozen and trying to run inside felt impossible.
    Covert told McCafferty and her mom about the incident, but was too afraid to report the incident to authorities. The next day, Haas confronted Covert about the situation. Covert wasn’t aware that Haas was behind her when it happened. Covert and Haas found comfort in going through that experience at almost the same time, and went to Kalispell Police Officer Cory Clarke together.
    Haas felt proud that she helped turn him in, because often people get scared and don’t know whom the right person is to talk to.
    “It was super nice to hear that he is away, especially being so close to Elrod (Elementary School) knowing that there are little girls that walk to school,” Haas said. “I am honestly glad it was me and not one of them because I know how to report it and I probably could have fought him off.”
    McCafferty, Covert, and Haas all agree that there are a lot of creeps out in the world, and everyone needs to be careful. Officer Clarke said tt is important for the public to know that if anyone is in a similar situation to seek safety first, then call 911. 

Flathead students face dangerous weather

Hailey Gauthier
of The Flathead Arrow

    Everyone knows the saying, teenagers are the worst drivers because they can’t focus well, and they aren’t mature enough. When snow is added to the equation, it can make everything worse. And with winter in full effect, in the Flathead Valley, there are many stories of cars crashing, sliding, and drifting into the snow.
    Junior Gabbie Sutton was driving down a hill a little to fast and hit black ice, slid into the ditch, and ended up 30-35 feet off the road. She hit a tree, which stopped her from rolling off a cliff.
    “It was very scary and honestly thought I was going to die,” Sutton said. “I missed two days of school because of injuries in my neck.”
    Montana’s weather these past couple of months has been brutal. The Flathead Valley experienced negative degree weather and a lot of snow. The valley got 33.6 inches in December, leading to the fifth snowiest month since 1899, according to The Daily Interlake. However, the massive amount of snow has not led to any snow days yet this school year.
    Senior Emily Brake got in a car accident on Monday, Jan. 2, when she lost control of her car around an icy corner and slammed into a truck and totaled her car.
    “I was really scared because I had my little brother in the back seat,” Brake said.

 

Former Flathead student passes away in avalanche

Hailey Gauthier
of The Flathead Arrow

    Former Flathead graduate Ben Parson (36) passed away on Jan. 5 2017. Parson graduated from Flathead in 1998 and was huge into adventure ever since then. His death consisted of one of his amazing adventures, he was back country skiing and an avalanche occurred. Ben died with many supporters by his side, which led to a memorial of people coming together and skiing in his memory.
    Parson had a wife and a one-year-old son that he left behind. He was a big family person, and him and his family were very adventurous together. He enjoyed mountain biking, and skiing. Parson and a close friend had one two national championships on the same mountain biking team. Parson was loved by many which led to a memorial for Parson on Whitefish Mountain Ski Resort, where there was a moment of silence at 4:30 Jan. 8th 2016 reported by the Daily Interlake. Over 300 students attended reported by the Flathead Beacon.
    Parson was a former fire fighter from Whitefish and was also a teacher at Fair-Mont-Egan school.
    “He was 26 when he started teaching the 7th grade at FME and it was his first teaching job. He won the hearts of his students quite quickly from the very start from the first day of making cinnamon rolls in class. He was an energetic, enthusiastic, fun loving teacher. He took his job very seriously and worked tireless hours trying to establish a positive educational climate for his students. He loved the outdoors, was athletic and created some lesson plans that were carried out in the form on a overnight backpack trip to Stanton Lake with his students and interested parents in the class of those two years. It was a highlight for the students even despite the rain that the second year encountered. They prepped for the adventure getting backpacks ready, food, gear etc, learning about the area with science mixed in along the way. They did math lessons and English lessons examples, figured out amounts of food, balance of gear, and journaled about the trip. Most of the students had never backpacked before and it was their first experience. They pitched their own tents, made a Parson campout meals, jumped in a cold spring lake, played Frisbee golf in the forest with a paper plate, told stories around the campfire, and experienced the joy of hiking and camping in the mountains of their own backyard. After the hike, Ben had all the class for a swimming/picnic ending at his parent's house on Lake Five,” said counselor Nancy Maxwell at Fair-Mont-Egan who’s oldest daughter was in Parsons first 7th grade class.
    The avalanche that Parson died in was in Glacier National Park. He was skiing with friends when the avalanche occurred. Parson was buried in the snow after hitting many trees and rocks and his partner found him by voice and called 911, on the other end of the line was a long time friend of Parson’s dating back all the way from the second grade, but Parson died during the recue according to the Flathead Beacon.
    Parsons family set up a gofundme account to help Parsons wife and one year old son. The goal was $100,000 and in 11 days 886 people donated and reached beyond the goal of 103,690 dollars.
    Parsons funeral was Jan. 13th 2017. There was a police escort, and many people attended.
    Many called Parson a hero and he will be missed by many.

