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Amazing Facts

  • Dr. Seuss pronounced his name "soyce".
  • Dr. Seuss wrote "Green Eggs and Ham" after his editor dared him to write a book using fewer than 50 different words.
  • Draftsmen have to make 27,000 drawings for the manufacturing of a new car.
  • Dragonflies are one of the fastest insects, flying 50 to 60 mph.
  • Dragonfly larvae develop under the water and eject water from their anus to propel them for short distances
  • Dreamt is the only English word that ends in the letters "MT".
  • Dry ice does not melt, it evaporates.
  • Dry wine is a wine that has been completely fermented, meaning that only 0.1% of the sugar remains.
  • Due to precipitation, for a few weeks K2 was bigger than Mt Everest.
  • Dueling is legal in Paraguay as long as both parties are registered blood donors.
  • Dunkirk, France is the site of the largest military evacuation in history. During World War II, some 340,000 Allied troops were evacuated to England. 
  • The retreat by sea took place between May 26 and June 4, 1940.
  • During a severe windstorm or rainstorm the Empire State Building may sway several feet to either side.
  • During conscription for World War II, there were nine documented cases of men with three testicles.
  • During Hell Week (the most grueling portion of training) the trainees get 4 hours of sleep.
  • During his entire life, Vincent Van Gogh sold exactly one painting, "Red Vineyard at Arles".
  • During his entire lifetime, Herman Melville's timeless classic of the sea, 'Moby Dick', only sold 50 copies.
  • During his lifetime Paganini published only five compisitions. He didn't expect anybody to be able to play them, and at that time nobody could.
  • During its entire life time a housefly never travels more than a hundred feet from the place where it was born.
  • During pregnancy, the average woman's uterus expands up to five hundred times its normal size.
  • During the 1600's, boys and girls in England wore dresses until they were about seven years old.
  • During the Alaskan Klondike gold rush, (1897-1898) potatoes were practically worth their weight in gold. Potatoes were so valued for their vitamin C 
  • content that miners traded gold for potatoes.
  • During the American Civil War the Union soldiers were issued eight pounds of ground roasted coffee as part of their personal ration of one hundred 
  • pounds of food. And they had another choice: ten pounds of green coffee beans.
  • During the average human life, you will consume 70 assorted bugs as well as 10 spiders whilst you sleep.
  • During the baseball rivalries between the two major leagues in the 1890s, the Pittsburgh Nationals took advantage of a technicality and signed a 
  • player away from another club. The Nationals' president, J. Palmer O'Neill, was called J. "Pirate" O'Neill, and his club became the Pittsburgh Pirates.
  • During the California gold rush of 1849, miners sent their laundry to Honolulu for washing and pressing. Due to the extremely high costs in California 
  • during these boom years, it was deemed more feasible to send their shirts to Hawaii for servicing.
  • During the chariot scene a small red car can be seen in the distance.
  • During the chariot scene in "Ben Hur", a small red car can be seen in the distance.
  • During the filming of Singin' in the Rain, the director had two ladies Carol Haney and Gwen Verdon put on tap dancing shows and dance around in 
  • bucketsful of water. Apparently, he liked Gene Kelly's dancing, but wasn't able to get the sound he wanted for someone dancing in the rain. The 
  • sounds of Gene Kelly's tap dancing in the movie aren't really the sounds he made during the filming of the movie.
  • During the mid-1800s, less than half of the newborn babies lived more than ten years. Today, over 90 percent do.
  • During the Prohibition, at least 1,565 Americans died from drinking bad liquor, hundreds were blinded, and many were killed in bootlegger wars. Federal 
  • Agents and the Coast Guard made 75,000 arrests per year.
  • During the Reign of Peter the Great, their was a special tax on anyone who had a beard.
  • During the time of Peter the Great, any Russian who wore a beard was required to pay a special tax.
  • During the US Civil war, 200,000 blacks served in the Union Army; 38,000 gave their lives; 22 won the Medal of Honor.
  • During the winter, squirrels make waterproof nests in hollow trees.
  • During warm weather, hippos secrete a reddish, oily fluid, called pink sweat, which acts as a skin conditioner to keep it moist.
  • During winter in Moscow the skating rinks cover more than 250,000 square meters of land.
  • During World War II Canadian scientists secretly developed biological weapons which were later taken over by the USA. Anthrax was one.
  • During World War II the U.S. government used 260 million pounds of instant coffee.
  • During World War II, bakers in the United States were ordered to stop selling sliced bread for the duration of the war on January 18, 1943. Only 
  • whole loaves were made available to the public. It was never explained how this action helped the war effort.
  • During World War II, the very first bomb dropped on Berlin by the Allies killed the only elephant in the Berlin Zoo.
  • Dwight D. Eisenhower, an avid golfer, had a putting green installed on the White House lawn.
  • Dynamite contains peanuts.
  • Each banana plant bears only one stem of fruit. To produce a new stem, only two shoots known as the daughter and the granddaughter are allowed 
  • to grow and be cultivated from the main plant.
  • Each day, there are over 120 million sexual intercourse taking place all over the world.thanx kim (Now dont you feel more contented each night 
  • before you go to sleep ALONE)
  • Each human generates about 3.5 pounds of rubbish a day, mostly paper.
  • Each king in a deck of playing cards represents a great king from history. Spades King David, Clubs Alexander the Great, Hearts Charlemagne, and 
  • Diamonds Julius Caesar.
  • Each king in a deck of playing cards represents a great king from history: Spades = David ; Clubs = Alexander the Great ; Hearts = Charlemagne ; 
  • Diamonds = Caesar
  • Each king in a deck of playing cards represents a great king from history: Spades King David, Clubs Alexander the Great, Hearts Charlemagne, 
  • Diamonds Julius Caesar.
  • Each person's ears are unique.
  • Each square inch of human skin consists of twenty feet of blood vessels.
  • Each unit on the Richter Scale is equivalent to a power factor of about 32. So a 6 is 32 times more powerful than a 5! Though it goes to 10, 9 is 
  • estimated to be the point of total tectonic destruction. 2 is the smallest that can be felt unaided.
  • Each year 50,000 earthquakes take place on this planet.
  • Each year approximately 250,000 American husbands are physically attacked and beaten by their wives.
  • Each year in America there are about 300,000 deaths that can be attributed to obesity.
  • Each year, insects eat 1/3 of the Earth's food crop.
  • Earth's magnetic field has been weakening. It seems to have lost 15% of its strength since 1670. At the present rate of decrease, it will reach zero 
  • in 2,000 years. Between the years 3500 and 4500, the magnetic field will not be sufficiently strong enough to ward off charged radiation from outer 
  • space.
  • Easter is the first Sunday after the first Full Moon after March 21.
  • Eating breakfast will help you burn from 5-20% more calories throughout the day.
  • Eating large amounts of carrots will eventually turn your skin orange because of the chemical substance called carotene which is found in carrots. 
  • Carotene is the cause of the orange hue in leaves during the fall.
  • Eddie Arcaro, one of the greatest jockeys in horse race history, rode 250 losers before he won his first race. Ultimately, Arcaro won 4,779 races 
  • including five Derby winners, six in the Preakness, and six in the Belmont Stakes, on such famous horses as Whirlaway, Citation, and Kelso.
  • Edgar Allan Poe introduced mystery fiction's first fictional detective, Auguste C. Dupin, in his 1841 story, "The Murders in the Rue Morgue."
  • Eggplant is a member of the thistle family.
  • Eggs sink in water when they are fresh and float when expired.
  • Eight positions are mentioned in Abbott and Costello's "Who's on First?" routine. Only right field was left out.
  • Einstein couldn't speak fluently when he was nine. His parents thought he might be retarded.
  • El Capitan in Yosemite National Park is the largest visible granite rock in the world. It's twice the size of the Rock of Gibraltar.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt wrote David O. Selznick to ask that her maid, Lizzy McDuffy, be considered for the role of Mammy in Gone With the Wind.
  • Electrical stimulation of certain areas of the brain has been proven to revive long-lost memories.
  • Elephant tusks grow throughout an elephant's life and can weigh more than 200 pounds. Among Asian elephants, only the males have tusks. Both 
  • sexes of African elephants have tusks.
  • Elephants are capable of swimming 20 miles in one day.
  • Elephants are the only Mammals that can't jump.
  • Elephants can communicate using sounds that are below the human hearing range: between 14 and 35 hertz.
  • Elephants can't jump.
  • Elephants only sleep for two hours each day.
  • Elephants produce 50 pounds of manure every day.
  • Elephants, horses, and camels all descended from animals that originally came from North America, despite their present homes in Eurasia.
  • Elizabeth the First suffered from anthophobia (a fear of roses).
  • Elton John and The Beach Boys are tied for the record for the longest gap between number one hit singles in the United States. Both waited 21 
  • years, 11 months.
  • Elvis had a twin brother named Aaron, who died at birth, which is why Elvis' middle name was spelled Aron: in honor of his brother. It is also 
  • misspelled on his tomb stone.
  • Elvis had a twin brother named Garon, who died at birth, which is why Elvis middle name was spelled Aron, in honor of his brother.
  • Elvis Presley made his first appearance on national television in 1956. He sang Blue Suede Shoes and Heartbreak Hotel on "The Dorsey Brothers 
  • Show."
  • Elwood Edwards did the voice for the AOL sound files (i.e. "You've got Mail!"). He is heard about 27 million times a day. The recordings were done 
  • before Quantum changed its name to AOL and the program was known as "Q-Link."
  • E-mails started in 1971. Ray Tomlinson is it's DADDY!! and the first e-mail was sent WRITTEN ENTIRELY IN UPPER CASE.
  • Emus and kangaroos cannot walk backwards, and are on the Australian coat of arms for that reason.
  • Emus cannot walk backwards.
  • Emus have double plumed feathers and they lay emerald/forest green eggs.
  • Engelbert Humperdinck's real name is Gerry Dorsey. He didn't make that name up, though. It originally belonged to the 1800s German musician who 
  • wrote the opera Hansel and Gretel.
  • England and the American colonies adopted the Gregorian calendar on September 14th, 1752. 11 days disappeared.
  • England once had a Prime Minister who was only 24 years old. He was William Pitt, elected in 1783.
  • England's King Edward VII gave a large diamond tiara to Wallis Warfield Simpson as a wedding gift. Simpson was the woman for whom Edward VII 
  • abdicated the throne for.
  • England's Stonehenge is 1500 years older than Rome's Colosseum.
  • English traders introduced opium to China to create a market for the drug. They then traded silver for opium to help pay other Chinese traders for 
  • their tea.
  • Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page were all once the lead guitarist for the English band the Yardbirds in the 1960's.
  • Ernest Vincent Wright wrote a novel, "Gadsby", which contains over 50,000 words, not a single word contained the letter "E."
  • Europe has no deserts, it is the only continent without one.
  • Evard Ericksen sculpted "The Little Mermaid" statue which is located in Copenhagen harbor.
  • Even if you cut off a cockroach's head, it can live for several weeks.
  • Even though they broke up 25 years ago, the Beatles continue to sell more records each year than the Rolling Stones.
  • Even when all the molecules in a single breath of air have been dispersed evenly in the earth's atmosphere, there will still be one or two of the same 
  • ones taken into the lungs with every subsequent breath. Every time you breathe in, you inhale one or two of the same molecules that you inhaled 
  • with the first breath you took as a baby.
  • Ever wonder how Swiss cheese is made? As the cheese ferments, a bacterial action generates gas. As the gas is liberated, it bubbles through the 
  • cheese, leaving all those holes.
  • Everest is not the tallest mountain. Mauna Kea Mountain in the Hawaiian Island is 230m taller. It is 4201m above water and 4877 underwater! 
  • Everest is only 8848m.
  • Every 14 years, Saturn's rings become briefly invisible to astronomers on Earth. At that time, the plane of the rings is tipped to that of the Earth's 
  • orbit, and they are seen edge-on. Since the ring's are so thin, they can't be seen at that angle.
  • Every citizen of Kentucky is required by law to take a bath at least once a year.
  • Every day more money is printed for Monopoly than the US Treasury.
  • Every day, 7% of the US eats at McDonald's.
  • Every eleven years the magnetic poles of the sun switch. This cycle is called "Solarmax".
  • Every human spent about half an hour as a single cell.
  • Every man in Brainerd, Minnesota is required by law to grow a beard.
  • Every person has a unique eye and tongue print.
  • Every person, including identical twins, has a unique eye and tongue print along with their finger print.
  • Every queen named Jane has either been murdered, imprisoned, gone mad, died young, or been dethroned.
  • Every square inch of the human body has an average of 32 million bacteria on it.
  • Every Swiss citizen is required by law to have a bomb shelter or access to a bomb shelter.
  • Every ten minutes, another plant or animal life form becomes extinct.
  • Every time Beethoven sat down to write music, he poured ice water over his head.
  • Every time the moon's gravity causes a ten-foot tide at sea, all the continents on earth rise at least six inches.
  • Every time you lick a stamp, you're consuming 1/10 of a calorie.
  • Every US president has worn glasses (just not always in public).
  • Every year 4 people in the UK die putting their trousers on.
  • Every year 8,000 people injure themselves while using a tooth pick.
  • Every year, $1.5 billion is spent on pet food. This is four times the amount spent on baby food.
  • Every year, Mexico City sinks about 10 inches.
  • Every year, surgical tools are left in approximately 1,500 patients in the USA. Fatter patients are more prone to having a surgical tool left inside of 
  • them due to the additional amount of space in their bodies.
  • Everyday, more money is printed for Monopoly sets than for the U.S. Treasury.
  • Everyone in the Middle Ages believed -as Aristotle had -that the heart was the seat of intelligence.
  • Everyone is colorblind at birth
  • Everyone knows that the U.S. gold depository is in Fort Knox, Kentucky. But nobody seems to know that the U.S. silver depository is at West Point, 
  • New York.
  • Everyone thought Albert Einstein suffered from dyslexia, because he couldn't speak properly until he was 9 years old.
  • Except for 2 and 3, every prime number will eventually become divisible by 6 if you either add or subtract 1 from the number. For example, the 
  • number 17, plus 1, is divisible by 6. The number 19, minus 1, is also divisible by 6
  • Experiments have shown that, ants are capable of lifting 50 times their own weight and pulling loads 300 times their own weight.
  • False eyelashes were invented by film director D.W. Griffith while he was making the 1916 epic, "Intolerance." He wanted actress Seena Owen to 
  • have lashes that brushed her cheeks.
  • Faye Wong received a 7 digit fee for recording 'eyes on me' and it took her about 4 hours.
  • February 1865 is the only month in recorded history not to have a full moon.
  • Federal law forbids recycling used eyeglasses in the United States.
  • Felix Faure (French President; 1841-1899), Pope Leo VII (936-939), Pope John VII (955-964), Pope Leo VIII (963-965), Pope John XIII (965-72), 
  • Pope Paul II (1467-1471), Lord Palmerston (British Prime Minister, 1784-1865), Nelson Rockefeller (US Vice President, 1908-1979), and John Entwistle 
  • (The Who's bassist, 1944-2002) all died while having sex.
  • Felix the Cat is the first cartoon character to ever have been made into a balloon for a parade.
  • Female chickens, or hens, need about 24 to 26 hours to produce one egg. Thirty minutes later they start the process all over again. In addition to 
  • the half-hour rests, some hens rest every three to five days and others rest every 10 days.
  • Female lions do 90% of the hunting.
  • Female rabbits on the other hand, reabsorb their embryo for the proteins
  • Females have a wider peripheral vision than males.
  • Ferrets sleep around 20 hours a day.
  • Fin whales are the second largest animal ever to live on earth. They have been measured to over 80 feet long in Antarctic waters.
  • Finagle's Law was the one that went, "Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong." Not Murphy's Law.
  • Finely grinding coffee beans and boiling them in water is still known as "Turkish Coffee." It is still made this way today in Turkey and Greece or 
  • anywhere else Turkish Coffee is served.
  • Fingernails grow nearly 4 times faster than toenails
  • Fingerprints serve a function they provide traction for the fingers to grasp things.
  • Finnish folklore says that when Santa comes to Finland to deliver gifts, he leaves his sleigh behind and rides on a goat named Ukko instead. 
  • According to French tradition, Santa Claus has a brother named Bells Nichols, who visits homes on New Year's Eve after everyone is asleep, and if a 
  • plate is set out for him, he fills it with cookies and cakes.
  • First Instant Replay was used during Army Navy Football Game at Municipal Stadium Philadelphia on December 7, 1963, invented by Tony Verna (CBS 
  • Director.)
  • First novel ever written on a typewriter: Tom Sawyer.
  • Fish scales are an ingredient in lipstick.
  • Five Jell-O®™ flavors have flopped: celery, coffee, cola, apple and chocolate.
  • Five NFL teams have bird nicknames: Arizona Cardinals, Philadelphia Eagles, Atlanta Falcons, Baltimore Ravens and Seattle Seahawks.
  • Flamingos are able to fly at a speed of approximately 55 kilometers an hour. In one night they can travel about 600 km.
  • Flavored coffees are created after the roasting process by applying flavored oils specially created to use on coffee beans.
  • Fleas are essential to the health of armadillos and hedgehogs; they provide necessary stimulation of the skin. Deloused armadillos and hedgehogs will 
  • die.
  • Fleas have killed more people (due to Bubonic plague and such) than all wars throughout history combined.
  • Fleas jump the equivilant of one mile..in insect feet.
  • Flies jump backwards when they take off.
  • Flies taste with their feet.
  • Flirtation between the members of the opposite sex on the streets of Little Rock may result in a 30-day jail term.
  • Florence Nightingale Graham adopted the name Elizabeth Arden once her company became successful at the beginning of the 1900s.
  • Florida law forbids rats to leave the ships docked in Tampa Bay.
  • Flying from London to New York by Concord, due to the time zones crossed, you can arrive 2 hours before you leave.
  • Fog and a cloud are the same thing, only at different altitudes. Fog is simply a cloud lying on the earth, while clouds are fog floating in the sky.
  • Food is so scarce in the Arctic, that wolves don't waste any part of their meals. A wolf will eat every part of an arctic hare, including the skin, fur, 
  • and bones.
  • Food passes through the small intestine in just two hours, zipping along at 0.002 mph. Inside the large intestine, it takes about 14 hours, traveling at 
  • a more leisurely rate of 0.00007 mph
  • For 186 days you can not see the sun in the North Pole.
  • For a short distance, the bluefin tuna can swim 50 miles per hour.
  • For a typical lovemaking session, the man will thrust an average of 60 to 120 times.
  • For drinking, washing, etc., an average American uses 168 gallons of water per day. The average American residence uses 107,000 gallons per year.
  • For every 230 cars that are made, 1 will be stolen.
  • For every degree of longitude there is a time gap of four minutes.
  • For every memorial statue with a person on a horse, if the horse has both front legs in the air, the person died in battle; if the horse has one front 
  • leg in the air, the person died of battle wounds; if all four of the horse's legs are on the ground, the person died of natural causes.
  • For five years, Webster's dictionary contained a definition of the word dord, a word that has never actually existed.
  • For hundreds of years, the people of Poona, India, have disposed of their dead by carrying the corpses to the top of a tower and letting the vultures 
  • eat them.
  • For the "wrong handed" people...Over 2500 left handed people a year are killed from using products made for right handed people! That means DEATH 
  • to Lefties
  • For the 66% of American's who admit to reading in the bathroom, the preferred reading material is "Reader's Digest."
  • For two years, during the 1970s, Mattel marketed a doll called "Growing Up Skipper." Her breasts grew when her arm was turned.
  • Forks weren't widely used in the United States until the 1800s.
  • Former First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt ate three chocolate-covered garlic balls in the morning. Her doctor told her it would help improve her memory.
  • Former President Cleveland defeated incumbent Benjamin Harrison in 1892, becoming the first (and, to date, only) chief executive to win 
  • non-consecutive terms to the White House.
  • Forty percent of McDonald's profits comes from the sale of Happy Meals.
  • Forty-six percent of the world's water is in the Pacific Ocean; that's around 6 sextillion gallons of water. The Atlantic has 23.9 percent; the Indian, 
  • 20.3; the Arctic, 3.7 percent.
  • Forty-six US federal agencies have officers with the authority to carry firearms and arrest people.
  • Found in Egypt, this illustration is over 3,000 years old.
  • Four different people played the part of Darth Vader (body, face, voice, and breathing).
  • Fourteen years before the Titanic sank, novelist Morgan Robertson published a novel called "Futility". The story was about an ocean liner that struck 
  • an iceberg on an April night. The name of the ship in his novel was The Titan.
  • Fourteenth century physicians didn't know what caused the plague, but they knew it was contagious. As a result they wore an early kind of 
  • bioprotective suit which included a large beaked head piece. The beak of the head piece, which made them look like large birds, was filled with 
  • vinegar, sweet oils and other strong smelling compounds to counteract the stench of the dead and dying plague victims.
  • Francis Bacon died of hypothermia while trying to freeze a chicken by stuffing it with snow.
  • Francis Scott Key wrote the words to "The Star-Spangled Banner" on the back on an envelope. The music is from an old English drinking song called 
  • "To Anacreon in Heaven."
  • Frank Baum named "Oz" after a file cabinet in his office. One cabinet was labeled "A to N," and the second was labeled "O to Z."
  • Frank Baum, looked at his filing cabinet and saw A-N, and O-Z, hence "Oz."
  • Frankfort, Kentucky, makes it against the law to shoot off a policeman's tie.
  • Franklin Pierce is the only President to have said "I promise" instead of "I swear at his Inauguration. He did it for religious reasons.
  • Franz Ferdinand was killed.. remember that the guys death partly caused the WWI. Anyway, his death was almost unavoidable. After an attempted 
  • assasination using a bomb failed, (because the bomb hit the rear mud flap of the car Ferdinand was in and bounced away) authorities decided to 
  • change the route of Ferdinands tour... but failed to inform the driver of the car. And so, unfortunately, at one stage, the driver took a wrong turn 
  • and drove into an alley. While reversing out, Princip (killer) came and shot Ferdinand and his wife at a distance of 4-5 feet killing them. Ferdinand 
  • brought his wife to Serejavo to celebrate their anniversary.
  • Frederic Remington's sculpture The Bronco Buster has mistake in it: the cowboy is wearing his spurs upside down.
  • Frederic-August Bartholdi sculpted The Statue of Liberty.
  • Frederick the great had his coffee made with champagne and a bit of mustard.
  • French composer Erik Satie holds the record for shortest and longest composition in the world. His piano piece Vexations lasts for just under a 
  • minute. However, Satie states in the score that it should be played 840 times in succession a nonstop playing time of 14 hours.
  • French was the official language of England for over 600 years.
  • Fried chicken is the most popular meal ordered in sit-down restaurants in the US. The next in popularity are: roast beef, spaghetti, turkey, baked 
  • ham, and fried shrimp.
  • Fried cockroach with garlic is used as medicine for the common cold
  • From 13th June'1948 to 1st June'1958 a citizen of Los Angeles hiccoughed 160,000,000 times. People sent him 60,000 suggestions for cures.
  • From 1836 to 1896, the Red Flag Act in England required that any self-propelled vehicle be preceded by a man carrying a red flag by day and a red 
  • lantern by night. In effect, this limited the speed to four miles per hour and retarded the development of all self-propelled vehicles, including the 
  • automobile.
  • From 70 to 80 percent of all ripe olives are grown in California's approximately 35,000 acres. In the 1700s, Franciscan monks brought olives to Mexico 
  • and then into California by way of the missions. The first cuttings were planted in 1769 at the San Diego Mission. Commercial cultivation of California 
  • olives began in the late 1800s. Today, anywhere from 80,000 to 160,000 tons of olives are produced in California each year.
  • From the 1500's to the 1700's, tobacco was prescribed by doctors to treat a variety of ailments including headaches, toothaches, arthritis and bad 
  • breath.
  • From the Middle Ages up until the end of the 19th century, barbers performed a number of medical duties including bloodletting, wound treatment, 
  • dentistry, minor operations and bone-setting. The barber's striped red pole originated in the Middle Ages, when it was a staff the patient would grip 
  • while the barber bled the patient.
  • Fuzzy Zoeller defeated Tom Watson and Ed Sneed in the first sudden-death playoff at The Masters in 1979.
  • G.I. Joe was introduced at the annual American International Toy Fair in New York on Feb. 9, 1964.
  • Gabriel, Michael, and Lucifer are the only angels named in the Bible.
  • Gabriel, Michael, and Lucifer are the three angels mentioned by name in the Bible.
  • Gaetano Albert "Guy" Lombardo did the first New Year's Eve broadcast of "Auld Lang Syne," from the Roosevelt Grill in New York City in 1929/1930.
  • Galileo became totally blind shortly before his death.
  • Gargling in public is against the law in Louisiana.
  • Gatorade was named for the University of Florida Gators where it was first developed.
  • General Robert E. Lee was not a slaveholder and never believed in slavery. He never believed in secession from the United States and strongly 
  • condemned it. He decided to lead the armies of the South because he wanted nothing to happen to his beloved Virginia.
  • General Stonewall Jackson has two separate burial sites one for his amputated left arm (Fredericksburg, VA) and one for the rest of his body 
  • (Lexington, VA). Jackson's left arm was shattered during the Battle of Chancellorsville by friendly fire and was amputated the next day. He died a 
  • week later. (8-1-02)
  • George Crum invented potato chips in 1853 at the Moon Lake Lodge in Saratoga Springs, New York. Crum was part Indian, part black, a former guide 
  • in the Adirondacks.
  • George Hancock invented a new game on November 30, 1887. It was played like baseball, except a broomstick was used for a bat and a boxing glove 
  • was the ball. Since the game was played indoors, it was originally called "indoor." Walter Hakanson later renamed it "softball."
  • George Harrison, with "My Sweet Lord," was the first Beatle to have a Number 1 hit single following the group's breakup.
  • George Orwell, author of Animal Farm and 1984, wrote under a pen name. His real name was Eric Blair.
  • George Washington had to borrow money to go to his own inauguration.
  • George Washington named Washington D.C. "Federal City." It was changed to "Washington D.C." after his death.
  • George Washington who commanded the Continental Army as a four-star general was promoted posthumously to the position of six-star "General of 
  • the Armies of Congress" by an order of Jimmy Carter, who felt America's first President should also be America's highest military official.
  • George Washington's favorite horse was named Lexington. Napoleon's favorite was Marengo. U.S. Grant had three favorite horses: Egypt, Cincinnati, 
  • and Jeff Davis.
  • George Washington's teeth were actually: carved from animal tusks, some of them were also somebody else's teeth, and some of them were from 
  • animals like deer and cales.
  • Gerald Ford was the only President to have two women attempt to assassinate him. Both attempts were in California in September of 1975. The first 
  • attempt was September 6, 1975, by Lynette Fromme who thought she could impress Charles Manson by killing the President. The next attempt was 
  • by Sara Jane Moore on September 22, 1975. Her motive was simply that she was bored. John Tyler, joined the Confederacy twenty years later and 
  • became the only President named a sworn enemy of the United States.
  • Gerald Ford, George Bush, Tommy Lasorda, Ted Koppel, John F. Kennedy Jr. and Bill Clinton are all left handed.
  • German chemist Hennig Brand discovered phosphorus while he was examining urine for a way to turn baser metals into gold.
  • German chocolate cake did not originate in Germany. In 1852, Sam German developed a sweet baking bar for Baker's Chocolate Co. The product was 
  • named in honor of him -Baker's German's Sweet Chocolate.
  • German Shepherds bite humans more than any other breed of dog.
  • Ghandi had the most extras of any movie ever made with about 300,000 people. The German movie Kolberg is second with 187,000.
  • Ghengis Kahn's first conquered land was an act of retaliation. Kahn sent a group of traders on a peaceful mission to Transoxiana. The governor there 
  • beheaded their leader and sent the others back to Kahn with their beards cut off. So Kahn attacked them and continued to onward until most of Asia 
  • and Europe were his.
  • Ghosts appear in 4 Shakespearian plays; Julius Caesar, Richard III, Hamlet and Macbeth.
  • Gilligan of Gilligan's Island had a first name that was only used once, on the never-aired pilot show. His first name was Willy.
  • Ginger has been clinically demonstrated to work twice as well as Dramamine for fighting motion sickness, with no side effects.
  • Giraffes and humans have the same amount of vertebrae in their necks.
  • Giraffes can last longer without water than a camel
  • Giraffes have no vocal chords.
  • Giraffes have the same number of vertebrae in their necks as humans. Their lips are prehensile, their tongues are 21 inches long, and they cannot 
  • cough.
  • Giraffe's tongues are 22 inches long and black with pink dots.
  • Girls tend to sleep more soundly than boys.
  • Glenn Miller was the first performer to earn a gold record. He got it for the Chattanooga Choo Choo on February 10, 1942.
  • Goats do not eat tin cans, as lampooned in cartoons. They nibble at the cans because they're after the glue on the labels.
  • Goats' eyes have rectangular pupils.
  • God is not mentioned once in the book of Esther.
  • Goethe couldn't stand the sound of barking dogs and could only write if he had an apple rotting in the drawer of his desk.
  • Goldfish have a memory span of 3 seconds!
  • Goldfish have the memory span of about 3-5 seconds, thats why you can leave them in a small jar and they wont get bored and you can also over 
  • feed them till they kaput.
  • Goldfish lose their color if they are kept in dim light or are placed in a body of running water, such as a stream.
  • Gottfried Daimler of Stuttgart, Germany, is generally regarded as the father of the automobile because he was the first to come up with a workable 
  • gasoline engine.
  • Goulash, a beef soup, originated in Hungary in the 9th century AD.
  • Grand Rapids, Michigan was the first city in the US to put fluoride in their water.
  • Grapes explode when cooked in the microwave.
  • Grapes explode when you put them in the microwave.
  • Grasping your ears is a sign of repentance or sincerity in India.
  • Grasshoppers have white blood.
  • Great Britain was the first country to issue stamps in 1840.
  • Greece and Australia are the only countries to participate in all of the modern Olympics.
  • Greece's anthem has 158 verses.
  • Greek has over 4 words for love. English has only one. Get my drift?
  • Greenland has more ice on it than Iceland does. In fact, Iceland has more grass and trees than Greenland does.
  • Greyhounds are not hyper and do not need constant exercise; they are quite happy occupying space on a couch.
  • Greyhounds can reach their top speed of forty-five miles per hour in only three strides.
  • Greyhounds have the best eyesight of any breed of dog.
  • Grey's Anatomy (the medical book most every doctor, nurse, biologist, etc. is trained on in most every university) was compiled using detailed 
  • pictures of dead Jews that Hitler and the 3rd Reich experimented on, most of which where dissected while still alive. Although the medical community 
  • knows this fact, they continue using the book due to its detail and real-life pictures.
  • Grover Cleveland's real first name is Stephen, Grover is his middle name.
  • Guinness Stout served in England is brewed in Ireland, and Guinness Stout served in Ireland is brewed in England.
  • Gunsmoke debuted on CBS-TV in 1955, and went on to become the longest-running (20 years) series on television.
  • Gustave Eiffel, the builder of the Eiffel Tower, also built a dam in Russia, a church in the Philippines, locks for the first attempt at the Panama Canal, 
  • and designed the right arm and full steel structure supporting the Statue of Liberty.
  • Gutzon Borglum, the sculptor of the four Presidents on Mount Rushmore, died a few months before the project was completed. It took him 14 years.
  • Gweneth Paltrow's nickname for Steven Speilberg is "Uncle Morty."
  • Hacky Sack was invented by a football player in the mid 1970's who used it to stregthen tendons he had torn in his knee.
  • Haggis, the national dish of Scotland: take the heart, liver, lungs, and small intestine of a calf or sheep, boil them in the stomach of the animal, 
  • season with salt, pepper and onions, add suet and oatmeal. Enjoy!
  • Hal in 2001: Space Oddessy got his name from the Producers of the film. HAL are letters before IBM (H comes before I, A comes before B, and L 
  • comes before M)
  • Half of all Americans live within 50 miles of their birthplace.
  • Half of all bank robberies take place on a Friday.
  • Half of all crimes are committed by people under the age of 18. 80% of burglaries are committed by people aged 13-21.
  • Half of the entire species of Chameleons occur only in Madagascar, the rest mostly in Southern Africa.
  • Halfway, Oregon temporarily changed its name to half.com as a publicity stunt for the web site of the same name.
  • Hamlet is the most demanding of Shakespeare's roles with 1,422 lines or roughly 36% of the total number of spoken lines in the play. Hamlet's role is 
  • made up of 11,610 words. The character Falstaff has the most lines of any character in all of Shakespeare's plays combined with 1,614 spoken lines 
  • in three different plays: Henry IV, Part I; Henry IV, Part II; and The Merry Wives of Windsor.
  • Hamsters blink one eye at a time.
  • Hamsters love to eat crickets.
  • Hans Christian Andersen, Cher, Tom Cruise, Albert Einstein, Whoopie Goldberg, Greg Louganis, Lee Harvey Oswald, and Gen. George S. Patton, are 
  • (were) all dyslexics.
  • Hans Christian Anderson, creater of fairy tales, was word-blind. He never learned to spell correctly, and his publishers always had errors
  • Hard Bean means the coffee was grown at an altitude above 5000 feet.
  • Harley Proctor found the name "Ivory" for his soap in the Bible. He was in church reading the line, "All thy garments smell of myrrh, and aloes, and 
  • cassia, out of the ivory palaces, whereby they have made thee glad." The original name of the soap was P&G White Soap.
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe's "Uncle Tom's Cabin" was published March 20, 1852. It was the first American novel to sell one million copies.
  • Harrison Ford is the only actor whose ten highest grossing movies have each earned at least $200 million.
  • Hartford, Connecticut, has made it illegal to educate dogs.
  • Harthahorne City Ordinance, Section 363, states that it shall be unlawful to put any hypnotized person in a display window.
  • Harvard University's original name was Cambridge. It only changed when John Harvard donated 400 books to the school.
  • have to be at least 58.5 inches to be an astronaut. (Click here)
  • Have you ever questioned your sanity? You have good reason to. Did you know that one out of every four people has some sort of pychological 
  • 'problem'?
  • Hawaii is the only state of the United States in which coffee is commercially grown. Hawaii features an annual Kona Festival, coffee picking contest. 
  • Each year the winner becomes a state celebrity. In Hawaii coffee is harvested between November and April.
  • Hawaii is the only US state that grows cacao beans to produce chocolate.
  • Hawaii is the only US state that grows coffee.
  • Hawaii officially became apart of the US on June 14, 1900.
  • Head lice actually prefer to live on clean heads, not dirty ones.
  • Heart-attacks are more common among men because they cry less frequently than women.
  • Heat is better retained in moist air than in dry air,which is why tropical nights are warm and desert nights are cold.
  • Heavyweight tire manufacturer Goodyear is in no way affiliated with Charles Goodyear, the inventor of vulcanized rubber. They merely admired his 
  • inventiveness and his process that was so easy to duplicate that competitors simply stole it.
  • Hedenophobic means fear of pleasure.
  • Hedgehogs have the most similar fingerprints to humans
  • Henri Matisse's Le Bateau hung in New York's Museum of Modern Art for 47 days in 1961 before someone noticed it was upside down.
  • Hens can distinguish between all the colors of the rainbow.
  • Here are the odds of rolling various combinations with two dice in a game of Craps:
  • Heroin is processed from morphine, a naturally occurring substance extracted from the seedpod of the Asian poppy plant. Heroin usually appears as a 
  • white or brown powder. Street names for heroin include "smack," "H," "skag," and "junk." Other names may refer to types of heroin produced in a 
  • specific geographical area, such as "Mexican black tar."
  • Hershey's Kisses are called that because the machine that makes them looks like it's kissing the conveyor belt.
  • Hershey's Kisses®™ are called that because the machine that makes them looks like it's kissing the conveyor belt.
  • Hills Brothers Ground Vacuum Packed Coffee was first introduced in 1900.
  • Hippopotamus means river horse.
  • Hippopotamuses actually sweat blood. Their skin contains a great amount of an oily substance that exudes from the pores, and when the beast 
  • perspires a little blood gets mixed in.
  • Hippopotamuses break wind through their mouths.
  • Hippopotamuses do 80% of their vocalizations underwater.
  • Hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia is the fear of long words
  • Hippos have killed more than 400 people in Africa more than any other wild animal.
  • Hippos kill more people in Africa when compared to crocodiles.
  • Hitler and Napoleon both had only one testicle.
  • Holland has the densest population per square mile of any nation in the world.
  • Holyoke, Massachusetts, makes it unlawful to water your lawn when it is raining.
  • Homosexuality remained on the American Psychiatric Association's list of mental illnesses until 1973.
  • Hondas and Toyotas are the most frequently stolen passenger cars because they have parts that can be readily exchanged between model years 
  • without a problem.
  • Honey is the only food that doesn't spoil.
  • Honeybees have a type of hair on their eyes
  • Honeybees have hair on their eyes.
  • Hong Kong has the world's largest double-decker tram fleet in the world.
  • Honorificabilitudinitatibus is the longest word consisting entirely of alternating vowels and consonants.
  • Hoover, Roosevelt, Truman and Nixon's Secretaries of State have won Noble Peace Prizes.
  • Horses are forbidden to eat fire hydrants in Marshalltown, Iowa.
  • Horses can sleep while standing upright.
  • Horses can't vomit.
  • Hostess Twinkies were invented in 1931 by James Dewar, manager of Continental Bakeries' Chicago factory. He envisioned the product as a way of 
  • using the company's thousands of shortcake pans which were otherwise employed only during the strawberry season. Originally called Little 
  • Shortcake Fingers, they were renamed Twinkie Fingers, and finally "Twinkies."
  • Hot water weighs less than cold water for a given volume.
  • Houseflies hum in the key of F.
  • Housefly's regurgitate food and eat it again every time they eat
  • Houston's Bob Watson scored Major League Baseball's 1,000,000th run on May 4, 1975.
  • How many American presidents are not buried in the United States? Six. Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, George Bush, Bill Clinton and 
  • George W. Bush.
  • Howard Taft was the first president to throw out the first pitch at a MLB game.
  • Howdy Doody had 48 freckles.
  • Howler monkeys are the noisiest land animals. Their calls can be heard over 2 miles away.
  • Hugh "Ward Cleaver" Beaumont was an ordained minister.
  • Hugh Jackman went through approximately 700 claws as the part of Wolverine in X-Men.
  • Human babies are born 2 months prematurely for our size and lifespan, to accomodate for the fact that we have large brains during birth. (Got this 
  • off my lecture).
  • Human beings can't smell or taste a substance that is not soluble. On a dry tongue, sugar has no taste. In a dry nose, the smell of a flower would 
  • not be noticed. Anything to be smelled must float in the air.
  • Human tapeworms can grow up to 22.9m.
  • Human teeth are almost as hard as rocks.
  • Human thigh bones are stronger than concrete. Wow... utterly amazing huh
  • Human thighbones are as strong as concrete.
  • Humans are the only animals that can blush.
  • Humans are the only animals that copulate face to face.
  • Humans are the only animals that use a smile as an emotional response.
  • Humans are the only primates that don't have pigment in the palms of their hands.
  • Humans have 46 chromosomes, peas have 14 and crayfish have 200.
  • Humans shed about 600,000 particles of skin every hour about 1.5 pounds a year. By 70 years of age, an average person will have lost 105 pounds 
  • of skin.
  • Humans shed and re-grow outer skin cells about every 27 days almost 1,000 new skins in a lifetime.
  • Humans use a total of 72 different muscles in speech.
  • Humming birds are the only birds that can fly backwards
  • Hummingbirds are the smallest birds so tiny that one of their enemies is an insect, the praying mantis.
  • Hummingbirds can't walk.
  • Humpback whales are the only ones that use bubbles to help capture their prey. The bubbles trap fish in a spot for feeding whales.
