Journals vs. Magazines



















Look at the...    
Popular Magazines & Newspapers Professional, Trade, Industry or Special-Interest Periodicals  Scholarly, Academic, Peer-Reviewed, or Refereed Journals 
Citation for:
  • frequency of publication
  • authors of articles
  • article titles
  • Issued frequently: weekly, biweekly, or monthly
  • Often one author. Staff-written or written by freelance authors or guest contributors.
  • Popular or catchy article titles.
  • Issued frequently: weekly, biweekly, or monthly.
  • Often one author. Staff-written by freelance authors, guest contributors, or professionals in the field.
  • Straightforward article titles, sometimes popular and catchy.
  •  Issued less frequently: monthly, quarterly, or semiannually.
  • Frequently multiple coauthors. Scholars and researchers in the filed, discipline, or specialty. Authors with university affiliations or professional titles.
  • Titles related to research question or results; often long, not catchy.
Whole Periodical for:
  • audience
  • purpose
  • paper, illustrations, layout
  • advertising
  • Educated but non-expert readers; uses simple language in order to meet minimum education levels.
  • Designed to entertain or persuade readers with a variety of general interest topics in broad subject fields; also geared to sell products and services through advertising.
  • Eye-catching covers, glossy paper, photos, illustrations, cartoons, sidebars.
  • Many ads for general-consumer products and services.
  • Practitioners of a particular profession, members of a trade, or workers in an industry; language appropriate for an educated readership; assumes a certain level of specialized knowledge.
  • Examines problems or concerns in a particular profession or industry; provides specialized information to a wide interested audience.
  • Eye-catching covers, glossy paper, photos, illustrations, cartoons, sidebars.
  • Many ads for products and services related to a particular profession, trade, or industry.
  • Scholars and researchers in the field, discipline, or specialty; language contains terminology and jargon of the discipline; reader is assumed to have a scholarly background.
  • To inform, report, or make available original research or experimentation in a specific field or discipline to the rest of the scholarly world; where new knowledge is reported.
  • Plain covers, usually plain matte paper; mostly text inside, with tables, figures, charts, graphs; little or no color or illustrations.
  • Few to no ads; if any, tend to be for other journals or specific services or products.
Articles for:
  • abstracts
  • references
  • No abstracts.
  • Sources are not cited; no references or bibliography at end of articles.
  • No abstracts.
  • Sources are not cited; no references or bibliography at end of articles.
  • Articles usually have an abstract at the beginning that summarizes the findings of the articles.
  • Scholarly references in the form of bibliographies, reference lists, and footnotes appear with each article.
 Examples:


 
Newsweek, Time, Reader's Digest 



finding
popular magazine articles
 
Beverage World, Restaurant News, Advertising Age


finding
 trade publication articles
Science, The Journal of American History, American Literature , Social Psychology Quarterly

finding
academic journal articles


Č
Ċ
jt okamura,
Nov 28, 2011, 1:08 PM
Comments