Samson persevering well

ALYSSA WISHER
of The Flathead Arrow

    What if your life changed in an instant?
    Flathead’s football coach and gym teacher Mr. Kyle Samson had collapsed during a football practice at legends stadium on Oct, 27.
    Mr. Samson had lost all movement on the left side of his body, and was in a wheel chair for the last Football game of the season.
    Mr. Samson has regained his movement in is arm but still has no movement in his left leg, and cannot put any pressure on it.
    “I believe one of the hardest things for him will be adjusting because he is a very active person,” said Mrs. Tricia Dean brother of Mr. Samson.
    Mr. Samson came back to school on Monday, Dec. 5.
    Samson comes in almost every morning and works his upper body.
    “No one knows what he has, but they named it conversion disorder because they don’t know what really happened,” said Mr. Charlie Dotson. “He just stressed him self out so bad that his brain shut down.”
    Medline Plus states conversion disorder is a mental condition in which a person has blindness, paralysis, or other nervous system (neurologic) symptoms that cannot be explained by medical evaluation.
    “They have given me every test and they still have no definite answer to give me,” said Mr. Kyle Samson. “I will be going to a neurosurgeon on Monday Dec. 19, for a second opinion.”
    Samson has acquired a new perspective on life, due to what he has been through.
    “Don’t take for granted what you have, whether it is to write or read, make the most of each day,” said Samson. “Make sure everything you do on a daily basis count.”
    Throughout his injury, Samson said that he had amazing support from the students and the teachers at Flathead. He said Flathead has some amazing people within the school, which make the best family.
    “Sometimes life goes day by day without any enjoyment. You truly just need to enjoy every moment,” said Samson.