  • Humphrey O'Sullivan invented the rubber heel because he was tired of pounding the pavements of Boston looking for a job.
  • Hungarian brothers George and L"szlo Biro invented the ball point pen in 1938.
  • Hydroponics is the technique by which plants are grown in water without soil.
  • Hydroxyzine (a prescription drug) is the longest containing "x-y-z" in exact order. Next in line line is xyzzors, a scientific name for a nematode worm 
  • in biology.
  • Hyenas can comsume prey carrying anthrax without contracting the disease itself
  • Hypnotism is banned by public schools in San Diego.
  • IBM introduced their first personal computer in 1981.
  • IBM's motto is "Think". Apple later made their motto "Think different".
  • Iced coffee in a can has been popular in Japan since 1945.
  • Idaho state law makes it illegal for a man to give his sweetheart a box of candy weighing less than fifty pounds.
  • If a child burps during a church service in Omaha, Nebraska his or her parents may be arrested.
  • If a crocodile loses his teeth it will always grow new ones to replace them.
  • If a person has two thirds of their liver removed through trauma or surgery, it will grow back to the original size in four weeks time
  • If a person were to ask what is the most northern point in the United States, the most Southern point in the United States, and so on, 3 of the 4 
  • compass directions are located in alaska. North East and West
  • If a small amount of liquor were placed on a scorpion, it would instantly go mad and sting itself to death.
  • If a statue in the park of a person on a horse has both front legs in the air, the person died in battle; if the horse has one front leg in the air, the 
  • person died as a result of wounds received in battle; if the horse has all four legs on the ground, the person died of natural causes.
  • If a substance is burned and all of the results of its burning (smoke, ash, soot and gas) are captured and weighed, they will be a little heavier than 
  • the original substance because they have been combined with oxygen.
  • If all numbers are arranged in alphabetical order, "eight" would be the first number. "Zero" would be the last number.
  • If all the gold in the ocean were mined, every person on Earth would get about 20 kgs of gold each.
  • If any of the heads on Mt. Rushmore had a body, it would be nearly 500 feet tall.
  • If Barbie were life-size her measurements would be 39-23-33.She would stand seven feet two inches tall and have a neck twice the length of a 
  • normal humans neck.
  • If hot water is suddenly poured into a glass that glass is more apt to break if it is thick than if it is thin. This is why test tubes are made of thin 
  • glass.
  • If it were removed from the body, the small intestine would stretch to a length of 22 feet.
  • If Monaco's ruling house of Grimaldi should ever be without an heir (male or female), the country will cease to be a sovereign state.
  • If one pound of spaghetti was layed out in one noodle it would be 300 feet long.
  • If someone were to capture and bottle a comet's 10,000-mile vapor trail, the amount of vapor actually present in the bottle would take up less than 
  • one cubic inch of space.
  • If Texas were a country it's GNP would be fifth largest of any country on earth.
  • If the average man never trimmed his beard, it would grow to nearly 30 feet long in his lifetime.
  • If the average person had started counting the moment they were born and continued counting, without stopping, until they turned 65 years old, 
  • they still would not have counted to a billion.
  • If the coils of a French horn were straightened out, the instrument would be 22 feet long.
  • If the earth were to become totally flat and the oceans distributed themselves evenly over the planet's surface, the water would be approximately 
  • two miles deep at every point.
  • If the entire population of the world were moved to Texas, it would still be less densely populated than New York City.
  • If the goverment passed a law that all the outdoor lighting in the united states had to be provided by low pressure sodium light bulbs, then they 
  • would save enough money to pay for evey college students tuition.
  • If the gross for Gone With the Wind were to be adjusted to allow for inflation in the period since its release, it would be regarded as the most 
  • successful film ever.
  • If the information contained in the DNA could be written down, it would fill a 1000 volume encyclopedia
  • If the liver ever stops working a person will die within 8 to 24 hours.
  • If the population of China walked past you in single file, the line would never end because of the rate of reproduction.
  • If the sun stopped shining suddenly, it would take eight minutes for people on earth to be aware of the fact.
  • If the U.S. government has no knowledge of aliens, then why does Title 14, Section 1211 of the Code of Federal Regulations, implemented on July 
  • 16, 1969, make it illegal for U.S. citizens to have any contact with extraterrestrials or their vehicles?
  • If you add up the numbers 1-100 consecutively (1+2+3+4+5 etc) the total is 5050.
  • If you are having problems remembering the planets in their correct order, just remember this sentance "My very educated mother justed served us 
  • nine pickles," Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupitor, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto.
  • If you are hedenophobic, you have a fear of pleasure.
  • If you are locked in a completely sealed room, you will die of carbon dioxide poisoning first before you will die of oxygen deprivation.
  • If you chew a cabbage/lettuce leaf properly, you'll lose more energy than you'll gain from actually eating it.
  • If you could count the number of times a cricket chirps in one minute, divide by 2, add 9 and divide by 2 again, you would have the correct 
  • temperature in celcius degrees
  • If you cut off the head of a cockroach, it can still survive but will eventually die, but only because it cannot eat without its head.
  • If you fart consistently for 6 years and 9 months, enough gas is produced to create the energy of an atomic bomb.
  • If you feed a seagull Alka-Seltzer, its stomach will explode.
  • If you fold a piece of A4 paper in half 44 times it will reach the moon
  • If you get the recomended 8 hours of sleep each night you will sleep over 2,900 hours each year.
  • If you go blind in one eye, you only lose about one fifth of your vision, but all your sense of depth.
  • If you go blind in one eye, you'll only lose about one-fifth of your vision (but all your depth perception.)
  • If you had $10 billion in $1 bills and spent one every second, it would take 317 years to spend them all.
  • If you had 15 cubes numbered 1 to 15 and you tried to line them up in every possible sequence, and if you made a change every minute, it would 
  • take you 2,487,996 years to do it.
  • If you had fifteen books on a shelf and you arrange them in every possible combination, and if you made one change every minute, it would take you 
  • 2,487,996 years to do them all.
  • If you have three quarters, four dimes, and four pennies, you have $1.19. You also have the largest amount of money in U.S. coins without being 
  • able to make change for a dollar
  • If you head directly south from Detroit, the first forign country you will enter is Canada
  • If you head directly south from the west coast of Florida, you will actually pass South America on the west side of the continent.
  • If you leave a goldfish in a dark room for years, it will turn white.
  • If you like your espresso coffee sweet, you should use granulated sugar, which dissolves more quickly, rather than sugar cubes; white sugar rather 
  • than brown sugar or candy; and real sugar rather than sweeteners which alter the taste of the coffee.
  • If you lock your knee while standing long enough, you will pass out.
  • If you need to remember pi, just count the letters in each word of the sentence: "May I have a large container of coffee?" If you get the coffee and 
  • are polite say: "Thank you," get two more decimal places. (3.141592653...). Here is another sentance: How I wish I could calculate Pi. (3.141592)
  • If you pet a cat 70 million times, you will have developed enough static electricity to light a 60-watt light bulb for one minute.
  • If you pile up the cans of Yeo's products, you would be able to reach the moon.
  • If you plant an apple seed, it is almost guaranteed to grow a tree of a different type of apple.
  • If you put a drop of liquor on a scorpion, it will instantly go mad and sting itself to death.
  • If you put a piece of scotch tape on an inflated balloon, then stick it with a small pin or needle, it won't pop.
  • If you put a raisin in a champagne bottle, it will rise and fall continuously.
  • If you put a raisin in a glass of champagne, it will keep floating to the top and sinking to the bottom.
  • If you rubbed garlic on the sole of your feet, it would be absorbed and eventually show up on your breath
  • If you sneeze too hard, you can fracture a rib. If you try to suppress a sneeze, you can rupture a blood vessel in your head or neck and die. If you 
  • keep your eyes open by force, they can pop out. (DON'T TRY IT, DUMBASS)
  • If you sneeze too hard, you can fracture a rib. If you try to suppress a sneeze, you can rupture a blood vessel in your head or neck and die
  • If you strech your arms straight out as far as you can, thats about how tall you are. Try it.
  • If you take any number between 1 & 9 and multipy them by 9 the sum of the two numbers will always be 9 (ex: 7 X 9 = 63 ; 6 + 3 = 9)
  • If you take any number, double it, add 10, divide by 2, and subtract your original number, the answer will always be 5.
  • If you toss a penny 10,000 times, it will not be heads 5,000 times, but more like 4,950. The heads picture weighs more, so it ends up on the bottom 
  • more often.
  • If you travel across the former Soviet Union you will cross seven time zones.
  • If you traveled the speed of light, it would only take you 0.0000294 seconds to climb Mt. Everest.
  • If you wanted to count from one to one trillion and you started right now, counting twenty-four hours a day, it would take you about 31,688 years.
  • If you wear headphones for one hour, it increases bacteria in your ear 700 times.
  • If you were at 0° latitude and 0° longtitude, you would be standing in the Atlantic Ocean
  • If you were to go on vacation for eleven days, you'd have less than one million seconds to enjoy it.
  • If you yelled for 8 years 7 months and 6 days, you would have produced enough sound energy to heat one cup of coffee.
  • If you fart consistently for 6 years and 9 months, enough gas is produced to create the energy of an atomic bomb.
  • If you yelled for 8 years, 7 months and 6 days, you will have produced enough sound energy to heat one cup of coffee. cool eh?
  • If you yelled for 8 years, 7 months and 6 days, you would have produced enough sound energy to heat one cup of coffee. (unsure)
  • If your like Jeanne Calment and live over 100, you are considered a Centurian.
  • If your shoes squeak, it simply means that two layers of leather in the sole are rubbing together. Driving a tack through the sole will often remove 
  • the squeak.
  • Imperia, Italy is the home of the Agnesi Historical Museum of Spaghetti.
  • Impotence is grounds for divorce in 24 states in the United States.
  • In "Silence of the Lambs", Hannibal Lector (Anthony Hopkins) does not blink in any scene.
  • In 10 minutes, a hurricane releases more energy than all the world's nuclear weapons combined.
  • In 1386, a pig was executed by public hanging for the murder of a child
  • In 1516, Friar Tomas sailed to the Caribbean bringing banana roots with him; and planted bananas in the rich, fertile soil of the tropics, thus 
  • beginning the banana's future in American life.
  • In 1638, Sweden founded a colony in the New World in the Delaware River Valley. It was called New Sweden.
  • In 1649, Massachusetts's Puritan government ruled the following: "Any childe over 16 who shall CURSE or SMITE their natural FATHER or MOTHER, or 
  • act in a STUBBORNE or REBELLIOUS manner shall be put to death."
  • In 1659 the state of Massachusetts outlawed Christmas.
  • In 1659, the General Court of Massachusetts ordered that anybody caught feasting or laying off from work, or in any other way goofing off on any 
  • other day other than Christmas, would be fined five shillings for each such offense.
  • In 1670, Dorothy Jones of Boston was granted a license to sell coffee, and so became the first American coffee trader.
  • In 1727, as a result of seedlings smuggled from Paris, coffee plants first were cultivated in Brazil. Brazil is presently by far the world's largest 
  • producer of coffee.
  • In 1771 the kingdom of Poland was larger in are than any other European country except Russia and had a bigger population than any other European 
  • country except France.
  • In 1789, Morocco became the first country to recognize the United States.
  • In 1810 US population was 7,239,881. Black population at 1,377,808 was 19%. In 1969 US population reached 200 million.
  • In 1831, Captain William Driver, a shipmaster from Salem, Massachusetts, left on one of his many world voyages. Friends presented him with a flag of 
  • 24 stars. As the banner opened to the ocean breeze, he exclaimed, "Old Glory." He kept his flag for many years, protecting it during the Civil War, 
  • until it was flown over the Tennessee capital. His "Old Glory" became a nickname for all American flags.
  • In 1832 Abraham Lincoln ran for the Illinois legislature, and lost.
  • In 1836 the U.S. government had so much extra money that it repaid all its debts, and still had money left over.
  • In 1845, President Andrew Jackson's pet parrot was removed from his funeral for swearing.
  • In 1850, Michigan's state constitution included the following line: "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, unless for the punishment of crime, shall 
  • ever be tolerated in this state." This inadvertently legalized slavery as an appropriate punishment for crime. It wasn't until 1963 that the grammar 
  • was fixed to outlaw slavery. The change required shifting the comma following "servitude" to the position after "slavery."
  • In 1853, Illinois passed a law that required any black entering the state and staying more than ten days to pay a fine of $50. If he could not pay, 
  • the person could be sold into slavery for a period commensurate with the fine.
  • In 1860, 'Godey's Lady's Book' advised US women to cook tomatoes for at least 3 hours.
  • In 1863, Paul Hubert of Bordeaux, France, was sentenced to life in jail for murder. After 21 years, it was discovered that he was convicted of 
  • murdering himself.
  • In 1865 opium was grown in the state of Virginia and a product was distilled from it that yielded 4 percent morphine. In 1867 it was grown in 
  • Tennessee: six years later it was cultivated in Kentucky. During these years opium, marijuana and cocaine could be purchased legally over the 
  • counter from any druggist.
  • In 1865, several veterans of the Confederate Army formed a private social club in Pulaski, Tennessee, called the Ku Klux Klan.
  • In 1879 during the term of Rutherford B. Hayes the first telephone was installed in the White House.
  • In 1886, Grover Cleveland became the only president to be married in the White House.
  • In 1889, the 1st coin-operated telephone, patented by Hartford, Connecticut inventor William Gray, was installed in the Hartford Bank.
  • In 1892, Italy raised the minimum age for marriage for girls to 12.
  • In 1894 there were only 4 automobiles in the US.
  • In 1899, a pharmacist named George Bunting blended his own cold cream, which, in addition to removing makeup and relieving sunburn, gained 
  • popularity for its ability to cure eczema. The product's claim of "No Eczema" led to its name, Noxzema.
  • In 1900 the average age at death in the US was 47.
  • In 1900, coffee was often delivered door-to-door in the United States, by horse-pulled wagons.
  • In 1900, Queen Victoria sent her New Year's greetings to the British troops stationed in South Africa during the Boer War in the form of a specially 
  • molded chocolate bar.
  • In 1901, Theodore Roosevelt became the only U.S. President in history to deliver his inaugural address without using the word "I". For the record, 
  • Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt and Dwight Eisenhower said "I" only once during their speeches.
  • In 1905, 18 men died from injuries sustained on the football field. President Theodore Roosevelt stepped in and instituted safety measures to make 
  • the game safer.
  • In 1908, figure skating became the first winter sport to be included in the Olympics.
  • In 1915, Winston Churchill fought in the front line trenches before he became the Minister of Munitions.
  • In 1920, 57% of Hollywood movies billed the female star above the leading man. In 1990, only 18% had the leading lady given top billing.
  • In 1920, Eugene Debs, a Socialist, received 920,000 votes for president of the United States even though he ran his entire campaign from prison.
  • In 1924, Pope Urban VIII threatened to excommunicate snuff users.
  • In 1925, the 1st motel -the "Motel Inn" -opened in San Luis Obispo, California.
  • In 1926, when a Los Angeles restaurant owner with the all-American name of Bob Cobb was looking for a way to use up leftovers, he threw together 
  • some avocado, celery, tomato, chives, watercress, hard-boiled eggs, chicken, bacon, and Roquefort cheese, and named it after himself: Cobb salad.
  • In 1930, the heaviest a female flight attendant could be was 115 pounds. They also had to be unmarried nurses.
  • In 1931, Charleston, SC was the first city in the United States to pass legislation establishing a historical district. The city has more than 1,000 
  • buildings that predate the Civil War.
  • In 1932 James Markham obtained the 1st patent issued for a tree. The patent was for a peach tree.
  • In 1936, England became the first country in the world to provide regular public broadcasting on television.
  • In 1938 Joe Shuster and Jerry Siegel sold all rights to the comic-strip character Superman to their publishers for $130.
  • In 1938, Hewlett-Packard became the first corporation to move to Silicon Valley.
  • In 1943, Navy officer Grace Hopper had no choice but to fix a computer glitch manually. The source of the problem? A moth. Hence the term 
  • "computer bug."
  • In 1945 a computer at Harvard malfunctioned and Grace Hopper, who was working on the computer, investigated, found a moth in one of the circuits 
  • and removed it. Ever since, when something goes wrong with a computer, it is said to have a bug in it.
  • In 1947, heavy snow blanketed the Northeast, burying New York City under 25.8 inches of snow in 16 hours; the severe weather was blamed for 
  • some 80 deaths.
  • In 1947, Toys for Tots started making the holidays a little happier for children by organizing its first Christmas toy drive for needy youngsters.
  • In 1950, UNIVAC became the first computer to tabulate the United States census.
  • In 1952, Mr. Potato Head became the first toy to be advertised on television in the U.S.
  • In 1957, the Shipping port Atomic Power Station in Pennsylvania, the first nuclear facility to generate electricity in the United States, went on line. 
  • (It was taken out of service in 1982.)
  • In 1959, the Soviet space probe "Luna Two" became the first manmade object to reach the moon as it crashed onto the lunar surface.
  • In 1960, an estimated 4,000 people were over 100 years old in the U.S. By 1995 the number had jumped to : 55,000.
  • In 1962, the Mashed Potato, the Loco-Motion, the Frug, the Monkey, and the Funky Chicken were popular dances.
  • In 1963, baseball pitcher Gaylord Perry remarked, "They'll put a man on the moon before I hit a home run." On July 20, 1969, a few hours after Neil 
  • Armstrong set foot on the moon, Gaylord Perry hit his first, and only, home run.
  • In 1964 General Mills began marketing Lucky Charms cereal with pink hearts, yellow moons, orange stars, and green clovers. The marshmallow bits 
  • (technically referred to as marbits) were invented in 1963 by John Holahan. The cereal is marketed using a leprechaun character named Lucky (L.C. 
  • Leprechaun is his full name) that touts his cereal as being "Magically Delicious." Over the years the various shapes and colors of the marshmallow bits 
  • in the cereal have undergone many changes.
  • In 1964, Sandy Koufax, Elstom Howard, Jimmy Brown, Oscar Robertson, and Cookie Gilchrist were all voted MVP from their respected (MLB, NFL, NBA) 
  • leagues. Each of them wore the number 32.
  • In 1964, Tanganyika and Zanzibar joined together to become Tanzania.
  • In 1964, University of Oregon grad student Carolyn Davidson designed what became known as the Nike "swoosh" for a mere $35. She did it four 
  • years after Phil Knight and track coach Bill Bowerman founded the company they originally called Blue Ribbon Sports.
  • In 1965, Congress authorized the Secret Service to protect former presidents and their spouses for their lifetime, unless they decline the protection. 
  • Recently, Congress limited the protection of former presidents and their spouses (elected after January 1, 1997) to 10 years after leaving office. 
  • President Clinton, who was elected in 1996, will be the last president to receive lifelong protection from the Secret Service.
  • In 1965, LBJ enacted a law requiring cigarette manufacturers to put health warnings on their packages.
  • In 1968, "Apollo Seven," the first manned Apollo mission, was launched with astronauts Wally Schirra, Donn Fulton Eisele and R. Walter Cunningham 
  • aboard.
  • In 1969 the US launched a male chimpanzee called Ham into space.
  • In 1969, Midnight Cowboy became the first and only X-rated production to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. (Its rating has since been 
  • changed to R.)
  • In 1970, 127 runners ran the NY Marathon. In 1998, 32,000 did.
  • In 1970, an Arizona lawyer named Russel H. Ansie filed a $100,000 law
  • In 1975, it cost only $180,000 to produce an hour-long TV drama.
  • In 1976, the average human had $5.60 of chemicals in their bodies. In 1946, that number was 98 cents.
  • In 1976, the first eight Jelly Belly® flavors were launched: Orange, Green Apple, Root Beer, Very Cherry, Lemon, Cream Soda, Grape, and Licorice.
  • In 1980, the only country in the world with no telephones was Bhutan.
  • In 1982, in the first operation of its kind, doctors at the University of Utah Medical Center implanted a permanent artificial heart in the chest of 
  • retired dentist Dr. Barney Clark, who lived 112 days with the device.
  • In 1984, a Canadian farmer began renting advertising space on his cows.
  • In 1985, Pete Rose became the first professional athlete to appear on the front of a Wheaties box.
  • In 1987 Playtex premiered the first US TV commercials with real lingerie models displaying their bras and underwear on national television.
  • In 1987, Ron Hextall of the Philadelphia Flyers became the first NHL goalie to score a goal. Actually, Ron Hextall was the first NHL goalie to score a 
  • goal by shooting the puck towards the opposing team's net in 1987. Billy Smith was the first goalie credited with a goal in 1979 when his clearing 
  • pass hit an opposing skater and went into the other team's goal.
  • In 1990, Bill Carson, of Arrington, Tennessee, grew the largest watermelon at 262 pounds that is still on the record books according to the 1998 
  • edition of the Guinness Book of World Records.
  • In 1990, over 4 billion dollars of coffee was imported into the United States.
  • In 1991 Procter & Gamble won a $75,000 lawsuit against James & Linda Newton who were found responsible for spreading rumors that the company 
  • supported the Church of Satan. The two were distributors of Amway Products, a competitor of Proctor & Gamble.
  • In 1992, approximately 750 deaths occurred in the United States due to workplace violence.
  • In 1992, the best selling American-produced car in Japan was the Honda Accord. It was built in Ohio and exported to Japan.
  • In 1995, KFC sold 11 pieces of chicken for every man, woman and child in the US.
  • In 1996, people in the United States sent and received 182,660,700,000 pieces of mail domestically. By way of comparison, Japan ranked second on 
  • this list with just 24,971,279,000.
  • In 1997, Fourteen percent of the one million citizens of Nairobi, Kenya carry the AIDS virus. Some 20% of the Kenyan military is infected.
  • In 1998 OSHA reported 1171 construction related fatalities, the sixth straight year this number has increased.
  • In 2001, there were more than 300 banana-related accidents in Britain, most involving people slipping on skins.
  • In 24 hrs. an average healthy human breathes 23,000 times.
  • In 4000 BC Egypt, men and women wore glitter eye shadow made from the crushed shells of beetles.
  • In 75% of American households, women manage the money and pay the bills.
  • In a deck of cards, the King of Hearts is the only king without a moustache.
  • In a lifetime the average US resident eats more than 50 tons of food and drinks more than 13,000 gallons of liquid.
  • In a psychology experiment, an electrode was attached to the pleasure centre of a rat's brain, which the rat could stimulate at the press of a 
  • button. It died of starvation when it wouldn't stop pressing the button long enough to eat.
  • In a recent survey in Japan, instant noodles were chosen as the greatest invention of all time
  • In a six-pack of pop, the cans cost more to make than the drink.
  • In a soccer game, the average length of time the ball is in play [for ninety minutes] is only 52 minutes.
  • In a study of 200,000 ostriches over a period of 80 years, no one reported a single case where an ostrich buried its head in the sand, or attempted 
  • to do so (apart from bones).
  • In a study of 200,000 ostriches over a period of 80 years, no one reported a single case where An ostrich buried its head in the sand.
  • In a survey of 200000 ostriches over 80 years, not one tried to bury its head in the sand.
  • In a typical season major league baseball will require 4,800 ash trees worth of Louisville sluggers.
  • In a University of Arizona study, rails and armsrests in public buses were found to be contaminated by the highest concentration of bodily fluids.
  • In a year, your heart can beat up to 40 000 000 times!
  • In Alabama it is illegal to stab yourself to gain someone's pity.
  • In Alaska it is against the laww to look at a moose from an airplane.
  • In Alaska it is illegal to whisper in someone's ear while they are moose hunting.
  • In Alaska, it is illegal to look at a moose from a flying vehicle.
  • In Albania nodding the head means "no" and shaking the head means "yes".
  • In Albany, New York, you cannot play golf in the streets.
  • In Albuquerque, New Mexico it is illegal for cab drivers to reach out and pull potential customers into their cabs.
  • In Alderson, West Virginia, it is illegal to walk a lion, tiger or leopard in the city limits, even it is on a leash.
  • In all of Shakespeare's works and excluding Roman numerals only one word begins with the letter "X." Xanthippe, the wife of Socrates, appears in 
  • The Taming of the Shrew.
  • In America you will see an average of 500 advertisements a day.
  • In America, someone is diagnosed with AIDS every 10 minutes. In South Africa, someone dies due to HIV or AIDS every 10 minutes.
  • In an article in 1998, The Journal of the American Medical Association claimed that adverse drug reactions may cause more than 100,000 deaths a 
  • year in the US alone.
  • In an authentic Chinese meal, the last course is soup because it allows the roast duck entree to "swim" toward digestion.
  • In an average lifetime, a person will eat 70 assorted insects and 10 spiders while sleeping.
  • In ancient China people committed suicide by eating a pound of salt.
  • In ancient chinese culture it was common for them to use the lining of a cats stomach as a condom.
  • In ancient Egypt they paid their taxes in honey.
  • In ancient Egypt, priests plucked EVERY hair from their bodies, including their eyebrows and eyelashes.
  • In ancient Greece the custom of allowing a condemned man to end his own life by poison was extended only to full citizens. Condemned slaves were 
  • instead beaten to death.
  • In ancient Rome it was considered a sign of leadership to be born with a hooked nose.
  • In ancient Rome, people found guilty of murdering their fathers were executed in a bizarre manner. The punishment was to be put in a sack with a 
  • rooster, a viper, and a dog, then drowned along with all three animals.
  • In ancient Rome, when a man testified in court he would swear on his testicles.
  • In ancient times, any Japanese who tried to leave his homeland was put to death.
  • In April 1964, The Beatles had the top five songs in the United States. This is the only time that the top five songs at any one time were by the 
  • same group.
  • In Arizona it is illegal to take naked photographs before noon on Sunday.
  • In Arizona, you cannot Drive past the same place more then 3 times in one hour. Its a law.
  • In Arkansas it is illegal to buy or sell blue lightbulbs.
  • In astrology, synastry is the comparison of natal charts to forecast how people will interact.
  • In Atlanta, GA, it is illegal to tie a giraffe to a telephone pole or street lamp.
  • In Australia, there is no death penalty.
  • In Baltimore it is illegal to mistreat oysters.
  • In Baltimore, it is illegal to wash or scrub sinks no matter how dirty they get.
  • In Bensalem, Pennsylvania it is illegal to race mufflerless go-karts after 6PM on Sunday.
  • In Bexley, Ohio Ordinance number 223, of 09/09/19 prohibits the installation and usage of slot machines in outhouses.
  • In Billings, Montana it is illegal for employees of the city's communications center to program their phones with speed dial.
  • In Boston, Massachusetts it is illegal to take a bath unless instructed to do so by a physician.
  • In Brandon, Mississipi it is illegal to attempt to stop someone from walking down the sidewalk by parking a motorhome in their path.
  • In Breton, AL there is a law against riding down the street in a motorboat.
  • In Britain, failed suicides were hanged in the 19th century.
  • In Broken Arrow, Oklahoma pigs less than 32 inches in length may be kept as pets provided there are no more than two in a house.
  • In Bromide, Oklahoma it is illegal for children to use towels as capes and jump from houses pretending to be superman.
  • In California you may not set a mouse trap without a hunting license.
  • In California, animals are banned from mating publicly within 1,500 feet of a tavern, school, or place of worship.
  • In Canada it's illegal to pay for a 50 cent item with only pennies, to publicly remove bandages, and for clear or non-dark sodas to contain caffeine.
  • In Canada, if a debt is higher than 25 cents, it is illegal to pay it with pennies.
  • In Carlsbad, New Mexico, it's legal for couples to have sex in a parked vehicle during their lunch break from work, as long as the car or van has drawn 
  • curtains to stop strangers from peeking in.
  • In Casablanca, Humphrey Bogart never said "Play it again, Sam."
  • In Casablanca, Humphrey Bogart never said "Play it again, Sam."
  • In Chicago, it is illegal to take a french poodle to the opera.
  • In Chillicothe, Ohio it is illegal to throw rice at weddings.
  • In Chinese dining, duck sauce is almost never used on duck.
  • In Chinese, the Kentucky Fried Chicken slogan 'Finger-lickin' good' came out as 'Eat your fingers off.'
  • In Chinese, the words 'crisis' and 'opportunity' are the same.
  • In Christian theology there are nine choirs of angels. From highest to lowest, they are: seraphim, cherubim, thrones, dominions, virtues, powers, 
  • principalities, archangels, and angels.
  • In Clawson, Mich., there is a law that makes it LEGAL for a farmer to sleep with his pigs, cows, horses, goats, and chickens.
  • In Colombia, if a Goajiro woman is successful in tripping a man during a ceremonial dance, he's required to have intercourse with her. (7-16-01)
  • In Columbus, Georgia it is illegal to sit on one's porch in an indecent position.
  • In Connecticut any dogs with tattoos must be reported to the police.
  • In Connecticut it is illegal to pirouette while crossing the street
  • In Corpus Christi, Texas, raising alligators in your home is against the law.
  • In Delaware it is illegal to get married on a dare.
  • In Delaware you may not sell dead people for money without a license.
  • In Denver it is unlawful to lend your vacuum cleaner to your next-door neighbor.
  • In Denver, Colorado it is illegal for Barber's to give massages to nude customers unless it is for instructional purposes.
  • In Detroit, couples are banned from making love in an automobile unless the act takes place while the vehicle is parked on the couple's own property.
  • In Detroit, Michigan it is illegal to sleep in a bathtub.
  • In Devon, Connecticut, it is unlawful to walk backwards after sunset.
  • In Disney's Fantasia, the Sorcerer's name is Yensid, which is Disney spelled backward.
  • In driving tests, women reacted to emergency options in.56 of a second. Men scored .59 in the same tests.
  • In Duluth, Minnesota it is illegal to allow animals to sleep in a bakery.
  • In Dyersburg, Tennessee it is illegal for a woman to call a man for a date.
  • In earlier times, virginity on one's wedding night was of the greatest importance. To prove that the bride was a virgin, it was customary that the 
  • couple would display the bloodstained bedsheet for all to see once the wedding was consummated.
  • In early America, coffee was usually taken between meals and after dinner.
  • In early Yorkshire, England, a plate holding wedding cake was thrown out of the window as the bride returned to her parent's home after the 
  • wedding. If the plate broke, she would enjoy a happy future with her husband. If the plate remained intact, her future was bleak.
  • In Eastern Africa you can buy banana beer. This beer is brewed from bananas.
  • In Elizabethan and Jacobean times, the age of a person when they marry was dependant on the person's class. Those with a high social status were 
  • permitted to marry at a younger age.
  • In England and the American colonies they year 1752 only had 354 days. In that year, the type of calendar was changed, and 11 days were lost.
  • In English Parliament, the Speaker of the House is not allowed to speak.
  • In English pubs, ale is ordered by pints and quarts. So in old England, when customers got unruly, the bartender would yell at them to mind their own 
  • pints and quarts and settle down. It's where we get the phrase "mind your P's and Q's."
  • In English, "four" is the only digit that has the same number of letters as its value.
  • In Erwin, Tennessee an elephant was once hanged for murder.
  • In Eureka, Nevada men who have mustaches are forbidden from kissing women.
  • In every episode of Seinfeld there is a Superman somewhere.
  • In every episode of TV's Seinfeld, there is a Superman somewhere in at least one scene. (There's plastic figurine on the shelf in the dining area, and 
  • a magnetic Superman on the fridge!)
  • In Florida failure to tell your neighbor his house is on fire is illegal.
  • In Florida it is illegal to fish while driving across a bridge.
  • In Florida, having sexual relations with a porcupine is illegal.
  • In Florida, unmarried women who parachute on Sundays may be jailed.
  • In Forrest Gump, Gary Sinise's character (Lt. Dan) tells Tom Hanks' character (Forrest Gump) that the day Forrest works on a shrimp boat is the day 
  • he'd be an astronaut. The following year, Sinise and Hanks appeared together as astronauts in Apollo 13.
  • In Gabon, there are several 1.8 billion years old natural nuclear reactors.
  • In Gary, Ind., persons are prohibited from attending a movie house or other theater and from riding a public streetcar within four hours of eating 
  • garlic.
  • In Georgia, movie houses that want to show films on Sunday must reserve one showing a month for religious material.
  • In German, "eins" and "acht" are the only numbers with their letters in alphabetical order.
  • In golf, a 'Bo Derek' is a score of 10.
  • In Greene, New York, it is illegal to eat peanuts and walk backwards on the sidewalks when a concert is on.
  • In Halethrope, Maryland kisses longer than one second are illegal.
  • In Hans Holbein's painting, "The Ambassadors," the artist added a small skull as a way of signing his name. Holbein is another word for "hollow bone" 
  • or "a skull."
  • In Hawaii it is illegal to get a tattoo behind your ear or on your eyelid unless in the presence of a registered physician.
  • In Hershey, Pennsylvania, the streetlights along "Chocolate Avenue" are in the shape of Hershey Kisses.
  • In honor of the original thirteen states, the U.S. $1 bill has the following on the back: 13 steps on the pyramid. The motto above the pyramid has 13 
  • letters (annuit coeptis). E pluribus unum, written on the ribbon in the eagle's beak, has 13 letters. 13 stars appear over the eagle's head. 13 stripes 
  • are on the shield. 13 war arrows are in the eagle's left talon.
  • In Hood River, Oregon, you can't juggle without a license.
  • In hotels in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, every room is required to have twin beds. And the beds must always be a minimum of two feet apart when a 
  • couple rents a room for only one night. And it's illegal to make love on the floor between the beds!
  • In Iceland it is illegal to have pets.
  • In Iceland, a Big Mac costs $5.50.
  • In Idaho walking along the street with a red-tipped cane is strictly prohibited.
  • In Idiana it is illegal to sell laughing gas with the intent to induce laughter.
  • In Illinois it is illegal for barbers to use their fingers to apply shaving cream to a customer's face.
  • In India, where hinduism is the biggest religon, they belive that there are about 300 million different gods. Because almost every village has it's own 
  • local god.
  • In Italy, espresso is considered so essential to daily life that the price is regulated by the government.
  • In its entire lifetime, the average worker bee produces 1/12th teaspoon of honey.
  • In Japan, coffee shops are called Kissaten.
  • In Joliet, Illinois it is illegal to mispronounce the name Joliet.
  • In July 1934, Babe Ruth paid the fan who caught his 700th career home run ball $20 to get it back.
  • In July 1981, a tortoise was sentenced to death for murder. Tribal elders in Kyuasini, a village in Kenya, formally condemned the tortoise because 
  • they suspected it of causing the death of six people, apparently through magic. However, because none of the villagers was prepared to risk the 
  • tortoise's wrath by carrying out the execution, it was instead chained to a tree. The tortoise was later freed after the government promised an 
  • official inquiry into the deaths.
  • In July, 1950, a patent was issued for an automatic spaghetti-spinning fork.
  • In Kansas it is illegal to catch bullfrogs in a tomato patch.
  • In Kentucky you need a license to walk around nude on your property.
  • In Kentucky, 50% of the people who get married for the first time are teenagers.
  • In Las Vegas, it's against the law to pawn your dentures.
  • In Lebanon, Virginia it is illegal to kick your wife out of bed.
  • In Lefors, Texas it is illegal to take more than three swallows of beer at any time while standing.
  • In Lexington, Kentucky, it's illegal to carry an ice cream cone in your pocket.
  • In literature, the average length of a sentence is around 35 words.
  • In Los Angeles, there are fewer people than there are automobiles.
  • In Los Angelos, California it is legal for a man to beat his wife with a leather strap as long as it is less than two inches in width, or she gives him 
  • permission to use a wider strap.
  • In M&M candies, the letters stand for Mars and Murrie, the developers of the candy in 1941.
  • In Maine, it is illegal to sell a car on Sunday unless it comes equipped with plumbing.
  • In Maryland, men may not buy drinks for female bartenders.
  • In Massachusetts you must have a license to wear a goatee.
  • In Massachusetts, if you get caught eating peanuts in church , you can be jailed for up to one year.
  • In Massachusetts, it is forbidden to put tomatoes in clam chowder.
  • In Massachusetts, it is unlawful to deliver diapers on Sunday, regardless of emergencies.
  • In Memphis, Tennessee it is illegal for a woman to drive by herself. A man must walk or run in front of the vehicle, waving a red flag to warn 
  • approaching pedestrians and motorists.
  • In Miami, it's illegal for men to be seen publicly in any kind of strapless gown.
  • in microsoft 1998 edition if your keyboard isnt responding it displays "keyboard not responding press enter to continue"
  • In most advertisements, including newspapers, the time displayed on a watch is 10:10.
  • In most advertisements, the time displayed on a watch is 10:10.
  • In most American states, a wedding ring is exempt by law from inclusion among the assets in a bankruptcy estate. This means that a wedding ring 
  • cannot be seized by creditors, no matter how much the bankrupt person owes.
  • In most comic strips and magazine advertisments, the time on the clock is 10:10.
  • In most watch advertisements the time displayed on a watch is 10:10.
  • In Nags Headm North Carolina you can be fined for singing out of tune for more than ninety seconds.
  • In Nevada it is illegal to ride a camel on the highway.
  • In New Hampshire it is illegal to inhale bus fumes with the intent of inducing euphoria.
  • In New Jersey it is illegal to delay or detain a homing pigeon.
  • In New York City it is illegal for a man to give 'The Standard Lear' to a woman. Violators are forced to wear horse blinders.
  • In New York City, approximately 1,600 people are bitten by other humans.
  • In Newport, Rhode Island it is illegal to smoke from a pipe after sunset.
  • In Nicholas County, W. Va., no member of the clergy is allowed to tell jokes or humorous stories from the pulpit during a church service.
  • In Norfolk, Virginia, a woman can't go out without wearing a corset. (There was a civil-service jobfor men onlycalled a corset inspector). However, in 
  • Merryville, Missouri, women are prohibited from wearing corsets because "the privilege of admiring the curvaceous, unencumbered body of a young 
  • woman should not be denied to the normal, red-blooded American male."
  • In North America, the breed of dog called the Doberman Pinscher is spelled with one "n". But in Europe where it originated, it's spelled with 2. The 
  • man who bred for the Doberman spelled his last name (Dobermann) with 2 'n's as well.
  • In North Andover, Massachusetts citizens are prohibitied from carrying 'space guns.'
  • In North Caroline it is illegal to make love on the floor of a hotel room between two double beds.
  • In North Dakota it is illegal to keep an elk in a sandbox in your backyard.
  • In NYC, "it is disorderly conduct for one man to greet another on the street by placing the end of his thumb against the tip of his nose and wiggling 
  • the extended fingers of that hand."
  • In Oblong, Illinois, it's punishable by law to make love while hunting or fishing on your wedding day.
  • In October 1959 Elizabeth Taylor became the first Hollywood star to receive $1 million for a single picture. (for Cleopatra)
  • In ohio it is illegal to ride on the roof of a taxi cab
  • In ohio it is illegal to run out of gas.
  • In Ohio women are forbidden from wearing patent leather shoes, lest men see reflections of their underwear
  • In Ohio, if you ignore an orator on Decoration day to such an extent as to publicly play croquet or pitch horseshoes within one mile of the speaker's 
  • stand, you can be fined $25.00.
  • In Oklahoma, people who make "ugly faces" at dogs may be fined and/or jailed.
  • In one of the central intersections of the resort town of Pompeii destroyed in A.D. 79 by Mt. Vesuvius is a replica of the male genitalia, imbedded in 
  • and made of cobblestones. The image is approximately three feet wide by three feet long, and points the way to a house of prostitution. The walls 
  • of the house are still decorated with picture of the various specialties of the ladies employed there.
  • In Oregon anyone with a bad reputation is prohibited from distributing malt beverages.
  • In Paulding, Ohio an officer of the law may bite a dog to quiet him.
  • In Pennsylvania: "Any motorist who sights a team of horses coming toward him must pull well off the road, cover his car with a blanket or canvas 
  • that blends with the countryside, and let the horses pass. If the horses appear skittish, the motorist must take his car apart piece by piece, and 
  • hide it under the nearest bushes."
