torque reaction engine

There are various ways to make the torque reaction engine, but it comes down to an inertial mass which is rotated clockwise, then counter-clockwise, then clockwise, etc., around a drive shaft. Rotation of the inertial mass produces a torque reaction on the drive shaft.  The drive shaft is fixed to the inside of the hull at the 1/3rd point.  In the tow craft variations, this is where the harness contacts the hull.  The torque reaction experienced by the drive shaft causes the hull to rotate, first one way, then the other, etc., which drives the fluke and produces thrust.  It is both incredibly simple and difficult to believe.  A torque reaction engine can be accomplished with diesel pistons, etc., etc., but, compared to a simple electric motor, all of these alternatives include more parts and require greater complexity to implement wide ranging variable torque reaction.

The torque reaction engine has only one moving part. There is no drive shaft contacting the water and the electric motor is efficient and reliable, so the craft is more reliable than any other craft of similar speed.

Here's a video demonstrating the principal of the torque reaction engine, using a conventional outrunner electric motor wrapped with an inertial mass, in this case, lead.

torque reaction engine


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