Mike Reilly visits during assembly

ZEPHREY HOLLOWAY
of The Flathead Arrow

    Mike Reilly, a former Flathead student athlete and graduate and current Canadian Football League quarterback for the Edmonton Eskimos visited Flathead High School on Monday, Dec. 5, to talk to students at an all-school assembly in the large gym about getting involved and never giving up.
    Reilly went to college with the Horseman academic scholarship. He attended two colleges got a degree in engineering. Then he was in the 2009 NFL Draft and traded between the Pittsburgh Steelers to the Green Bay Packers to the formerly known St Louis Rams and the Seattle Seahawks. He was only on the Practice Squad for about two years. Then he went to the Canadian Football League with the British Columbia Lions. Mike was the third string quarterback for the Lions. He finally got professional playing time on Oct. 19th 2012 when he was put in against the Edmonton Eskimos. He had 19 completions for 276 yards along with two touchdowns which lead the lions to a victory 39 -19. Which opened the door to the real start of his career.
    Since his start with the Eskimos in 2013, Reilly has been one of the top rushers in the CFL, has gone through great adversity with multiple injuries through out is career. In his second season the Eskimos made it to the Grey Cup but lost 43-18 against the Calgary Stampeders. According to Mike Reilly they had only had their staff for about a month prior to the start of the Season.
    “When 2015 started, it was the second year with the current staff,” Reilly said. “At the time we had came close to the championship in the division finals, but fell a little bit short in 2014.”
    “We were able to pick up where we left off; that made 2015 smooth.We already knew what to expect,”Reilly said.
    For the 2015 season the Eskimos were chopping on the bit. But the first game became the biggest challenge of Reilly’s career.
    “I had a guy dive at my knees and blow my knee out in the first game of the regular season,” Reilly said.  “I got lucky and didn’t require surgery.  I was only out for nine weeks.”
    After he was rehabilitated the Eskimos came back and won ten games in a row to go and win the Grey Cup.
    “I fully expect next year to have the same feeling that we had in 2015, we are not starting from scratch again,” said Reilly.
    Going into the 2016 season was not nearly as smooth, according to Reilly, with a completely different staff. The Eskimos learned about the new coaching staff, what they expected and what rules they had.
    “The last third of the season we came out very strong, I think we won six of eight games. And we made it back to the division finals so it’s very similar to the 2014 season,” said Reilly.
     The Eskimos lost in the eastern finals against the Ottawa RedBlacks in a snowy battle on Sunday, Nov. 20th. “So now we’ll have a full off-season. I fully expect next year to have the same feeling that we did in 2015, where you know we are not starting from scratch again,” said Reilly.
    Mike Reilly ended his season with 400 plus yards rushing yards. This is his fourth year in a row he has lead the CFL in quarterback rushing yards. “Our coach doesn’t care about records as much as keeping people healthy, which I respect, so we did come a little short on a couple of those,” said Reilly. Reilly is a humble player as much as he is for the team stats. “If you talk to anyone who knows me really well, I don’t really care so much about personal records and numbers,” said Reilly, “Though they are something that is fun and exciting to shoot for and it is something that I expect of our team because I know we are capable of that.” He has the mindset if he plays to his hardest and have the team right beside him in their victories, goals and records then the Eskimos will win the Grey Cup. “But more importantly, I look back to the 2015 season and winning that championship. That was a better feeling of accomplishment than any record that I have ever set has been, so ultimately I want to win that championship again,” said Reilly.  He is very confident that the Edmonton Eskimos will make it to the Grey Cup in the 2017 season. 
    “Rather than pushed him, I guided him. You didn’t push Mike; he pushed himself and pulled you along,” said Mr. Pat Reilly. Mr. Reilly is Mike Reilly’s father and one of the two people he attributes his success to. “It was never a fear of disappointing him but just the excitement of making him proud. That’s why I worked as hard as I did,” Reilly said. Mike Reilly’s parents are very supportive of him playing professional football in Canada. “They are Road Warriors,” said Mr. Pat Reilly. Mr. Reilly and Mrs. Reilly make the trip to Edmonton for almost every game. “It’s about a nine hour drive from Kalispell to Edmonton, depends on the weather,” said Mr. Reilly, “Sometimes it is close to a 12-hour drive with the snow.” They are very dedicated to their son’s career.
    “We make all of the Edmonton, Calgary and occasionally we make Vancouver B.C. It’s really hard to make the away game,” said Mr. Pat Reilly. The Reilly family is very close to each other and they are all along for this journey from a high school student with good grades to a professional football player with an engineering degree. Mike Reilly will continue to play football for his team and the pure enjoyment of the sport.

Flathead involved in season of giving

Teka Catron

of The Flathead Arrow

    Before Christmas break Flathead holds an Annual food drive to help families in the valley. The efforts, along with the cans go to the Lion Club Christmas Basket, which provides holiday food baskets for families in the Kalispell district.
    This year Flathead Student Council has been working on the theme “Serve. Lead. Inspire.” The student body was challenged to bring can foods into their 2 period classes. Each teacher along with their students was supposed to make the best tower out of the cans brought in.
    Mrs. Kelli Higgins class completed this task with the most can foods and won movie passes for discount Tuesday night at Signature Theaters (in the form on gift cards). The class with the best can structure also got free hot dogs during the home Cross Town    Basketball game. Higgin’s class decided to reconstruct a scene from Steinbeck’s novel Cannery Row they are reading in IB English.
    All cans were displayed infront of the Auditorium before they were shipped to the Lion Club.
    Student council usually creates a theme of all the cans collected, but this year the produce was shipped before “canstruction” happened. 