  • In playing poker, there is one chance in 500 of drawing a flush.
  • In Pocatello, Idaho, a law passed in 1912 provided that "The carrying of concealed weapons is forbidden, unless same are exhibited to public view."
  • In Providence, Rhode Island it is illegal to sell toothpaste and a toothbrush to the same customer on a Sunday.
  • In Radford, VA you are not allowed to spit, loogie, puke or urinate on the streets.
  • In Reno, Nevada staging a marathon dance is illegal, although posting a notice on a fire hydrant about illegal dance marathons is not.
  • In Richmond, Virginia it is illegal to flip a coin in any eating establishment to determine who buys a cup of coffee.
  • In Rochester, Michigan, anyone bathing in public must have his or her bathing suit inspected by a police officer.
  • In rural areas, there are more insects in 1 square mile than there are humans on earth
  • In Salem, Massachesetts sleeping in the nude in a rented room is forbidden, even for married couples.
  • In Saratoga, Florida it is illegal to sing while wearing a bathing suit.
  • In Scituate, Rhode Island it is illegal to keep a flock of chickens in your motorhome if you live in a trailer park.
  • In Scotland, Irn-Bru is a soft drink that is more popular than Coca-Cola. When McDonalds opened in Glasgow and did not sell Irn-Bru, it was 
  • considered an insult, and the restaurant was subsequently boycotted.
  • In Seattle, Washington, it is illegal to carry a concealed weapon that is over six feet in length.
  • In seventy-five years the human heart pumps 3,122,000,000 gallons of blood, enough to fill in oil tanker over 46 times!
  • In Shakespeare, Rosalind, the heroine of "As You Like It", has more lines than any of Shakespeare's female characters. Cleopatra comes in second 
  • with 670 lines and third place belongs to Imogen ("Cymbeline"), with 591 lines.
  • In Shakespeare's time, mattresses were secured on bed frames by ropes when you pulled on the ropes the mattress tightened, making the bed firmer 
  • to sleep on. That's where the phrase, "goodnight, sleep tight" came from.
  • In Siberia, in 1994, a container full of marijuana was discovered in the 2,000-year-old grave of a Scythian princess and priestess, among the many 
  • other articles buried with her.
  • In some chuch in South Carolina, every man must bring a rifle to church on Sunday to ward off Indian attacks.
  • In some town in South Carolina, it is perfectly legal for a man to beat his wife. But only if its on the courthouse steps on Sunday.
  • In South Carolina you can be fined for not denouncing "the evils of intemperance" on the fourth Friday of every October.
  • In South Dakota it is illegal to try to convince a pacifist to renounce his beliefs by threatening to arm-wrestle him.
  • In South Korea, Green Giant canned sweet corn is advertised as a topping for ice cream.
  • In space, astronauts are unable to cry, tears can't flow down, because of the lack of gravity.
  • In Spanish, the word "hombre" means: 'shoulder', 'man', and 'hat' all at the same time.
  • In Spit Bergen, Norway at one time of the year the sun shines continuously for three and a half months.
  • In Springfield, door to door salesman are prohibited from selling their goods while standing in the middle of the road, screaming at passing vehicles.
  • In Staten Island, New York it is illegal for a father to call his son a 'faggot' or 'queer' in an effort to curb 'girlie' behavior.
  • In Sterling, Colorado, it is unlawful to allow a pet cat to run loose without a taillight.
  • In Sumatra, workers on coffee plantations gather the world's most expensive coffee by following a gourmet marsupial who consumes only the 
  • choicest coffee beans. By picking through what he excretes, they obtain the world's most expensive coffee -'Kopi Luwak', which sells for over $100 
  • per pound.
  • In Sweden, when leaving someone's home, wait until you get to the doorway to step outside before putting on your coat. To do so earlier suggests 
  • you are eager to leave.
  • In Tennessee it is illegal to use a lasso to catch fish.
  • In Tennessee, it is illegal to shoot any game other than whales from a moving automobile.
  • In terms of area, Juneau, Alaska, is the largest city in the United States, yet it can only be reached by boat or plane.
  • In Texas any artificial constructed underwater barrier reefs must come with an instruction booklet.
  • In Texas criminals are required to give their victims 24 hours notice, either orally or in writing, and to explain the nature of the crime to be 
  • committed.
  • In Thailand, the left hand is considered unclean, so you should not eat with it. Also, pointing with one finger is considered rude and is only done 
  • when pointing to objects or animals, never humans.
  • In the "Princess Diaries" when the main character is talking to her friend while walking up and down a bench, she falls which portrays her clumsey 
  • character. That wasn't on purpose, though. It was raining and the bench was very slippery and she fell for real. If you watch that scene, it will make 
  • perfect sense consdering the way they were laughing and how the princess told her friend to keep talking. The director liked it, so he kept it.
  • In the 14th century, the Arabs started to cultivate coffee plants. The first commercially grown and harvested coffee originated in the Arabian 
  • Peninsula near the port of Mocha.
  • In the 16th century, Turkish women could divorce their husbands if the man failed to keep his family's pot filled with coffee.
  • In the 1700s, European women achieved a pale complexion by eating "Arsenic Complexion Wafers" actually made with the poison.
  • In the 17th century, no citizen of Japan was allowed to leave the country on penalty of death.
  • In the 17th century, the number pi was known to 35 decimal places. Today, to 1.2411 trillion.
  • In the 1800s, the Chinese believed that strangling a man was less sever a punishment than beheading because the body would not be permanently 
  • disfigured.
  • In the 1870s, William Russell Frisbie opened a bakery called the Frisbie Pie Company in Bridgeport, Connecticut. His lightweight pie tins were 
  • embossed with the family name. In the mid-1940s, students at Yale University tossed the empty pie tins as a game.
  • In the 1905 football season, 18 men were killed in college games in the United States, and 159 more were permanently injured.
  • In the 1960's, the US spent millions developing a zero gravity pen for use in space
  • In the 19th century, craftsmen who made hats were known to be excitable and irrational, as well as to tremble with palsy and mix up their words. 
  • Such behavior gave rise to the familiar expression "mad as a hatter". The disorder, called hatter's shakes, was caused by chronic mercury poisoning 
  • from the solution used to treat the felt. Attacking the central nervous system, the toxin led to behavioral symptoms.
  • In the ancient Greek city-state of Sparta, if a man was not married by age 30, he would not be allowed to vote or watch athletic events involving 
  • nude young men.
  • In the Andes, time is sometimes measured by how long it takes to chew a quid of coca leaf.
  • In the building trade a slate measuring 24 by 12 inches is called a
  • In the city of Carmel, where Clint Eastwood grew up, they dont have postmen, coz they dont have street numbers. Ppl go to the post office to 
  • collect their mail.
  • In the course of an average lifetime you will, while sleeping, eat 70 assorted insects and 10 spiders.
  • In the early days of modern theater, artificial lighting was produced by throwing pollen grains of the club moss which is highly flammable when placed 
  • on a hot surface onto a hot shovel.
  • In the early stages of development, and pig's embroyo is similar to that of a human's.
  • In the England it is illegal to sell most goods on a sunday, (this law is mostly ignored), it is however legal to sell a carrot. It is also legal to sell it at 
  • any price and to give free gifts with it, such as anything else one might want to buy on a sunday!
  • In the entire state of Maryland, it is illegal to give or recieve oral sex.
  • In the game "Monopoly," the space on which a player has the greatest statistical chance of landing is Illinois Avenue.
  • In the great fire of London in 1666, half of London was burnt down but only 6 people were injured.
  • In the Great Seal of the US the eagle grasps 13 arrows and an olive branch.
  • In the Holocaust between 5.1 and 6 million of Europe's 10 million Jews were killed. An additional 6 million 'unwanted' people were also executed, 
  • including more than half of Poland's educated populace.
  • In the kingdom of Bhutan, all citizens officially become one year older on New Year's Day.
  • In the last 4000 years no new animals have been domesticated.
  • In the last three centuries, 90% of all people living in the Western world have switched from tea to coffee.
  • In the late 19th century the Supreme Court of the United States legally declarded the tomato a vegetable.
  • In the late 19th century, millions of human mummies were used as fuel for locomotives in Egypt where wood and coal was scarce, but mummies were 
  • plentiful.
  • In the mall, the fat sheriff with the shotgun fires at the spiders. When the ejected casings hit the ground, they make a metallic "chink" noise. 
  • Shotgun casings are made of plastic.
  • In the Middle Ages, chicken soup was believed to be an aphrodisiac.
  • In the Middle Ages, young men and women drew names from a bowl to see who their valentines would be. They would wear these names on their 
  • sleeves for one week. To wear your heart on your sleeve now means that it is easy for other people to know how you are feeling.
  • In the movie Casablanca Rick never says "Play it again, Sam." He says: "You played it for her, you can play it for me. Play it!". Ilsa says "Play it, 
  • Sam. Play `As Time Goes By"'.
  • In the Netherlands, in 1634, a collector paid 1,000 pounds of cheese, four oxen, eight pigs, 12 sheep, a bed, and a suit of clothes for a single bulb of 
  • the Viceroy tulip.
  • In the original Star Wars A New Hope when everyone is stuck in the trash compactor and the storm troopers come for C-3PO and R2-D2 the 
  • stormtroopers come through the door and one of them hits its head, very funny. They make it look like he did it on purpose by another stormtrooper 
  • says "Take care of him" which they added in there guess Lucas kept it as kind of a joke
  • In the original Wizard of Oz, during the scene in the forest, you can see a body hanging from a tree in the background. This is real. He was an actor 
  • that hung himself after he didnt get the part of the Tinman. They cut it out of the later versions, but if you have a movie from before the golden age 
  • of film editing, you'll see him.
  • In the pilot episode of Seinfeld (then called The Seinfeld Chronicles) , Kessler was the last name of the neighbor who would later become known as 
  • Kramer.
  • In the quiet town of Connorsville, Wisconsin, it's illegal for a man to shoot off a gun when his female partner has an orgasm.
  • In the Simpsons series, Homer has said 3267 "Doh!"
  • In the Spanish Pyrenees, when a beekeeper dies, each of his bees is splashed with a drop of Black Ink.
  • In the St. Louis, MO area, the word "hoosier" is used as a slang term for what the rest of the country would describe as "white trash," "rednecks," or 
  • "hillbillies".
  • In the ten years between 1987 and 1997, there was an increase of over 800 million people on the planet.
  • In the United States bacteria in foods cause 6.5 million to 33 million cases of human illness and 9,000 deaths annually.
  • In the United States only 80 miles separate the highest point of land and the lowest point in the lower 48 states. Mount Whitney on the eastern 
  • border of Sequoia National Park in California is 14,496 feet high, and a pool called Badwater in Death Valley is 280 feet below sea level.
  • In the United States, a pound of potato chips costs two hundred times more than a pound of potatoes.
  • In the United States, approximately seven billion pounds of chocolate and candy are manufactured each year.
  • In the United States, more Frisbee discs are sold each year than baseballs, basketballs, and footballs combined.
  • In the United States, poisoning is the fourth leading cause of death among children.
  • In the US a pound of potato chips costs 200 times more than a pound or potatoes
  • In the US, about 127 million adults are overweight or obese; worldwide, 750 million are overweight and 300 million more are obese. In the US, 15% of 
  • children in elementary school are overweight; 20% are worldwide.
  • In the US, Delaware, Virginia and Michigan rank as the top three states for Ritalin use, and most of the prescriptions are for elementary and middle 
  • school age children. Doctors in these states prescribe at least 33 grams for every 1,000 residents, 56 percent more than the national average, 
  • according to figures compiled by the Federal Drug Enforcement Agency.
  • In the US, federal law states that children's TV shows may contain only 10 minutes of advertising per hour and on weekends the limit is 10 and 
  • one-half minutes.
  • In The Wizard of Oz the Scarecrow was looking for a brain, the Cowardly Lion was looking for courage, and the Tin Man was looking for a heart.
  • In the year 1763, there were over 200 coffee shops in Venice.
  • In the year 1790, there were two firsts in the United States; the first wholesale coffee roasting company, and the first newspaper advertisement 
  • featuring coffee.
  • In the year 498 B.C., in the city of Chung-tu, crime ceased to happen with the naming of a new Minister of Crime. Legend has it that nobody wanted 
  • to commit a crime because everyone idolized the new minister, someone by the name of Confucius.
  • In Tonawanda, New York homeless people may not start a fire in the park unless they intend to cook food.
  • In Tulsa, Oklahoma the limit on kisses is three minutes (by law).
  • In Tulsa, Oklahoma, it is against the law to open a soda bottle without the supervision of a licensed engineer.
  • In Turkey during the 16th and 17th centuries, anyone caught drinking coffee was put to death.
  • In turtles, the colon(intestine) is also used for respiration, as it takes in oxygen. Thats how they stay underwater for so long.
  • In Utah a husband is responsible for all criminal acts committed by his wife while she is in his presence.
  • In Utah it is illegal to fish from horseback.
  • In Utah, birds have the right of way on all highways.
  • In Vermont it is illegal to paint landscapes in times of war.
  • In Vermont it is illegal to whistle while underwater.
  • In Vermont women must obtain written permission from their husbands to wear false teeth.
  • In Vulcan, Alberta Canada, the tourist welcome sign is written in both English and Klingon (alien language from "Star Trek").
  • In Washington D.C. it is illegal to post a notice in public which calls another person a 'coward' for refusing to accept a challenge to duel.
  • In Washington, anyone under the age of 18 must have parental permission to throw a tear gas canister.
  • In Waterloo, Nebraska it is unlawful for barbers to eat onions while on the job.
  • In West Virginia it is illegal to dig for ginseng on your neighbor's lawn without their permission.
  • In West Virginia you cannot fly a red flag in front of your house if you are disappointed in your sherrif.
  • In West Virginia, it is legal for one to take roadkill home for dinner....
  • In Winston-Salem, North Carolina, it is against the law for children under seven years of age to go to college.
  • In Wisconsin you are allowed to marry your house.
  • In Wisconsin, after 3:00 a.m., you have to send a rocket signal in the air after every mile you drive. Then wait a minute for a response.
  • In Wyoming it is illegal to tattoo a horse with the intent of making it unrecognizable to its owner.
  • In York, Pennsylvania, you can't sit down while watering your lawn with a hose.
  • Incan soldiers used to eat freeze-dried potatoes when they were on a march. The Incans would leave the food outside to freeze overnight, then 
  • thaw them out and stomp on them to remove the excess water.
  • Including the 2000 World Series, there have been only three meetings between teams from the same city: 1906 (Cubs vs. White Sox), 1944 
  • (Cardinals vs. Browns) and 2000 (Mets vs. Yankees).
  • India has a Bill of Rights for cows.
  • India has the most post offices of any country with 280,181.
  • India is the leading film making country in the world. More than twice as many films are made in India each year than in France, the third highest film 
  • producers in the world.
  • Indiana has a city named Santa Claus.
  • Infant beavers are called kittens.
  • Influenza caused over twenty-one million deaths in 1918.
  • Insects shiver when they're cold.
  • Insomniacs may move as many as seventy times.
  • Insulin was discovered in 1922 by Sir Frederick Banting and Dr. Charles Best.
  • Intel is a shortened name for Integrated Electronics. The company's founders wanted to use the full name when they went into business in 1968, but 
  • it was already in use.
  • Intelligent people have more zinc and copper in their hair.
  • Irish cream and Hazelnut are the most popular whole bean coffee flavorings.
  • Irving Berlin has never learned to read music or to write it. He hums or sings his songs to a secretary, who takes them down in musical notation.
  • Isaac Newton, Peter Tchaikovsky and Annie Lennox were all born on Christmas.
  • Israel is the only country in the world, which has compulsory military service for women.
  • It has 51 meanings as a noun, 126 meanings as a verb, and 10 meanings as a participle adjective.
  • It has been calculated that a single breath from a mature blue whale can inflate up to 2000 balloons.
  • It has been proven that feathers directly evolved from reptiles' scales. Therefore, birds came after reptiles.
  • It has been reported that some dogs are able to sniff out skin cancer. It's in a journal on Lancet. Click here
  • It is against the law for a monster to enter the corporate limits of Urbana, Illinois.
  • It is against the law in Oregon to fish with canned corn.
  • It is against the law in Pueblo, Colorado, to raise or permit a dandelion to grow within the city limits.
  • It is against the law in Texas, NJ, Iowa, and 25 other states for gay men to have sex of any kind. The result of a man having sex with another man 
  • is punishable by fines and up to 6 months in jail. it is, however, LEGAL for a male in Texas to have sex with his sheep.
  • It is against the law to have a pet in Iceland.
  • It is also against the law in Oregon to get married in your bathing suit.
  • It is believed that the Greek poet Aeschylus was killed when a bird flying overhead dropped a tortoise and struck him. Birds have been known to 
  • carry shellfish to great heights and drop them in order crack the shells.
  • It is estimated that 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 snowflakes have fallen to the earth since it was formed.
  • It is estimated that a plastic container can resist decomposition for as long as 50,000 years.
  • It is forbidden for aircraft to fly over the Taj Mahal.
  • It is illegal for a man to kiss a woman while she is asleep in Logan County, Colorado.
  • It is illegal for a mother to give her daughter a perm without a state license.
  • It is illegal for both sexes to flirt or respond to flirtation using the eyes and/or hands.
  • It is illegal in Elkhart, Indiana, for a barber to threaten to cut off a youngster's ears...what about an oldster?
  • It is illegal in Georgia to use profanity in the presence of a corpse.
  • It is illegal in Lafayette, Louisiana to play a musical instrument for the purpose of attracting attention, without a license.
  • It is illegal in North Carolina to have sex in churchyards.
  • It is illegal in Reno, Nevada to conceal a spray-painted shopping cart in your basement.
  • It is illegal to accept a gratuity or tip in Iowa.
  • It is illegal to drive more than two thousand sheep down Hollywood Boulevard at one time.
  • It is illegal to hunt camels in Arizona.
  • It is illegal to hunt camels in the state of Arizona.
  • It is illegal to mistreat rats in Denver.
  • It is illegal to say "Oh, Boy" in Jonesboro, Georgia.
  • It is illegal to take more than 2 baths a month within Boston confines.
  • It is impossible for a pig to look up at the sky and people can not lick their elbows!!!!! be sure to remember that the next time you stick your elbow in 
  • spagetti =)
  • It is impossible for a solar eclipse to last for more than 7 minutes 58 seconds.
  • It is impossible for anyone to verbally count up to the number 1 trillion
  • it is impossible to drink more than a gallon of milk in 1 hour without throwing up!!!
  • It is impossible to get water out of a rimless tyre.
  • It is impossible to land on planet Jupiter, because, scientists believe that below all the gases and liguid there is a center [core] which is made up of 
  • small ball of pressurized iron, but it is impossible to tell for sutre.
  • It is impossible to lick your elbow.
  • It is impossible to sneeze and keep your eyes open at the same time.
  • It is impossible to sneeze with your eyes open.
  • It is only appropriate to fly the US flag upside down in emergencies. It means "Help Me, I am in Trouble!"
  • It is physically impossible for pigs to look up into the sky.
  • It is possible to lead a cow up stairs, but not down.
  • It is Texas law that when two trains meet each other at a railroad crossing, each shall come to a full stop, and neither shall proceed until the other 
  • has gone.
  • It is unlawful for small boys to throw stones, at any time, at any place in the District of Columbia.
  • It snows more in the Grand Canyon than it does in Minneapolis and Minnesota.
  • It takes 120 drops of water to fill a teaspoon.
  • It takes 17 muscles to smile and 43 to frown.
  • It takes 20 different muscles to form a kiss.
  • It takes 25 muscles to swallow.
  • It takes 3,000 cows to supply the NFL with enough leather for a year's supply of footballs.
  • It takes 35 to 65 minks to produce the average mink coat. The numbers for other types of fur coats are: beaver 15; fox 15 to 25; ermine 150; 
  • chinchilla 60 to 100.
  • It takes a lobster approximately seven years to grow to be one pound.
  • It takes about 1.25 seconds for moonlight to reach the Earth.
  • It takes about 20 seconds for a red blood cell to circle the whole body.
  • It takes about 48 hours for your body to completely digest the food from one meal.
  • It takes forty minutes to hard boil an ostrich egg.
  • It takes only 8 minutes for sunlight to travel from the sun to the earth, which also means, if you see the sun go out, it actually went out 8 minutes 
  • ago
  • It takes seven years for a lobster to weigh one pound.
  • It takes, on average, 345 squirts from a cow's udder to yield one gallon of milk.
  • It took Leonardo Da Vinci 10 years to paint Mona Lisa. He never signed or dated the painting. Leonardo and Mona had identical bone structures 
  • according to the painting. X-ray images have shown that there are 3 other versions under the original.
  • It took over 4 years to film milo and otis to get the animals to do what they are suppose to.
  • It was claimed that a Tiger shot dead by colonel Jim Corbett in 1907 had killed 436 people in India.
  • It was discovered on a space mission that a frog can throw up. The frog throws up its stomach first, so that the stomach is dangling out of it's 
  • mouth. Then the frog uses its' forearms to dig out all of the stomach's contents and then swallows the stomach back down again.
  • It was during the 1600's that the first coffee mill made its debut in London.
  • It was proposed in the Rhode Island legislature in the 1970s that there be a $2 tax on every act of sexual intercourse.
  • It was the accepted practice in Babylon 4,000 years ago that for a month after the wedding, the bride's father would supply his
  • It was the Frisbie Pie Company of Bridgeport, CT, whose name -and lightweight pie tins -gave birth to the modern Frisbee.
  • It was the law in Scotland in 1288 that for each year known as "lepe yeare" any maiden lady could ask the man she liked to be her husband. If he 
  • refused and didn't have a good excuse he would be "mulcted of ye sum of one pound or less" (essentially, he would owe her a dollar). France 
  • enacted a similar law a year later.
  • It was the left shoe that Aschenputtel (Cinderella) lost at the stairway, when the prince tried to follow her. It was originally the right, but the 
  • translator messed up again.
  • It wasn't until 1913 that sports teams started using numbers on players' jerseys for identfication. It first happened during a football game between 
  • the University of Chicago and the University of Wisconsin.
  • It would take 15,840,000 rolls of wallpaper to cover the Great Wall of China.
  • Italians do not drink espresso during meals. It is considered to be a separate event and is given its own time.
  • Italians in Italy consume a million and a half tons of spaghetti every year.
  • Italy now has over 200,000 coffee bars, and still growing.
  • It's a common myth that chocolate aggravates acne. Experiments conducted at the University of Pennsylvania and the U.S. Naval Academy found 
  • that consumption of chocolate -even frequent daily dietary intake -had no effect on the incidence of acne. Professional dermatologists today do not 
  • link acne with diet.
  • It's a diverse world we live in. In the U.S., football, basketball and baseball are the three most watched sports on TV. In England, the top three most 
  • viewed are soccer, Formula One auto racing and boxing. In Russia, it's soccer, ice hockey and boxing. And in China, it's soccer, table tennis and 
  • swimming.
  • It's a good thing lemmings are promiscuous, they produce 4 times as many females as males.
  • It's against the law in Willowdale, Oregon, for a husband to curse during sex.
  • It's against the law to catch fish with your bare hands in Kansas.
  • It's been estimated that man have been riding horses for over 3,000 years.
  • It's been estimated that one out of every two hundred women is born with an extra nipple.
  • It's been said that Adolph Hitler was a coprophiliac, which means he had a fetish for women's feces. He also had a thing for being urinated on by 
  • women.
  • It's believed that India gets its name from the Indus River. The interesting thing is that none of the river is actually in India...it's in Pakistan.
  • It's estimated that at any one time around 0.7% of the world's population is drunk.
  • It's illegal in Newcastle, WY to have sex in a butcher shop's meat freezer.
  • It's illegal in Wilbur, Washington, to ride an ugly horse.
  • It's illegal to have sex on a parked motorcycle in London.
  • It's illegal to mispronounce the name of the state of Arkansas in that state.
  • It's impossible to get water out of a rimless tire.
  • It's impossible to lick your elbow.
  • It's impossible to sneeze with your eyes open.
  • It's more likeJacksonville, Florida has the largest total area of any city in the United States. It takes up 460 square miles, almost twice the area of 
  • Los Angeles.
  • Jaguars are frightened by dogs
  • Jamaica Blue Mountain is often regarded as the best coffee in the world.
  • James Buchanan was certainly a good host. When England's Prince of Wales came to visit in the fall of 1860, so many guests came with him, it's said 
  • the president slept in the hallway.
  • James Madison, 5 feet, 4 inches tall, was the shortest president of the US. Abraham Lincoln was the tallest at six feet, 4 inches.
  • James Madison, the fourth President of the United States, stood only five feet four inches tall and weighed less than one hundred pounds.
  • James Ramsey invented a steam-driven motorboat in 1784. He ran it on the Potomac River in an event witnessed by George Washington.
  • Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison and Jimi Hendrix all died at the young age of 27.
  • Japan is the world's leading importer of iron ore.
  • Japan ranks Number 3 in the world for coffee consumption.
  • Jaw muscles can provide about 200 pounds of force to bring the back teeth together for chewing.
  • Jayne Mansfield decorated her "Pink Palace" by writing to 1,500 furniture and building suppliers and asking for free samples. She told the donors they 
  • could then brag that their goods were in her outlandish mansion. The pitch worked, and Jayne received over $150,000 worth of free merchandise.
  • It's safe to make love while parked in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Police officers aren't allowed to walk up and knock on the window. Any suspicious officer 
  • who thinks that sex is taking place must drive up from behind, honk his horn three times and wait approximately two minutes before getting out of his 
  • car to investigate.
  • It's strange that a city with a two letter abreviation (LA) was named after a river called "EL RIO DE SENORA LA REYNA DE LOS ANGELES DE 
  • PORCIUNCULA".
  • Jellyfish are 95% water
  • Jellyfish can sense a storm 10 to 15 hrs. before it actually occurs and leaves the shore and go into the deep sea.
  • Jergens Lotion was created by Andrew Jergens, a former lumberjack, in 1880.
  • Jerry Garcia only had four fingers on his picking hand, he lost one of his fingers when he was a boy.
  • Jerry Seinfeld's first sitcom wasn't Seinfeld. He played the governor's speechwriter on three episodes of Benson (he was fired from the job).
  • Jerry West was the model for the official NBA logo. His silhouette appears dribbling a basketball.
  • Jessica Tandy is the oldest winner of an Academy Award. She won the 1989 Best Actress award for Driving Miss Daisy at the age of 80 years and 9 
  • months. She beat George Burns for that distinction by just a few months.
  • Jethro Tull is not the name of the rock singer responsible for such songs as "Aqualung" and "Thick as a Brick." Jethro Tull is the name of the band. 
  • The singer is Ian Anderson. The original Jethro Tull was an English horticulturalist who invented the seed drill.
  • JFK Jr. and Christine Amanapour of CNN were roommates at Brown University.
  • JFK's golf clubs sold for $772,500 at a 1996 auction. The buyer was Arnold Schwarzenegger.
  • Jim Delligatti, a McDonald's franchise owner in Uniontown, PA, invented the Big Mac in 1968. He originally named it the Big Mac Super Sandwich. The 
  • following year McDonald's sold it nationwide.
  • Jim Henson first coined the word "Muppet". It is a combination of "marionette" and "puppet."
  • Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and Jim Morrison were all 27 years old when they died.
  • Jimmu, the legendary first ruler of Japan, began his reign in the year 660. Akihito, the current emperor, is said to be the 125th direct descendant of 
  • Jimmu to rule Japan.
  • Jimmy Carter was the first President born in a hospital.
  • Jimmy Carter was the first U.S. President to be born in a hospital.
  • Joan of Arc was actually burned alive as a witch in 1431, and only considered a saint in the 20th century. (Them folks must be pissed to hear that)
  • John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and James Monroe died on July 4th. Adams and Jefferson died in the same year. Supposedly, Adams last words were 
  • "Thomas Jefferson survives."
  • John Hancock and Charles Thomson were the only people to sign the Declaration of independence on July 4th, 1776. The last signature came five 
  • years later.
  • John Lennon's first girlfriend was named Thelma Pickles.
  • John Milton used 8,000 different words in his poem, "Paradise Lost."
  • John Paul Jones' real name was John Paul. In a letter to Benjamin Franklin, he admitted he'd killed a sailor in the West Indies and changed his name to 
  • escape punishment. The "Jones" comes from Mrs. Willie Jones of North Carolina, whom he "admired."
  • John Tyler was the first president to be married in office on June 26, 1844.
  • John Wayne's real name was Marion Michael Morrison.
  • John Wilkes Booth's brother once saved the life of Abraham Lincoln's son.
  • Johnny Appleseed planted apples so that people could use apple cider to make alcohol.
  • Johnson & Johnson created the Band-Aid in 1899 because Robert Wood Johnson attended a lecture concerning the prevention of infection in wounds 
  • during surgical operations. The company created the zinc oxide adhesive bandage for surgeons, and launched the consumer version, Band-Aids, in 
  • 1921.
  • Joseph Priestley not only discovered oxygen, but he also discovered ammonia, carbon monoxide, hydrogen chloride, sulphur dioxide, and nitrous 
  • oxide. He was also the first person to isolate chlorine.
  • Joseph Priestly is credited with discovering oxygen, ammonia, carbon monoxide, hydrogen chloride, sulphur dioxide, and nitrous oxide. He was also the 
  • first to isolate chlorine.
  • Joseph Swan invented the light bulb in 1879, one year before Thomas Edison did. However, Swan didn't patent the idea and was widely accused of 
  • copying Edison who did patent the idea and was therefore recognized as its inventor. Swan continued to be denied recognition until some time later 
  • when it was shown that both light bulbs were produced using different processes. Edison and Swan later formed a joint company using the best of 
  • both technologies.
  • Judy Scheindlin ("Judge Judy") has a $25,000,000 salary, while Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg has a $190,100 salary.
  • Julius Caesar and Napoleon Bonaparte both suffered from epilepsy.
  • Julius Caesar was the first to encode communications, using what has become known as the Caesar Cipher.
  • Julius Caesar, Martin Luther and Jonathan Swift all suffered from Ménièr's disease. It is a disorder of the hearing and balance senses causing hissing, 
  • roaring or whistling sounds to be perceived.
  • Julius Caesar's autograph is worth about $2,000,000.
  • Jupiter has the shortest day of all the planets. Although it has a circumference of 280,000 miles compared with Earth's 25,000 Jupiter manages to 
  • make one turn in 9 hours and 55 minutes.
  • Jupiter's moon Ganymede is the largest moon in the Solar System, and is larger than the planets Mercury and Pluto.
  • Just twenty seconds worth of fuel remained when Apollo 11's lunar module landed on the moon.
  • Kangaroos and emus cannot walk backwards, and are on the Australian coat of arms for that reason.
  • Kansas state law requires pedestrians crossing the highways at night to wear tail lights.
  • Ketchup was once sold as a patented medicine. In the 1830s it was marketed in the United States as Dr. Miles's Compound Extract of Tomato.
  • Ketchup was sold in the 1830s as medicine.
  • Key West, Florida is the southernmost point in the continental United States. South Point, Hawaii is the country's southernmost point overall.
  • Kikkoman soy sauce was originated in 1630 in Japan.
  • Killer whales (Orcas) kill sharks by torpedoeing up into the shark;s stomach from underneath causing the shark to explode.
  • Kim Basinger fears large crowds. She even locked herself in her house for 4 months, because of this fear.
  • King Henry III of France, Louis XIV of France, and Napoleon all suffered from ailurophobia the fear of cats.
  • Kirkland, Illinois, law forbids bees to fly over the village or through any of its streets.
  • Kitsap County, Washington, was originally called Slaughter County, nicely: the first hotel there was called The Slaughter House.
  • Kiwi birds are blind, they hunt only by smell.
  • Koala bears also have finger prints that are almost identical to ours
  • Koala bears have fingerprints so similar to humans that they could be confused at a crime scene.
  • Koalas have twin thumbs
  • Kodak is the first chain store to open in Antarctica.
  • Korea's poshintang dog meat soup is a popular item on summertime menus, despite outcry from other nations. The soup is believed to cure summer 
  • heat ailments, improve male virility, and improve women's complexions.
  • Kotex was first manufactured as bandages, during W.W.I.
  • Kuwait is about 60% male (highest in the world). Latvia is about 54% female (highest in the world).
  • L.L. Cool J is the only rap star to have performed at a presidential inaugural concert. He performed at Bill Clinton's gala in 1993.
  • La Pax, Bolivia is a virtually fireproof city. At an altitude of about 12,000 feet above sea level, the amount of oxygen in the atmosphere is barely able 
  • to support fire.
  • La Paz, Bolivia is the highest capital city in the world.
  • Lab tests can detect traces of alcohol in urine six to 12 hours after a person has stopped drinking.
  • Lacrosse was invented by American Indians.
  • Lady Godiva's horse was named Aethenoth.
  • Laid end-to-end, the arteries, capillaries and veins would stretch for about 60,000 miles in the average child and would be about 100,000 miles in an 
  • adult - enough to wrap around the world nearly four times.
  • Laika the dog, was the first living thing which was sent to space.
  • Lake Michigan is the only one of the Great Lakes located entirely within the United States.
  • Lake Nicaragua boasts the only fresh-water sharks in the entire world.
  • Lake Pontchartrain Causeway at New Orleans, Louisiana, is the world's largest bridge. It is almost 24 miles (about 38 kilometers) long.
  • Large doses of coffee can be lethal. Ten grams, or 100 cups over 4 hours, can kill the average human.
  • Large kangaroos cover more than 30 feet with each jump.
  • Larger Stingrays have the power to drive their stingers or tail-spines through the hulls of wooden boats
  • Las Vegas means "The Meadows" in Spanish.
  • Laser stands for "light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation." Developed 1950s 1960s.
  • Lassie was played by a group of male dogs; the main one was named Pal.
  • Lassie was played by several male dogs, despite the female name, because male collies were thought to look better on camera. The main "actor" was 
  • named Pal.
  • Lassie, the TV collie, first appeared in a 1930s short novel titled Lassie Come-Home written by Eric Mowbray Knight. The dog in the novel was based 
  • on Knight's real life collie, Toots.
  • Latin Americans have two last names.
  • Latin is a dead language.
  • Laughing lowers levels of stress hormones and strengthens the immune system. Six-year-olds laugh an average of 300 times a day. Adults only laugh 
  • 15 to 100 times a day.
  • Laws forbidding the sale of sodas on Sunday prompted William Garwood to invent the ice cream sundae in Evanston, IL, in 1875.
  • Lee De Forest, the inventor of the radio tube, was tried for fraud in 1913. He was accused of tricking the public into buying stocks in his company, 
  • the Radio Telephone Company, by making "absurd and deliberately misleading" claims about the possibility of transmitting the human voice across the 
  • Atlantic Ocean.
  • Lee Harvey Oswald's cadaver tag sold at an auction for $6,600 in 992.
  • Leif Erikson was the first European to set foot on North America in the year 1000. (No, it wasn't Columbus)
  • Lemons contain more sugar than strawberries.
  • Leonard da Vinci could write with one hand and draw with the other at the same time.
  • Leonardo Da Vinci invented the scissors, the helicopter, and many other present day items.
  • Leonardo Divinci made sketches of a tracked armored vehicle to be used as an offensive weapon. It was pedal powered.
  • Leopards are so stealthy that they can roam around a city like Manhattan with the chances of not being seen!
  • Leopards were originally called Pard, Pardus and Panther
  • Let us look at the possible origin of 'banana'. 'ba', in Egyptian mythology is the soul. 'Nana', as we all know, is another word for grandmother. So, is a 
  • banana, the grandmother of the soul?
  • Levi Strauss blue jeans with copper rivets were priced at $13.50 per dozen in 1874.
  • Levi's 501 jeans got its number from its original stock number in the first Levi's store.
  • Lice is the plural of louse.
  • Light travels at the rate of 186,200 miles a second.
  • Lightning bolts can sometimes be hotter than the sun. (about 50 000º F)
  • Lightning puts 10,000,000 tons of nitrogen into the earth each year.
  • Lightning strikes 6,000 times every minute on the entire planet
  • Lightning strikes the earth about 8 million times a day.
  • Like fingerprints, everyone's tongue print is different
  • Lincoln Logs were invented by Frank Lloyd Wright's son.
  • Linoleum was patented in 1860 by Frank Walton, who also made up the name for his product.
  • Lions are the only truly social cat species, and usually every female in a pride, ranging from 5 to 30 individuals, is closely related.
  • Listerine mouthwash can be used as a deoderant. Douse your armpits with it and the smell vanishes within a couple minutes.
  • Little Jackie Paper was the name of Puff the Magic Dragon's human friend.
  • Lizards can self-amputate their tails for protection. It grows back after a few months.
  • 'Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch' is the actual name of a village in northern Wales
  • Lloyd's of London began as Edward Lloyd's coffeehouse.
  • Local calls using a coin-operated phone in the U.S. cost only 5 cents everywhere until 1951.
  • Lorne Greene had one of his nipples bitten off by an alligator while he was host of "Lorne Greene's Animal Kingdom."
  • Lou Gehrig earned a total of $316,000 during his 17 year career with the New York Yankees. In 1992, a fan paid $363,000 for a Yankee jersey that Gehrig wore during the 1927 season.
  • Louis XVI of France was captured at Varennes in June 1791 while trying to flee his country. He was stopped at an inn when he tried to pay with a coin that carried his likeness.
  • Louisa Adams, wife of John Quincy Adams, was the first and only foreign-born first lady.
  • Lovebirds are small parakeets who live in pairs. Male and female lovebirds look alike, but most other male birds have brighter colors than the females.
  • Lovers in Liberty Corner, New Jersey, should avoid satisfying their lustful urges in a parked car. If the horn accidentally sounds while they are frolicking behind the wheel, the couple can face a jail term.
  • Luther Crowell invented the paper bag in 1867.
  • Macaroni, Gentoo, Chinstrap and Emperor are types of penguins.
  • MacDonalds fries are made with beef flavoring. mmmmmmm.
  • Madagascar is the fourth largest island in the world, preceded by Greenland, New Guinea, and Borneo.
  • Madonna suffers from garophobia (the fear of thunder).
  • Maine is the only state in the United States whose name has one syllable.
  • Male bees will try to attract sex partners with orchid fragrance.
  • Male feral rabbits urinate on the females to state their ownership
  • Male horseflies can fly over 90mph.
  • Male lions somtimes kill their own kids if they seem a threat or take the attention of their mate.
  • Male seagulls have red legs.
  • Males, on average, think about sex every 7 seconds.
  • Man O' War lost only one race in his career. It happened in 1919 to a horse named Upset.
  • Manhattan Island from end to end is less than one million inches long.
  • Manta Rays have no external organs for urination, therefore they release the urine from their pores
  • Many hamsters only blink one eye at a time.
  • Many koalas are killed in sanctuaries by cars of visitors. 2. A newborn koala finds its way to the mother's pouch by following a trail of saliva.
  • Many scholars believe that an earthquake caused the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, referred to in the Bible as "the smoke of the country." 
  • Earthquakes produce massive clouds of dust that resemble billowing smoke.
  • Many scientists believe that birds evolved from reptiles. Both species lay eggs, and they both have egg teeth that serve only one purpose: to help 
  • the babies break the egg and enter the world. Egg teeth fall off within hours of birth.
  • Margaret Mitchell wrote Gone with the Wind between 1926 and 1929. In her early drafts, the main character was named "Pansy O'Hara" and the 
  • O'Hara plantation we know as Tara was called "Fountenoy Hall."
  • Marie and Irene Curie are the only mother and daughter to win Nobel prizes with their husbands. Marie and Pierre Curie won the Physics prize in 1903. 
  • Irene and Frederic Joliot-Curie won in 1935 for chemistry. Incidentally, Marie Curie also won the 1911 Nobel Prize for chemistry.
