home‎ > ‎

PRACTICAL WHAT TO DO IF... MY PET HAS... WHILE WAITING TO SEE THE VET

PLEASE NOTE THIS PAGE IS STILL UNDER CONSTRUCTION AND THUS WILL BE SUBJECT TO FURTHER UPDATES SO PLEASE RETURN REGULARLY FOR MORE INFORMATION WHICH WILL GRADUALLY BE INTEGRATED TO THE FIRST AID PAGES
BACK TO HOME PAGE

In all cases you should have contacted a veterinary practice and a veterinary check up should be done even if the obvious symptoms clear up as the underlying cause of the problem may still be present and have been eased by the advice given here, but can still need further attention.  These are practical tips that I regularly give clients.

HOW TO TELL IF YOUR PET IS DEHYDRATED.

The skin on the back of the neck if pulled up should rapidly return to its normal shape.  In a dehydrated individual the skin will only go back to its normal shape slowly.  In a severely dehydrated individual the skin will remain tented with in severe cases sunken eyes, this requires urgent veterinary attention more particularly when the change occurs rapidly.

IF YOUR PET HAS VOMITING...

Firstly you need to be very careful in following the advice and that you do so with full awareness of medical conditions your pet has or may have.  For example, I normally advise the withdrawal of all water and food.  Yet the withdrawl of water or all food is not always a good idea in diabetic patients or patients suffering from any form of kidney failure unless the individual is put on a drip immediately to ensure they are still getting fluids.  Equally attempting to stop vomiting in an individual, who has just taken in something toxic that the body is deliberately trying to get rid of is also not a good idea.   In very young animals, kittens, pups foals etc,  fluids and food often can only be withdrawn for short periods due to their rapid growth and metabolism. That taken in most cases stopping the individual taken all water or food is the best approach to many types of vomiting.  The reason for this is that reflex vomiting is usually caused by any expansion of the stomach and all too often the amount of fluid vomited out is more than the patient has drunk and even food eating will be accompanied by the loss of gastric juices leading to more rapid dehydration.  An individual who continues to vomit despite the removal of both fluids and food needs veterinary attention as it will dehydrate fairly rapidly, particularly so if it is accompanied by diarrhoea.  

Water is normally withdrawn safely for a period of 24 hours in a healthy adult individual and food may have to be withdrawn for a full 48 hours.  After the 24 hour period water is slowly reintroduced a little at a time.  One often starts by just wetting a saucer and allowing the pet to lick it.  Then if there is no vomiting putting a little water in the saucer frequently and if there is still no vomiting gradually increase the amount of water till the individual is getting a normal amount of water.  Food is similarly re introduced slowly after the 48 hour time period.  The 24 hour fluid and 48 hour food guide is flexible as some individuals will rapidly return to normal and so fluid and food can be reintroduced earlier, but with caution and done slowly.

Some emergency homoeopathic remedies while waiting to go to the vet for vomiting are Nux Vomica (Food Poisoning, over eating, vomiting) Phosphorus (thirsty individual with vomiting as soon as food gets warm in the stomach) Arsenicum Album (chilly, restless individuals, constantly sipping water) - there are many more remedies that a veterinary homoeopath will be able to help with.

IF YOUR PET HAS DIARRHOEA...

The advice is similar to that for vomiting especially if both diarrhoea and vomiting are present simultaneously once again watch signs of dehydration.  If the diarrhoea is rapid in on set and is offensive and bloody particularly in a young or unvaccinated  animal urgent veterinary attention is required Aconite can be helpful as a first remedy at the very onset of symptoms, but will rapidly progress to one of the remedies below.   Some emergency homoeopathic remedies while waiting to go to the vet in animals with diarrhoea are Arsenicum Album (chilly, restless individuals, constantly sipping water very smelly diarrhoea) Phosphorus (very smelly diarrhoea in thirsty patient often alternates with Arsenicum Album, Mercurius Solubus (straining with diarrhoea), Aloe and Sulphur (diarrhoea worse in the morning) there are many more remedies that a veterinary homoeopath will be able to help with.

IF YOU ARE TOLD TO BRING A URINE SAMPLE.....
Click on this link to go to an article written by Tom Farrington on this 

BACK TO HOME PAGE

Comments