Foster named new Flathead softball coach

Maddie Huestis
of The Flathead Arrow

    Flathead High School has a new softball coach.
    The new coach, Jack Foster, has 18 years of experience coaching softball in both in Post Falls, Idaho, and Glacier High School. Foster coached from 1997-2005 and 2007-2014. He led the Post Falls Trojans in 2010 to the state championship in 5A, the largest classification in Idaho. Last year, Foster was the junior varsity coach at Glacier High School.
    “I am very excited about this upcoming softball season,” senior pitcher Kylee Beccari said. “It’s a fun group of girls to play with and I get to play with my closest friends. Softball is the sport that I love and it should be a blast.”
    Mrs. Tasia Gates was the head coach for two years and compiled a record of 8-35 overall.
    Foster played baseball at North Idaho College for one season before transferring to Walla Walla Community College to play football for two seasons. He transferred again to the University of Idaho, where he completed a bachelor’s degree in elementary education. He taught for 28 years in Post Falls before he and his wife moved to Kalispell in August, 2015.
    “I was a head coach before and really enjoyed it,” Foster said. “I decided I would like to do it again. I want to see the girls be successful not only on the field but also as young people.”
    With only two seniors coming back the Bravettes have a younger team this year.
    “Working with a new group should be fun and exciting for them as well as me,” Foster said.
Softball starts in March.

Students enjoy advantages of Running Start

Teka Catron

of The Flathead Arrow

    Running Start is a partnership between high schools and Flathead Valley Community College. It is a great opportunity for students to begin building their college transcript at a lower price. The program provides seniors and juniors with the opportunity to get an early affordable start on their college credits while attending high school.
    Some courses offer double credit opportunities which allow students to gain high school and college credit at the same time. By joining running start it can decrease the time it takes to complete a college degree.
    This program provides the students with the first six credits cost free, if in district. After finishing your free credits, and still being a running start student, subsequent courses are offered at a reduced price of about $56 per credit you take.
    As a Running Start student, you’ll be considered a college student, and will be expected to perform the same level of work and will participate in the classroom just as all other college students.
    Courses numbered 100 and above are eligible for this program. Your Flathead High School counselor can advise you on course applicability and credit equivalency.
    Once the end of each semester comes along, FVCC will mail your grades to your current high school. The grades you receive during running start become part of your college transcript.
    When applying to other colleges you must list FVCC as a college you've attended and have FVCC send a copy of your official transcript of grades as part of the application process.

 