  • Marie Curie, the Nobel prize winning scientist who discovered radium, died on July 4, 1934 of radiation poisoning.
  • Marie Owen was the first policewoman in the United States. She started her career in Detroit in 1893.
  • Mark Twain was the first to have written a novel [Tom Sawyer] on a typewriter.
  • Marseilles is the oldest city in France. It was settled in about 6,000 B.C. by Ionian Greeks, who called it Massilia.
  • Martha Washington in the only woman whose portrait has ever appeared on a US currency note. Her portrait was on the face of the $1 silver 
  • certificate issues of 1886 and 1891, and on the back of the $1 silver certificate of 1896. Sacagewea and Susan B. Anthony are the only women 
  • represented on a US coin. Both were honored on a dollar coin.
  • Mary Queen of Scots was a skilful billiards player
  • Massachusetts law declares that peanuts may not be eaten in court.
  • May and June are the most popular months to get married. January is the least popular.
  • Mayonnaise is said to be the invention of the French chef of the Duke de Richelieu in 1756. While the Duke was defeating the British at Port Mahon, 
  • his chef was creating a victory feast that included a sauce made of cream and eggs. When the chef realized that there was no cream in the kitchen, 
  • he improvised, substituting olive oil for the cream. A new culinary masterpiece was born, and the chef named it "Mahonnaise" in honor of the Duke's 
  • victory.
  • McDonald's "Big Mac" slogan, introduced in 1975, is: "Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions, and a sesame seed bun."
  • McDonalds and Burger King sugar-coat their fries so they will turn golden-brown.
  • Mel Blanc (the voice of Bugs Bunny) hated carrots.
  • Members of the Nazi SS had their blood type tattooed on their armpits.
  • Men are 6 times more likely to get struck by lightning then women
  • Men are a lot more streamlined than women for swimming, because the female's mamaries create a lot of drag. Enough, in fact, that racing suits 
  • have been developed with tiny pegs above the breasts to cause disturbance, which decreases the drag.
  • Men are more likely to be left-handed(10%) than females(8%)
  • Men can read smaller print than women.
  • Men commit suicide three times more frequently than women do. But women attempt suicide two to three times more often than men.
  • Men's three pound is the most complex and orderly arrangement of matter known in the universe.
  • Mercury is the only metal that is liquid at room temperature.
  • Mercury is the only planet whose orbit is coplanar with its equator. Venus and Uranus are the only planets that rotate opposite to the direction of 
  • their orbit.
  • Methylphenidate (Ritalin) is a medication prescribed for individuals (usually children) who have an abnormally high level of activity or attention-deficit 
  • hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). According to the National Institute of Mental Health, about 3 to 5 percent of the general population has the disorder, 
  • which is characterized by agitated behavior and an inability to focus on tasks. Methylphenidate also is occasionally prescribed for treating 
  • narcolepsy. Methylphenidate is a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant. It has effects similar to, but more potent than, caffeine and less potent 
  • than amphetamines. It has a notably calming effect on hyperactive children and a "focusing" effect on those with ADHD.
  • Mexico City is sinking at a rate of 6 to 8 inches a year because it's built on top of an underground reservoir. Wells are drawing out more and more 
  • water for the city's growing population of more than 15 million people.
  • Mexico City is the oldest capital city in the Americas.
  • Mexico City sinks ten inches per year.
  • Mexico once had three presidents in one day.
  • Mice, whales, elephants, giraffes and man all have seven neck vertebra.
  • Michael Jordan has more money from Nike annually than all of the Nike factory workers in Malaysia combined.
  • Michael Myers, the villain of the Halloween movies, is named after a real person. When Assault on Precinct 13 performed better than expected in 
  • England, director John Carpenter decided to thank the English distributor by naming the main character of his next movie after him.
  • Michelangelo painted only one easel picture.
  • Michelangelo's Last Judgment, which hangs on the walls of the Sistine Chapel, drew some harsh criticism from one of the Vatican's officials because 
  • of the nudity. So Michelangelo made some changes to his work: he painted in the face of the complaining clergyman and added a donkey's ears and 
  • a snake's tail.
  • Mickey Mouse is known as 'Topolino' in Italy.
  • Midgets and dwarfs almost always have normal-sized children, even if both parents are midgets or dwarfs.
  • Mike Greenwell of the Boston Red Sox holds the major league record for the most RBIs that accounted for all of his team's runs. In 1996, he batted in 
  • nine runs in a game against the Seattle Mariners.
  • Milk as an additive to coffee became popular in the 1680's, when a French physician recommended that cafe au lait be used for medicinal purposes.
  • Milk is actually considered to be a food and not a beverage.
  • Millie the White House dog earned more than 4 times as much as Pres. Bush in 99. And, rightfully so.
  • Mineral deposits in caves: The ones growing upward are stalagmites, the ones growing downward are stalactites.
  • Minnesotans are forbade from teasing skunks.
  • Minnows have teeth in their throat.
  • Minors in Kansas City, Missouri, are not allowed to purchase cap pistols; they may buy shotguns freely, however.
  • Minus forty degrees Celsius is exactly the same as minus forty degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Mockingbirds can imitate any sound from a squeaking door to a cat meowing.
  • Modern coffee brewing methods use approximately 200° water.
  • Moles are able to tunnel through 300 feet of earth in a day.
  • Monday is the only day of the week that has an anagram, dynamo.
  • Monday's Child is fair of face, Tuesday's child is full of grace, Wednesday's child is full of woe, Thursday's child has far to go, Friday's child is loving 
  • and giving, Saturday's child has to work for its living, But a child that's born on the Sabbath Day, Is fair and wise and good and gay.
  • Money isn't made out of paper, it's made out of linen.
  • Monosodium glutamate can be found in mushrooms thanx liz chell, tomatoes and meat. MSG is safe to consume, and is essentially made of only 
  • water, sodium and glutamate. It contains only 1/3 the amount of sodium found in table salt, and can reduce salt intake in recipes.
  • Montana mountain goats will butt heads so hard their hooves fall off.
  • Montgomery Ward was the first company in the United States to advertise, "Satisfaction guaranteed or your money back." They did it in 1874, two 
  • years after company founder Aaron Montgomery Ward launched his mail-order catalog.
  • Moon was Buzz Aldrins mothers maiden name. (Buzz Aldrin was the second man on the moon).
  • More Monopoly is printed yearly than real money throughout the world.
  • More people are afraid of open spaces (kenophobia) than of tight spaces (claustrophobia).
  • More than 100 years ago, the felt hat makers of England used mercury to stabilize wool. Most of them eventually became poisoned by the fumes, as 
  • demonstrated by the Mad Hatter in Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland. Breathing mercury's fumes over a long period of time will cause erethism, a 
  • disorder characterized by nervousness, irritability, and strange personality changes.
  • More than 20,000 men were killed, wounded, or missing in action in the battle of Antietam, September 17, 1862. This was the bloodiest one-day fight 
  • during the Civil War.
  • More than 25% of the world's forests are in Siberia.
  • More than 50% of the people in the world have never made or received a telephone call.
  • More than 80% of all the world's earthquakes occur in the Pacific basin borders.
  • More than 92 465 people that did the death test in www.thespark.com claimed they had leprosy.
  • More than 99.9% of all the animal species that have ever lived on earth were extinct before the coming of man.
  • More than one million people play a single/multiplayer game called Diablo 2! I`m one of them!
  • More water flows over Niagara Falls every year than any other falls on earth.
  • Morphine was given its name in 1803 by the discoverer, a 20 year old German pharmacist named Friedrich Saturner. He named it after Morpheus, the 
  • Greek god of dreams.
  • Moses Malone was the first basketball player to go directly from high school to a professional American team.
  • Mosquito repellents dont really repel mozzies. They actually block the sensory pores and makes the mozzies think they're flying to a colder, dryer, 
  • more CO2 free area.
  • Mosquitoes dislike citronella because it irritates their feet.
  • Mosquitoes have teeth.
  • Mosquitoes prefer children to adults, and blondes to brunettes.
  • Mosquitos usually don't fly in winds more than 10 mph.
  • Most American car horns honk in the key of F.
  • Most boat owners name their boats. The most popular boat name is Obsession
  • Most car horns honk in the key of F
  • Most caucasian babies are born with dark blue eyes, although it normally changes colour after child birth.
  • Most cows give more milk when they listen to music.
  • Most dust particles in your house are made from dead skin.
  • Most Eskimos do not live in igloos.
  • Most gemstones contain several elements; except the diamond, it's all carbon.
  • Most Greyhounds are universal blood donors and are used to provide extra blood during another dog's surgery.
  • Most honey bees die after it stings people as our skin is elastic, unsuitable for their stingers which are meant for harder inelastics skins. Their venom 
  • glands are also torn out in the process. (So removing the stinger by piching the tip is well, in one word, dumb.jk)
  • Most household dust is made of dead skin cells.
  • Most landfilled trash retains its original weight, volume, and form for 40 years.
  • Most lipstick contains fish scales.
  • Most marine fish can survive in a tank filled with human blood
  • Most men have erections every hour to hour and a half during sleep.
  • Most of the vitamin C in fruits is in the skin.
  • Most people know what pH means, but few people know that it stands for pondus hydrogenii which means potential hydrogen and that each unit is a 
  • phidron.
  • Most people move about forty times in their sleep during the night.
  • Most-visited presidential grave: John F. Kennedy's in Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va. The only other president buried in Arlington: William 
  • Howard Taft.
  • Mount Everest is a foot higher today than it was a century ago, and it's believed to still be growing.
  • Mount Everest moves approximately 2.4 inches (10 cm) in a Northeasterly direction every year.
  • Mount Everst in Nepal, China: 29,035 feet / 8850 meters (seven feet [2.1 meters] above it's height of 29,028 feet which was determined in 1954).
  • Mountain Dew does reduce your sperm count significantly.
  • Movie detective Dirty Harry's badge number is 2211.
  • Mozart sold one of his most prized pieces, Symphony No. 5 for under $20.
  • Mr Ennis used to be a singer for a jazz band (He's my modern history teacher)
  • Mr. Rogers is an ordained minister.
  • Mr. Rogers was an ordained Presbyterian minister.
  • Mt. Athos, in northern Greece, likes to call itself an independent country. It has a population of about 4,000...all men. No females of any kind, 
  • including animals, are allowed. There are twenty monasteries within a space of twenty miles.
  • MTV (Music Television) made its debut at 12:01 a.m. on August 1, 1981 The first music-video shown on the rock-video cable channel was, 
  • appropriately, "Video Killed the Radio Star" by the Buggles. MTV's original five veejays were Martha Quinn, Nina Blackwood, Mark Goodman, J.J. 
  • Jackson and Alan Hunter.
  • Muhammad Ali won his heavyweight championships on three continents: North America, Asia and Africa.
  • Muhammad is the most common first name in the world.
  • Mules are genetically sterile. i.e. they cannot reproduce.
  • Murphy's oil soap is the chemical most commonly used to clean elephants.
  • Mushrooms have no chlorophyll so they don't need sunshine to grow and thrive. Some of the earliest commercial mushroom farms were set up in 
  • caves in France during the reign of King Louis XIV (1638-1715).
  • Nabisco's "Oreo's" are the world's best-selling brand of cookie at a rate of 6 billion sold each year. The first Oreo was sold in 1912.
  • 'Naked' means to be unprotected. 'Nude' means unclothed.
  • Names for Atlantic hurricanes can be only French, English, or Spanish.
  • Napoleon Bonaparte is the historical figure most often portrayed in movies. He has been featured in 194 movies, Jesus Christ in 152, and Abraham 
  • Lincoln in 137.
  • Napoleon constructed his battle plans in a sandbox.
  • Napoleon took 14,000 French decrees and simplified them into a unified set of 7 laws. This was the first time in modern history that a nation's laws 
  • applied equally to all citizens. Napoleon's 7 laws are so impressive that by 1960 more than 70 governments had patterned their own laws after them 
  • or used them verbatim.
  • NASCAR stands for National Association of Stock Car Auto Racing.
  • Natural gas has no odor. The smell is added artificially so that leaks can be detected.
  • Nearly 400 cocoa beans are required to make a pound of chocolate liquor, the semi-liquid mass produced by grinding the beans. A non-alcoholic 
  • substance, chocolate liquor is the basis of all chocolate and cocoa products.
  • Nearly half the people on the earth live in only one thirtieeth of the total land area.
  • Neck ties were first worn in Croatia.
  • Negative emotions such as anxiety and depression can weaken your immune system.
  • Neil Armstrong stepped on the moon with his left foot first.
  • Neil Shoen, the guitarist from Journey got his start playing in San Francisco with Santana.
  • Neil Young was once roommates with Rick James.
  • Neither Fruit Flies nor May Flies are flies.
  • Nevada was the first state to sanction the use of the gas chamber, and the first execution by lethal gas took place in February, 1924.
  • New Hampshire law forbids you to tap your feet, nod your head, or in any way keep time to the music in a tavern, restaurant, or cafe.
  • New Hampshire's license plates are stamped with the motto "Live Free Or Die." They are made by prison inmates.
  • New Jersey, with 96, is the US state with the greatest number of hazardous waste sites.
  • New Orleans' first Mardi Gras celebration was held in February, 1826.
  • New York City has 570 miles of shoreline.
  • New York City's administrative code still requires that hitching posts be located in front of City Hall so that reporters can tie their horses.
  • New York City's nickname the "Big Apple" is named after an early swing-dance that originated in a South Carolina club (which used to be a church) 
  • called "The Big Apple."
  • New York's first St. Patrick's day parade was held on March 17, 1762.
  • New Zealand is the only country that contains every type of climate in the world.
  • Newborn babies have about 350 bones. They gradually merge and disappear until there are about 206 by age 5.
  • Next time you start a riot in Wisconsin remember that it is illegal to use a laser pointer to do so.
  • Nine U.S. Presidents never went to college: George Washington, Andrew Jackson, Martin Van Buren, Zachary Taylor, Millard Fillmore, Abraham 
  • Lincoln, Andrew Johnson, Grover Cleveland, and Harry Truman.
  • Ninety percent of all species that have become extinct have been birds.
  • No evidence of man's evolutionary ancestors has so far been found in either North or South America. Fossils and other remains suggest that the first 
  • Americans crossed the Bering Straits (which at the time was dry land) from Asia between 20,000 and 40,000 years ago.
  • No language has more synonyms than English.
  • No man is allowed to make love to his wife with the smell of garlic, onions, or sardines on his breath in Alexandria, Minnesota. If his wife so requests, 
  • law mandates that he must brush his teeth.
  • No one knows where Mozart is buried.
  • No one knows why there is a 33 on a Rolling Rock bottle... the secret died with the original brewer.
  • No one knows why, but 90 percent of women who walk into a department store immediately turn to the right....
  • No one may catch fish with his bare hands in Kansas.
  • No piece of dry square paper can be folded more than 7 times in half!
  • No piece of paper can be folded more than 7 times.
  • No piece of square, dry paper can be folded more than seven times in half
  • No president of the United states was an only child.
  • No SEAL has ever surrendered and no wounded or dead SEAL has ever been left on the field during battle.
  • No species of wild plant produces a flower or blossom that is absolutely black, and so far, none has been developed artificially.
  • No two human outer EARS (pinnae)-even your own- are exactly alike.Earology, as the system is called, was developed to supplement identification 
  • by fingerprints.
  • No two lions have the same pattern of whiskers, like a fingerprint.
  • No two spider webs are the same.
  • No woman may have sex with a man while riding in an ambulance within the boundaries of Tremonton, Utah. If caught, the woman can be charged 
  • with a sexual misdemeanor and "her name is to be published in the local newspaper." The man isn't charged nor is his name revealed.
  • No word in the English language rhymes with month, orange, silver, or purple.
  • Nobel, actually invented dynamite, (Dynamite no.1 and Ballistite) but when he saw the destruction it caused, he decided to do something benevolent 
  • with all the money he made. Hence the Nobel Prize.
  • Nobody is buried in Grant's tomb. President & Mrs. Grant are entombed there. A body is buried only when it is placed in the ground and covered with 
  • dirt.
  • Nobody knows what happened to the body Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. During his funeral in 1791, a thunderstorm suddenly appeared and his funeral 
  • party dropped the coffin and ran for cover. When they returned, the coffin was gone.
  • Nobody knows where Mozart is buried.
  • Non-dairy creamer is flammable.
  • Non-married couples in Idaho who engage in sexual intercourse can be jailed for up to six months
  • No-one has ever died from smoking cannabis
  • North America was called Turtle Island by the Delaware Indians.
  • Not only do apple seeds contain cyanogens, precursors to cyanide, but peach pits, almond skins, citrus fruits and some berrys contain them aswell.
  • Nothing rhymes with the word 'month'
  • Now, where did the word 'fuck' come from? Click here to find out
  • Nutmeg is extremely poisonous if injected intravenously it can kill you.
  • Oak trees do not have acorns until they are fifty years old or older.
  • Oak trees do not produce acorns until they are at least fifty years old.
  • October 1st is the official Coffee Day in Japan.
  • Oddly, no term existed for "homosexuality" in ancient Greece there were only a variety of expressions referring to specific homosexual roles. Experts 
  • find this baffling, as the old Greek culture regarded male/male love in the highest regard. According to several linguists, the word "homosexual" was 
  • not coined until 1869 by the Hungarian physician Karoly Maria Benkert.
  • Of all known forms of animals life ever to inhabit the Earth, only about 10 percent still exist today.
  • Of all the languages in the world, English has the largest vocabulary about 800,000 words.
  • Of all the words in the English language, the word "set" has the most definitions.
  • Of Chief Executives, only Benjamin Harrison was the grandson of a President.
  • Of the 206 bones in the human body, 52 are in the feet.
  • Of the 2200 persons quoted in the current edition of "Bartlett's Familiar Quotations," only 164 are women.
  • Of the 25 highest mountains on earth, 19 are in the Himalayas.
  • Of the 266 men who have been pope, 33 have died violently.
  • Of the 3,000 islands in the Bahama chain in the Caribbean, only 20 are inhabited.
  • Of the 60,000 americans who fled to Canada during the Viet Nam war 30,000 still reside there.
  • Of the estimated 162 million land-based telephones in the U.S., 25 million have unlisted numbers.
  • Of the Top 10 grossing movies of the 1980s, seven were either produced or directed by Stephen Spielberg or George Lucas. They also represent the 
  • men behind the top three grossing films of the 1970s.
  • Offered a new pen to write with, 97% of all people will write their own name.
  • Officially, the term "boulder" is applied only to stones larger than 10 inches in diameter.
  • Ok food fans! Whats in an oxtail soup? "Oxen tails!" i hear you say...well, wrong. Try beef cattle.
  • Okay, ketchup actually began in Thailand. There it was labelled "Kachiap".
  • Olympic badminton rules say that the bird has to have exactly fourteen feathers.
  • Olympic pools are 50 meters long.
  • Olympus Mons on Mars is the largest volcano in our solar system.
  • On a bingo card of 90 numbers there are approximately 44 million possible ways to make bingo.
  • On a Canadian two-dollar bill, the American flag is flying over the Parliament Building.
  • On a clear night in the Northern Hemisphere the naked eye can discern some 5000 stars.
  • On an American one-dollar bill there is a tiny owl in the upper-left-hand corner of the upper-right-hand "1" and a spider hidden in the front 
  • upper-right-hand corner.
  • On April 12, 1938, the state of New York passed a law requiring medical tests for marriage license applicants, the first state to do so.
  • On April 25, 1889, The Kansas Times and Star was the first newspaper to use the phrase "bestseller." On that day the newspaper listed six books as 
  • the "best sellers here last week."
  • On August sixth, 1945, during World War Two, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing an estimated 140,000 people in 
  • the first use of a nuclear weapon in warfare.
  • On average 150,000 pints of Guiness are lost each year in the mustaches of English tavern-goers.
  • On average 900 people start the Navy SEALs training program. On average 650 people drop out.
  • On average people fear spiders more than they do death.
  • On average women say 7,000 words per day. Men manage just over 2000.
  • On average, 100 people choke to death on ball-point pens every year.
  • On average, 12 newborns will be given to the wrong parents daily.
  • On average, 150 couples get married in Las Vegas each day.
  • On average, 42,000 balls are used and 650 matches are played at the annual Wimbledon tennis tournament.
  • On average, 90% of the people that have the disease Lupus are female.
  • On average, a human being will have sex more than 3,000 times and spend two weeks kissing in their lifetime.
  • On average, about 500 meteorites strike the surface of the Earth each year. The calculated risk of being struck by a meteorite in the United States 
  • is once every 9,300 years.
  • On average, adults watch double the amount of TV as teenagers do.
  • On average, Americans consume eighteen acres of pizza daily
  • On average, cows poop 16 times a day.
  • On average, every American consumes 109 pounds of beef a year. It takes eight pounds of grain to produce one pound of beef.
  • On average, every chocolate bar contains at least three insect legs.
  • On average, every person in the United States owns 2.1 radios.
  • On average, more people fear spiders than death.
  • On average, people fear spiders more than they do death.
  • On average, people fear spiders more than they do dying. However, statistically you are more likely to be killed by a champagne cork than by the 
  • bite of a poisonous spider.
  • On average, pigs live for about 15 years.
  • On average, right-handed people live 9 years longer than their left-handed counterparts.
  • On average, twelve newborns are given to the wrong parents each day.
  • On average, we lose 11 oz. of weight while we are asleep at night.
  • On average, we spend 6 months of our lives waiting for red lights.
  • On average, when asked for a color, 3 out of 5 people will say red.
  • On Dec. 10th 1901 the 1st Nobel prizes were awarded. Literature Rene Sully-Prudhomme; Physiology Emil von Behring; Chemistly Jacobus van't Hoff; 
  • Physics Wilhelm Roentgen; Peace Jean Henri Dunant Frederic Passy.
  • On December 20, 1860, South Carolina was the first state to secede from the Union.
  • On February 6, 1971 the first golf ball was hit on the moon by Alan Shepard.
  • On February 7, 1969 a meteorite weighing over 1 ton fell in Chihuahua, Mexico.
  • On February 9, 1993, "Dateline NBC" was forced to publicly apologize, and NBC president Michael Gartner resigned for a scandal caused by "Dateline" 
  • rigging a GM truck with explosives to simulate a "scientific" crash-test demo.
  • On Hilton Head Island, South Carolina it is illegal to shine a flashlight on a sea turtle.
  • On its trip around the sun, the earth travels over a million and a half miles per day.
  • On July 28th, 1945, a US Army bomber crashed into the 79th floor of New York's Empire State Building, killing 14 people.
  • On July 4, 1776, King George III of England noted in his diary: "Nothing of importance happened today."
  • On June 26th, 1945, the charter of the United Nations was signed by 50 countries in San Francisco. (The text of the charter was in five languages: 
  • Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish.)
  • On May 25, 1957, two men with the same name scored holes in one on the same golf course. Edward Chapman got a hole in one on the eighth hole 
  • at Richmond, Surrey in England. Later that day, Edward Chapman hit one from from the sixth tee.
  • On record, the largest iceberg ever, was larger than the country of Belgium.
  • On record, the only time it recently snowed in the Sahara Desert was on Feb.18,1979.
  • On September 13th, 1916 an elephant that had killed a man was hanged until dead from a rail road crain in Erwin, Tennesee. On their first attempt 
  • the elephant fell to the ground. It was very sad.
  • On the cartoon show "The Jetsons," Jane is 33 years old and her daughter Judy is 15 years old.
  • On the old Canadian 2 dollar bill,the flag flying over the Parliament Building is NOT an American flag.
  • On this planet there is a can of SPAM opened every four seconds.
  • Once a human reaches the age of 35, he/she will start losing approximately 7,000 brain cells a day. The cells will never be replaced.
  • One - quarter of the world's cattle live in India.
  • One 75-watt light bulb gives off more light than three 25-watt light bulbs.
  • One American of every 16 will have one of the Top 12 most common last names.
  • One beaver can cut down as many as 216 trees per year.
  • One in about eight million people has progeria, a disease that causes people to grow faster than they age.
  • One in every 2000 babies is born with a tooth.
  • One in every 9000 people is an albino.
  • One in every four Americans has appeared on television.
  • One in fourteen women in America is a natural blonde. Only one in sixteen men is.
  • One light year the distance light travels in a year at the speed of 186,000 miles per second is just under six thousand billion miles. Earth's nearest 
  • neighbor in space, outside our own solar system is four light years away (about 24 trillion miles).
  • One million tons of oil is equivalent to about 13,000,000,000 kilowatt hours of electricity.
  • One of the greatest soldiers in history, Alexander the Great, was tutored by the greatest thinker of all time, Aristotle.
  • One of the holiest Christian holidays is named after a pagan goddess. The name "Easter" derives from the Anglo-Saxon goddess Eostre, who 
  • governed the vernal equinox.
  • One of the largest carriers of hepitius B is diner mints.
  • One of the many Tarzans, Karmuala Searlel, was mauled to death by a raging elephant on set.
  • One of the reasons marijuana is illegal today is because cotton growers in the 30s lobbied against hemp farmers (they saw it as competition).
  • One out of every 43 prisoners escapes from jail. 94% are recaptured.
  • One penny doubled everyday becomes over 5 million dollars in just 30 days.
  • One plain milk chocolate candy bar has more protein than a banana.
  • One pound of tea can make 300 cups of the beverage.
  • One quarter of the bones in your body, are in your feet
  • One ragweed plant can release as many as one billion grains of pollen.
  • One square mile of land contains more insects than total number of human beings on earth.
  • One tonne of uranium produces the same amount of energy as 30,000 tonnes of coal.
  • Only 1 person in 2 billion will live to be 116 or older.
  • Only 16% of able-bodied males in the American colonies participated in the Revolutionary War.
  • Only 3 mayors of U.S. cities went on to become president: Calvin Coolidge, Grover Cleveland, and Andrew Johnson.
  • Only 3 words in the English language end in "ceed": "proceed," "exceed," and "succeed."
  • Only 55% of all Americans know that the sun is a star.
  • Only about 20% of harvested coffee beans are considered to be a premium bean of the highest quality.
  • Only female mosquitoes bite. Females need the protein from blood to produce their eggs. Males only drink water and plant juice.
  • Only four countries in the world start with the letter 'D'. They are Denmark, Dominica, Djibouti and the Dominican Republic
  • Only full-grown male crickets can chirp.
  • Only one in two billion people will live to be 116 or older.
  • Only one movie has had three Academy Award nominees in the same category. In 1963, Tom Jones earned Best Supporting Actress nominations for 
  • Diane Cilento, Dame Edith Evans and Joyce Redman.
  • Only one of the 88 stable chemicals are named after a person gadolinium. It's named after Finnish chemist Johan Gadolin.
  • Only one person in two billion will live to be 116 years old.
  • Only six baseball teams remain from the original National League, which was founded in 1876.
  • Only three horses who had never previously won a race earned their first victories at the Kentucky Derby. They were Buchanan in 1884, Sir Barton in 
  • 1919 and Brokers Tip in 1933.
  • Only three Presidents graduated from the military academies: Grant, Eisenhower (West Point) and Carter (Annapolis).
  • Only two people signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4th, John Hancock and Charles Thomson. Most of the rest signed on August 2, but 
  • the last signature wasn't added until 5 years later.
  • Orange juice helps the body absorb iron easily when consumed with a meal.
  • Oranges, lemons, watermelons, and tomatoes are berries.
  • Orca (killer) whales can grow to b 30ft long.
  • Orcas (killer whales) kill sharks by torpedoing up into the shark's stomach from underneath, causing the shark to explode.
  • Orchids have the smallest seeds. It takes more than 1.25 million seeds to weigh 1 gram.
  • Orville Wright was involved in the first aircraft accident. His passenger, a Frenchman, was killed.
  • Ostriches stick their heads in the sand to look for water.
  • Ostriches swallow pebbles to aid in indigestion.
  • Our eyes are always the same size from birth but our nose and ears never stop growing.
  • Our galaxy has approximately 250 billion stars.
  • Our nerves system transmits messages at up to 300 ft. per second.
  • Our sun and the surrounding planets orbit around the center of the Milky Way galaxy once every 250 million years.
  • Our sun has an expected lifetime of about 11 billion years.
  • Out of all the eight letter words in the English language, only one has only one vowel in it: "strength"
  • Ovaltine was originally called Ovamaltine. A clerical error forced the name to be changed when the manufacturer registered the name.
  • Over 10,000 birds a year die from smashing into windows
  • Over 10,000 coffee cafes plus several thousand vending machines with both hot and cold coffee serve the needs of Tokyo alone.
  • Over 23% of all photocopier faults worldwide are caused by people sitting on them and photocopying their asses.
  • Over 2500 left handed people a year are killed from using products made for right handed people. "left" in Latin is "sinister" and "right" is "dexter". 
  • Ambidextrous simply means "both right".
  • Over 2500 left handed people are killed each year from using products made for right handed people.
  • Over 5 million people in Brazil are employed by the coffee trade. Most of those are involved with the cultivation and harvesting of more than 3 billion 
  • coffee plants.
  • Over 53 countries grow coffee worldwide, but all of them lie along the equator between the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn.
  • Over 75% of people who read this will try to lick their elbow.
  • Over 80% of professional boxers have suffered brain damage.
  • Over 96% of American households purchase bananas at least once each month.
  • Over billions of years, black holes become white holes and they spit out all of the things they sucked in. the atoms are completely jumbled, so no one 
  • knows what will ever come out. Theoratically they'll also turn into a white hole. If you were unfortunate enough to fall within one, you would never 
  • actually hit -- because time would stop at some point within the event horizon (space outside) of the black hole. Thanx De Composed
  • Over the course of his lifetime, the average man will ejaculate approximately 18 quarts of semen, containing about a half trillion sperm.
  • Over the last 50 years in the United States, approximately 9,000 people have died as a result of tornadoes, 5,000 as the result of floods, and 4,000 
  • as the result of hurricanes.
  • Over-roasted coffee beans are very flammable during the roasting process.
  • Owls are one of the only birds that can see the color blue.
  • Owls have eyeballs that are tubular in shape, because of this, they cannot move their eyes.
  • Pablo Picasso almost died at birth. The midwife present though he was stillborn and left him on the table. His father, a physician, revived Pablo by 
  • breathing air into his lungs.
  • Pablo Picasso has sold more works of art individually costing over one million dollars than any other artist. His 211 is well ahead of the 168 for Pierre 
  • Auguste Renoir.
  • Pablo Picasso's career lasted seventy-eight years, from 1895 until his death in 1973.
  • Pakistan was named in 1933 and is derived from the first letters of "Punjab," "Afghan," "Kashmir," "Sind," and "Tan." All of these are districts or states 
  • of what is now Pakistan.
  • Pamela Lee-Anderson was the first to be born in Canada on the centennial anniversary of Canada's independence (7/1/1967).
  • Panama is the only place in the world where someone can see the sun rise on the Pacific Ocean and set on the Atlantic.
  • Paper bags are outlawed in grocery stores in Afghanistan. They believe paper is sacred.
  • Paper was invented in the early second century by a Chinese eunuch.
  • Parker Brothers prints about 50 billion dollars worth of Monopoly money in one year, which is more than the real money printed in a year.
  • Parker Brothers was founded by George Swinerton Parker, 18, in 1885. The first game produced was 'Banking,' in which the player who amasses the 
  • most wealth is the winner.
  • Parrots, most famous of all talking birds, rarely acquire a vocabulary of more than twenty words, however Tymhoney Greys and African Greys have 
  • been know to carry vocabularies in excess of 100 words.
  • Patagonia at the southern tip of South America is the only populated land area south of 40 degrees South Latitude. By comparison, most of Europe, 
  • Asia, and two-thirds of North America are north of 40 degrees North Latitude.
  • Paul Gauguin's Marquesas Island neighbor, Tioka, bit him on the head after he died. Tioka was following a Marquesan custom of verifying the dead.
  • Paul Hornung holds the NFL record for the most points in a single season. He scored 176 points in 1960.
  • Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr were the two left-handed Beatles.
  • Paul Quincy Randolph Shermasn Thomas Uncas Victor William Xerxes Yancy Zeus Wolfeschlegelsteinhausenbergerdorft Sr.
  • Paul Reiser played the piano in the "Mad about You" theme.
  • PcGamer readers are all mighty and should be obeyed explicitly, lest they release the wrath of the Coconut Monkey upon the wrong doers.
  • Peanuts are beans.
  • Peanuts are one of the ingredients of dynamite.
  • Peanuts are one of the main ingredients in dynamite.
  • Peanuts are salted in the shell by boiling them in a heavily salted solution, then allowing them to dry.
  • Pearl Jam's first album, 10, was named in tribute of basketball player Mookie Blaylock who's number is 10
  • Pearls can melt/dissolve in vineger.
  • Pearls melt in vinegar.
  • Pears ripen from the inside out, and according to a survey on the lifestyle channel, men prefer hard pears while women prefer soft pears.
  • Pedals were added to the bicycle in 1839.
  • Penguins are not found in the North Pole
  • Penguins can jump as high as 6 feet in the air.
  • Penguins can leap to heights as high as six feet.
  • Penguins feathers are covered in fat, which helps keep them warm.
  • Penicillin was first produced synthetically in a laboratory in 1946.
  • Pennies are made of 95% copper and 5% zinc.
  • Penny Marshall was the first woman film director to have a film take in more than $100 million at the box office she accomplished this with the 1988 
  • flick Big.
  • People do not get sick from cold weather. It is mostly from being indoors more.
  • People drank gold powder mixed in with water in medieval Europe to relieve pain from sore limbs.
  • People photocopying their buttocks are the cause of 23% of all photocopier faults worldwide.
  • People say "bless you" when you sneeze because your heart stops for a millisecond.
  • People say that cracking your bones will cause arthritis when you get older. Actually all you are doing is popping air pockets, and does not cause 
  • arthritis.
  • People sneeze at about 90 miles per hour.
  • People will swallow about 8 spiders in their lifetime...mmm....yummy
  • Per capita, the Irish eat more chocolate than Americans, Swedes, Danes, French, and Italians.
  • Per-capita, Israel eats the most turkey based products in the world.
  • Percentage of Africa that is wilderness: 28% Percentage of North America that is wilderness: 38%
  • Perfume contains ethyl alcohol and 25% fragrant oils. Cologne is cheaper to produce and to purchase because the oil content in cologne is only 3%. 
  • Cologne was named for the German city in which it was first produced. The original formula combined alcohol, lemon spirits, orange bitters and mint 
  • oil.
  • Persians first began using colored eggs to celebrate spring in 3,000 B.C. 13th century Macedonians were the first Christians on record to use colored 
  • eggs in Easter celebrations. Crusaders returning from the Middle East spread the custom of coloring eggs, and Europeans began to use them to 
  • celebrate Easter and other warm weather holidays.
  • Pet parrots can eat virtually any common "people-food" except for chocolate and avocados. Both of these are highly toxic to the parrot and can be 
  • fatal.
  • Pierce Brosnan's first appearance as James Bond was in 1995 Golden Eye.
  • Pierre, the capital of South Dakota, is the only state capital name that shares no letters with the name of its state.
  • Pig vomit is used in perfume and cologne to hold the scent in
  • Pigeons can be killed by feeding them uncooked rice, either coz their stomach can't handle the carbohydrates or it swells in their throats and chokes 
  • them. No head popping.
  • Pigs, walruses and light-colored horses can be sunburned.
  • Pine, spruce, or other evergreen wood should never be used in barbecues. These woods, when burning or smoking, can add harmful tar and resins to 
  • the food. Only hardwoods should be used for smoking and grilling, such as oak, pecan, hickory, maple, cherry, alder, apple, or mesquite, depending 
  • on the type of meat being cooked.
  • Pineapples are classified as berries.
  • Pink elephants can be found in some regions of India. Because of the red soil, elephants take on a permanent pink color because the spray dust over 
  • their bodies to protect themselves from insects.
  • Pinocchio is Italian for 'Pine Eye'.
  • Pitcher Joe Nuxhall of the Cincinnati Reds hurled his first major-league game in 1944. Nuxhall, the youngest pitcher in major league baseball, was only 
  • 15 years, 10 months and 11 days old when he pitched that game against the St. Louis Cardinals.
  • Planet Jupiter spins so fast that there are 2 sunrises and 2 sunsets every 24 hours by earth time.
  • Planet Venus is the only planet to spin counter-clockwise.
  • Plant life could not exist without lightning. Nitrogen, an essential food for plants, comprises 80% of the atmosphere, but in a form that is insoluble 
  • and unusable. It's the intense heat of lightning that forces the nitrogen to combine with oxygen in the air, forming nitrogen oxides that are soluble in 
  • water and fall to the earth in rain as dilute nitric acid. This reacts with minerals in the ground to become the nitrates on which the plants depend.
  • Plants that need to attract moths for pollination are generally white or pale yellow, to be better seen when the light is dim. Plants that depend on 
  • butterflies, such as the poppy or the hibiscus, have more colorful flowers.
  • Playboy debuted the triple-page centerfold in the March 1956 issue. Marian Stafford took the honors.
  • Playing cards in India are round.
  • Playing cards were issued to British pilots in World War II. If captured, they could be soaked in water and unfolded to reveal a map fpr escape.
  • Pluto has the longest year, lasting 247 years and 256 days in Earth time (90,472 days including 61 leap years).
  • Poland's Stella Walsh (Stanislawa Walasiewicz)-won the women's 100-meter race at the 1932 Olympics in Los Angeles, becoming the first woman to 
  • break the 12-second barrier. When she was killed in 1980 as an innocent victim in a robbery attempt, an autopsy declared her to be a male.
  • Polar bears are left handed.
  • Polar bears are the only mammal with hair on the soles of its feet.
  • Polar bears do not have white fur, it is actually clear and hollow. the skin underneath this fur is actually black
  • Polaris is the closest visible star to true north and is thus referred to as the North Star. By sometime around the year 2100, the wobble of the Earth's 
  • axis will slowly begin pointing the North Pole away from Polaris. By the year 14,000 A.D., the new North Star will be Vega.
  • Police dogs were first used in 1816 in Scotland.
  • Pollsters say that 40% of dog and cat owners carry pictures of the pets in their wallets.
  • poop is a verb
  • Poor whites in Florida and Georgia are called "crackers." They got the name from their principal staple food, cracked corn. Another theory states that 
  • the name comes from the days when they would drive cattle southward using the "crack" of their bullwhips to keep the animals in line and moving.
  • Pope Adrian VI choked to death after a fly got stuck in his throat as he was taking a drink from a fountain
  • Pope John XXIII served as a sergeant in the Italian army during World War I.
  • Pope Leo VII (936-9) died of a heart attack during sex, Pope John VII (955-64) and John XIII (965-72) were bludgeoned to death by the husband of 
  • the woman he was with at the time, and Pope Paul II (1467-71) allegedly died while being sodomized by a page boy.
  • Porcupines float in water.
  • Portugal is the world's largest producer of cork.
  • POSSLQ in a census form means "Person of opposite sex sharing living Quarters"
  • Potato chips are American's favorite snack food. They are devoured at a rate of 1.2 billion pounds a year.
  • Potato chips were invented in Saratoga Springs in 1853 by chef George Crum. They were a mocking response to a patron who complained that his 
  • French fries were too thick.
  • Pound cake is so named not just because of the pound of butter, but more precisely because each of the four main ingredients (flour, butter, sugar 
  • and eggs) are weighed out as a pound.
  • Prague consumes 3 times more beer than all the soft drinks combined
  • Prairie dogs are not dogs. A prairie dog is a kind of rodent.
  • Precipitation causes K2 to be taller than Mount Everest for several weeks out of each year.
  • Pregnancy in humans lasts on average about 270 days (from conception to birth).
  • Pregnant female polar bears will not eat for several months while resting in her den under the snow. Thanx Tony W.
  • President Eisenhower also banished squirrels from the grounds because they were ruining the green.
