What's a De Jure Grand Jury?

I will now try to share with you my understanding of the program and process.  Please be patient with me (Jim Costa), as this is as new to me as it is with you.  We will both be learning as we go along. 

What is it?

To the best of my understanding, we are creating a De Jure Grand Jury for the first time in Florida since 1861.  This will be the highest court venue in the county and will have authority over any other legal process or government authority operating within the county.  This has always been a right of the citizens recognized by the Bill of Rights as a “jury of peers”.  Unfortunately, our governments have failed to teach us this in our school system over the past 150 years.  They were hoping  that we would just forget about it, as we have done, until recently.  This is our fourth branch of government designed under common law to keep a check on our governments to not overstep their bounds.

How will it Meet and be Controlled?

The jury will meet in a private place outside of the normal legal system.  It will not be controlled by courts or the State Attorney.  It will be an independent body that will hear cases that residents request to be heard. Upon request, their cases will be transferred from the normal court system to the De Jure system. All proceedings will be done in secret and your identy will remain secret, as is standard practice for all grand juries.  Most of the work will be done from your homes using Skype.  This is an encrypted computer communication device that will allow you to see and talk to all the jurists in private.  If you are unfamiliar with it, be assured it is as simple as using a telephone.  You will not need access to a computer right away so don’t be concerned about that.

Will I be Trained?

Yes.  You will be trained in the Constitution and the Jurist Right of Nullification to void any law the jurist finds violates the rights of any party before it.  You will also be trained in how to present your findings and / or issue commands.  All of us will be trained in the use of Skype. 

 

What Will the Jury Do?

If the jury is hearing a criminal case, it will decide the facts of the case before it.  It will then review any law involved in that hearing to ensure that it does not violate civil rights.  If a civil rights violation has occurred the jury must acquit if the decision is unanimous or declare a mistrial if just one jurist finds a violation. If not a criminal hearing (family, civil, traffic), the jury must make a decision while disregarding the law in question if it violates civil rights.

If a violation has occurred, the jury then can expand its investigation of that law and its application.  It has the power of subpoena.  The jury then can issue commands to rectify, including, but not limited to: Cease and Desist Orders, cause the employment termination of government employees or issuance of criminal indictments of any party violating the civil rights of another resident.

Commands can be issued to, and indictments can be issued against, any government official or employee, including but not limited to: Judges, a sheriff, administrators (county, municipal, state or federal), private citizens, businesses and corporations.

When Will the Jury be Convened?

Hopefully, each county jury will be convened about a month after we begin taking applications in that county. In the meantime, continue on with your regular life.  Once you are selected to serve, you will have the opportunity to give an employer a two week notice and catch up with the rest of the jurors later.


What is the History of a De Jure Grand Jury?

De Jure Grand Juries go back to 1215 with the granting of the Magna Carta, which began the English peoples freedom form the monarch.  It, like our Constitution, grants the right to a trial "by peers".  This refers to a Grand Jury.  Until the civil war in the 1860's these juries were common place.  Their purpose was to keep a rein on the government(s) and to prevent them from eroding our constitutional rights.

This was accomplished by the Jurist's right of Nullification.  The Jurist's Right of Nullification is the right to nullify a law before the jury that a jurist feels is unconstitutional.  Our government has gone to great lengths to remove that right from our education and public knowledge.  Our intent is to retrain juries of that lawful right and implement it in the courts.
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