Trump wins FHS, Electoral College elections

Hailey Gauthier
of The Flathead Arrow


    The presidential election of 2016 proved to be historic on Tuesday, Nov. 8.
Not only did the Republican underdog Donald Trump win, he won by a landslide in the Electoral College but lost the popular vote 62,379,366 to 64,469,963.
    President elect Trump shocked the nation on Tuesday night with battleground victories in Florida, Ohio, Texas, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Utah, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and North Carolina to redraw the U.S. political map.
    As of Tuesday, Nov. 15, Trump held a 290-232 Electoral College victory with only Michigan left to be added in. That's a 56-44 percent victory margin, or 12 percent victory.
    “I'm glad he trumped Hillary and has the opportunity to Make America Great Again,” senior Cameron Welch said.
    The mock election at Flathead High School on Tuesday, Nov. 1, in the Social Studies Resource Center came out more lopsided.
    Flathead High School voted 66.2 percent for Donald Trump and 18.5 percent for Hillary Clinton—that’s a 48 percent difference.
    According to the New York Times in the Flathead County, Trump received 30,079 of the votes. In Montana, he won 58.4 percent. Clinton only got 13,223 total votes in the Flathead County, and 35.4 percent of the votes in Montana.
    “There’s a lot of hurt because of the election, and I’m personally not pleased with the outcome. What’s important for me now, is that people respect each other and their differences,” said senior Rhiannon Bennetts.
    The initiatives were others big subjects. There were 4 different initiatives. Initiative No. 116, which would add a new section to the Montana Constitution establishing specific rights for crime victims, passed. Statewide, the initiative passed 66-33 percent. Within FHS, it was almost identical, 65.2-34.8 percent.
    Initiative No. 117, which would have prohibited the use of traps and snares for animals on any public lands within Montana did not pass by a vote of 62-37 percent statewide. FHS students agreed with the rest of the state, with a vote of 56.1 percent to 43.9 percent.
    Initiative No. 181, which would have established the Montana Biomedical Research Authority to oversee and review grant applications for the purpose of promoting the development of therapies and cures for brain diseases and injuries and mental illness, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, brain cancer, dementia, traumatic brain injury and stroke was turned down statewide 57-42 percent. FHS students had a different view of the initiative and would have passed it, 66.3 percent to 33.7 percent.
    Initiative No. 182 renames the Montana Marijuana Act to the Montana Medical Marijuana Act and amended the state constitution to allow a single treating physician to certify medical marijuana for a patient diagnosed with chronic pain and includes post-traumatic stress disorder as a “debilitating medical condition” for which a physician may certify medical marijuana. The state passed the initiative, 57-42 percent. FHS students voted to pass it as well, with a 55.9 percent to 44.1 percent margin.
    Some FHS students were disappointed because they got to taste what participating in an election would be like, but didn’t actually get to register an official vote.
    “All I can say is I’m super bummed that I didn’t get to vote,” senior Marshal Bowen said, because his 18th birthday was the day after Nov. 8. “I felt like I was sitting on the sidelines of the big game, and wasn’t put in.”
    The president and the initiatives were not the only issues on the Montana ballot and the FHS ballot. The U.S. Representative nominees were Denise Juneau (Democrat), Ryan Zinke (Republican) and Rick Breckenridge (Libertarian). Within the walls of FHS, Zinke won 69.5 percent of the votes. According to the Flathead Beacon, Zinke won with 56 percent of the votes as opposed to 40 percent from Juneau.
    The governor of Montana was also voted on. Running was Steve Bullock (Democrat), Greg Gianforte (Republican) and Ted Dunlap (Libertarian). In the FHS vote, Gianforte gathered 46.6 percent of the votes, and Bullock had 44.3 percent of the votes. That’s a 2.3 percent difference. The real results came out differently, as the Flathead Beacon said Bullock won with 50 percent of the votes and Gianforte had 47 percent of the votes. Even though the tables were turned, the percent difference was almost identical with a 3 percent difference.
    The Secretary of State runners were Corey Stapleton (Republican), Monica Lindeen (Democrat) and Roger Roots (Libertarian). At FHS, students voted in favor of Stapleton, who won in a landslide with 63.8 percent of the votes. Lindeen got 23.8 percent of the votes. That is a 40 percent difference in votes. Stapleton also won in the election. According to the Flathead Beacon, he won with 55 percent of the votes and Lindeen got 41 percent of the votes. There was a little difference in percentages; the Flathead polls had a 14 percent difference.
    The Attorney General candidates were Tim Fox (Republican) and Larry Jent (Democrat). FHS students voted for Fox to win with 75.8 percent of votes, while Jent got 24.2 percent of votes. That is 51.6 percent difference. The Montana election went about the same, with Fox winning 67 percent of votes and Jent garnering 32 percent of votes, which is a 35 percent difference.
    The State Auditor nominees were Jesse Laslovich (Democrat) and Matt Rosendale (Republican). According to the state election Rosendale won with 53 percent of the votes. Laslovich got 46 percent. At FHS, Rosendale won with 71.1 percent of the votes. Runner-up Laslovich had 28.9 percent. That’s a whopping 42.2 difference in percentages.
    The State Superintendent of Public Instruction was another subject to vote on. The people running were Melissa Romano (Democrat) and Elsie Arntzen (Republican). In the state election, Arntzen landed the lead with 51 percent of votes while Romano got 48 percen. That was a 3 percent win for Arntzen. At FHS, Arntzen also won, but by quite a bit more than in the election. Arntzen won with 64.8 percent of the votes and Romano had 35.2 percent, which is a 29.6 percent win for Arntzen.