  • President George Washington created the Order of the Purple Heart in 1782. It's a decoration to recognize merit in enlisted men and 
  • non-commissioned officers.
  • President Lincoln proclaimed the first national Thanksgiving Day in 1863.
  • Preys like buffalos react poorly to slow movements. That's why crocs can swim slowly over to them without them scuttering off.
  • Prince Charles and Prince William never travel on the same airplane in case there is a crash.
  • Prior to 1907, when the United States started mass production of asphalt from crude oil, the roads were paved from asphalt bought from Trinidad, 
  • which had a pitch lake that was the world's first large commercial source of natural asphalt.
  • Probably the best known multiple meaning is the hebrew word "SHALOM" which means, alternately, "hello", "good-bye", and "peace"
  • Proctor & Gamble originally manufactured candles before moving on to soap.
  • Producer Paul Maslansky was on the set of The Right Stuff when a bus from the local police academy rolled up. After a bunch of freaks walked off, a 
  • sergeant explained that the mayor had forced the department to loosen its acceptance standards. Not too long afterwards, Police Academy hit the 
  • theaters.
  • Professor Moriarity was Sherlock Holmes' archenemy.
  • Prostitution is legal in Canada, however running a brothel is not.
  • Prussic acid, in a crystalline powder called Zyklon B, was used to kill in Germany's gas chambers. The gas would paralyze the victim's lungs, causing 
  • them to suffocate.
  • Public telephones in Israel are no longer operated by tokens as they were in the past. They are now operated by magnetic cards known in Hebrew as 
  • a telecart (tel-eh-cart). These plastic cards, the same size and shape as a credit card, are available at post offices, some hotel reception desks, 
  • street kiosks and dispensing machines.
  • Pure electricity, when photographed, shows up as a brightly glowing liquid droplet flowing inside a tiny crystal.
  • Put fish skin or isinglass size of a nine-pence in pot when put on to boil or else the white and shell of half an egg to a couple of quarts of coffee."
  • Putty is a cement compound of fine powdered chalk or oxide of lead mixed with linseed oil.
  • Q is the only letter that does not appear in the names of any state of the Unites States.
  • Queen Victoria eased the discomfort of her menstrual cramps by having her doctor supply her with marijuana.
  • Quinine, one of the most important drugs known to man, is obtained from the dried bark of an evergreen tree native to South America.
  • Quito in Ecuador, South America, is said to have the most pleasant climate in the world. It is called the 'Land of Eternal Spring.' The temperature 
  • rarely drops below 46 degrees Fahrenheit during the night, or exceed 72 degrees Fahrenheit during the day.
  • Rabbits aren't rodents like most people think. They are actually Lagomorphs.
  • Rabbits can suffer from heat stroke.
  • Rabbits do in fact make sounds. When angry, upset, or frightened, a rabbit makes a sort of grunting/whimpering sound. It's actually quite interesting.
  • Rabbits have been the emblem of fertility because of its well-known talents for multiplying.
  • Rabbits have three eyelids, they also are incapable of burping or farting.
  • Racecar spelled backwards is racecar.
  • Radio and TV producer John Guedel was the originator of the musical commercial.
  • Rain falls at 11kmph (7mph)
  • Raindrops aren't actually tear-drop shaped. They are rounded at the top and flat on the bottom.
  • Rape is reported every six minutes in the U.S.
  • Raphael died on his birthday in 1520 at the age of 37. His artwork was so popular that he essentially worked himself to death.
  • Rats and horses can't vomit.
  • Rats are omnivorous, eating nearly any type of food, including dead and dying members of their own species.
  • Rats can survive without water longer than camels.
  • Rats cannot vomit
  • Rats multiply so quickly that in 18 months, two rats could have over million descendants.
  • Raw coffee beans, soaked in water and spices, are chewed like candy in many parts of Africa.
  • Recent epidemiological studies have shown that while excessive intake of alcohol kills off brain cells, it attacks the slowest and weakest brain cells 
  • first. Thus, regular consumption of beer helps eliminate the weaker cells, constantly making the brain a faster and more efficient machine.
  • Recent scientific research has has shown Duck's quacks DO echo, even though they are commonly thought not to because the echo is can not be 
  • heard by the human ear.
  • Red is the most popular car color in the U.S.
  • Red paint is the cheapest color to make.
  • Refried beans aren't really what they seem. Although their name seems like a reasonable translation of Spanish frijoles refritos, the fact is that these 
  • beans aren't fried twice. In Spanish, refritos literally means "well-fried," not "re-fried."
  • Reggie Jackson holds the major league record for most strikeouts with 2,597.
  • Regular coffee drinkers have about one-third less asthma symptoms than those non-coffee drinkers. So says a Harvard researcher who studied 
  • 20,000 people.
  • Reindeer milk has more fat than cow milk.
  • Rembrandt died broke. A friend had to come up with the $5.20 it cost to bury the great master.
  • Rene Descartes came up with the theory of coordinate geometry by looking at a fly walk across a tiled ceiling.
  • Research indicates that mosquitoes are attracted to people who have recently eaten bananas.
  • Research show that only 43% of homemade dinners served in the US include vegetables.
  • Retail espresso vendors report an increase in decaffeinated sales in the month of January due to New Year's resolutions to decrease caffeine intake.
  • Rhinos are part of the same family as horses.
  • Ribbon worms eat themselves if they cant find food
  • Rice and some other grains contain chemicals that can enhance brain functions.
  • Rice is the staple food of more than one-half of the world's population.
  • Rice paper isn't made from rice but from a small tree which grows in Taiwan.
  • Richard F. has pointed out possible inaccuracies with the trivia for December 16th and January 1st. For this reason, I have decided to pull them.
  • Richard Henry and Francis Lightfoot Lee are the only brothers who signed the Declaration of Independence. Their cousin, Henry Lee, was a famous 
  • Revolutionary War commander and the father of General Robert E. Lee.
  • Richard Millhouse Nixon was the first US president whose name contains all the letters from the word "criminal." William Jefferson Clinton is the 
  • second.
  • Richard Nixon was the 1st US president to visit China in February, 1972.
  • Ricin is a protein produced by the castor oil plant, Ricinus communis, which is highly toxic (the minimal lethal dose is around 1 µg / kg body weight, 
  • that means 1/15th of a milligram could kill a 150 lb. person). Ricin can be a dangerous contaminant, making the production of castor oil a precisely 
  • controlled process.
  • Rin Tin Tin was born to a war-dog mother in a German trench in France during World War I. Deserted when the Germans retreated, the German 
  • shepherd puppy was found by an American officer who happened to be a police-dog trainer from California. During Rin Tin Tin's training after the war, 
  • the dog's intelligence came to the attention of Warner Brothers, which signed the dog up for what turned out to be a long career as one of the 
  • biggest box-office draws of the silent screen era.
  • Rising sea levels caused by global warming could lead to major flooding in Shanghai and Guangzhou and other Chinese coastal cities by year 2050. 
  • This could cause 76 million people to become homeless.
  • Roasted coffee beans start to lose small amounts of flavor within two weeks. Ground coffee begins to lose its flavor in one hour. Brewed coffee and 
  • espresso begins to lose flavor within minutes.
  • Robert Goddard a scientist and holder of 214 patents fired the first rocket using liquid propellant in 1926.
  • Robert Peary, who left pieces of the flag scattered at the North Pole was honored for doing this.
  • Robert Todd Lincoln (Abraham Lincoln's oldest son) was in Washington DC during his father's assassination as well as during President Garfield's 
  • assassination, and he was in Buffalo NY when President McKinley was assassinated.
  • Robert Wadlow is regarded as the tallest man ever known. He was 8'11" at the time of his death at the age of 21.
  • Robert William Thomson, a Scottish engineer, invented the first rubber tire in 1845.
  • Rodents teeth never stop growing.
  • Roger Bannister of Great Britain was the first man to run a mile in under four minutes. On May 6, 1954, he ran the mile in 3 minutes 59.4 seconds.
  • Roman statues were made with detachable heads, so that one head could be removed and replaced by another.
  • Ronald Reagan married his first wife, Jane Wyman, at Forest Lawn Cemetery in Glendale, California.
  • Roosters can't crow if they can't fully extend their necks.
  • Rosalind Franklin was the woman behind Watson and Crick's doudle helix DNA model. She did all the experiments, but died before she was paid credit. 
  • Watson and Crick merely took her results and interpreted it.
  • Roseanne's fear is anyone touching her toes.
  • Roses may be red, but violets are indeed violet.
  • Rudolph the Red-nosed reindeer was actually created as a promotional figure for Montgommery Wards department stores.
  • Rubber bands last longer when refrigerated.
  • Rubbing cocoa butter on your abdomen during pregnancy will prevent stretch marks.
  • Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer, was created in 1939, in Chicago, for the Montgomery Ward department stores for a Christmas promotion. The 
  • lyrics were written as a poem by Robert May, but weren't set to music until 1947. Gene Autry recorded the hit song in 1949.
  • Rudyard Kipling was fired as a reporter for the San Francisco Examiner. His dismissal letter was reported to have said, "I'm sorry, Mr. Kipling, but you 
  • just don't know how to use the English language. This isn't a kindergarten for amateur writers."
  • Running cold water over the onion and the knife will keep you from crying when you cut it, because water neutralizes the chemical that makes you 
  • cry.
  • Rutgers beat Princeton 6-4 in the first ever college football game. At the time, a touchdown was worth only two points.
  • Rutherford Hayes became U.S. President by one vote.
  • Saffron, made from the dried stamens of cultivated crocus flowers, is the most expensive cooking spice.
  • Saint Isidore, or Seville, who lived in the 17th century, was believed to have written the world's first encyclopedia, the Etymologies. It included 
  • entries on medicine, mathematics, history and theology.
  • Salt caravans crossing the Sahara desert sometimes numbered as many as 40,000 camels.
  • Salt is mentioned more than 30 times in the Bible.
  • Salt was once a very precious commodity, so much that many people were paid
  • Samual Morse, who invented the telegraph, was originally a portrait painter and didn't give up painting to turn to inventing until he was 46 years old.
  • Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain) was born on and died on days when Halley's Comet can be seen. During his life he predicted that he would die when it 
  • could be seen.
  • Samuel Clemens [AKA Mark Twain] was born in 1835 when Haley's Comet came into view. When he died in 1910, Haley's Comet came into view again.
  • Sandy Koufax threw a no-hitter in four consecutive seasons between 1962-65. He's the only player to throw no-hitters in more than two straight 
  • seasons.
  • Santa Claus has a brother named Bells Nicholas who brings presents to children on New Year's Eve.
  • Santa's reindeer are: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Donner, and Blitzen.
  • Saudi Arabia covers an area of 830,000 sq. miles, yet there is not a single river in the whole country.
  • Scandinavia has the world's highest per capita annual coffee consumption, 26.4 pounds. Italy has an annual consumption per capita of only 10 
  • pounds.
  • Scarecrows frighten birds because of the human odor emitted from the clothes they wear. Come rain and wind, this odor dissapears. (tip for people 
  • who dont bathe often)
  • Scholars estimate that the 66 books of the King James version of the Bible were written by some 50 different authors.
  • Scholars have named the highest number that's been counted, a googleplex.
  • Scientists have discovered that the mating call of the Mediterranean fruit fly has exactly the same frequency as lower F# on a harmonica.
  • Scientists have figured out that the speed of nerve impulses in the brain is 404 feet per second. If an idea is complex enough to take 100 nerve 
  • messages from one side of the brain to the other, the thought could be completed in less than a tenth of a second.
  • Scientists have performed brain surgery on cockroaches.
  • Scorpions can be killed by pouring vinegar over them. They'll 'snap' and sting themself.
  • Scorpions can withstand 200 times more nuclear radiation than humans can.
  • Scotland has more redheads than any other part of the world.
  • Sea otters have the thickest fur of all animals.
  • Sea turtles don't age-they wont die unless they get an infection or get eaten by a larger animal. This means there could be a thousand year old 
  • turtle swimming around somewhere.....
  • Sea water is approximately 3.5 percent salt.
  • Sea water weighs about a pound and a half more per cubic foot than fresh water at the same temperature.
  • Sea water, loaded with mineral salts, weighs about a pound and a half more per cubit foot than fresh water at the same temperature.
  • Sears Roebuck and Company was founded in 1892 by Richard Warren Sears, a former railroad worker turned watch salesman, and Alvah Roebuck, a 
  • watchmaker.
  • Seattle passed an ordinance that states that goldfish could ride the city buses in bowls only if they kept still.
  • Second and third Presidents, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, both died on July 4, 1826.
  • Seeing eye dogs are color blind but can still read stop lights by the position of the 'on' light
  • Self-annointing is something only hedgehogs do, in which they lick or nibble on something, make a foamy paste in their mouths, and then spread it 
  • with their long tongues in little spots on their quills. No one has ever determined exactly why they do this.
  • Seoul, the South Korean capital, just means "the capital" in the Korean language.
  • Seven cities claim to be the birthplace of the Greek epic poet Homer. He is also thought to have been born in either 1159 B.C., 1102 B.C., 1044 B.C., 
  • 830 B.C., or 685 B.C.
  • Seven of the eight US Presidents who have died in office either through illness or assassination were elected at precisely 20-year intervals.
  • Seven suicides are recorded in the Bible.
  • Seven thousand years ago, the ancient Egyptians bowled on alleys similar to the ones in use today.
  • Several buildings in Manhattan, NY have their own zip code. For example the former World Trade Center has several.
  • Shakespeare and Cervantes died on the same day, April 23, 1616.
  • Shaquelle O'Neal [AKA Shaq] wears a size 22EEE shoe.
  • Sharks apparently are the only animals that never get sick. As far as is known, they are immune to every known disease including cancer.
  • Sharks are immune to cancer.
  • Sharon Stone was the first Star Search spokes model.
  • Shell color is determined by the breed of hen and has no effect on its quality, nutrients or flavor.
  • Sherlock Holmes NEVER said, "Elementary, my dear Watson".
  • Sherlock Holmes, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's brilliant detective, arrived on the mystery scene in the late nineteenth century in "A Study in Scarlet" 
  • (1887).
  • Shipwreck Kelly (1885-1952) set many flagpole-sitting records. He sat for 49 days on one flagpole. He once estimated that he spent a total of over 
  • 20,000 hours sitting on flagpoles. Flagpole sitting was a craze started in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1929.
  • Shirley Temple always has 56 curls in her hair. (talk about uptight).
  • Shirly Temple received 135,000 presents on her 8th birthday.
  • Shoe salesmen have been using those little wooden measuring sticks since 1657.
  • Shrimp have their heart in their head
  • Sigmund Freud had a morbid fear of ferns.
  • Since Hindus don't eat beef, the McDonald's in New Delhi makes its burgers with mutton.
  • Since the beginning of this fact, 3000 puppies were born in the U.S.A
  • Sing Sing prison in New York has a name derived from the Indian words for "stony place."
  • Sir Barton won the Belmont Stakes in New York in 1919, to become the first horse to capture the Triple Crown. This was the first time that the 
  • Belmont Stakes had been run as part of thoroughbred racing's most prestigious trio of events. Sir Barton had already won the first two jewels of the 
  • Triple Crown -the Kentucky Derby in Louisville, Kentucky and the Preakness Stakes in Maryland.
  • Sir Isaac Newton was an ordained priest in the Church of England.
  • Sir Isaac Newton was only 23 years old when he discovered the law of universal gravitation.
  • Six checker cabs are still in use in NYC.
  • Six eight-stud Lego pieces can be combined 102,981,500 ways.
  • Six ounces of orange juice contains the minimum daily requirement for vitamin C.
  • Skin is thickest, 1/5 inch, on the upper back. It is thinnest on the eyelids, which are only 1/50th inch thick
  • Slaves who lived under the Manchus the last emperors of China who ruled from 1644-1912 wore pigtails so that they could be picked out quickly.
  • Sliced bread was introduced under the Wonder Bread label in 1930.
  • Sliced bread was patented in 1954.
  • Slicing the ear off the bull is the main object to bullfighting in one form...then stabbing the bull through the neck into the spinal cord to kill it is the 
  • next goal...the matadors are allowed two tries for that. Next, two mules take the dead carcass out of the stadium and where they have a 
  • celebration in honor of the owner of the bull and a feast (guess what the main course is!).
  • Slugs have four noses.
  • Smith is the most common last name in the United States. A little over 1% of all Americans share that last name.
  • Smokers are likely to die on average six and a half years earlier than non-smokers.
  • Smokey the Bear's zip code is 20252.
  • Snakes are immune to their own poison.
  • Snakes have two sex organs... in case one drops off in their fervent attempt to trick females into mating..
  • 'Soldiers disease' is a term for morphine addiction. The Civil War produced over 400,000 morphine addicts.
  • Some baby giraffes are more than six feet tall at birth.
  • Some biblical scholars believe that Aramaic (the language of the ancient Bible) did not contain an easy way to say 'many things' and used a term 
  • which has come down to us as 40. This means that when the bible -in many places -refers to '40 days,' they meant many days.
  • Some biblical scholars believe that Aramaic (the language of the ancient Bible) did not contain an easy way to say "many things" and used a term 
  • which has come down to us as 40. This means that when the bible in many places refers to "40 days," they meant many days.
  • Some cultures kiss by biting off each other's eyelashes.
  • Some frogs like the wood frog and some turtles can stop their heart and frost their tissues during winter and defrost after that
  • Some frogs use sugars as an antifreeze for vital organs
  • Some horticulturists suspect that the banana was the earth's first fruit. Banana plants have been in cultivation since the time of recorded history. 
  • One of the first records of bananas dates back to Alexander the Great's conquest of India where he first discovered bananas in 327 B.C.
  • Some large clouds store enough water for 500000 showers
  • Some lions mate 50 times a day.
  • Some people have more bones in their feet than others.
  • Some reconstituted tobacco contains the same ingredients found in fart.
  • Some ribbon worms will eat themselves if they can't find any food.
  • Some toothpastes contain antifreeze.
  • Somebody actually timed a rattlesnake mating session that lasted 22.75 hours.
  • Sometime around 1050 some English boys looking for a diversion blew up an old cow bladder and began to kick it around. The new game would go on 
  • to be called soccer.
  • Sometime around 1325, the Aztecs were looking for a place to build their capital. A priest had interpreted an omen to mean the site should be where 
  • the found an eagle, perched on a cactus, devouring a snake. And that's why they chose what is now Mexico City; they found the eagle eating a 
  • snake while resting on a cactus. The scene is depicted on the Mexican flag.
  • son-in-law with all the mead he could drink. Mead is a honey beer, and because their calendar was lunar based, this period was called
  • Sound carries so well in the Arctic that on a calm day, a conversation can be heard from 1.8 miles away.
  • Source: Another Site
  • Source: brainofbrian.com
  • Source: Growing up jewish
  • Source: In an old dictionary (70 years old) in my basement
  • Source: Rabbit shows/fact books
  • Source: Some Encyclopedia
  • South Africa is the only country to have three capital cities: one for each branch of its government (Administrative, Legislative, and Judicial).
  • South Africa used to have two official languages, now it has eleven.
  • Southbridge, Massachusetts, makes it illegal to read books or newspapers after 8 p.m. in the streets.
  • Soybean actually has Diadzein and genistein that act like weak estrogen.
  • Special studies conducted about the human body revealed it will usually absorb up to about 300 milligrams of caffeine at a given time. About 4 
  • normal cups. Additional amounts are just cast off, providing no further stimulation. Also, the human body dissipates 20% of the caffeine in the 
  • system each hour.
  • Sperm banks keep their donor semen at approximately -321 degrees Fahrenheit. At that temperature, it could be kept indefinitely.
  • Spotted skunks do handstands before they spray.
  • Squirrels eat through 40,000 pine cones a year.
  • St. Augustine, Florida is the oldest city in the US.
  • St. Teresa of Avila is the patron saint of chess-players!!
  • Stag beetles have stronger mandibles than humans.
  • Stage bows were originally devised as a way for actors to thank the audience. The audience would or would not acknowledge each of the actors in 
  • turn, depending on how much they enjoyed the performance.
  • Stanford University engineers Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard started their company in a Palo Alto garage with $1,538. Their first product was an audio 
  • oscillator bought by Walt Disney studios for use in the movie Fantasia.
  • Stanley Kubrick approached Lloyd's of London about an insurance policy in case extraterrestrial life was discovered before the release of his movie 
  • 2001: A Space Odyssey.
  • Starfish eat by regurgitating their stomach on top of their food. If they dont like what they are eating they detach the stomach and grow a new 
  • one.
  • Starfish have eight eyes, one at the end of each leg.
  • Starfish have no brains.
  • Stars come in different colors; hot stars give off blue light, and the cooler stars give off red light.
  • Stars with really strong gravity cause themselves to become smaller and smaller and eventually turn into black holes.
  • State with the highest percentage of people who walk to work: Alaska.
  • Stephen Hawking was born exactly 300 years after Galileo died.
  • Sterling silver contains 7.5% copper.
  • Steve McQueen persuaded his karate teacher, kickboxing champion Chuck Norris, to pursue acting.
  • Steve Young, the San Francisco 49ers quarterback, is the great-great-grandson of Mormon leader Brigham Young.
  • Steven Speilberg calls Gweneth Paltrow "Gwynnie the pooh."
  • Stewardesses is the longest word that is typed using only the left hand.
  • Sting got his name from a black and yellow striped sweater he would wear a lot.
  • Sting was a high school teacher
  • Strawberries, raspberries, and cherries are not actually berries.
  • Streetcar conductors, taxi drivers, and business executives have the highest statistical chance of getting peptic ulcers.
  • Strength is the longest english word with only one vowel.
  • Strict Puritan laws had their origins from practical reasons. Smoking was banned farmers would raise badly needed food crops instead of tobacco. 
  • Cooking was banned on Sundays to prevent house fires during the long hours the family was at church. Young men were banned from hunting to 
  • prevent weapons from falling into Indian hands.
  • Studies have proven that it's harder to tell a convincing lie to someone you find sexually attractive.
  • Studies have shown that men become sexually aroused nearly every time they dream.
  • Studies show that, for some unknown reason, the higher the level of education, the more men tend to have wet dreams.
  • Stuttering is 4 to 6 times more common in boys than in girls.
  • Subbookkeeper is the only word with four pairs of double letters in a row.
  • Sugar was first added to chewing gum in 1869 by a dentist (William Semple).
  • Sugar was first added to chewing gum in 1869. Ironically, a dentist named William Semple was behind the decision.
  • Suit against G-d. He won because the defendant never showed up in court.
  • Sunday, July 20, 1969: Neil Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon, Edwin Aldrin was the second. They were members of Apollo 11, and 
  • landed in the Sea of Tranquility. The Lunar Excursion Module was named the "Eagle." Michael Collins stayed onboard the mother ship, "Columbia."
  • Swans are the only birds with penises.
  • Swaziland has banned miniskirts in schools in an effort to slow the spread of AIDS.
  • Swearing at someone over the phone in virginia is punishable by a $100 fine.
  • Sweden is the largest spender on ketchup. $4 per capita. Australia is second at $2.50
  • Sweden will be home of the worlds first fermented harring museum.
  • SWIMS is the longest word with 180-degree rotational symmetry (if you were to view it upside-down it would still be the same word and perfectly 
  • readable).
  • Swiss Steak, Chop Suey, Russian Dressing, and a Hamburger all originated in the US.
  • Syzygy is the term referring to when the moon is in a direct line with the earth and the sun. The average person knows this time to be a full or new 
  • moon.
  • Table tennis balls have been known to travel off a paddle at speeds up to 160 km/hr (approx. 100mph).
  • Talking on a cellular phone while driving is against the law in Israel.
  • Tallahassee, FL was the only Southern capital east of the Mississippi not captured during the U.S. Civil War.
  • Tangerines are named after the Moroccan city of Tangiers.
  • Tapeworms range in size from about 0.04 inch to more than 50 feet in length.
  • Tapioca is made from the starch in the roots of a poisonous plant known as bitter cassava.
  • Tarantulas can go up to 2 years without eating or drinking. Sea turtles can go up to 35 years without eating or drinking.
  • Tarantulas have retractable claws like cats and the hairs on their abdomen and back legs can stick into an enemy and itch. They also get bald on 
  • their thorax when they get old. Thanx Laura
  • Tasmania has the cleanest air in the inhabited world.
  • Tatum O'Neal is the youngest Oscar winner not to receive a Special Award. O'Neal was just 10 years old when she won the Best Supporting Actress 
  • award for Paper Moon. Shirley Temple is the youngest person to win an Academy Award when she was given the Special Award for Outstanding 
  • Contribution in 1934 at the age of 6.
  • Taurine, the main ingredient in Red Bull, is an extract of the stomach lining of cows
  • Tea was so expensive when it was first brought to Europe in the early 17th century that it was kept in locked wooden boxes.
  • Ten inches of snow equals one inch of rain in water content.
  • Ten percent of the salt mined in the world each year is used to de-ice the roads in America.
  • Tequila is made from the root of the blue agave cactus.
  • Tequila is thought to be the first distilled liquor in the Americas. The Aztecs were known to have drunk it before Cortez arrived.
  • Termites outnumber humans ten to one
  • Tessenjutsu is a deadly martial art in Japan that is based solely on the use of a fan.
  • Texas horned toads can shoot blood out of the corners or their eyes.
  • Texas is the only state that allows its residents to cast absentee ballots from space. This is because the Houston Space Center is home to most of 
  • the United States' astronauts. 
  • Texas was one of the first states to adopt capital punishment by lethal injection -in 1977.
  • Thanks to the electric light, the average American today sleeps 1.5 hours less each day than Americans of 60 years ago.
  • That means that if you put a baby croc in an aquarium, it would be little for the rest of its life.
  • That white, powdery stuff on the wings of moths is actually the way moths dispose of waste.
  • The "57" on the Heinz ketchup bottle represents the number of pickle types the company once had.
  • The "caduceus" the classical medical symbol of two serpents wrapped around a staff comes from an ancient Greek legend in which snakes revealed 
  • the practice of medicine to human beings.
  • The "countdown" (counting down from 10 for an event such as New-Years Day) was first used in a 1929 German silent film called "Die Frau Im 
  • Monde" (The Girl in the Moon).
  • The "Daddy long legs" spider has venom to be used as a defensive mechanism. Don't worry though, coz it cannot puncture human skin, and even if it 
  • did, it would PROBABLY only cause a allergic reaction
  • The "honey month" or what we know today as the "honeymoon."
  • The "huddle" in football was formed due a deaf football player who used sign language to communicate and his team didn't want the opposition to 
  • see the signals he used and in turn huddled around him.
  • The "if" and "then" parts of conditional ("if P then Q") statement are called the protasis (P) and apodosis (Q).
  • The "London Bridge" is now in Arizona in the U.S.A. This fat cat(rich guy) bought it for only $2.46 million dollars.
  • The "Miss America" pageant made its network TV debut on ABC In 1954. Miss California, Lee Ann Meriwether, was crowned the winner.
  • The "O" when used as a prefix in Irish surnames means "descendant of."
  • The "save" icon in Microsoft Office programs shows a floppy disk with the shutter on backwards.
  • The "save" icon in Microsoft©®™ Word's toolbar shows a floppy disk with the shutter on backwards.
  • The "Sesame Street" characters Bert and Ernie were named after Bert the cop and Ernie the cab driver in Frank Capra's "It's A Wonderful Like."
  • The "sixth sick sheik's sixth sheep's sick" is said to be the toughest tongue twister in the English language.
  • The "spot" on the 7-Up logo comes from its inventor who had red eyes. He was an albino.
  • The "Spruce Goose" flew on November 2, 1947, for one mile, at a maximum altitude of 70 feet. Built by Howard Hughes, it is the largest aircraft ever 
  • built, the 140-ton eight-engine seaplane, made of birch, has a wingspan of 320 feet. It was built as a prototype troop transport. Rejected by the 
  • Pentagon, Hughes put the plane into storage, never to be flown again.
  • The "Twelve Days of Christmas" gifts: A partridge in a pear tree, two turtledoves, three French hens, four calling birds, five gold rings, six geese 
  • laying, seven swans swimming, eight maids milking, nine ladies dancing, ten lords leaping, eleven pipers piping, and twelve drummers drumming. 
  • (There are 364 gifts altogether)
  • The "y" in signs reading "ye olde.." is properly pronounced with a "th" sound, not "y". The "th" sound does not exist in Latin, so ancient Roman 
  • occupied (present day) England used the rune "thorn" to represent "th" sounds. With the advent of the printing press the character from the Roman 
  • alphabet which closest resembled thorn was the lower case "y".
  • The "You Are Here" arrow on maps is called an ideo locator.
  • The # symbols is often referred to as a "number sign" or "pound sign." Its actual name is an octothorpe
  • The 1922 Essex was the first popularly priced car available with a closed body. The two-door, six-cylinder sedan was called the Essex Coach and 
  • sold for $945.
  • The 1932 Olympics in Los Angeles was the first time the three-level winner's stand was used for the medal ceremony.
  • The 1st 20 African slaves were brought to the US, to the colony of Virginia in 1619, by a Dutch ship.
  • The 1st Academy Awards ceremony to be telecast was the 25th, in 1953.
  • The 1st Academy Awards were presented in 1927.
  • The 1st annual Grammy Awards were awarded in 1959. The Record of the Year was "Volare" by Domenico Modugno, the Album of the Year was "Peter 
  • Gunn" by Henry Mancini and the winner of the best R&B performance was "Tequila" by Champs.
  • The 1st buffalo ever born in captivity was born at Chicago's Lincoln Park Zoo in 1884.
  • The 1st CMA (Country Music Association) Awards, hosted by Sonny James and Bobbie Gentry, were presented at an awards banquet and show in 
  • 1967.
  • The 1st comic strip was "The Yellow Kid," in the New York World in 1896. The cartoonist was Richard Felton Outcault.
  • The 1st feature-length animated film, released by Disney Studios in 1937, was "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs."
  • The 1st inductees to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1961 were Jimmie Rodgers, Fred Rose and Hank Williams were.
  • The 1st interracial kiss on TV took place Nov. 22, 1968 between Captain James T. Kirk (William Shatner) and Lt.Uhura (Nichelle Nichols) on an 
  • episode of "Star Trek."
  • The 1st kiss in a movie was between May Irwin and John Rice in "The Widow Jones," in 1896.
  • The 1st live televised murder was in 1963, when Jack Ruby killed JFK's assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald while millions of viewers watched.
  • The 1st nuclear-powered submarine, the Nautilus, commissioned by the United States Navy in 1954, made her maiden voyage on Jan. 17, 1955.
  • The 1st performance of Handel's "Messiah" was on April 13, 1742 at the New Music rooms in Fishamble St., Dublin. Because of the demand for space, 
  • the men were asked not to wear their swords and the ladies not to wear hooped skirts.
  • The 1st personal computer, the Apple II, went on sale in 1977.
  • The 1st presidential news conference filmed for TV was in 1955. Eisenhower was the president.
  • The 1st televised presidential debate was September 26, 1960, between Nixon and Kennedy.
  • The 1st time the "f-word" was spoken in a movie was by Marianne Faithfull in the 1968 film, "I'll Never Forget Whatshisname." In Brian De Palma's 
  • 1984 movie, "Scarface," the word is spoken 206 times an average of once every 29 seconds.
  • The 1st unattended, 24-hour self-service laundromat in the United States was opened by Nelson Puett in 1949 on North Loop in Austin, Texas.
  • The 1st US federal holiday honoring Martin Luther King, Jr. was in 1986.
  • The 1st US federal legislation prohibiting narcotics (opium) was enacted in 1909.
  • The 1st US federal penitentiary building was completed at Leavenworth, Kansas in 1906.
  • The 1st US Minimum Wage Law was instituted in 1938. The minimum wage was 25 cents per hour.
  • The 1st US Mormon temple was dedicated in Kirtland, Ohio in 1836.
  • The 1st US zoo was built in Philadelphia, PA, in 1876.
  • The 1st winner of the Academy Award for best picture, and the only silent film to achieve that honor, was the 1927 film, "Wings."
  • The 2,000 Arabica coffee cherries it takes to make a roasted pound of coffee are normally picked by hand as they ripen. Since each cherry contains 
  • two beans, it takes about 4,000 Arabica beans to make a pound of roasted coffee.
  • The 26 letters of our alphabet can make 403,290,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 different combinations.
  • The 3 Magi:(or Wise Men) and their gifts: Melchoir, "king of light," offered Gold, Gaspar ,"or the white one," offered frankincense, and Balthazar, "lord 
  • of treasures," offered myrrh.
  • The 5 oldest colleges in the U.S. are, in order, Harvard, William & Mary, Yale, Princeton, and Penn.
  • The 7 Dwarfs are Happy, Grumpy, Dopey (the beardless one), Doc, Bashful, Sneezy, Sleepy. They were miners.
  • The 772-778 Digits of pi are 9999998.
  • The abbreviation 'ORD' for Chicago's O'Hare airport comes from the old name 'Orchard Field.'
  • The Academy Award was rumored to have gotten its nickname of Oscar for its resemblance to a film librarian's Uncle Oscar.
  • The act of snapping your fingers has a name: fillip.
  • The active ingredient in smelling salts is ammonia.
  • The Agen plum which would become the basis of the US prune industry was first planted in California in 1856.
  • The air we breathe is 78% nitrogen, 21.5% oxygen, .5% argon and other gases.
  • The air we breathe is comprised of 78% nitrogen, 21.5% oxygen and 0.5% argon.
  • The airplane, Buddy Holly died in, was the "American Pie," which is where Don McLarean got the song title from.
  • The American Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) was formed in 1866.
  • The amount of drag or air resistance produced by putting your bicycle on top of your car is so great that on a trip from England to Scotland it would 
  • be cheaper to send it by train because of the fuel consumption to overcome the drag
  • The anaconda, one of the world's largest snakes, gives birth to its young instead of laying eggs.
  • The ancient Egyptians slept on pillows made of stone.
  • The ancient Egyptians trained baboons to wait on tables.
  • The ancient Romans built such an excellent system of roads that the saying arose "all roads lead to Rome," that is, no matter which road one starts 
  • a journey on, he will finally reach Rome if he keeps on traveling. The popular saying came to mean that all ways or methods of doing something end 
  • in the same result, no method being better than another.
  • The anemometer is an instrument which measures the force, velocity, or pressure of the wind.
  • The Angel falls in Venezuela are nearly 20 times taller than Niagara Falls.
  • The Angel Falls in Venezuela is the highest waterfall in the world, its waters drop from over 3,200 feet.
  • The animal responsible for the most human deaths world-wide is the mosquito.
  • The animal that tends to cling to rocks and boats are barnacles.
  • The animal whose brain accounts for the largest share of its body weight is the squirrel monkey. It's brain makes up about 5% of its total weight.
  • The animal with the largest brain in proportion to its size is the ant.
  • The annual Night of the Radishes is held in Oaxaca, Mexico. It's held on December 23rd of every year as part of a pre-Christmas tradition. Farmers 
  • carve figures from radishes and display them in the city's main plaza.
  • The annual White House Easter egg-roll was started by President Hayes in 1878.
  • The ant can lift 50 times its own weight.
  • The anti-malarial drug quinine is taken from the bark of the Andean cinchona tree.
  • The Apollo 11 plaque left on the Moon says, "Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the Moon July 1969, A.D. / WE CAME IN PEACE FOR 
  • ALL MANKIND."
  • The apricot can be traced back to China at least four thousand years ago, and it first appeared in Greek mythology as the "golden apple".
  • The Arabica is the original coffee plant. It still grows wild in Ethiopia. The arabica coffee tree is an evergreen and in the wild will grow to a height 
  • between 14 and 20 feet.
  • The Arabs are generally believed to be the first to brew coffee.
  • The Arctic ocean is the smallest and shallowest. The Arctic Ocean is the world's smallest ocean. It is mostly covered by solid ice, ice floes, and 
  • icebergs.
  • The aroma and flavor derived from coffee is a result of the little beads of the oily substance called coffee essence, coffeol, or coffee oil. This is not 
  • an actual oil since it dissolves in water.
  • The art of knitting originated in Scotland.
  • The ashes of the average cremated person weigh 9 pounds.
  • The Atlantic Ocean has a greater salt content than the Pacific Ocean.
  • The Australian emu holds the land speed record for birds (31 mph).
  • The average 3 year-old watches about 30 hours of television a week.
  • The average adult guinea pig weighs 2 pounds.
  • The average adult has about 3,500 square inches of skin. The skin itself has roughly a billion pores or openings.
  • The average adult male ostrich, the world's largest living bird, weighs up to 345 pounds.
  • The average adult raccoon weighs 21 pounds.
  • The average age of an Italian barista is 48 years old. A barista is a respected job title in Italy.
  • The average American consumes over 28 pounds of bananas each year.
  • The average American spends 120 hours a month watching television, the equivalent of five complete days in front of the TV.
  • The average American will eat 35,000 cookies in a lifetime.
  • The average American woman spends 55 minutes per day getting showered, dressed, and groomed.
  • The average annual coffee consumption of the American adult is 26.7 gallons, or over 400 cups.
  • The average bank teller loses about $250 every year.
  • The average bra is designed to last for only 180 days of use.
  • The average capacity of a pelican's pouch is 12 quarts.
  • The average cat consumes about 127,750 calories a year, nearly 28 times its own weight in food and the same amount again in liquids.
  • The average chicken lays about 260 eggs a year.
  • The average child recognizes over 200 company logos by the time he enters first grade.
  • The average child will eat 1,500 PB sandwiches by high school graduation.
  • The average chocolate bar has 8 insects' legs melted into it.
  • The average cod deposits between 4 and 6 million eggs at a single spawning.
  • The average cough comes out of your mouth at 60MPH.
  • The average cow produces 40 glasses of milk each day.
  • The average cup of coffee contains more than 1000 different chemical components, none of which is tasted in isolation but only as part of the 
  • overall flavor.
  • The average duration of sexual intercourse for humans is 2 minutes.
  • The average elephant produces 50 pounds of dung each day.
  • The average elephant weighs less than the average blue whale's tongue
  • The average family will spend $250,000 (thats a quarter million dollars) on each child from the time he/she is born until he/she turns 18.
  • The average flea can jump up to 350 times its own length. To match that a human would have to jump 1,000 feet.
  • The average fox weighs 14 pounds.
  • The average garden variety caterpillar has 248 muscles in its head.
  • The average healthy human being farts 16 times a day.
  • The average healthy porpoise lives 30 years.
  • The average home size in the United States is now 2,200 square feet, up from 1,400 square feet in 1970, according to the National Association of 
  • Home Builders.
  • The average housefly lives for only two weeks.
  • The average human body contains enough: iron to make a 3 inch nail,sulfur to kill all fleas on an average dog, carbon to make 900 pencils, potassium 
  • to fire a toy cannon, fat to make 7 bars of soap, phosphorous to make 2,200 match heads, and water to fill a ten-gallon tank.
  • The average human body has enough fat to make 7 bars of soap.
  • The average human breathes about 700,000 cubic inches of air every day.
  • The average human eats 8 spiders in his/her lifetime at night.
  • The average human head weighs about eight pounds.
  • The average human produces 10,000 gallons of saliva in a life time.
  • The average human produces 25,000 quarts of spit in a lifetime, enough to fill two swimming pools.
  • The average lead pencil will draw a line 35 miles long or write approximately 50,000 English words.
  • The average life expectancy of a beaver in captivity is five years.
  • The average life expectancy of a kangaroo in captivity is 7 years.
  • The average life expectancy of a leopard in captivity is 12 years.
  • The average life expectancy of a rhinoceros in captivity is 15 years.
  • The average life expectancy of a toilet is 50 years.
  • The average life expectancy of geese, barring all accidents, is 25 years.
  • The average life span of a moose is 15 to 25 years.
  • The average life span of a mosquito is two weeks.
  • The average life span of a taste bud is 10 days.
