Animal Ministries Corner

posted Oct 31, 2017, 9:15 PM by Cheryl Hentz   [ updated Oct 31, 2017, 9:16 PM ]

Our four-legged pets are part of the family. So, with the holidays coming, be sure to include them in the festivities. But use common-sense and keep things as earth-friendly as possible when doing so.

Buy (or make) them a treat. Pet stores and others who sell pet food and related items will likely go all out for the holiday season, but if you’d rather make treats for your pet(s), there are plenty of great recipes online. Most will probably be designed for year-round enjoyment, but you can use cookie cutters to mold them into holiday treats. And, if they call for pumpkin or peanut butter, rest assured, those items are safe for dogs (but in moderation, of course).

Don’t leave them out of gift-opening. Everyone else will be opening gifts, so be sure to include the fur-kids. They will have a lot of fun trying to get smaller gifts out of their own personalized stockings (a gift in and of itself), or wrap up a tennis ball, bone, catnip, or some other toy and watch them tear open the paper with delight. Some pets may even get more enjoyment out of the unwrapping than they do the actual gift, but they will enjoy the gifts once the paper’s tossed out in the recycle bin.

Get them their own special ornaments. Many families have a tradition of getting a special personalized ornament each year. If this is something your family does, consider getting one for your pets, as well. You could get a special ornament for each pet (if you have more than one pet), or one for all of them, if you so choose. Such ornaments can be personalized by having their photo and or name(s) engraved on them. If you’d rather do it yourself, you can always make an ornament and if your pet cooperates, include their paw print on it before baking in an oven or kiln. (Salt dough is said to work great if making ornaments in the oven.) Either way, it’s a special way to keep holiday memories of your fur-kids alive for years to come.

Keep them warm and toasty (and safe). Your pet’s coat only keeps them so warm when the winds blow and the snow flies. Why not get them a snuggly pet bed of their own? And for those winter walks in the snow, ice and slush, you can get them a coat, or even boots to protect their feet from freezing in the ice, or getting salt on them from sidewalks (that salt can be dangerous if they lick it off; so be sure to wipe their feet when coming indoors after walks around the neighborhood.). And consider using pet-safe salt on your own sidewalks to protect your own pets and others in the neighborhood that may walk by.

Happy holidays from our group to you and yours!

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