Flathead students help build a new house

Jordan Buxton

of The Flathead Arrow

    After a very successful first year with housing construction class, Flathead High School teacher Mr. Brock Anderson decided to have a second year of housing construction classes, building another three bedroom, two bathroom house.
    “There was a need from local contractors (for more employees),” Brock Anderson said. “And students needed an opportunity to explore good paying job opportunities.”
    Twenty-five students connect this class to the school; however, the school can’t isn’t really able to profit off the class, Brock Anderson created the non-profit organization “Kalispell Student Built Homes” to keep the class self-sustaining. Brock Anderson has had to take out loans to build the houses, however he is hoping that in five years, he will not need to take out any more loans because the program should be fully self-sustaining.
    Housing Construction 1 and 2 are vocational classes for Flathead students. It gives students the opportunity to explore other fields of work that has a high potential of paying well. It is a two-year class; the older more-experienced students are able to give the less-experienced peers more guidance to help the house building go much more smoothly.
    “Housing two is pretty cool because you know a lot of the stuff from and also get to help out the new kids,” Riley Anderson said “It helped me to get a job framing houses. Once I started working I already new a lot of things from being in housing construction.”
    This is Riley Anderson's second year with housing construction and he is planning to go into Architecture when he is done with high school and this class helped him make this decision.
    Riley Anderson and Brock Anderson are not related. 
    This year’s loan is about $225,000, and when the home is finished and sold Brock Anderson said he would be able to pay off the loan and put the profit towards next year’s house.
    “This year seems to be going much better than the last,” Brock Anderson said. “Since I have more experience, this year is going much more smooth. This house is projected to be complete by the beginning of May.”
    Brock Anderson plans to continue this class “until I get a mobile Scooter, in other words forever.” This is good news for the school and the community because he will continue to build affordable homes and provide students who are interested in housing as well.

Daphne reborn at Flathead High School

ELIJAH KIGILYUK
of The Flathead Arrow

    Thanks to the efforts of Kalispell sculptor John Rawlings, the moose that frequents the Flathead High School Commons and auditorium foyer has a new life.
    Rawlings, who sculpted Daphne, the 91-inch tall moose entirely out of fiberglass and tree bark, spent a couple days in September at FHS repairing the damage from the infamous senior prank last spring. The moose was molded from a lightweight fiberglass material with selective pieces of tree bark hot glued to the fiberglass mold.
    The restoration was successfully accomplished.
    “You can’t notice the damages,” senior Alek Jochim said. “It looks brand new.”
    The moose was tipped over during an ill-advised prank and caused heavy damage to the face and broke off an antler.
    “It certainly made me sad that she suffered so, but I am a much more forgiving person,” Rawlings said.
    Originally sculpted for the “Cows on Parade” art fundraiser held in Chicago, the moose took many months to build. The inspiration to sculpt the moose came from the ancient Greek myth of Daphne and Apollo. Cupid was insulted by Apollo and in retaliation, he shot two arrows—one he fired at Apollo, which evoked love and passion; the other he shot at a wood nymph Daphne, which evoked the opposite. To preserve her virginity, Daphne ran. Apollo ran faster than Daphne and as soon as he grabbed her, Daphne called out to her father, who did the only thing he could to save her… He turned her into a laurel tree. Her leaves never lose their color and were used to weave crowns of victory in the early Olympic games.
    “Your moose has always been a symbol of victory for me,” Rawlings said.
    Rawlings said he was not angry with the individuals that vandalized the moose, but was sad the moose suffered like that.
    “It was a lapse in judgment,” he said. “Hopefully, the individuals learned from their experience.”