  • The average life span of the hedgehog is 10 years.
  • The average lifespan of a Major League baseball is five to seven pitches.
  • The average light bulb can last for about 750 to 1,000 hours.
  • The average litter of Mexican wolves is between four and seven pups.
  • The average llama weighs 375 pounds.
  • The average marathon runner's heart beats about 175 times per minute during a race. A typical adult's heart beats 68 times a minute at rest.
  • The average mature oak tree sheds approximately 700,000 leaves in the fall.
  • The average number of cars stolen per day in Mexico City this year is 124.
  • The average number of peanuts in a box of Cracker Jacks is 27.
  • The average per capita consumption of soap, in all of its uses, in the United States is about forty pounds per year.
  • The average person drinks about 16, 000 gallons of water in a lifetime.
  • The average person falls asleep in seven minutes.
  • The average person grows up to 6 feet of nose hair.
  • The average person has over 1,460 dreams a year
  • The average person in the United States watches 239 minutes of television per day.
  • The average person ingests about a ton of food and drink each year.
  • The average person is about a quarter of an inch taller at night.
  • The average person loses an average of 40 to 100 strands of hair a day.
  • The average person produces 25,000 quarts of spit in a lifetime, enough to fill two swimming pools.
  • The average person releases nearly a pint of intestinal gas by flatulence every day. Most is due to swallowed air. The rest is from fermentation of 
  • undigested food.
  • The average person swallows one liter of snot every day. This is from the MN Science Museum.
  • The average person uses the bathroom 6 times per day.
  • The average person walks the equivalent of twice around the world in a lifetime.
  • The average person's hair will grow approximately 590 inches in a lifetime.
  • The average person's left hand does 56% of the typing.
  • The average person's scalp has 100,000 hairs.
  • The average porcupine has more than 30,000 quills.
  • The average porpoise weighs 103 pounds.
  • The average raindrop falls at 7 miles per hour.
  • The average snail moves at a rate of approximately 0.000362005 miles per hour.
  • The average speed for a migrating duck is fifty miles per hour.
  • The average steer reaches sexual maturity six months after birth.
  • The average US male will spend 2,965 hours shaving during his lifetime.
  • The Aztecs of Mexico roasted and ground up the cacao bean, mixed it with water, added peppers and other spices, stirred it up to a froth and drank 
  • the pungent mixture they called "chocolatl."
  • The Baby Ruth candy bar was named after Grover Cleveland's baby daughter, Ruth, not Babe Ruth the baseball player.
  • The bagpipe was originally made from the whole skin of a dead sheep.
  • The banana is the most prolific of all food plants with as many as 300 bananas growing on the same stalk.
  • The banana market is controlled by five large corporations Chiquita (25%), Dole (25%), Del Monte (15%), Noboa (11%) and Fyffes (8%). Most 
  • bananas are grown on huge plantations, controlled by these corporate giants. The remaining banana production for export comes from small banana 
  • producers.
  • The banana plant reaches its full height of 15 to 30 feet in about one year. The trunk of a banana plant is made of sheaths of overlapping leaves, 
  • tightly wrapped around each other like celery stalks.
  • The bands on hats traces back to the custom on knights wearing their lady loves' scarves around the helmet.
  • The banjo is America's only true native musical instrument. It was first developed in the South in the 1790s.
  • The barn owl has one ear higher than the other. The left ear is higher and points downward to hear sounds from below it, while the right ear is lower 
  • and pointed upward to pick up sounds from above.
  • The base of the Great Pyramid of Egypt is large enough to cover 10 football fields.
  • The basis of the Macintosh computer was Apple's Lisa which was released in 1983. This was the first system to utilize a GUI or Graphical User 
  • Interface. The first Macintosh was released in 1984.
  • The Beatles' 1st song to hit the UK charts was "From Me to You" in June, 1963.
  • The Beatles song "Dear Prudence" was written about Mia Farrow's sister, Prudence, when she wouldn't come out and play with Mia and the Beatles 
  • at a religious retreat in India.
  • The Beatles were depicted in wax at Madame Tussaud's Wax Museum in London, in 1964, the first pop album stars to be honored.
  • The Beatles were George Harrison, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, and Ringo Starr. But there were also two lesser known, previous members of the 
  • band: Pete Best and Stu Sutcliffe.
  • The BEAVER, is America's largest rodent and can remain underwater for 20 minutes! erm... sealions can do that as well (just something random)
  • The beluga whale, otherwise known as the white whale, is nicknamed the "sea canary" because of the birdlike chirping sounds it makes.
  • The best recorded distance for projectile vomiting is 27 feet.
  • The bestselling books of all time are The Bible (6billion+), Quotations from the Works of Mao Tse-tung (900million+), and The Lord of the Rings 
  • (100million+)
  • The Bible devotes some 500 verses on prayer, less than 500verses on faith, but over 2000 verses on money and posessions.
  • The Bible does not say there were three wise men; it only says there were three gifts.
  • The bible does not specify exactly how many wise men were sent to Bethleham.
  • The Bible has been translated into Klingon.
  • The Bible is the best selling book of all time with approximately six billion books sold. The second-best selling book is Quotations from the Works of 
  • Mao Tse-Tung with about 800 million sales.
  • The Bible was written by about 40 men over a period of about 1600 years dating from 1500 BC to about 100 years after Christ.
  • The big differences between pythons and boa constrictors: pythons are longer and lay eggs. Boas give birth to live babies.
  • The Big Room at Carlsbad Caverns in New Mexico is 2,500 feet in length, 600 feet wide, and 250 feet high.
  • The biggest member of the cat family is the male lion, which weighs 528 pounds (240 kilograms).
  • The biggest specie of apes are the gorillas.
  • The biro was invented by George and Lazio Biro.
  • The Black Death reduced the population of Europe by one third in the period from 1347 to 1351.
  • The Black Hole, 1979, was Disney's first PG-rated movie.
  • The blood of mammals is red, the blood of insects is yellow, and the blood of lobsters is blue.
  • The bloodhound is the only animal whose evidence is admissible in an American court.
  • The blue whale has a heart the size of a small car and its blood vessal is so broad, that a person could swim through it.
  • The board game Monopoly was originally rejected by Parker Brothers, who claimed it had 52 fundamental errors.
  • The body can function without a brain. And anyone who has walked around the city on a Saturday night will know what I mean.
  • The body's largest internal organ is the small intestine at an average length of 20 feet
  • The bones of a pigeon weigh less than its feathers.
  • The book The Doors of Perception, by Aldous Huxley, was the inspiration behind Jim Morrison naming his band The Doors. The book extolls the use of 
  • hallucinogenic drugs.
  • The border between Canada and the U.S. is the world's longest frontier. It stretches 3,987 miles (6,416 km).
  • The botanical name of the chocolate plant is Theobramba cacao, which means "Food of the Gods."
  • The brewing of beer is recorded as far back as 6,000 years ago. Until the 12th century (when skilled experts took over), women performed the task 
  • of making beer as part of their household chores.
  • The bridge across the Niagra Falls began with a kite carrying a line across it.
  • The brightest star in history was the supernova of 1054, which formed the Crab Nebula. It was brighter than Venus and bright enough to be seen in 
  • daylight and to cast a shadow at night. We know about it through the astronomic records of China and Japan.
  • The Brownie box camera, introduced by Eastman Kodak, sold for $1.00 in 1900. The camera's 6-exposure film sold for 15 cents.
  • The bubbles in Guiness beer sink to the bottom rather than float to the top as in other beers.
  • The Burramundy, a fish, grows up as a male, but after 2 years or so, it turns into a female to breed. (i think papaya(papua?) trees are the same)
  • The Butterfinger candy bar was first produced by Chicago's Curtiss Candy Co. in 1923. As an advertising ploy, candy bars were dropped from an 
  • airplane on cities in 40 states.
  • The California grape and wine industries were started by Count Agoston Haraszthy de Moksa, who planted Tokay, Zinfandel, and Shiras varieties from 
  • his native Hungary in Buena Vista in 1857.
  • The California redwood coast redwood and giant sequoia are the tallest and largest living organism in the world.
  • The calories burned daily by the sled dogs running in Alaska's annual Iditarod race average 10,000. The 1,149-mile race commemorates the 1925 
  • "Race for Life" when 20 volunteer mushers relayed medicine from Anchorage to Nome to battle a children's diphtheria epidemic.
  • The Canadian government legalized marijuana for medicinal use in 1999. After discovering a shortage of local growers they began to import the dope 
  • from Mississippi.
  • The Canary Islands were not named for a bird called a canary. They were named after a breed of large dogs. The Latin name was Canariae insulae 
  • "Island of Dogs."
  • The candy bar, Baby Ruth, is named after President Clevelands' daughter, not Babe Ruth the baseball player.
  • The Cannes Film Festival was conceived in 1938 by two French journalists while they were traveling by train to the Venice Film Festival.
  • The canning process for herring was developed in Sardinia, which is why canned herrings are better known as sardines.
  • The cashew nut in its natural state contains a poisonous oil. Roasting removes the oil and makes the nuts safe to eat.
  • The cat lover is an ailurophile, while a cat hater is an ailurophobe.
  • The caterpillar has more than 2,000 muscles
  • The catfish has over 27,000 taste buds.
  • The catgut formerly used as strings in tennis rackets and musical instruments does not come from cats. Catgut actually comes from sheep, hogs, 
  • and horses.
  • The Catholic Church only declared in 1992 that the earth may go round the sun.
  • The center of the earth is almost 4000 miles beneath our feet.
  • The chameleon has several cell layers beneath its transparent skin. These layers are the source of the chameleon's color change. Some of the layers 
  • contain pigments, while others just reflect light to create new colors. Several factors contribute to the color change. A popular misconception is that 
  • chameleons change color to match their environment. This isn't true. Light, temperature, and emotional state commonly bring about a chameleon's 
  • change in color. The chameleon will most often change between green, brown and gray, which coincidently, often matches the background colors of 
  • their habitat.
  • The chances for a mother giving birth to quadruplets (four Childs) are almost 1 in 600,000.
  • The chances of an exact duplication of fingerprints are about 64 billion to 1.
  • The channel between England and France grows 300mm each year.
  • The characters Bert and Ernie on Sesame Street were named after Bert the cop and Ernie the taxi driver in Frank Capra's "It's a Wonderful Life".
  • The characters of Homer, Marge, Lisa, and Maggie were given the same first names as Simpsons creator Matt Groening's real-life father, mother, and 
  • two sisters.
  • The Charlotte Dundas, a paddle-wheel steamboat, was the world's first steam-powered vessel, not Robert Fulton's Clermont. In 1802, five years 
  • before Fulton's famous ship took sail, The Dundas was a steam-powered tugboat in Great Britain.
  • The cheetah is the only cat in the world that can't retract its claws.
  • The chemical n-acetyl-cysteine found in raw eggs is proven to help hangovers.
  • The Chinese language does not require punctuation.
  • The Chinese were using aluminum to make things as early as 300 AD Western civilization didn't rediscover aluminum until 1827.
  • The Chinese, during the reign of Kublai Khan, used lions on hunting expeditions. They trained the big cats to pursue and drag down massive animals 
  • from wild bulls to bears and to stay with the kill until the hunter arrived.
  • The chow-chow and the Chinesse Shar-Pei are the only dogs that have a black tongue. The tongues of all other dogs are pink.
  • The Church of Scientology was founded in 1953, at Washington DC, by US science fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard.
  • The cigarette lighter was invented before the match. 
  • The citrus industry started in the United States in 1873 when two Riverside, CA ranchers obtained some orange saplings from the U.S. Department of 
  • Agriculture. Two years earlier, the government had secured a dozen saplings from Brazil.
  • The City of Istanbul straddles two separate continents, Europe and Asia.
  • The city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania is the only city where all major sports teams share the same colors (black and gold).
  • The city of St. Petersburg, Russia, was founded in 1703 by Peter the Great, hence the name, St. Petersburg. But it wasn't always that simple. In 
  • 1914, at the beginning of World War I, Russian leaders felt that Petersburg was too German-sounding. So they changed the name of the city to 
  • Petrograd -to make it more Russian-sounding. Then, in 1924, the country's Soviet Communist leaders wanted to honor the founder of the Soviet 
  • Union, Vladimir I. Lenin. The city of Petrograd became Leningrad and was known as Leningrad until 1991 when the new Russian legislators -no longer 
  • Soviet Communists -wanted the city to reflect their change of government.
  • The city of Venice stands on about 120 small islands.
  • The Civil War in the United States elevated the popularity of coffee to new heights. Soldiers went to war with coffee beans as a primary ration.
  • The clock at the National Bureau of Standards in Washington, D.C. will gain or lose only one second every 300 years.
  • The clock tower that supports the famous clock 'Big Ben' at the house of parliament in London, is 320 feet high. The bell from which the clock get it's 
  • name, weighs 13.5 tones.
  • The closest star to the sun, Alpha Centauri, is never visible in the sky north of about 30 degrees Northern Lattitude.
  • The cockroach has a high resistance to radiation and is the creature most likely to survive a nuclear war.
  • The cockroach is the fastest animal on 6 legs, covering a meter a second.
  • The Code of Hammurabi made it forbidden to randomly mistreat slaves. However, the code also stated that slaves were to be branded on the 
  • forehead and forbidden to hide or mask the mark.
  • The coffee filter was invented in 1908 by a German homemaker, Melitta Benz, when she lined a tin cup with blotter paper to filter the coffee grinds.
  • The coffee tree produces its first full crop when it is about 5 years old. Thereafter it produces consistently for 15 or 20 years.
  • The coldest capital city in the world is Ulaan Bator, Mongolia.
  • The coldest outdoor temperature ever recorded on earth was 127 below zero in Antarctica on August 24, 1960.
  • The color of a chile is no indication of its spiciness, but size usually is the smaller the pepper, the hotter it is.
  • The combination "ough" can be pronounced in 9!! different ways; Read this: "A rough-coated, dough-faced, thoughtful ploughman strode through the 
  • streets of Scarborough; after falling into a slough, he coughed and hiccoughed."
  • The combination "ough" can be pronounced in nine different ways. The following sentence contains them all: "A rough-coated, dough-faced, 
  • thoughtful ploughman strode through the streets of Scarborough; after falling into a slough, he coughed and hiccoughed."
  • The common goldfish is the only animal that can see both infrared and ultra-violet light.
  • The complete skin covering of the body measures about 20 sq. feet.
  • The complete title of the Statue of Liberty is Liberty Enlightening the World
  • The complete works of Shakespeare can be stored on 5 Megabytes.
  • The computer in 2001: A Space Odyssey as a tongue-in-cheek reference to IBM. The name was derived from the fact that the letters H-A-L 
  • precede the letters I-B-M in the alphabet.
  • The computer programming language ADA was named in honor of Augusta Ada King. The U.S. Defense Department named the language after the 
  • Countess of Lovelace and daughter of Lord Byron because she helped finance and program what is thought to be the first computer, the "analytical 
  • engine" designed by Charles Babbage.
  • The condensed water vapor in the sky left behind by jets is called a contrail.
  • The condom made originally of linen was invented in the early 1500's.
  • The correct name for the capital city of Thailand is rung Thep, and it's been this way for over 130 years. Foreigners persist on calling it Bangkok.
  • The correct response to the Irish greeting, "Top of the morning to you," is "and the rest of the day to yourself."
  • The country of Losotho is completely surrounded by the country of South Africa.
  • The country of Tanzania has an island called Mafia.
  • The country of Tonga once issued a stamp shaped like a banana.
  • The country with the highest rate of cremations is Japan. In 1996, 98.7% of all deaths were cremated.
  • The creators of a new model of Chevys couldn't figure out why their car, the Nova, wasn't selling well in Hispanic countries... until someone pointed 
  • out that 'Nova' means 'No go' in Spanish.
  • The crew of Apollo 11 who put the first man on the moon have the same initials as the first men on earth. Armstrong : Adam Aldrin : Abel Collins : 
  • Cain
  • The crow is the smartest of all birds.
  • The cruise liner Queen Elizabeth II moves only six inches for each gallon of diesel that it burns.
  • The cruise liner, QE2, moves only six inches for each gallon of diesel that it burns.
  • The Cullinan Diamond is the largest gem-quality diamond ever discovered. Found in 1905, the original 3,100 carats were cut to make jewels for the 
  • British Crown Jewels and the British Royal family's collection.
  • The curvature of the earth is pretty close to eight inches every mile, or 66 feet every hundred miles.
  • The daughter of confectioner Leo Hirschfield is commemorated in the name of the sweet he invented: Although his daughter's real name was Clara, 
  • she went by the nickname Tootsie, and in her honor, her doting father named his chewy chocolate logs Tootsie Rolls.
  • The Death Star death ray control panel from the original is actually the control panel of Grass Valley Group GVG 300 Video (television) production 
  • switcher
  • The Declaration of Independence was written on hemp (a variety of the marijuana plant) paper
  • The deepest hole ever made in the world is in Texas. It is as deep as 20 empire state buildings but only 3 inches wide. (Who made it? A petroleum 
  • company)
  • The deepest land point on Earth is the area around the Dead Sea in Israel. The Dead Sea is located 1,312 below sea level.
  • The deepest spot in any ocean is the Mariana Trench. It's 36,198 feet below sea level (about seven miles).
  • The designer of the Statue of Liberty, French sculptor Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi, used his wife as the model for the body and his mother as the 
  • model for the face.
  • The difference between AM and FM radio is that FM is line-of-sight, while AM bounces off the atmosphere (more accurately, the ionosphere.) AM 
  • stations have to reduce the power of their transmissions at night because the ionosphere lifts with the colder temperatures and lees solar 
  • interference.
  • The difference between apple juice and apple cider is that the juice is pasteurized and the cider is not.
  • The difference between male and female blue crabs is the design located on their belly. The male blue crab has the Washington monument and the 
  • female blue crab's belly is shaped like the U.S. capitol.
  • The dimensions of a regulation football field are: 360 feet long and 160 feet wide.
  • The dioxin 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin is 150,000 times deadlier than cyanide.
  • The dirt extracted to build the foundation of the World Trade Center in New York City was dumped into the Hudson River. The community of Battery 
  • City Park now resides on that dirt.
  • The disease-carrying mosquito, delivering encephalitis, the West Nile virus, malaria, and Dengue fever, is by far the deadliest beast in the animal 
  • world. The World Health Organization says mosquitos cause more than 2 million deaths a year worldwide. Another insect,
  • The distance between cities are actually the distances between city halls.
  • The distance between the pitcher's rubber and home plate in baseball is 60 feet, 6 inches.
  • The dollar was established as the official currency of the US in 1785.
  • The dot above an 'i' is called the tittle.
  • The dot over the letter "i" is called a tittle.
  • The dragons and other monsters that graced the bows of the Viking ships were so fierce-looking that a law was passed in Iceland ordering the 
  • skipper of any Viking ship to remove the figurehead before entering port.
  • The drip pot was invented by a Frenchman around 1800.
  • The drug thiopentone can kill a human being in one second if it's injected directly into the blood stream.
  • The drummer for ZZ Top (the only one without a beard) is named Frank Beard.
  • The Dutch acquired Surinam in exchange for Manhattan Island in 1667.
  • The dye used to stamp the grade on meat is edible. It's made from grape skins.
  • The ear which the matador slices off the bull is his trophy.
  • The earliest cocoa plantations were established in 600 AD, in the Yucatan, by the Mayans.
  • The earliest known wholly glass objects beads were found in Egypt about 4,500 years ago. The first glass cups were also found in Egypt about 3,500 
  • years ago.
  • The earliest recorded Olympic Games result was from the 180 meter sprint in the 776 B.C. The winner was a man named Coroebus.
  • The earliest works of art are paleolithic animal paintings discovered in prehistoric caves in southern France and northern Spain. The paintings date 
  • from 30,000 to 10,000 B.C.
  • The earth is 24,901 miles around at the equator.
  • The earth is not perfectly round. Technically, it's a triaxial ellipsoid, which is to say that it's nearly spherical, but flattened at the top and bottom.
  • The Earth is not round, but slightly pear-shaped.
  • The earth is presently inhabited by 1.4 million species of animals and 500,000 species of plants.
  • The earth is roughly 4600 million years old.
  • The earth is the most densest planet in the solar system, and is the only planet not named after a god.
  • The earth rotates on its axis more slowly in March than in September.
  • The earth weighs 6 sextillion, 588 quintillion tons.
  • The earth wobbles on its axis every 21-26,000 years
  • The Earths core is a ball of Iron-Nickle at 7,000 C and is 80% the size of the moon.
  • The earth's rotation is slowing down at a rate of one second per century. The gravity from the sun and moon are creating tidal friction on the earth 
  • that are acting as brakes on planet's spin.
  • The eggs from the ovaris of a pig, when shot into another animal, can sterelise it, making it impotent.
  • The Eiffel Tower is 984 feet high.
  • The Eiffel Tower is painted approximately once every 7 years and requires nearly 50 tons of paint each time.
  • The Eiffel Tower receives a fresh coat of 300 tons of reddish-green paint every seven years.
  • The Eiffel Tower was built for the 1889 World's Fair.
  • The Eisenhower interstate system requires that one mile in every five must be straight. These straight sections are usable as airstrips in times of war 
  • or other emergencies.
  • The electric automobile self-starter was invented to make it possible for women to drive without a companion, who was previously needed to crank 
  • the engine.
  • The electric chair was invented by a dentist.
  • The electric chair was invented by Dr. Alphonse Rockwell and was first used on William Kemmler on August 6, 1890.
  • The elephant is the only animal that has been taught to stand on its head.
  • The elephant, as a symbol of the US Republican Party, was originated by cartoonist Thomas Nast and first presented in 1874.
  • The emperor of Japan is the 125th of his line, which dates back to 660 B.C.
  • The Empire State Building in New York City is constructed of over 10 million bricks.
  • The Empire State Building in New York City weighs approximately 365,000 tons.
  • The emu's eyes are so similar to that of a human eye, that those studying to become eye doctors often practice surgery on them.
  • The English Romantic poet Lord Byron was so devastated upon the death of his beloved Newfoundland, whose name was Boatswain, that he had 
  • inscribed upon the dog's gravestone the following: "Beauty without vanity, strength without insolence, courage without ferocity, and all the virtues 
  • of man without his vices."
  • The English word "soup" comes from the Middle Ages word "sop," which means a slice of bread over which roast drippings were poured. The first 
  • archaeological evidence of soup being consumed dates back to 6000 B.C., with the main ingredient being Hippopotamus bones!
  • The English word with the most meanings is the simple 3 letter word "SET".
  • The entire Encyclopedia Britannica is banned because it contains a formula for making beer at home.
  • The entire worlds output of urine takes about 45 minutes to go over the Niagra falls.
  • The equatorial bulge of the earth does not rest along the equator. The highest point of the bulge is actually located 25 feet to the south.
  • The eraser wasn't put onto pencils until 1858 by Hyman Lipman.
  • The estimated number of M & M's sold each day in the United States is 200,000,000.
  • The estimated weight of the Great Pyramid of Egypt is 6,648,000 tons.
  • The Europeans first added chocolate to their coffee in the 1600's.
  • The expletive, "Holy Toledo," refers to Toledo, Spain, which became an outstanding Christian cultural center in 1085.
  • The expression "three dog night" originated with the Eskimos and means a very cold night so cold that you have to bed down with three dogs to 
  • keep warm.
  • The extended right arm of the Statue of Liberty is 42 feet long.
  • The eyeball of a human weighs approximately 28 grams.
  • The eyes of an Ostrich are larger than its brain.
  • The Falkland Isles (pop. about 2000) has over 700000 sheep (350 per person).
  • The famous Indian epic "Mahabharata" contains almost three million words.
  • The famous Pizza chain store Sabarro originated in a small corner store in my hometown of Brooklyn, NY, which actually sold fresh cut meat.
  • The famous Revolutionary war general Lafayette had the same first name as his wife Mary.
  • The famous ship "Old Ironsides" actually had wooden sides.
  • The fastest bird is the Spine-tailed swift, clocked at speeds of up to 220 miles per hour.
  • The fastest land animal is the cheetah, however the fastest animal in the world is the prerigine falcon, which can dive at 217mph
  • The fastest -moving land snail, the common garden snail, has a speed of 0.0313 mph.
  • The father of Dave Matthews was one of the original fathers of the super conductor (died of lung cancer when dave was 10 [was a non-smoker])
  • The FDA allows an average of 30 or more insect fragments and one or more rodent hairs per 100 grams of peanut butter.
  • The February of 1865 is the only month in recorded history not to have a full moon.
  • The Federal Reserve printed up an extra $50 billion in small bills just in case people started hoarding money prior to the year 2000. Since nowhere 
  • near that much cash was needed, and there was a long-term storage problem, most of that money was recycled.
  • The feet account for one quarter of all the human bodies bones.
  • The female spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) has a 'penis'.
  • The final episode of M*A*S*H ranks as the most watched television program of any kind in United States history. An estimated 50,150,000 people 
  • tuned in on February 28, 1983. That amounted to 60.2% of all households with a television. Second on the list was the "Who Shot J.R." episode of 
  • Dallas.
  • The final score in the game that Wilt Chamberlain scored 100 points was Warriors 169 Knicks 147.
  • The fingerprints of koala bears are almost indistinguishable from those of humans, so much that they could be confused at a crime scene.
  • The first "official" vasectomy was performed in 1893.
  • The first "puck" ever used in a professional hockey game was a frozen piece of cow dung.
  • The first American advertisement for tobacco was published in 1789. It showed a picture of an Indian smoking a long clay pipe.
  • The first American satellite in orbit, Explorer I, was launched February 1, 1958.
  • The first animal sent to space was a female Samoyed named Laika. Laika was sent into space on November 3, 1957 aboard the Russian spacecraft 
  • Sputnik II.
  • The first anti-lynching law in the United States was passed in Georgia in 1893, but it only made the violation punishable by four years in prison. 
  • (11-1-04)
  • The first asteroid to ever be discovered is Ceres. It was discovered 1801 and is 582 miles in diameter.
  • The first bank in history was the Igibi. It was established in 575 B.C.
  • The first bar code was used on Wrigleys gum
  • The first baseball game was broadcast in color on August 11, 1951 (Brooklyn Dodgers beat the Boston Braves 8-1)
  • The first bath tub to be installed in the white house was during the time of Millard Fillmore.
  • The first black player in the American League was Larry Doby with the Cleveland Indians in 1947.
  • The first bomb the Allies dropped on Berlin in WWII killed the only elephant in the Berlin Zoo.
  • The first book published in the United States was Massachusetts Bay Colony: The Oath of a Free Man, in 1638.
  • The first brand of Wrigley's chewing gum was called "Vassar", after the New England woman's college. Next were "Lotta" and "Sweet Sixteen Orange."
  • The first building with an elevator was the six-story 130-foot Equitable Life Building in New York. It was built in 1870.
  • The first CD pressed in the U.S. was Bruce Springsteen's 'Born in the USA.'
  • The first chimpanzee to travel into space was named Ham. He got the name from the lab he was raised in, the Holloman AeroMedical laboratory in 
  • Alamogordo, NM. Ham flew in a Mercury space capsule in 1961. His trip also proved that space travel was safe for humans.
  • The first city in America to have a TV station was: Schenectady, NY.
  • The first city to reach a population of 1 million people was Rome, Italy in 133 B.C. London, England reached the mark in 1810 and New York, USA 
  • made it in 1875. Today, there are over 300 cities in the world that boast a population in excess of 1 million.
  • The first coffee drinkers, the Arabs, flavored their coffee with spices during the brewing process.
  • The first coin minted in the United States was a silver dollar. It was issued on October 15, 1794.
  • The first comic strip was "The Yellow Kid," which ran in the New York World in 1896. The cartoonist's name was W.R. Hearst.
  • The first commercial espresso machine was manufactured in Italy in 1906.
  • The first commercial product manufactured in the United States and exported to Europe was a glass bottle made in Jamestown in 1608.
  • The first company that Bill Gates ever ran created machines that would record the number of cars passing a given point on a street.
  • The first computer, the steam-driven calculating machine, was built in 1823 by Charles Babbage. It failed to work due to poor workmanship in the 
  • intricate parts. When rebuilt by the London Museum of Science in 1991, it worked.
  • The first contraceptive diaphragms, centuries ago, were citrus rinds (i.e., half an orange rind). Casanova used half lemon rinds as a cervical cap and 
  • the acidic juice as a potent spremicide(something that kills sperms).
  • The first cookbook published in the United States was Compleat Housewife, or Accomplished Gentlewoman's Companion, printed in Williamsburg, VA in 
  • 1742.
  • The first Corvette rolled off the Chevrolet assembly line in Flint, MI. in 1953. That early 'Vette sold for $3,250.
  • The first country to abolish capital punishment was Austria in 1787.
  • The first cover of "Sports Illustrated," in 1954, showed National League umpire, Augie Donatelli, behind the plate with two major-league stars: 
  • catcher Wes Westrum, and batter Eddie Matthews.
  • The first credit card, issued in 1950, was Diner's Club. Frank X. McNamara started the company with 200 card holders.
  • The first daily comic strip in the U.S. was "Mutt & Jeff."
  • The first drive-in movie theater was built in Camden, NJ in 1932-3. It cost 25 cents per car or $1 for three or more people to watch a movie.
  • The first episode of "Joanie Loves Chachi" was the highest rated American program in the history of Korean television. "Chachi" is Korean for "penis."
  • The first film granted permission by the Chinese government to be filmed in the Forbidden City was The Last Emperor, 1987.
  • The first flight of the Wright Brothers was a distance less than the wing span of a Jumbo Jet.
  • The first footprints at Grauman's Chinese Theater (now Mann's Chinese Theater), were made by Norma Talmadge in 1927. Legend has it that she 
  • accidentally stepped in wet concrete outside the building. Since then, over 180 stars have been immortalized, along with their hands and feet and 
  • even noses (Jimmy Durante).
  • The first Ford cars used Dodge engines.
  • The first foreign fort the American flag flew over was Fort Derne in Libya, on the shores of Tripoli
  • The first formal rules for playing baseball required the winning team to score 21 runs.
  • The first fully working parachute was used in 1787 by Jacques Gernerin who dropped 3,000 feet from a balloon. This was long before the airplane was 
  • invented.
  • The first house rats recorded in America appeared in Boston in 1775.
  • The first issue of People Magazine, in 1974, cost 35 cents and featured actress Mia Farrow on the cover.
  • The first Kentucky Derby was run at Churchill Downs in 1875 with Aristides as winner.
  • The first known contraceptive was crocodile dung, used by Egyptians in 2000 B.C.
  • The first known heart medicine was discovered in an English garden. In 1799, physician John Ferriar noted the effect of dried leaves of the common 
  • foxglove plant, digitalis purpurea, on heart action. Still used in heart medications, digitalis slows the pulse and increases the force of heart 
  • contractions and the amount of blood pumped per heartbeat.
  • The first losing candidate in a US presidential election was Thomas Jefferson. He lost to John Adams. George Washington had been unopposed.
  • The first man-made object to circle the earth was Sputnik I, launched in 1957.
  • The first modern Olympiad was held in Athens in 1896. 484 contestants from 13 nations participated.
  • The first motion picture copyrighted in the United States showed a man in the act of sneezing.
  • The first nation to ally with the USA during the Persian Gulf war was Canada. However, their soldiers were deemed unfit for combat and assigned to 
  • guard duty.
  • The first NBA player to score 38,000 points was Kareem Abdul-Jabar in 1989.
  • The first NFL team that plays its home games in a domed stadium to win a Superbowl was the St. Louis Rams in 1999.
  • The first novel ever written on a typewriter is Tom Sawyer.
  • The first offspring of captive-born elephant parents in the Western Hemisphere was a 150-pound Asiatic elephant born on Mother's Day in 1975 at 
  • the Los Angeles Zoo.
  • The first Olympics were held in Athens in 1896, with nine nations competing.
  • The first owner of the Marlboro Company died of lung cancer.
  • The first Parisian cafe opened in 1689 to serve coffee.
  • The first percussion instrument introduced to an orchestra was the kettledrums, then called the timpani, in the 1600s.
  • The first perfect game in baseball history was achieved by John Lee Richmond on June 12, 1880.
  • The first person to go over Niagara Falls in a barrel was Anna Edson Taylor. She made the journey on October 24, 1901, and escaped unhurt.
  • The first personal computer was called the Altair and was made by a company called MITS in 1974. It came in a kit and had to be
  • The first pick (by Eagles) in the first NFL draft in 1935, was Jay Berwanger from the University of Chicago. He never played in the league
  • The first place in the western world to give women the right to vote was an island known as Man.
  • The first place winners at the first modern Olympics were awarded an olive branch and a silver medal. The runners-up received laurel sprigs and 
  • copper medals.
  • The first plastic ever invented was celluloid in 1868. It's still used today to make billiard balls.
  • The first players elected to Baseball Hall of Fame were Ty Cobb, Babe Ruth, Honus Wagner, Christy Mathewson & Walter Johnson in 1936.
  • The first police car was an electric-powered vehicle used in Akron, OH in 1899.
  • The first police force was established in Paris in 1667.
  • The first President to ride in an automobile was William McKinley. After being shot, he was taken to the hospital in a 1901 Columbia electric 
  • ambulance.
  • The first prime number after 1,000,000 is 1,000,003.
  • The first product Motorola started to develop was a record player for automobiles. At that time, the most known player on the market was Victrola, 
  • which Motorola got their name from.
  • The first product Motorola started to develop was a record player for automobiles. At that time, the most known player on the market was Victrola, 
  • so they called themselves Motorola.
  • The first product of the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company now known as 3M when it was founded was sandpaper.
  • The first professional football team to sport an insignia on their helmets was the Los Angeles Rams in 1950, who hand painted yellow horns on their 
  • blue leather helmets.
  • The first public mention of a name for the United States' capital was in a letter from General George Washington in 1791, who referred to it as 
  • Federal City.
  • The first reference to a monetary prize in a horse race was offered by Richard I in 1195.
  • The first ring donuts were produced in 1847 by a 15 year old baker's apprentice, Hanson Gregory, who knocked the soggy center out of a fried 
  • doughnut.
  • The first Rose Bowl game was held in 1902 in Pasadena, California. The University of Michigan beat Sanford 49-0.
  • The first safety feature for an automobile was invented in 1908 by John O'Leary. He patented a large net, to be installed on the front fender, to 
  • scoop pedestrians out of the way before they could be run over.
  • The first scheduled airplane passenger service in the world was between Tampa and St. Petersburg, Fla., in 1914.
  • The first seeing-eye dog was presented to a blind person on April 25, 1938.
  • The first self-rising pancake mix was invented in 1889 by a newspaper man in Missouri (Chris L. Rutt).
  • The first series of commemorative stamps issued by the U.S. Postal Service depicted Columbus's discovery of America. They were issued in 1893 and 
  • available in 16 denominations ranging from one cent to $5.
  • The first shopping bag with handles was invented in 1918 by Walter Deubener.
  • The first Soccer World Cup was held in Uruguay in 1930 and attracted 13 competing countries.
  • The first suburban shopping mall was opened in 1922 by National Department Stores in Saint Louis.
  • The first Super Bowl was broadcasted by two networks: CBS and NBC.
  • The first Super Bowl was played in 1967. The Green Bay Packers of the National Football League defeated the Kansas City Chiefs of the American 
  • Football League, 35-to-10.
  • The first telephone book ever issued contained only fifty names. It was published in New Haven, Connecticut, by the New Haven District Telephone 
  • Company in February, 1878.
  • The first toothbrush with bristles was developed in China in 1498. Bristles were taken from hogs at first, later from horses. The nylon bristles were 
  • developed in 1938 by DuPont.
  • The first toy product ever advertised on television was Mr. Potato Head®. Introduced in 1952.
  • The first translation of the English Bible was initiated by John Wycliffe and completed by John Purvey in 1388.
  • The first triple jump in figure skating competition was performed by Dick Button in 1952.
  • The first U.S. patent for an animal was issued to Harvard University in 1988 for an oncomouse, a genetically engineered mouse that's susceptible to 
  • breast cancer. It's used to test anti-cancer therapies.
  • The first US consumer product sold in the Soviet Union was Pepsi-Cola.
  • The first US Marines wore high leather collars to protect their necks from sabres, hence the name "leathernecks."
  • The first US Patent was for manufacturing potassium carbonate (used in glass and gunpowder). It was issued to Samuel Hopkins on July 31, 1970.
  • The first US president to both be sued for sexual misconduct and forced to give a deposition while in office was William Jefferson Clinton.
  • The first Wimbledon Tennis Competition took place in 1877 solely as an amateur competition. Men's singles was the only event that took place. There 
  • were 22 competitors and the championship was won by Spencer Gore.
  • The first woman in Congress was Jeanette Rankin of Montana, in 1917.
  • The first woman to qualify for the Indianapolis 500 was Janet Guthrie in 1977.
  • The first woman to run for President was Victoria Woodhull, on the Equal Rights Party ballot in 1872.
  • The first words that Thomas A. Edison spoke into the phonograph were, "Mary had a little lamb."
  • The first written account of the Loch Ness Monster, or Nessie, was made in 565AD.
  • The first-known contraceptive was crocodile dung, used by Egyptians in 2000 BC.
  • The first-lady of the U.S. is considered a private citizen.
  • The fist product to have a bar code was Wrigley's gum.
  • The five interlocking Olympic rings are black, blue, red, green, and yellow because at least one of these colors appears on every national flag.
  • The five most frequently used letters in the English alphabet are, in order, E T A I S.
  • The five most populated cities in the world are, in order, Tokyo-Yokohama (Japan), Mexico City (Mexico), Sao Paulo (Brazil), Seoul (South Korea), 
  • and New York (United States).
  • The flag of the Philippines is the only national flag that is flown differently during times of peace or war. A portion of the flag is blue, while the other 
  • is red. The blue portion is flown on top in time of peace and the red portion is flown in war time.
  • The flag of the Philippines is the only national flag that is flown differently during times of peace or war. A portion of the flag is blue, while the other 
  • is red. The blue portion is flown on top in time of peace and the red portion is flown in war time.
  • The flavor we think of as bubblegum is a combination of wintergreen, vanilla and cassia, a form of cinnamon.
  • The flea can jump 350 times its body length. It's like a human jumping the length of a football field.
  • The fleshy projection above the bill of a turkey is called a snood.
  • The following is said to be the toughest tongue twister in the English language: "sixth sick sheik's sixth sheep's sick".
  • The football huddle started at Gallaudet University (the world's only accredited four-year liberal arts college for the deaf) in the 19th century when 
  • the football team found that opposing teams were reading their signed messages and intercepting their plays.
  • The forth railway bridge is a meter longer in summer than in winter due to thermal expansion.
  • The Four Freedoms by Norman Rockwell are the most widely reproduced and distributed paintings in history.
  • The four highest grossing movies of the 1940s were all animated motion pictures by Disney (Bambi, Pinnochio, Fantasia, and Cinderella).
  • The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, named in the Bible's Book of Revelation, are Conquest, Slaughter, Famine, and Death.
  • The Four Horsemen of the Fighting Irish of Notre Dame played together for the last time in 1925, as the Irish downed Stanford in the Rose Bowl, 
  • 27-10. The Four Horsemen were Jim Crowley, Elmer Layden, Don Miller and Harry Stuhldreher.
  • The four principal characters from the cartoon series "The Chipmunks" are Alvin, Simon, Theodore, and Dave.
  • The fragrance of flowers is due to the essences of oil which they produce.
  • The French philosopher, Voltaire, reportedly drank fifty cups of coffee a day.
  • The Fresh Kills Landfill on Staten Island, NY opened in 1948 and is the world's largest landfill. It covers 3,000 acres and receives 14,000 tons of 
  • garbage a day. It's scheduled to close in 2002.