Grizzly bear charges Flathead student

ELIJAH KIGILYUK 
of The Flathead Arrow

    Across the state of Montana, since late June, there have been six reported grizzly bear attacks. Among these attacks was a Flathead High School graduate--the first grizzly death in Glacier National Park since the May of 1998. Coming from all across Montana, these stories are hitting closer to home than FHS students realize.Flathead High School senior Marshall Bowen nearly became another awful statistic. Bowen was bow hunting on Sep. 24 near Avon, Montana, when he was charged by a grizzly bear. 
It stopped less than 15 feet from him.
     "It happened so fast that I didn't have time to react," Bowen said. "I had bear spray, but there was no way I had enough time to unholster it."     That morning, Bowen and his buddy decided to split up and hunt separate locations. Bowen climbed over a ridge and found a small meadow. Sitting at the edge of the meadow, he cow called twice. Within 15 seconds, a grizzly bear shot straight out of the forest and charged directly towards Bowen. 
    “The bear was looking straight at me, but I don't think it could see me,” Bowen said. “I was wanting to grab my bear spray, but I knew there wasn’t enough time to take it out. While I was thinking that, the bear ran at me again. It all happened in a matter of seconds. I don’t think a lot of people realize how fast bears move, it’s a lot faster than you think.”
    After the bluff charge, it stopped for a few seconds and then continued its charge, passing him by just a few feet.    “I probably could have reached out and touched him,” Bowen said. “I couldn’t believe what I was seeing. I would have never thought something like this would happen tome.”
    Once the bear disappeared into the forest behind him, Bowen immediately left the scene. Bowen’s experience of hunting alone left him with a lesson that he will never forget.
    “You are not the big boy in the woods,” he said. “Leave the bears alone. Don’t hunt alone. You never know where they are.”
    Bowen was fortunate to leave the encounter unharmed. Less could be said about half a dozen other Montana residents that have been attacked this year.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        

Flathead renews Thompson as head wrestling coach

MATT GASH-GILDER
of The Flathead Arrow

    High school wrestling programs in Montana have officially been put on notice: Notorious wrestling duo Mr. Jeff Thompson and Mr. Jeff Anderson are returning to Flathead’s wrestling team after taking a eight-year break from coaching.
    The successful duo coached the Brave Brawlers from 2000-2008, led the team to four state titles, and into the national top 10 high school rankings. Thompson was named Montana Coach of the year in 2004, 2006, 2007 and 2008.
    Thompson led the Braves to four Class AA state titles from 2004-2008, broke his own Flathead team record of 410 points at state (which still stands), had a 126-19 dual record, produced 107 state placers, 48 state finalists, and 13 state champions.
    Coach Thompson replaces the departure of Coach Rich Vasquez, after three years as head coach.
    “I feel good about Thompson being the new coach,” two-time state champion Trae Vasquez said. “Even though my dad has been my coach my whole life, Thompson has been coaching me since I was like four years old too. So just having two coaches now that are influencing my wrestling is just going to be better for me. My dad is still going to be my coach but Thompson is definitely going to be there to help us all out and he’s definitely going to lead us to a state title and I think it’ll be awesome.”
    Thompson said the overall goal is to bring home a state title. He said the main focus is on the things the team has control of, which is the performance of the wrestlers, and winning a state title would be the byproduct of doing so.
    Legends of the wrestling room, like Bryce Stacey and Tyler Wells, are returning to help coach for the Braves as well. Both were state champions under Thompson during the golden age of Flathead wrestling.
    Anderson, who wrestled in the Olympic trials, coached Thompson to win three individual high school state titles in Great Falls. Thompson then proceeded to wrestle varsity at the University of Minnesota after his high school career.
    “We all know how to wrestle,” state finalist Hunter Rush said. “I don’t think the wrestling will change and the team aspect will be the same also, but the feel of wrestling will be different.”
    The first practice of the wrestling season will be on Thursday, Nov. 17. The first dual is in Butte on Friday, Dec. 2. The first home meet is on Thursday, Dec. 22, against Sandpoint, Idaho; Eureka and Columbia Falls. The wrestling team has only two home duals after that.