  • The Fresh Kills Landfill site on Staten Island, New York, opened in 1948, is the world's largest. It covers 3,000 acres and receives up to 14,000 tons 
  • of garbage a day. It is scheduled to reach capacity and close by the year 2002.
  • The fruit of the Cacao tree grow directly from the trunk. They look like small melons, and the pulp inside contains 20 to 50 seeds or beans. It takes 
  • about 400 beans to make a pound of chocolate.
  • The full name of Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin is actually Uncle Tom's Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly.
  • The full Spanish name of the city of Los Angeles is "El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Angeles de la Porciuncula." Translated, it means "The 
  • town of Our Lady the Queen of the Angels of the Little Portion."
  • The fungus called truffles can cost $800 to $1,500 per pound. They are sniffed out by female pigs, which detect a compound that is in the saliva of 
  • male pigs as well. The same chemical is found in the sweat of human males.
  • The furthest point from any ocean would be in China.
  • The fuzz on a tennis ball is intentionally included as a way to give the ball some definite action when it hits the court. It also slows the flight of the 
  • ball through the air.
  • The game of volleyball was invented in 1895 by William G. Morgan.
  • The Garfish has green bones.
  • The gases emitted from a banana or an apple can help an orange ripen. (Not sure which fruits are concerned).
  • The gazelle is a kind of antelope.
  • The gender of Reptiles are determined not by the sex genes, but by the temperature in which the egg is incubated. A certain temperature will 
  • produce a male and vice versa for a female.
  • The genre of art known as Cubism derived its name from a belittling remark made by Matisse in reference to a Graque painting. Matisse said that the 
  • landscape looked as though it were wholly made up of little cubes.
  • The Genus and species of a gorilla are Gorilla gorilla.
  • The geographic center of the United States is Smith County, KS. The geographic center of North America is Pierre County, ND.
  • The giant squid has the largest eyes in the world.
  • The giant squid is the largest creature without a backbone. It weighs up to 2.5 tons and grows up to 55 feet long. Each eye is a foot or more in 
  • diameter.
  • The gila monster is the only poisonous lizard in the United States.
  • The giraffe has a black tongue which is 14 inches long.
  • The giraffe has the highest blood pressure of any animal.
  • The giraffe is the only animal born with horns.
  • The glue on Israeli postage is certified kosher.
  • The glue on Israeli postage stamps is certified kosher.
  • The Gothic-style Washington National Cathedral contains the remains of the only US president buried in Washington: Woodrow Wilson. William 
  • Howard Taft and John F. Kennedy are buried at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, VA.
  • The great Gothic cathedral of Milan was started in 1386, and wasn't completed until 1805.
  • The Great Lakes are Lake Michigan, Lake Huron, Lake Superior, Lake Erie and Lake Ontario.
  • The Great Lakes are the most important inland waterway in North America. All the lakes, except Lake Michigan, which lies entirely in the United 
  • States, are shared by the United States and Canada and form part of the border between these countries.
  • The Great Lakes contain 6 quadrillion gallons of fresh water, one-fifth of the world's fresh surface water. The Great Lakes are the largest group of 
  • freshwater lakes in the world.
  • The Great Lakes have a combined area of 94,230 square miles larger than the states of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Rhode Island, 
  • Massachusetts, and Vermont combined.
  • The greatest snowfall ever in a single storm was 189 inches at the Mount Shasta Ski Bowl in February, 1959.
  • The Gregorian calendar was introduced by Pope Gregory in 1582 AD, and was adopted by Great Britain and the English colonies in 1752.
  • The Guinness Book of Records holds the record for being the book most often stolen from Public Libraries.
  • The hair of man's beard are about as strong as copper wire of the same dimensions.
  • The hair on a polar bearis not white, but clear. They reflect light, so they appear white.
  • The hamburger was invented in 1900 by Louis Lassen. He ground beef, broiled it, and served it between two pieces of toast.
  • The harmless Whale Shark, holds the title of largest fish, with the record being a 59 footer captured in Thailand in 1919.
  • The Hawaiian alphabet has only 12 letters.
  • The heart of a blue whale is the size of a small car. The tongue of a blue whale is as long as an elephant.
  • The heart of an astronaut actually gets smaller when in outer space.
  • The heavy tea tax imposed on the colonies in 1773, which caused the "Boston Tea Party," resulted in America switching from tea to coffee. Drinking 
  • coffee was an expression of freedom.
  • The height of the Eiffel Tower in France varies , depending on the temperature, by as much as 6 inches.
  • The herring is the most widely eaten fish in the world. Nutritionally its fuel value is that equal to that of a beefsteak.
  • The high jump method of jumping head first and landing on the back is called the Fosbury Flop.
  • The high level of unemployment in Canada makes it one of the least popular destinations for illegal immigrants.
  • The highest man-made temperature 70 million degrees Celsius was generated at Princeton University in a fusion-power experiment.
  • The highest point of the earth, with an elevation of 29,141 feet, is the top of Mt. Everest in Tibet.
  • The highest recorded temperature in the US was 134 Fahrenheit in Death Valley, California.
  • The highest temperature ever recorded in the continental US was 134 degrees on July 10, 1913 in Death Valley, California.
  • The highest temperature ever recorded in the world was 136.4 degrees Fahrenheit at El Azizia, Lybia, on September 13, 1922.
  • The highest waterfall in the world, Angel Falls in Venezuela, has a total drop of 3,121 feet.
  • The Himalayas are the fastest growing mountains in the world. Already the tallest, the mountain range is growing at a rate of about a half an inch 
  • each year.
  • The Hindu holy day begins at sunrise, the Jewish holy day begins at sunset, and the Christian holy day begins at midnight.
  • The Hollywood sign was first erected in 1923. Conceived as a real estate ad, it originally read Hollywoodland. The sign stands 50 feet tall, stretches 
  • 450 feet across, weighs 450,000 pounds.
  • The homan mouth contains more bacteria than any other orifice in the body.
  • The Honda Accord has the highest stolen rate in the US according to NCIB.
  • The honeybee kills more people world-wide than all the poisonous snakes combined.
  • The Hoover Dam was built to last 2,000 years. The concrete in it will not even be fully cured for another 500 years.
  • The horned owl is the only animal stupid enough to attack a skunk.
  • The horse shoe crab has blue blood which can be used to kill bacteria
  • The hottest chile in the world is the habanero.
  • The House of Lancaster, symbolized by the red rose, won England's 'War of the Roses.'
  • The 'huddle' in football was formed due to a deaf football player who used sign language to communicate and his team didn't want the opposition to 
  • see the signals he used and in turn huddled around him.
  • The human body contains enough phosphorus to make the heads of 200 matches, enough fat for seven bars of soap, and enough iron to make one 
  • nail.
  • The human body has enough fat to produce 7 bars of soap.
  • The human body has over 45 miles of nerves.
  • The human body has over 600 muscles, 40% of the body's weight.
  • The human brain is about 85% water.
  • The human eyes can distinguish about 17,000 different colors.
  • The human head weighs 7 pounds.
  • The human heart creates enough pressure in the bloodstream to squirt blood 30 feet.
  • The human heart creates enough pressure to squirt blood 30ft.
  • The human heart pumps 1.5 million gallons of blood a year.
  • The hummingbird is the only bird that can hover and fly straight up, down, or backward!
  • The hummingbird, the loon, the swift, the kingfisher, and the grebe are all birds that cannot walk.
  • The Hundred Year War actually lasted 116 years (1337 to 1453).
  • The ice cream soda was invented in 1874 by Robert Green. He was serving a mixture of syrup, sweet cream and carbonated water at a celebration in 
  • Philadelphia. He ran out of cream and substituted ice cream.
  • The idiom "pillar of salt" means to have a stroke, or to become paralyzed and dead.
  • The Iditarod Dogsled Race got its name from Iditarod, a small mining village along the race's route. The race commemorates an emergency operation 
  • in 1925 to get medical supplies to Nome, Alaska following a diphtheria epidemic.
  • The Imperial torte, a square chocolate cake with five thin layers of almond paste, was created by a master pastry chef at the court of Emperor 
  • Franz Joseph (1830 1916).
  • The infamous "Red Baron" was German World War I pilot Manfred von Richthofen.
  • The infinite sign is called a lemniscate.
  • The International Space Station weighs about 500 tons and is the same size as a football field.
  • The international telephone dialing code for Antarctica is 672.
  • The internet is NOT FREE, a group of companies actually own the internet.
  • The Jazz Singer, 1927, was the first movie with audible dialogue.
  • The Jordanian city Amman was once called Philadelphia.
  • The Kama Sutra was written by Mallanga Vatsyayana, who was rumored to be celibate.
  • The kangaroo and the emu are shown supporting the shield on Australia's coat of arms.
  • The kangaroo rat can cover ground at a rate of 17 feet per second. It can leap as much as 18 inches straight up and can switch directions at the 
  • peak of its jump.
  • The katydid bug hears through holes in its hind legs.
  • The kilt was invented by a English gentleman who came to Scotland to open a factory because he got tired of his Scottish workers showing up in a 
  • long tunic with a belt (they couldn't afford pants). Rather than raise wages so they could afford pants he invented the kilt which is just a lot of 
  • fabric and they could afford that. The kilt did not become a symbol of clan pride until the English banned the kilt in Scotland. Then it became part of 
  • national pride to wear the newly invented clan plaids.
  • The king of hearts is the only king without a moustache.
  • The kiss that is given by the bride to the groom at the end of the wedding ceremony originates from the earliest times when the couple would 
  • actually make love for the first time under the eyes of half the village!
  • The kissing under the missletoe tradition originated from the Druids.
  • The kiwi has nostrils near the tip of its bill that allows it to sniff the ground for food.
  • The Kiwi, national bird of New Zealand, can't fly. It lives in a hole in the ground, is almost blind, and lays only one egg each year. Despite this, it has 
  • survived for more than 70 million years.
  • The Kwoma of New Guinea consider it proper for the girl to make sexual advances rather than the boy in order to help the men avoid upsetting the 
  • girl's parents.
  • The largest amount of money you can have without having change for a dollar is $1.19 (3 quarters, 4 dimes, and 4 pennies cannot be divided into a 
  • dollar).
  • The largest antique ever sold is the London Bridge. It was sold and moved Lake Havasu City, AZ in 1971.
  • The largest baseball card collection, 200,000 cards, is in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
  • The largest bell in the world is the Tsar Kolokol in the Kremlin in Moscow. It's 20' 2" high and 21' 8" in diameter. Cast in 1735, it weighs 222.56 tons 
  • and has never been wrung...it cracked before it was installed.
  • The largest bird egg in the world today is that of the ostrich. Ostrich eggs are from 6 to 8 inches long. Because of their size and the thickness of 
  • their shells, they take 40 minutes to hard-boil.
  • The largest body of fresh water in the world is Lake Superior.
  • The largest cell in the human body is the female ovum, or egg cell. It is about 1/180 inch in diameter. The smallest cell in the human body is the male 
  • sperm. It takes about 175,000 sperm cells to weigh as much as a single egg cell.
  • The largest cell in the human body is the female reproductive cell, the ovum. The smallest is the male sperm.
  • The largest cockroach on record is one measured at 3.81 inches in length.
  • The largest coffee importer center in the U.S. is located in the city of New Orleans, LA.
  • The largest desert in the world, the Sahara, is 3,500,000 square miles.
  • The largest gold nugget ever found weighed 172 lbs., 13 oz.
  • The largest Great White Shark ever caught measured 37 feet and weighed 24,000 pounds. It was found in a herring weir in New Brunswick in 1930.
  • The largest hailstone ever recorded was 17.5 inches in diameter bigger than a basketball.
  • The largest human organ is the liver, which weighs about 55 ounces in a person weighing 150 pounds. By some definitions, the skin is an organ, in 
  • which case skin would be the largest organ at 384 ounces.
  • The largest human organ is the skin, with a surface area of about 25 square feet.
  • The largest insect egg belongs to the Malaysian jungle nymph, a sticklike insect, and measures about 1.3 centimeters long larger than a peanut! 
  • (Some insects, mainly mantises and cockroaches, lay egg cases that are larger, but they contain about 200 individual eggs.)
  • The largest item on any menu in the world is probably the roast camel, sometimes served at Bedouin wedding feasts. The camel is stuffed with a 
  • sheep's carcass, which is stuffed with chickens, which are stuffed with fish, which are stuffed with eggs.
  • The largest living organism ever found is a honey mushroom, Armillaria ostoyae. It covers 3.4 square miles of land in the Blue Mountains of eastern 
  • Oregon, and it's still growing.
  • The largest movie theater in the world, Radio City Music Hall in New York City, opened in December, 1932. It originally had 5,945 seats.
  • The largest painting in the world is The Battle of Gettysburg, painted in 1883 by Paul Philippoteaux and sixteen of his assistants. The painting took 
  • two and a half years to create and is 410 feet long, 70 feet high, and weighs 11,792 pounds.
  • The largest pig on record was a Poland-China hog named Big Bill, who weighed 2,552 lbs.
  • The largest sculpture ever made are the faces of Washington, Lincoln, Jefferson and Roosevelt on Mt. Rushmore.
  • The largest ship in the world is the French oil tanker that is nearly 415 mts. long, almost as long as Sydney harbour bridge.
  • The largest single flower is the Rafflesia or "corpse flower". They are generally 3 feet in diameter with the record being 42 inches.
  • The largest single-ticket jackpot winner in history is Jack Whittaker Jr. of West Virginia. In December 2002 he had the sole winning ticket for a 
  • $314.9 million jackpot in the U.S. Powerball lottery.
  • The largest stained-glass window in the world is at Kennedy International Airport in New York City. It can be seen on the American Airlines terminal 
  • building and measures 300 feet long by 23 feet high
  • The largest stained-glass window in the world is at Kennedy International Airport in New York City. It can be found in the American Airlines terminal 
  • building and measures 300 feet long by 23 feet high.
  • The largest US city in area is Juneau, Alaska, which covers 3,108 square miles. Los Angeles covers only 458.2 square miles.
  • The last member of the famous Bonaparte family, Jerome Napoleon Bonaparte, died in 1945, of injuries sustained from tripping over his dog's leash.
  • The last thing to happen is the ultimate. The next-to-last is the penultimate, and the second-to-last is the antepenultimate.
  • The lead in a normal pencil would draw a line of 35 miles.
  • The leading cause of deaths for children between the ages of 1 and 4 are motor vehicle crashes.
  • The Leaning Tower of Pisa was built on the site of a river estuary. The land under the town has several layers of silt and soft clay. The 15,000-ton 
  • tower tilts to the south because the subsoil is too unstable.
  • The left lung is smaller than the right lung to make room for the heart.
  • The left side of your brain controls the right side of your body and vice versa.
  • The left testicle usually hangs lower than the right for right-handed men. The opposite is true for lefties.
  • The lemur of Madagascar is one of very few of the human species' ancestors that has survived unchanged down the long corridors of evolution. 
  • Having developed after the first primates, it is classified as a prosimian, meaning "before monkey," and is one of the ancestors common to both 
  • monkeys and men.
  • The letter "I" is used exactly 109 times in Act IV of Shakespeare's Macbeth.
  • The letter "W" is the only letter in the alphabet that doesn't have just one syllable - it has three.
  • The letter J does not appear ANYWHERE in the periodic table of elements.
  • The letter most in use in the English language is "E" and the letter "Q" is least used.
  • The letters in the abbreviation e.g. stand for exempli gratia - a Latin term meaning "for example."
  • The Library of Congress has approx. 327 miles of bookshelves.
  • The lie detector was invented by John Augustus Larson in 1921.
  • The light from your computer screen streams at you at almost 186,000 miles per second.
  • The lights of Las Vegas at night can be seen from outer space.
  • The linen bandages that were used to wrap Egyptian mummies averaged 1,000 yards in length.
  • The liquid inside coconuts can be used as blood plasma substitutes!
  • The little bags of netting for gas lanterns (called 'mantles') are radioactive, so much so that they will set off an alarm at a nuclear reactor.
  • The little lump of flesh just forward of your ear canal, right next to your temple, is called a tragus.
  • The little overhang of bone and feathers over an eagle's eye is there to protect the sensitive eyeball from the mountain and desert sun. It's not 
  • meant to make the bird look fierce.
  • The Lone Ranger's "real" name is John Reid.
  • The longest movie ever screened was a 1970 British film that lasted 48 hours, 0 minutes. Believe it or not, its name is The Longest and Most 
  • Meaningless Movie in the World.
  • The longest muscle in the human body is the sartorius. This narrow muscle of the thigh passes obliquely across the front of the thigh and helps 
  • rotate the leg to the position assumed in sitting cross-legged. Its name is a derivation of the adjective "sartorial," a reference to what was the 
  • traditional cross-legged position of tailors (or "sartors") at work.
  • The longest name in the Bible Mahershalalbaz (Isaiah 8:1).
  • The longest one syllable word in he English language is "screeched".
  • The longest Oscar acceptance speech was made by Greer Garson for 1924's "Mrs. Miniver." It took an hour.
  • The longest place-name still in use is Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateaturipukakapikimaungahoronukupokaiw en uaitnatahu, a New Zealand 
  • hill.
  • The longest railway in the world is the Trans-Siberian Railway or Trans-Siberian Railroad, built 1891-1916, a network of railways connecting European 
  • Russia with Russian Far East provinces. It is 9,288.2 kilometres (5,787 miles) long and spans 8 time zones.
  • The longest recorded flight of a chicken is 13 seconds!
  • The longest recorded gloved boxing match took place in 1893. Andy Bowen and Jack Burke fought for more than 7 hours. After 110 rounds, the fight 
  • was declared a draw because both Bowen and Burke were too exhausted to continue.
  • The longest reign in the history of the world was that of Pepi II of the sixth Egyptian dynasty. He ruled from the age of 6 until his death at age 94.
  • The longest reigning monarch in history was Pepi II, who ruled Egypt for 90 years; 2566 to 2476 BC. The second longest was France's Louis XIV, who 
  • ruled for 72 years, 1643 to 1715.
  • The longest river in the world, the Nile, is 4,145 miles long.
  • The longest single-word name of a place on Earth is: Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateaturipuakapikimaungahoronukupokaiwhenuakitanatahu. 
  • This place is a Moari name for a hill in New Zealand and consists of 85 letters. By the way, the name means "The place where Tamatea, the man 
  • with the big knees, who slid, climbed, and swallowed mountains, known as land-eater, played on the flute to his loved one."
  • The longest war between two nations in history, The Hundred Years War between England and France, really lasted for 115 years(1338-1453).
  • The longest word in the dictionary with only one vowel is "STRENGTHS."
  • The longest word in the English language is 1909 letters long and it refers to a distinct part of DNA.
  • The longest word in the english language is pneaumonaultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis...It's a lung disease contracted from breathing in too 
  • much volcanic dust settlement.
  • The longest word in the English language, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis. The only 
  • other word with the same amount of letters ispneumonoultra-microscopicsilicovolcanoconioses, its plural.
  • The longest word in the Finnish language, that isn't a compound word, is 'epaejaerjestelmaellistyttaemaettoemyydellaensaekaeaen'. In English it 
  • means 'even with their lack of ability to disorganize'.
  • The longest word that can be typed on the top row of letters on a "Qwerty" keyboard is TYPEWRITER.
  • The Looney Tunes song is actually called "The Merry-Go-Round Broke Down."
  • The low frequency call of the humpback whale is the loudest noise made by a living creature. The call of the humpback whale is louder than 
  • Concorde and can be heard from 500 miles away.
  • The lowest point that a person can reach on Earth, outside of riding a submarine or going down a mine shaft, is where the Jordan River enters the 
  • Dead Sea. It's 1,290 feet below sea level.
  • The lowest temperature ever recorded in the world was 129 degrees below 0 at Vostok, Antarctica, on July 21, 1983.
  • The lowest valued note in the world is the Hong Kong 1 cent note of which
  • The magician's words "hocus-pocus" were taken from the name of a mythological sorcerer, Ochus Bochus, who appeared in Norse folktales and 
  • legends.
  • The magnetic North Pole shifts by about 7 meters a day.
  • The magnolia tree is named after Pierre Magnol, a French scientist.
  • The Mai Tai cocktail was created in 1945 by Victor Bergeron, the genius of rum, also known as Trader Vic. The drink got its name when he served it 
  • to two friends from Tahiti, who exclaimed "Maitai roa ae!," which in Tahitian means "Out of this world the best!"
  • The main active chemical in marijuana is THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol). The membranes of certain nerve cells in the brain contain protein 
  • receptors that bind to THC. Once securely in place, THC kicks off a series of cellular reactions that ultimately lead to the high that users experience 
  • when they smoke marijuana
  • The Main Library at Indiana University sinks over an inch every year because when it was built, the engineers failed to take into account the weight 
  • of all the books that would occupy the building.
  • The main road in Hershey, PA (where Hershey's candy bars are made) is Chocolate Avenue.
  • The major side effects from abusing anabolic steroids can include liver tumors and cancer, jaundice (yellowish pigmentation of skin, tissues, and body 
  • fluids), fluid retention, high blood pressure, increases in LDL (bad cholesterol), and decreases in HDL (good cholesterol). Other side effects include 
  • kidney tumors, severe acne, and trembling.
  • The male gypsy moth can "smell" the virgin female gypsy moth from 1.8 miles away.
  • The male penguin incubates the single egg laid by his mate. During the two month period he does not eat, and will lose up to 40% of his body 
  • weight.
  • The male praying mantis cannot copulate while its head is attached to its body. The female initiates sex by ripping the males head off.
  • The male scorpion fly gets other males to bring him food by imitating a female fly.
  • The male seahorse carries the eggs until they hatch instead of the female.
  • The man who commissioned the Mona Lisa refused it.
  • The Manta Ray is the largest of all fish.
  • The mask used by Michael Myers in the original "Halloween" was actually a Captain Kirk mask painted white, due to low budget.
  • The maximum length allowed for a baseball bat in the major leagues is 42 inches.
  • The melting point of cocoa butter is just below the human body temperature -which is why it literally melts in your mouth.
  • The Mesopotamians were the first people to keep records of lunar eclipses. The earliest records show that they started sometime around 2200 B.C.
  • The metal instrument used in shoe stores to measure feet is called the Brannock device.
  • The metric system was to blame for the loss of the Mars Climate orbiter.
  • The Michelin man is known as Mr. Bib. His name was Bibendum in the company's first ads in 1896.
  • The microwave was invented after a researcher walked by a radar tube and a chocolate bar melted in his pocket.
  • The military salute originated during the medieval times. Knights in armor used to raise their visors to reveal their identity, and the motion later 
  • evolved into the modern-day salute.
  • The Mills Brothers have recorded the most songs of any artist: about 2,250.
  • The minarets ofthe Taj Mahal in India are angled at 88 degrees outwards so that they would not collapse into the structure should an earthquake 
  • occur
  • The minimum number of darts that need to be thrown to complete a single in, double out game of 501 is nine.
  • The Miss America Contest was created in Atlantic City in 1921 with the purpose of extending the tourist season beyond Labor Day.
  • The model of King Kong used in the original movie was only 18 inches tall.
  • The modern Olympic Games were held in the first time in 1896 at Athens and were then followed by the 1900 Paris games. The winter games were 
  • added in 1924.
  • The mola mola or ocean sunfish lays up to 5,000,000 eggs at one time.
  • The Mona Lisa, by daVinci, is 2'6" by 1'9".
  • The Mona-Lisa, now hanging in the Louvre museum in Paris, is valued today at $100,000,000.
  • The monastic hours are matins, lauds, prime, tierce, sext, nones, vespers and compline.
  • The Montreal Canadians of the mid-1950s are the only team to win five straight Stanley Cup championships.
  • The Monty Python movie "The Life of Brian" was banned in Scotland.
  • The moon actually has mirrors on it. They were left there by astronauts who wanted to bounce laser beams off them, so that the distance to the 
  • moon can be measured.
  • The most abundant metal in the Earth's crust is aluminum.
  • The most collect calls are made on father's day.
  • The most common blood type in the world is Type O. The rarest, Type A-H, has been found in less than a dozen people since the type was 
  • discovered.
  • The most common disease in the world is tooth - decay.
  • The most common injury in bowling is a sore thumb.
  • The most common street name in the United States is Second Street. First Street isn't first because many times the designation is replaced with the 
  • name Main Street.
  • The most expensive book or manuscript ever sold at an auction was The Codex Hammer, a notebook belonging to Leonardo da Vinci. It sold for $30.8 
  • million.
  • The most expensive movie memorabilia ever sold at an auction was Clark Gable's Academy Award for It Happened One Night. It sold for $607,500 on 
  • December 15, 1996.
  • The most expensive painting ever sold at auction was Portrait of Dr. Gachet by Vincent van Gogh. On May 15, 1990, Ryoei Saito paid $75 million for 
  • it. He followed up that spending spree by paying the second-highest price ever, $71 million for Au Moulin de la Galette by Pierre Auguste Renoir, just 
  • two days later.
  • The most frequently seen birds at feeders across North America last winter were the Dark-eyed Junco, House Finch and American goldfinch, along 
  • with downy woodpeckers, blue jays, mourning doves, black-capped chickadees, house sparrows, northern cardinals and european starlings.
  • The most searched thing on yahoo.com every year is porn.
  • The most snow accumulation in a one-day period was 75.8 inches at Silver Lake, Colorado, in April 1921.
  • The most successful X-rated movie of all time is Deep Throat. It cost less than $50,000 to make it and has earned more than $100 million.
  • The most used line in the movies is "Lets get out of here."
  • The most widely accepted legend associated to the discovery of coffee is of the goatherder named Kaldi of Ethiopia. Around the year 800-850 A.D., 
  • Kaldi was amazed as he noticed his goats behaving in a frisky manner after eating the leaves and berries of a coffee shrub. And, of course, he had to 
  • try them!
  • The most widely culticated fruit in the world is the Apple.The second is the Pear.
  • The motto for the Olympic Games is Citius Altius Fortius. Translated, it means Faster Higher Stronger.
  • The mouse is the most common mammal in the US.
  • The movie As Good As It Gets is called Mr. Cat Poop in China.
  • The movie Quo Vadis had 30,000 extras.
  • The Museum of Modern Art in New York City hung Matisse's 'Le Bateau' upside-down for 47 days before an art student noticed the error.
  • The muzzle of a lion is like a fingerprint no two lions have the same pattern of whiskers.
  • The nail of our middle finger grows the fastest and the nail of our thumb grows slowest.
  • The name "Uncle Sam" for the U.S. came from a person known as Uncle Sam Wilson of Troy, NY, who supplied food for the U.S. army in the war of 
  • 1812.
  • The name Coca-Cola in China was first rendered as 'Ke-kou-ke-la.' Unfortunately, the Company did not discover until after thousands of signs had 
  • been printed that the phrase means 'bite the wax tadpole' or 'female horse stuffed with wax' depending on the dialect. Coke then researched Chinese 
  • characters and found a close phonetic equivalent, 'ko-kou-ko-le,' which can be loosely translated as 'happiness in the mouth.'
  • The name for Oz in the Wizard of Oz was thought up when the creator Frank Baum looked at his filing cabinet and saw A-N and O-Z.
  • The name for the middle part of the nose (the part that separates the nostrils) is called a chaffanue
  • The name 'Intel' stems from the company's former name, 'Integrated Electronics'.
  • The name of all the continents end with the same letter that they start with.
  • The name of the dog from "The Grinch Who Stole Christmas" is Max.
  • The name of the dog on the Cracker Jack box is Bingo.
  • The name of the first airplane flown at Kitty Hawk by the Wright Brothers, on December 17, 1903, was Bird of Prey.
  • The name of the Russian space station, Mir, means "peace."
  • The name Santa Claus is a corruption of the Dutch dialect name for Saint Nicholas Sint Klass.
  • The name Wendy was made up for the book "Peter Pan". There was never a recorded Wendy before.
  • The name Wendy was made up for the book 'Peter Pan'. It came from the author's friends, whom he called his "fwendy" (friend)
  • The name Wendy was made up for the book Peter Pan. There was never a recorded Wendy before it.
  • The nation of Monaco on the French Riviera, is smaller than Central Park in New York. Monaco is 370 acres and Central Park is 840 acres.
  • The national anthem of Greece has 158 verses.
  • The national dish of Scotland, haggis, is made of the heart, liver, lungs and small intestines of a calf. It's then boiled in the stomach of the animal, 
  • and seasoned with salt, pepper and onions. Oh, and don't forget to add the suet and oatmeal.
  • The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced in 1978 that it would alternate men's and women's names in the naming of 
  • hurricanes. It was seen as an attempt at fair play. Hurricanes had been named for women for years, until NOAA succumbed to pressure from women's 
  • groups who were demanding that Atlantic storms be given unisex names.
  • The national sport of Nauru, a small Pacific island, is lassoing flying birds.
  • The Navy SEALs were formed in 1962.
  • The Neanderthal's brain was bigger than yours is.
  • The nearest relative of the hippopotamus is the common pig.
  • The Netherlands is the lowest country in the world. An estimated 40% of its land is below sea level.
  • The New York City Chamber of Commerce is the oldest chamber of commerce in the United States. King George III granted a royal charter for it in 
  • 1770.
  • The New York phone book had 22 Hitlers listed before World War II ... and none after.
  • The New York Yankees have won the most champoinships (26 times) in their respected sport (MLB, NBA, NHL, NFL) for any professional sports team.
  • The Nile catfish swim upside down.
  • The number 111,111,111 multiplied by itself will result in the number 12,345,678,987,654,321.
  • The number 2,520 can be divided by 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 without having a fractional leftover.
  • The number 37 will wholly divide (no decimals) into 111, 222, 333, 444, 555, 666, 777, 888, and 999.
  • The number of atoms in a pound of iron is nearly five trillion trillion: 4,891,500,000,000,000,000,000,000.
  • The number of cricket chirps you count in a fifteen-second span, plus 37, will tell you the approximate current air temperature.
  • The number of possible ways of playing just the first four moves on each side in a game of chess is 318,979,564,000.
  • The number of times a drowning person will rise to the surface depends on how much air is in his lungs. He could rise once, twice, or five times. Or 
  • not at all. Obese people will stay afloat longer than skinny people because fat contains air molecules.
  • The number of triplets born in the US in 1994 (4,594) was more than triple the number born in 1971 (1,034), an increase attributed to older age of 
  • the mothers and the use of fertility-enhancing drugs and techniques.
  • The number of VCRs in the United States grew from 52,565,000 in 1987 to 86,825,000 in 1997, a 39.5% increase.
  • The numbers "172" can be found on the back of a US $5 bill, in the bushes at the base of the Lincoln memorial.
  • The numbers 111 222 333 444 555 666 777 888 999 are all multiples of 37.
  • The numbers on opposite sides of a die always add up to seven.
  • The nursery rhyme Ring Around the Rosy is a rhyme about the plague. Infected people with the plague would get red circular sores ("Ring around the 
  • rosy..."), these sores would smell very badly so common folks would put flowers on their bodies somewhere (inconspicuously), so that it would cover 
  • the smell of the sores ("...a pocket full of posies..."), People who died from the plague would be burned so as to reduce the possible spread of the 
  • disease ("...ashes, ashes, we all fall down!")
  • The Oblivion ride at Alton Towers has a G-force of 5. Thats higher than the G-force of an average NASA take-off!
  • The occupations of the three men in a tub were butcher, baker, and candlestick maker.
  • The odds against a royal flush in poker are exactly 649,739 to 1.
  • The odds of being born male are about 51.2%, according to census.
  • The official definition of a desert is any land that where more water evaporates than is acquired through precipitation.
  • The official name of the St. Louis Gateway Arch is "The Jefferson National Expansion Monument." The Gateway Arch looks taller than it is wider, but 
  • it is exactly 630 feet by 630 feet.
  • The official sport for the State of Maryland is jousting.
  • The official state song of Georgia since 1922 has been "Georgia on My Mind".
  • The Ohio river forms at the confluence of the Allegheny and the Monongahela.
  • The oiuja board was invented by Isaac and William Fuld, and was patented July 1, 1892.
  • The oldest "cricket" match was played between the USA and Canada in 1844.
  • The oldest continuous comic strip still in existence is The Katzenjammer Kids. It first appeared in newspapers in 1897.
  • The oldest exposed surface on earth is New Zealand's south island.
  • The oldest goldfish lived for 14,795 days.
  • The oldest living thing in existence is not a giant redwood, but a bristlecone pine in the White Mountains of California, dated to be aged 4,600 years 
  • old.
  • The oldest man-made building of any kind still existing is the central edifice of the 4,600-year-old mastaba (a tomb for kings) built at Sakkara, Egypt. 
  • It was created to honor King Zoser, the first ruler of the Third Dynasty.
  • The oldest musical instrument is probably the flute. It's been discovered that primitive cave dwellers made an instrument from bamboo or some other 
  • small hollow wood.
  • The oldest person to live was Jeanne Louise Calment, she lived for a whopping 122 years until she died of smoking related complications. Don't 
  • Smoke!
  • The oldest recorded document on paper made from fibrous material was a deed of King Roger of Sicily, in the year 1102.
  • The oldest tennis court in the world is the one built at Hampton Court in 1530 for Henry VIII.
  • The oldest works of art are pictures of animals found in caves in Spain and France. They have been dates as far back as 18,000 years ago.
  • The olive branch in the eagle's right talon has 13 leaves.
  • The Olympic Games were held in St. Louis, MO. In 1904, the first time that the games were held in the United States.
  • The Olympic was the sister ship of the Titanic, and she provided twenty-five years of service.
  • The only 15 letter word that can be spelled without repeating a letter is "uncopyrightable"!
  • The only animals that can naturally sleep on their backs are humans. No other animal actually does--apes usually sleep sitting up and leaning on 
  • something.
  • The only big cat that doesn't roar is a Jaguar
  • The only bird that can fly backwards is the hummingbird.
  • The only bird that cannot fly is the penguin
  • The only bone in the human body not connected to another is the hyoid, a V-shaped bone located at the base of the tongue between the mandible 
  • and the voice box. Its function is to support the tongue and its muscles.
  • The only bone not broken so far during any ski accident is one located in the inner ear.
  • The only continent without reptiles or snakes is Antarctica.
  • The only countries in the world with one syllable in their names are Chad, France, Greece, and Spain.
  • The only difference between brown eyes and every other colored eyes is that brown eyes have more pigment.
  • The only dog to ever appear in a Shakespearean play was Crab in The Two Gentlemen of Verona
  • The only domestic animal not mentioned in the Bible is the cat.
  • The only father and son to hit back-to-back home runs in a major league baseball game: Ken Griffey, Jr., and his father, Ken Griffey, Sr., both of the 
  • Seattle Mariners in a game against the California Angels on September 14th, 1990.
  • The only food cockroaches won't eat are cucumbers.
  • The only jointless bone in your body is the hyoid bone in your throat
  • The only loss Packers' coach Vince Lombardi ever suffered in the postseason was to the Philadelphia Eagles, 17-13, in the 1960 NFL championship 
  • game.
  • The only member of the British House of Commons who is not allowed to speak is the man called the Speaker of the House.
  • The only MLB team to have both its city's name and its team name in a foreign language is the San Diego Padres.
  • The only one of his sculptures that Michelangelo signed was the "The Pieta," completed in 1500.
  • The only painting by Leonardo da Vinci on permanent display in the United States hangs in the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. It's a portrait of 
  • Ginevra di Benci, the wife of a politician in Florence.
  • The only president buried in Washington, D.C. proper: Woodrow Wilson, who was laid to rest in the National Cathedral.
  • The only president buried on the grounds of a state capitol: James Polk in Nashville, Tenn.
  • The only President in office to weigh less than 100 pounds was James Madison.
  • The only President to be head of a labor union was Ronald Reagan.
  • The only presidents buried together: John Adams and his son John Quincy Adams are in a basement crypt in Quincy, Mass.
  • The only real person to be a PEZ head was Betsy Ross.
  • The only repealed amendment to the US Constitution deals with the prohibition of alcohol.
  • The only rock that floats in water is pumice.
  • The only state allowed to fly its flag at the same height as the U.S. flag is Texas.
  • The only three non-Presidents pictured on U.S. paper money are: Alexander Hamilton on the $10 bill, Benjamin Franklin on the $100 bill, and Salmon Chase on the $10,000 bill.
  • The only time the human population declined was in the years following 1347, the start of the epidemic of the plague 'Black Death' in Europe.
  • The only two days of the year in which there are no professional sports games (MLB, NBA, NHL, or NFL) are the day before and the day after the 
  • Major League all-stars Game
  • The only U.S. president to be born on the fourth of July was Calvin Coolidge.
  • The only way a cow can clean out its nose is to lick the gooie substance called BOOGERS out with its tongue...YUCK!!
  • The opposite sides of a dice cube always add up to seven.
  • The Oprah Winfrey Show started out as a local morning talk show called A.M. Chicago. The name was changed in September 1985 after Winfrey beat 
  • Donahue in the Chicago ratings. The show was expanded from a half and to an hour and went nationwide a year later.
  • The orgasms of common, barnyard pigs can last up to thirty minutes!
  • The origin of bananas is traced back to the Malaysian jungles of Southeast Asia, where so many varieties and names for the banana are in that area.
  • The origin of right-handed buttons on men's shirts stems from battles where they wore armor. With most men being right handed the armor needed 
  • to overlap so that a sword could not enter through the gap during a right-handed blow from an adversary.
  • The original American Express card was purple.
  • The original coke contained cocaine and was labeled as a "cure all miracle drug". It became the popular soda when it carbonated water was 
  • accidentally added to it. The cocaine, however, was later removed when people began to become addicted.
  • The original name for basketball, as invented by Dr. James Naismith, was indoor rugby. It was one of the game's first players that started calling it 
  • basketball because of the peach baskets that acted as the original goals.
  • The original name for butterfly was flutterby.
  • The original name of Los Angeles was El Pueblo de Nuestra Senora la Reina de los Angeles del rio Porciuncula, translating into:The Village of our Lady 
  • the Queen of the Angels of the Porciuncula River.
  • The original purpose of a coffin was not to protect the body from prowling animals or grave robbers. It was invented to keep the dearly departed from coming back to haunt survivors.
  • The original purpose of the coffin was to prevent the dearly departed from coming back and haunting the survivors.
  • The original story from Tales of 1001 Arabian Nights begins, "Aladdin was a little Chinese boy."
  • The original Volkswagen Bug Has Finally Stopped Production. The last one rolled out in brazil on July 31st 2003. The car introduced in 1946. 57 years 
  • in production. The fact is that there were more classic vw bugs produced then any other car ever. about 400 million to be exact. wow.
  • The origional Coca cola was so named because it did, in fact, contain cocaine. Today, however, the coke cans labeled "original" do not contain any cocaine.
  • The Oscar award got its name from an actress who mentioned it looks like her uncle Oscar.
  • The Oscar statuette was designed by MGM's art director, Cedric Gibbons, in 1928. The design has remained unchanged, except for getting a higher pedestal in the 1940's.
  • The Ostrich people in Africa are a group of people who have only 2 toes due to inbreeding
  • The Ouija board got its name from the combination of the French and German words for "yes" oui and ja.
  • The owner of every hotel in Hastings, Nebraska, is required to provide each guest with a clean and pressed nightshirt. No couple, even if they are 
  • married, may sleep together in the nude. Nor may they have sex unless they are wearing one of these clean, white cotton nightshirts.
  • The Pacific Giant Octopus, the largest octopus in the world, grows from the size of pea to a 150 pound behemoth potentially 30 feet across in only 
  • two years, its entire life-span.
  • The Pacific Ocean at the Isthmus of Panama is often 20 feet higher than the Atlantic Ocean.
  • The Pacific Ocean fills nearly a complete hemisphere of the earth's surface.
  • The Pacific Ocean holds 46% of the world's water. The rest is divided up as followed: Atlantic Ocean - 23.9%, Indian Ocean - 20.3%, and the Arctic 
  • Ocean - 3.7%.