Voters approve $19 million for Flathead High School 

KAYCEE SMITH  

of The Flathead Arrow

    Flathead High School was established in 1897, making it one of the oldest high schools in Montana. Along with the history, comes with major improvements the valley needs to keep both schools enrolled. The 2016 high school bond was passed on October 3, to take out Flathead half floors, take down the original gymnasium that is falling down at FHS, update the Ag-Center, update Linderman Education Center, improve Legends Stadium, and attend to maintenance needed at Glacier High School.
    The half floors were built in 1910, and still hold classrooms that are used daily. 106 years later many issues have arose with the functionality of the floors. Since they are so old, they don’t have elevators that are accessible to handy caped people. This forces the class be moved when someone is in a wheel chair, or even crutches. Senior Alyssa Wisher, who tore her ACL this fall, understands the struggle of having classes on the half floors.
    What use to be called the “girls gym” is another part of Flathead that will be torn down and rebuilt. The bond includes a brand new gymnasium that will be connected to the school unlike the small gym. Many rotary, and high school practices are being held in the gym still. Since it is so old many of the lines have faded, and the space around the gym doesn’t fit today’s needs. The blue prints of the new gym make it multi-functional.
    In 1978 the district build the Agriculture Center, and it has not received an update since being built. The bond is allowing the center to use $4.64 million dollars to update what is mandatory to fix. With the money the Ag-Center will create six classrooms and a science lab with the existing building. Outside of the building the bond will cover expanding the shop to welding programs, and renovate the animal care facility, also build two common areas for extra learning space. With the improvements on the site it will allow 150 more students at the center.
    Linderman education center, that was previously only for 10th graders, but now is used for secondary high school learning. Linderman was built during 1939, and now holds 165 students wanting to finish high school. Since it was primarily used for one grade, the space is small making Linderman overcrowded and with a waiting list of 80 students. The bond will renovate the entire space creating new learning space and a library. Since the building is so old the bond will also repair the roof and bring it up to safety codes.
    Rawson Field, now known as Legends Stadium, was built in 1977, renovated, and now needs more repairs. It is a major hosting place for athletic events for Flathead and Glacier high school along with youth organizations. The bond will address the aging bleachers and drainage issues on the field. The field its self will also be fixed to make it safer and more usable according to the district officials.
    The total cost of the bond will be $28.76 million dollars. Start of when construction will start is still being decided. Half-floors and the old gym will be the first to be torn down according to administrator Mr. Bryce Wilson. ­­­ 


Attendance Change

TEKA CATRON

of the Flathead Arrow

    This year Flathead High School has a new color level of attendance depending on the number of days you are marked absence. This system is referred as the Tiered system, this  applies to all the student body.
     
Students will fall into four different levels a green, yellow, orange, or red based on their absences in each class period. This excludes any school related absences such as, School Sponsored, School Council, or Office Request.  
 
    
“Being a at Flathead my freshman year i didn’t notice or understand the Attendance policy very well, but being a sophomore with the new levels it makes more sense so you're not in red so fast if you are gone a lot.”  sophomore Emily Bachman said.
  
     
The Green level ranges from 0-2 absences in one or more class periods per semester. With a semester incentive drawing.
    Yellow Level is if you have 3-6 unexcused or excused absences. Including an Automatic phone call sent home, Catch up time- which is assigned by the teacher of the class missed, detention, garbage detail, or Wednesday school.
 
    Orange level is the third level ,also the new one that was added in, 7-9 absences. If you fall into this level you get a automated phone call sent home, parent contact made by assigning staff member, catch up time with the teacher or administration, detention, garbage detail, Wednesday, or In School Suspension.    
    
Red Level is 10 or more absences in one or more classes per semester. This level requires catch up time or make up work will not receive credit, In school suspension, Out of School suspension, or CRYj. You credit for the class missed may be withheld.

    
“As long as it is consistently enforced, I think it is an improvement,” said Flathead English teacher Alison Kreiss. “We all want students to succeed.  In order to succeed they need to be here, but they also need flexibility and opportunities to learn from mistakes."
    It is reasonable to expect the some courses cannot be replicated due to the assignment, for example science classes where performance based activities or experiences are used.  Students are advised to make prior arrangements with their teacher for planned absences.