  • The Pacific Ocean was named by Magellen because it was calmer than the Atlantic
  • The painting, "American Gothic" depicts the sister and the dentist of artist Grant Wood as rural farm folk.
  • The Pantheon is the largest building from ancient Rome that survives intact.
  • The past-tense of the English word "dare" is "durst".
  • The patron saint of dentists is St. Apollonia. She reportedly had her teeth pulled out in 249 AD by an anti-Christian mob.
  • The peace symbol was created in 1958 as a nuclear disarmament symbol by the Direct Action Committee, and was first shown that year at peace 
  • marches in England. The symbol is a composite of the semaphore signals N and D, representing nuclear disarmament.
  • The penalty for killing a cat, 4,000 years ago in Egypt, was death.
  • The penguin is the only bird that can't fly but can swim.
  • The Pentagon in Arlington Virginia has twice as many bathrooms as is necessary. When it was built in the 1940s the state of Virginia still had 
  • segregation laws requiring separate toilet facilities for blacks and whites.
  • The period at the end of this sentence can hold 2,000,000 hydrogen atoms.
  • The period between midnight and dawn is the best time to look for shooting stars. On a normal night you can see between five and ten an hour. In a 
  • desert, you can see one every eight minutes.
  • The permanent teeth that erupt to replace their primary predecessors (baby teeth) are called succedaneous teeth.
  • The Philippines consist of 2,100 islands.
  • The Philippines has more than 1,000 regional dialects and two official languages.
  • The phone number of the white house is: (202) 456-1414.
  • The phrase "raining cats and dogs" originated in 17th Century England. During heavy downpours of rain, many of these poor animals unfortunately 
  • drowned and their bodies would be seen floating in the rain torrents that raced through the streets. The situation gave the appearance that it had 
  • literally rained "cats and dogs" and led to the current expression.
  • The phrase "raining cats and dogs" originated in 17th Century England. During heavy downpours of rain, many of these poor animals unfortunately 
  • drowned and their bodies would be seen floating in the rain torrents that raced through the streets. The situation gave the appearance that it had 
  • literally rained "cats and dogs" and led to the current expression.
  • The phrase "rule of thumb" is derived from an old English law which stated that you couldn't beat your wife with anything wider than your thumb.
  • The phrase "sleep tight" originated when mattresses were set upon ropes woven through the bed frame. To remedy sagging ropes, one would use a 
  • bed key to tighten the rope.
  • The phrase 'going bananas' was first recorded in the Oxford English Dictionary, and is linked to the fruit's 'comic' connections with monkeys.
  • The pigmy shrew a relative of the mole is the smallest mammal in North America. It weighs 1/14 ounce less than a dime.
  • The Pillsbury Bake-off has been held every year since 1948.
  • The pineapple was symbol of welcome in the 1700-1800's. That is why in New England you will see so many pineapples on door knockers. An arch in 
  • Providence RI leading into the Federal Hill neighborhood has a pineapple on it for that very reason. Pineapples were brought home by seafarers as 
  • gifts.
  • The placement of a donkey's eyes in its' head enables it to see all four feet at one time.
  • The plant life in the oceans make up about 85 percent of all the greenery on the Earth.
  • The plastic things on the end of shoelaces are called aglets.
  • The platypus and echidna are the only mammals that hatch from eggs. Both live in Australia.
  • The play Chantecler, written by French playwright Edmond Rostand, features a rooster as the major character.
  • The poison arrow frog has enough poison to kill about 2,200 people.
  • The poisonous copperhead smells like fresh cut cucumbers.
  • The poisonous copperhead snake smells like fresh cut cucumbers.
  • The pop you hear when you crack your knuckles is actually a bubble of gas burning.
  • The popular name for the giant sequoia tree is Redwood.
  • The population of the American colonies in 1610 was 350.
  • The position of a donkey's eyeballs allow them to see all four of their feet
  • The pound cake got its name from the pound of butter it contained.
  • The pound sign is called a 'octothorp.'
  • The praying mantis is the only insect that can turn its head.
  • The precise geographical center of the North American continent is in a town called Rugby, North Dakota.
  • The principality of Monaco consists of only 370 acres.
  • The Professor on "Gilligan's Island" was named Roy Hinkley. The Skipper was named Jonas Grumby. Both names were used only once in the entire 
  • series, on the first episode.
  • The Professor's real name was Roy Hinkley, Mary Ann's last name was Summers and Mrs. Howell's maiden name was Wentworth.
  • The Prudential Life Insurance Company in USA stopped using their slogan "Own A Piece Of The Rock" after Rock Hudson died of AIDS and many jokes 
  • where made about him and the slogan.
  • The Puritans had such an obsessive fear of masturbation that almost any means were used to curtail the practice. For instance, some doctors 
  • recommended covering the penis with plaster of Paris.
  • The queen of England does not have the right to vote in any British election.
  • The queen of England has two birthdays.
  • The Queen termite can live up to 50 years and have 30,000 children every day.
  • The raised reflective dots in the middle of highways are called Botts
  • The Ramses brand condom is named after the great phaoroh Ramses II who fathered over 160 children.
  • The rapid rate of expansion of gas is what gives steam its power. One volume of water, at normal atmospheric pressure and at the boiling point, 
  • yields 1,670 volume of steam.
  • The reason firehouses have circular stairways is from the days of yore when the engines were pulled by horses. The horses were stabled on the 
  • ground floor and figured out how to walk up straight staircases.
  • The reason most mosquito bites itch is because mosquitoes inject saliva into the persons skin before they suck your blood. They take it out once 
  • they are done, but if they are forced to fly away, they don't get a chance to draw the saliva out. And it is their saliva that causes the itch.
  • The reason why the very beginning of The Wizard of Oz is black and white, is because color was not available at that point. When color was 
  • available, the writers decided to start using it in Munchkinland.
  • The record for the biggest one day rainfall was set on Reunion Island in the Indian Ocean, on March 15, 1952, where 74 inches of rain fell in 24 
  • hours.
  • The record for the most weddings is held by King Mogul of Siam, who had 9000 weddings and 9000 wives.
  • The red capes used to taunt bulls in bullfights is the same shade of red as the bull's blood. That way you can't tell it is covered with the bull's blood 
  • by the end of the fight. Fight spectators like bullfighting, but not blood.`
  • The red kangaroo of Australia can jump 27 feet in one bound.
  • The red sea is not red.
  • The red spot on the 7up cans comes from it's inventor. He was an albino (albinos have red eyes).
  • The regular garden variety caterpillar has 248 muscles in its head.
  • The Republic of Israel was established April 23, 1948.
  • The revolving door was invented August 7, 1888, by Theophilus Van Kannel, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  • The Ribbon worm will start eating itself to avoid starvation
  • The ridges on the sides of coins are called reeding or milling.
  • The right lung is slightly larger than the left
  • The right side of a boat was called the starboard side due to the fact that the astronavigators used to stand out on the plank (which was on the 
  • right side) to get an unobstructed view of the stars. The left side was called the port side because that was the side that you put in on at the port.
  • The river Danube empties into the Black Sea.
  • The Romans defeated Hannibal's elephants after they found that the elephants were afraid of the smell of horse blood. On the battlefield they slit 
  • the throats of their own horses in order to cause the enemy's mounts to panic.
  • The Romans made condoms from the muscle tissue of warriors they defeated in battle.
  • The rose family of plants, in addition to flowers, gives us apples, pears, plums, cherries, almonds, peaches and apricots.
  • The rosy periwinkle plant, found in Madagascar, is used to cure leukemia.
  • The rumble that is created when a Harley's engine runs has been patented by the company
  • The Russian Imperial Necklace has been loaned out by Joseff jewelers of Hollywood for 1,215 different feature films.
  • The S in Harry S Truman stands for nothing.
  • The safety pin was patented in 1849 by Walter Hunt. He sold the patent rights for $400.
  • The Sahara Desert expands at a rate of about 1 km each month.
  • The Sahara desert is larger as Europe and large then the combined areas of next largest 9 deserts.
  • The Sahara Desert is over twice as big as the second largest desert in the world, The Australian Desert. The Sahara is 3.5 million square miles 
  • compared to the 1.47 million square miles of the Australian. This is "true" in the generic sense of the Autralian Desert. There is no Australian Desert. 
  • It is divided into many different deserts. What would be true would be to say the Sahara is bigger than the desert space in Australia (which is A LOT 
  • not sure how much as a percentage of the total land mass of australia).
  • The sailfish can swim faster than a horse can gallop.
  • The saluki is the oldest known breed of domesticated dog. Carvings of animals resembling the saluki have been found in excavations of the Sumerian 
  • Empire. They are believed to have originated from between 6,000 and 7,000 B.C.
  • The salute of uniform bodies (eg. army, police) originated from knights who lifted their visors to show their face to a royalty.
  • The same material that is used to make bulletproof glass is also used in Tupperware's Rock 'n Serve containers. The container, however, is not 
  • entirely bulletproof. Due to the lifetime warrantee on Tupperware products, the company will replace it for FREE! (Just in case you're in quick need of 
  • a shield and a Rock 'n Serve is the only thing handy)
  • The San Diego Zoo in California has the largest collection of animals in the world.
  • The sandwich is named for the Fourth Earl of Sandwich (1718-92), for whom sandwiches were made so that he could stay at the gambling table 
  • without interruptions for meals.
  • The Santa Maria was the only one of Columbus's ships not to return to Spain. It hit a reef on December 5, 1492 and sank.
  • The saying 'once in a blue moon ' refers to the occurrence of two full moons during one calendar month. The last two occurred in January & March 
  • 1999. The next one isn't until the end of 2001.
  • The science-fiction series "Lost in Space" (set in the year 1997) premiered on CBS in 1965.
  • The sea contains about 1/2 of the world's known animal groups
  • The Sea of tranquility is found on the moon.
  • The SEALs have been deployed in Vietnam, Laos, Panama, Bosnia, Haiti, Somalia, and Colombia.
  • The search engine "Lycos" is named for Lycosidae, the Latin name for the wolf spider family. Unlike other spiders that sit passively in their web, wolf 
  • spiders are hunters, actively stalking their prey.
  • The secretary-bird swallow hen's egg whole without breaking its shell.
  • The sentence "The quick brown fox jumps over a lazy dog." uses every letter of the alphabet!
  • The setting sun is redder than the rising sun because the air at the end of the day is generally dustier than it is at the beginning of the day.
  • The seven archangels are Michael, Gabriel, Raphael, Uriel, Chamuel, Jophiel, and Zadkiel.
  • The Seven Deadly Sins are lust, pride, anger, envy, sloth, avarice and gluttony.
  • The seven hills of Rome are the Palatine (on which the original city was built), the Capitoline, Quirinal, Viminal, Esquiline, Caelian, and Aventine.
  • The seven virtues are prudence, courage, temperance, justice, faith, hope and charity.
  • The seven wonders of the ancient world werethe Egyptian Pyramids at Giza, Hanging Gardens of Babylon, Statue of Zeus at Olympia, Colossus of 
  • Rhodes or huge bronze statue near the Harbor of Rhodes that honored the sun god Helios, Temple of Artemis at Ephesus, Mausoleum at 
  • Halicarnassus, Lighthouse at Alexandria
  • The sex of crocodiles is determined by the incubation temperature. Eggs incubated at temperatures below 85 degrees become females. Those 
  • incubated above 95 degrees become males. 2. Crocodiles are the closest living relatives to birds.
  • The shallowest sea is the sea of Azov.It is 13 meters at its deepest.
  • The shape of a plants' collenchyma cells and the shape of the bubbles in beer foam are the same they are orthotetrachidecahedrons.
  • The shore of the Dead Sea in Israel-Jordan is 1312 feet (400 meter) below sea level.
  • The shortest "-ology" (study of) word is oology, the study of eggs.
  • The shortest British monarch was Charles I, who was 4'9".
  • The shortest verse in the Bible consists of two words: "Jesus wept" (John 11:35).
  • The shortest war in history was between Zanzibar an England in 1896. Zanzibar surrendered after 38 minutes.
  • The shortest word in the English language with all its letters in alphabetical order is the word "almost."
  • The side of a hammer is a cheek.
  • The silhouette on the MLB logo is Harmon Killebrew.
  • The silkworm consumes 86000 times its own weight in 56 days.
  • The single highest temperature ever recorded in U.S. history was 134 degrees Fahrenheit. It was recorded in Greenland Ranch, CA on July 10, 1913. 
  • The lowest recorded temperature was minus 80 degrees on January 23, 1971 in Prospect Creek, AK.
  • The six most dangerous occupations in America are; football player, firefighter, race-car driver, astrnaut, police officer, and fisherman.
  • The size of a newly born kangaroo is 2.5 cms.
  • The size of a raindrop is around 0.5 mm 2.5 mm, and they fall from the sky on average 21 feet per second.
  • The skipper's real name on Gilligan's Island is Jonas Grumby. It was mentioned once in the first episode on their radio's newscast about the wreck.
  • The slanted line that divides dates, fractions, choices, etc. (6/1/04) is called a virgule.
  • The sloth (a mammal) moves so slowly that green algae can grow undisturbed on it's fur
  • The sloth moves so slowly that it's fur offers a comfortable environment for algae to grow.
  • The slowest trainee on the SEALs obstacle course must wear a pink T-shirt that reads, "Always a Lady".
  • The smallest breed of dogs are the Chihuahuas.
  • The smallest fish in the world is the Trimattum Nanus of the Chagos Archipelago. It is only 0.33" long.
  • The smallest island with country status is Pitcairn in Polynesia, at just 1.75 square miles.
  • The smallest known fish is the Pandaka Pygmea,about the size of an ant and almost transeparent.
  • The smallest number spelled with an "a" is one thousand.
  • The Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History houses the world's largest shell collection, some 15 million specimens. A smaller museum in 
  • Sanibel, Florida owns a mere 2 million shells and claims to be the worlds only museum devoted solely to mollusks.
  • The smoke detector was invented in 1969.
  • The snail mates only once in it's entire life.
  • The soldiers of World War I were the first people to use the modern flushing toilet. The inventor: Thomas Crapper.
  • The song "Happy Birthday to You" was originally written by sisters Mildred and Patty Hill as "Good Morning to You." The words were changed and it 
  • was published in 1935.
  • The song "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling" was written by George Graff, who was German, and was never in Ireland in his life.
  • The song Take Me Out to the Ballgame was written by Jack Norworth and Albert von Tilzer.
  • The sorcerer's name in Disney's Fantasia is Yensid, which happens to be Disney backwards.
  • The sound of a snore (up to 69 decibels) can be almost as loud as the noise of a pneumatic drill.
  • The sound of E.T. walking was made by someone squishing her hands in Jello.
  • The sound you hear when you macho people crack your knuckles is actually the sound of nitrogen gas bubbles bursting.
  • The sound you here when you put a seashell next to your ear is not the ocean, but blood flowing through your head.
  • The soundtrack to Oklahoma was the first album to sell one million copies on August 18, 1958.
  • The South Pole is covered with 8,850 feet of solid ice.
  • The South Pole was reached for the first time on 14 December 1911 by a team of explorers led by Roald Amundsen.
  • The Soviet Caucasus mountain actually moved a mile in 1972. Heavy rains swelled an underground river and the whole mountain salied away over the 
  • course of eight days.
  • The Sphinx ( famous pyramid) was carved from one piece of stone.
  • The standard blue U.S. Postal Service mailbox can hold approximately 4,000 letters at a time.
  • The Stanley Cup came from the Governor General of Canada from 1888 to 1893, Sir Frederick Arthur Stanley. Stanley was a fan of hockey and 
  • presented a trophy to be contested by the best amateur hockey team in Canada. The amateur HNA would later become to NHL in 1917.
  • The Star Trek theme actually has lyrics.
  • The starfish has an eye on the end of each arm.
  • The starfish is one of the only animals who can turn it's stomach inside-out. They also dont have brains. (See the connection?)
  • The state flower of Texas is the Bluebonnet; the state tree is a pecan.
  • The state law of Pennsylvania prohibits singing in the bathtub.
  • The state of Utah used to be submerged under water and to this day brine shrimp can still be found in rain-filled hollows under rocks and boulders.
  • The states of Washington and Montana still execute prisoners by hanging.
  • The states with the most presidential burial sites: Ohio and Virginia (tie).
  • The statue by Auguste Rodin that has come to be known as The Thinker wasn't meant to be a portrait of a man in thought. It's a portrait of Dante 
  • Aligheri.
  • The statue of Freedom atop the U.S. Capital building is 19.5 feet tall and weighs 15,000 pounds. It was created in Rome, and the ship that brought it 
  • to America ran into a storm so severe that most of the cargo had to be tossed overboard. Before the ship reached the United States, it was 
  • condemned and sold in Bermuda, where the statue was put in storage. Two years later it reached Washington, but because of the Civil War the 
  • dome wasn't finished and the statue didn't get hoisted to its proper position for another two years.
  • The Statue of Liberty arrived in New York City in 1885 aboard the French ship "Isere."
  • The Statue of Liberty weighs 225 tons.
  • The Statue of Liberty's mouth is 3 feet wide.
  • The stormtroopers in the original starwars are seen in many seen carrying long blasters. On closer inspection you can see that the blasters are 
  • actually WWII era German MG42 machine guns (modified slightly)
  • The strawberry is the only agricultural product that bears its seeds on the outside.
  • The striped billiard balls weight .1 ounces or so more than the solids
  • The strongest muscle in the body is the tongue. (Relative to size)
  • The strongest muscle in the human body is the tongue. (the heart is not a muscle)
  • The study of insects is called entomology.
  • The study of word origins is called etymology.
  • The Sudan is the largest country in Africa. It covers about 967,500 square miles of the continent.
  • The Sumatran tiger has the most stripes of all the tiger subspecies, the Siberian tiger has the least.
  • The sun is about three million miles closer to the earth on January 1st than it is on June 1st.
  • The sun weighs 330,000 times as much as the earth.
  • The sun's average period of rotation is 27 days.
  • The sun's total lifetime as a star capable of maintaining a life-bearing Earth is about 11 billion years. Nearly half that time has passed.
  • The supersonic Concorde jet made its first trial flight on January 1, 1969.
  • The surface of the Earth is about 60% water and 10% ice.
  • The swastika was origionaly a symbol of peace and honor and is still used by Buddhists today.
  • The Swiss consume more chocolate per capita than any other nation on earth. That's 22 pounds each compared to 11 pounds per person in the 
  • United States.
  • The symbol on the "pound" key (#) is called an octothorpe.
  • The symbols used on playing cards were supposed to represent the four classes of men: hearts represented the clergy; spades (from the Spanish 
  • word espada, or sword) represented the warriors; clubs were originally leaves and represented the peasants; and citizens and merchants were 
  • recognized in the diamonds.
  • The table fork was introduced into England in 1601. Until then people would eat with their knives, spoons or fingers. When Queen Elizabeth first used 
  • a fork, the clergy went ballistic. They felt it was an insult to God not to touch meat with one's fingers.
  • The Taj Mahal in India is perfectly symetrical, except for one thing. The two tombs inside are not equal in size. This is because the male tomb has to 
  • be larger than the female tomb.
  • The Taj Mahal was actually built for use as a tomb.
  • The Taj Mahal was commissioned in 1630 by Shah Jehan to honor his wife Mumtaz, who died in childbirth.
  • The tallest monument built in the US, the Gateway Arch, in St. Louis, Missouri, is 630 feet tall.
  • The telescope at the Lick Observatory on Mount Hamilton, in California, also serves as a tomb. The 36-inch refracting telescope is mounted on a 
  • pillar that contains the remains of Jack Lick, who died in 1876. Lick was a wealthy financier and philanthropist who financed the construction of the 
  • observatory that bears his name.
  • The telescope on Mount Palomar, California, can see a distance of 7,038,835,200,000,000,000,000 miles.
  • The temperature of the earth's interior increases by one degree every 60 feet down.
  • The term "devil's advocate" comes from the Roman Catholic Church. When deciding if someone should be sainted, a devil's advocate is always 
  • appointed to give an alternative view.
  • The term "dog days" has nothing to do with dogs. It dates back to Roman times, when it was believed that Sirius, the Dog Star, added its heat to 
  • that of the sun from July3 to August 11, creating exceptionally high temperatures. The Romans called the period dies caniculares, or "days of the 
  • dog."
  • The term "dog days" has nothing to do with dogs. It dates back to Roman times, when it was believed that Sirius, the Dog Star, added its heat to 
  • that of the sun from July3 to August 11, creating exceptionally high temperatures. The Romans called the period dies caniculares, or "days of the 
  • dog."
  • The term "honeymoon" is derived from the Babylonians who declared mead, a honey-flavored wine, the official wedding drink, stipulating that the 
  • bride's parents be required to keep the groom supplied with the drink for the month following the wedding.
  • The term "the whole 9 yards" came from W.W.II fighter pilots in the South Pacific. When arming their airplanes on the ground, the .50 caliber 
  • machine gun ammo belts measured exactly 27 feet, before being loaded into the fuselage. If the pilots fired all their ammo at a target, it got "the 
  • whole 9 yards."
  • The term "throw one's hat in the ring" comes from boxing, where throwing a hat into the ring once signified a challenge. Today it nearly always 
  • signifies political candidacy.
  • The term "white chocolate" is a misnomer. Under Fedaral Standards of Identity, real chocolate must contain chocolate liquor. "White" chocolate 
  • contains no chocolate liquor.
  • The term 'crack' refers to the crackling sound heard when the mixture is smoked (heated), presumably from the sodium bicarbonate.
  • The term 'hay fever' originated in England, where some people suffered allergic symptoms during hay pitching time when the symptoms became 
  • serve, workers often felt feverish.
  • The term karaoke means "empty orchestra" in Japanese, and the karaoke machine was designed originally to provide backing tracks for solo cabaret 
  • performers.
  • The term 'screwing' was derived from the activities of pigs. A pig's member screws.
  • The term Y2K was invented by David Eddie in June 1995 through the email.
  • The term, "It's all fun and games until someone loses an eye" is from Ancient Rome. The only rule during wrestling matches was, "No eye gouging." 
  • Everything else was allowed, but the only way to be disqualified is to poke someone's eye out.
  • The term, "It's all fun and games until someone loses an eye" is from Ancient Rome. The only rule during wrestling matches was, "No eye gouging," 
  • eveything else was allowed.
  • The Texas Rangers were the first U.S. state police force. They were established in 1835.
  • The the oldest living thing on earth is 12,000 years old. It is the flowering shrubs called creosote bushes in the Mojave Desert.
  • The theobromine in chocolate that stimulates the cardiac and nervous systems is too much for dogs, especially smaller pups. A chocolate bar is 
  • poisonous to dogs and can even be lethal.
  • The three best-known western names in China: Jesus Christ, Richard Nixon, and Elvis Presley.
  • The three central panels on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel tell the story of Adam and Eve.
  • The three most common elements in the universe are 1) hydrogen; 2) helium; 3) oxygen.
  • The three most recently discovered planets were Uranus in 1781, Neptune in 1846, and Pluto in 1930.
  • The three most valuable brand names on earth Marlboro, Coca Cola, and Budweiser, in that order.
  • The Three Musketeers names are Porthos, Athos, and Aramis (D'Artagnan joins them later.)
  • The three primary colors are red, yellow and blue. The three secondary colors are green, orange and purple.
  • The Three Wise Men of the East brought gold, frankincense and myrrh to the infant Jesus. Frankincense is a gum resin used as a base for incense. 
  • Myrrh, also a gum resin, was valued as a perfume and unguent used in embalming.
  • The Three Wise Monkeys have names: Mizaru (See no evil), Mikazaru (Hear no evil), and Mazaru (Speak no evil).
  • The three-syllable word "hideous," with the change of a single consonant, becomes a two-syllable word with no vowel sounds in common: "hideout."
  • The thumbnail grows the slowest; the middle nail grows the fastest.
  • The tiger is the largest member of the cat family.
  • The tiny poison arrow frog has enough poison to kill over 2200 people!
  • The tip of the hour hand on your watch travels at a speed of 0.00000275 miles per hour.
  • The tips of fingers and the soles of feet are covered by a thick, tough layer of skin called the stratum corneum.
  • The Titanic was the first ship to use the SOS signal. It was adopted as the international signal for distress in 1912, and the Titanic struck the 
  • iceberg in April of that year.
  • The title role of Dirty Harry, 1971, was originally intended for Frank Sinatra. After he refused, it was offered to John Wayne, and then Paul Newman, 
  • finally being accepted by Clint Eastwood.
  • The toes of mummies are wrapped individually.
  • The Toltecs (a 7th century tribe) used wooden swords so they wouldn't kill their enemies.
  • The tomato is not just a fruit, but it is a berry along with the cucumber, squash, and melon.
  • The tongues of chameleons are twice the length of their bodys.
  • The tonsillectomy is the most common surgical procedure.
  • The tool doctors wrap around a patient's arm to measure blood pressure is called a sphygmomanometer.
  • The Top 10 grossing movies of the 1990s each earned at least $500 million worldwide and brought in a combined total of over $7 billion.
  • The top downhill speed of the Ford Model T was 50 miles per hour.
  • The top selling song of all time is Elton John's tribute to the late Princess Diana. Candle in the Wind 1997 has sold over 35 million copies worldwide
  • The total number of African slaves sent to all parts of the world between 1500 and 1865 was estimated to be at least 12 million. When you consider 
  • that only one in ten made the trip alive, the number of Africans who were enslaved or killed in the 350 years of the slave trade had to be no less 
  • than 120 million people.
  • The total number of Americans killed in the Civil War is greater than the combined total of Americans killed in all other wars.
  • The total surface area of a pair of human lungs is equal to that of a tennis court.
  • The town of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, is closer to the equator than it is to the North Pole.
  • The town of Idaho Falls, Idaho, forbids anyone over the age of eighty-eight to ride a motorcycle.
  • The town of Tidikelt in the Shara Desert once went ten years without rainfall.
  • The trainees are thrown into a pool with their hands and feet tied wearing snorkeling masks. They are then harassed by their instructors who knock 
  • their masks off, spin their bodies, and pull them under in an effort to disorient the student.
  • The training mantra of the SEALs is, 'The only easy day was yesterday.'
  • The Tranquilizer, Valium (sleeping piles) is the most widely used drug on earth.
  • The Treaty of Tordesillas divided all of South America between Spain and Portugal in 1493. Pope Alexander VI drew up the treaty following 
  • Columbus's discovery of the New World.
  • The tsetse fly kills another 66,000 people annually.
  • The turbot fish lays approximately 14 million eggs during its lifetime.
  • The turkey was named for what was wrongly thought to be its country of origin.
  • The turtle has the lowest pulse rate of any animal: 13 beats per minute.
  • The two lines that connect your top lip to the bottom of your nose are known as the philtrum.
  • The two most popular sports in the world are Association Football (soccer) and Table Tennis (ping-pong) respectively. I guess people love their balls, 
  • regardless of size. Hehe!
  • The two presidents who died on the same day: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson died July 4, 1826.
  • The two robbers crucified next to Jesus were named Dismas and Gestas.
  • The typical lovemaking session averages 15 minutes in length.
  • The U.S. Army has a stealth reconnaissance helicopter named "The Duke" in honor of John Wayne.
  • The U.S. bought Alaska from Russia for 2 cents an acre.
  • The U.S. Dow Jones' lowest figure was 41.22 was on July 8, 1932.
  • The U.S. Post Office handles 43 percent of the world's mail.
  • The U.S. standard railroad gauge (distance between rails) is 4 feet, 8.5 inches.
  • The underside of a horses hoof is called a frog.
  • The underside of a horse's hoof is called a frog. The frog peels off several times a year with new growth.
  • The Union ironclad, Monitor, was the first U.S. ship to have a flush toilet.
  • The United States government keeps its supply of silver at the US Military Academy at West Point, NY.
  • The United States is the world's largest consumer of coffee, importing 16 to 20 million bags annually (2.5 million pounds), representing one-third of all 
  • coffee exported. More than half of the United States population consumes coffee. The typical coffee drinker has 3.4 cups of coffee per day. That 
  • translates into more than 450,000,000 cups of coffee daily.
  • The United States Library of Congress contains 73 millions volumes (books), arranged on 350 miles of shelves.
  • The United States minted a 1787 copper coin with the motto 'Mind Your Business.'
  • The United States nickel (five cent piece) is made of 75% copper and 25% nickel.
  • The United States produces 3,145,892,000,000 kilowatt hours of electricity every year. That's over three times the amount of the second-highest 
  • producing country, Russia.
  • The United States Treasury Department maintains a fund known as "The Conscience Fund," which accepts money sent in anonymously by taxpayers 
  • who think they've cheated the government. The money is used for miscellaneous expenses.
  • The universe is so vast in relation to the matter it contains that it can be compared in the following way: A building 20 miles long, 20 miles wide and 
  • 20 miles high that contains 1 grain of sand.
  • The US Army has a 50 caliber sniper rifle that can shoot through the engine block of a car.
  • The US city with the highest murder rate is Detroit, with 45.3 homicides per 100,000 people.
  • The US federal income tax was first enacted in 1862 to support the Union's Civil War effort. It was eliminated in 1872, revived in 1894 then declared 
  • unconstitutional by the Supreme Court the following year. In 1913, the 16th Amendment to the Constitution made the income tax a permanent 
  • fixture in the US tax system.
  • The US has more personal computers than the next 7 countries combined.
  • The US President's Cabinet is composed of: the Attorney General, the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Treasury, the Secretary of Defense, the 
  • Secretary of Agriculture, the Secretary of Interior, the Secretary of Commerce, the Secretary of Health/Human Services, the Secretary of 
  • Housing/Urban Development, the Secretary of Labor, the Secretary of Transportation, the Secretary of Energy, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, 
  • the Secretary of Homeland Security, and the Secretary of Education.
  • The use of the names of dead presidents to sell alcohol in Michigan is prohibited.
  • The USSR set off the largest nuclear explosion in history, detonating a 50 megaton bomb (2600 times the Hiroshima bomb) in an atmospheric test 
  • over the Novaya Zemla Islands, October 30 1961.
  • The vast majority of coffee available to consumers are blends of different beans.
  • The Vatican's Swiss Guard still wears a uniform designed by Michelangelo in the early 16th century.
  • The venom of a female black widow spider is more potent than that of a rattlesnake.
  • The Venus flytrap feeds primarily on ants, not flies.
  • The very first bomb dropped by the Allies on Berlin during World War II killed the only elephant in the Berlin Zoo.
  • The very first bomb dropped by the Allies on Berlin in World War II killed the only elephant in the Berlin Zoo.
  • The Vince Lombardi Trophy is awarded to the winners of the Super Bowl.
  • The vintage date on a bottle of wine indicates the year the grapes were picked, not the year of bottling.
  • The Virginia Code (1930) has a statute: "To prohibit corrupt practices or bribery by any person other than candidates."
  • The viscera of Japanese abalone can harbor a poisonous substance which causes a burning, stinging, prickling and itching over the entire body. It 
  • does not manifest itself until exposure to sunlight if eaten outdoors in sunlight, symptoms occur quickly and suddenly.
  • The vocabulary of the average person consists of 5,000 to 6,000 words.
  • The Volkswagen was originally called the "Strength Through Joy Wagon".
  • The waste produced by one chicken in its lifetime can supply enough electricity to run a 100-watt bulb for 5 hours.
  • The water in the Great Salt Lake of Utah is more than four times as salty as any ocean.
  • The way that prostitutes got the nickname "Hooker" was because of a general of the Civil War. General Hooker would keep a number of prostitutes to 
  • follow has army and keep his men's moral up. The prostitutes were referred to as "Hookers brigade."
  • The WD in WD-40 stands for Water Displacer.
  • The weddell seal, can travel underwater for seven hours without surfacing.
  • The weight of air in a milk glass is about the same as the weight of one aspirin. (But one also wonders how big a milk glass is... anyone?)
  • The wettest spot in the world is located on the island of Kauai. Mt. Waialeale consistently records rainfall at the rate of nearly 500 inches per year.
  • The whiskers on a catfish are called barbells.
  • The White House, in Washington DC, was originally gray, the color of the sandstone it was built out of. After the War of 1812, during which it had 
  • been burned by Canadian troops, the outside walls were painted white to hide the smoke stains.
  • The lunula is the half-moon shaped pale area at the bottom of finger nails.
  • The white potato originated in the Andes mountains and was probably brought to Britain by Sir Francis Drake about 1586.
  • The Willamette River in Oregon is the only river on earth that flows it's entire distance north.
  • The wind must be below one mile an hour in order for the National Weather Service to rate the weather as "calm."
  • The winter of 1932 was so cold that Niagara Falls froze completely solid.
  • The Wizard of Oz was a Broadway musical 37 years before the MGM movie version was made. It had 293 performances and then went on a tour that 
  • lasted 9 years.
  • The word "checkmate" in chess comes from the Persian phrase "Shah Mat," which means, "The King Is Dead."
  • The word "coach" is derived from the village of Kocs, Hungary, where coaches were invented and first used.
  • The word "crap" came from Thomas Crapper-a famous plumber in the early days of the toilet.
  • The word "dude" is the name for an infected elephant butt hair.
  • The word "earthling" was first found in print in 1593.
  • The word "homosexual" was not coined until 1869 by the Hungarian physician Karoly Maria Benkert.
  • The word "honcho" comes from a Japanese word meaning "squad leader" and first came into usage in the English language during the American 
  • occupation of Japan following World War II.
  • The word "karate" means "empty hand."
  • The word "lethologica" describes the state of not being able to remember the word you want.
  • The word "maverick" came into use after Samuel Maverick, a Texan refused to brand his cattle. Eventually any unbranded calf became known as a 
  • Maverick.
  • The word "MOW" can be read the same way upside-down, hence the word ambigram. Many other words can be written differently using special 
  • characters of writing to make the word appear the same way from different points.
  • The word "piano" is really an abbreviation for the word "pianoforte."
  • The word "pure" appears on the scroll held by the Quaker pictured on the packages of Quaker Oats cereal.
  • The word "queue" is the only word in the English language that is still pronounced the same way when the last four letters are removed.
  • The word "samba" means "to rub navels together."
  • The word "set" has more definitions than any other word in the English language.
  • The word "supercalifragilisticexpialidocious," from the movie Mary Poppins, was added to the Oxford dictionary in 1964.
  • The word "tip" dates back to the old London coffeehouses. Conspicuously placed brass boxes etched with the inscription, "To Insure Promptness," 
  • encouraged customers to pay for efficient service. The resulting acronym, TIP, has become a byword.
  • The word "trivia" comes from the Latin "trivium" which is the place where three roads meet, a public square. People would gather and talk about all 
  • sorts of matters, most of which were trivial.
  • The word Assassin is derived from a Middle Eastern religious and political sect known as Hashishins. The name means 'hashish smoker'which refers to 
  • the practice of taking hashish to induce visions of ecstacy before murdering their enemies as their religious duty. They were very good at what they 
  • did.
  • The word 'byte' is a contraction of 'by eight.'
  • The word 'cappuccino' is the result of several derivations, the original of which began in 16th century. The Capuchin order of friars, established after 
  • 1525, played an important role in bringing Catholicism back to Reformation Europe. Its Italian name came from the long, pointed cowl, or cappuccino, 
  • derived from cappuccino, "hood," that was worn as part of the order's habit. The French version of cappuccino was capuchin, from which came 
  • English Capuchin. In Italian cappuccino went on to describe espresso coffee mixed or topped with steamed milk or cream, so called because the color 
  • of the coffee resembled the color of the habit of a Capuchin friar. The first use of cappuccino in English is recorded in 1948 in a work about San 
  • Francisco. There is also the story line that says that the term comes from the fact that the coffee is dark, like the monk's robe, and the cap is 
  • likened to the color of the monk's head.
  • The word gargoyle comes down from the Old French: gargouille, meaning throat or gullet. This is also the origin of the word gargle. The word 
  • describes the sound produced as water passes the throat and mixes with air. In early architecture, gargoyles were decorative creatures on the 
  • drains of cathedrals.
  • The word 'geography' is derived from the greek words geo (the Earth) and graphein (to write).
  • The word gymnasium comes from the Greek word gymnazein which means to exercise naked.
  • The word 'lethologica' describes the state of not being able to remember the word you want.
  • The word 'monosyllable' actually has five syllables in it.
  • The word 'news' did not come about because it was the plural of 'new.' It came from the first letters of the words North, East, West and South. This 
  • was because information was being gathered from all different directions.
  • The word 'pixel' is a contraction of either 'picture cell' or 'picture element'.
  • The word quisling comes from the name of Major Vidkun Quisling, a Norwegian who collaborated with the Germans during their occupation of Norway. 
  • The word now means "traitor."
  • The word racecar and kayak are the same whether they are read left to right or right to left.
  • The word vaccine comes from the Latin word "vacca," which means cow. This name was chosen because the first vaccination was derived from 
  • cowpox which was given to a boy.
  • The words "volt" and "voltage" are named for a member of the Italian nobility in the 1700s named Count Voltman.
  • The words "video recording" and "videotape" were first used in the early 1950s. At the time, only television professionals used them.
  • The words racecar, kayak, level and Navy Van are the same whether they are read left to right or right to left, and these are called palindromes. The 
  • longest palindromes in the dictionary however are the words 'Malayalam''rotavator' 'redivider'. Now check these out. 'A man a plan a canal panama'. 
  • 'Ten animals i slam in a net'thanx seraph, mashkur, hannah b, marky and jay, jelly baby king
  • The words silent and listen have the same letters. Santa and Satan do too.
  • The work "fuck" is used 257 times in the movie Pulp Fiction.
  • The works of Gregor Mendel, father of the science of genetics, went undiscovered for sixteen years after his death.
  • The World Bank estimates that Mexico owes the most money of any country in the world. They have $165,743,000,000 in external debt. Brazil is 
  • second with $159,139,000,000 in debt.
  • The world population of chickens is about equal to the number of people.
  • The world record for balancing people on your head is 92 in one hour.
  • The world record frog jump is 33 feet 5.5 inches over the course of 3 consecutive leaps, achieved in May 1977 by a South African sharp-nosed frog 
  • called Santjie.
  • The World Rubik Cube championship was held in Budapest on June 5, 1982. Nineteen National Champions took part. Minh Thai, the US Champion, won 
  • by solving the Cube in of 22.95 seconds. The world record, in competitive conditions, grew progressively lower and now stands at 16.5 seconds.
  • The world smallest mammal is the bumblebee bat of Thailand, weighing less than a penny.
  • The world's costliest coffee, at $130 a pound , is called Kopi Luwak. It is in the droppings of a type of marsupial that eats only the very best coffee 
  • beans. Plantation workers track them and scoop their precious poop.
  • The world's deadliest mushroom is the Amanita phalloides, the death cap. The five different poisons contained by the mushroom cause diarrhea and 
  • vomiting within 6 to 12 hours of ingestion. This is followed by damage to the liver, kidneys, and central nervous system and, in the majority of cases, 
  • coma and death.
  • The world's first adhesive postage stamp went on sale in England in 1840. It was the Penny Black, portraying Queen Victoria.
  • The world's first chocolate candy was produced in 1828 by Dutch chocolate-maker Conrad J. Van Houten. He pressed the fat from roasted cacao 
  • beans to produce cocoa butter, to which he added cocoa powder and sugar.
  • The World's first microprocessor was created in 1971, called the 4004 by Intel. It contained 2300 transistors.
  • The world's first singing commercial aired on the radio on Christmas Eve, 1926 for Wheaties cereal. The four male singers, eventually known as the 
  • Wheaties Quartet, sang the jingle.
  • The world's first speed limit regulation was in England in 1903. It was 20 mph.
  • The world's highest mountain, even higher than Mt.Everest is Mauna Koa an underwater mountain which rises 33,476 feet and has its peak on the 
  • island of Hawaii.
  • The world's highest railway is in Peru. The Central Railway climbs to 15,694 feet in the Galera tunnel, 108 miles from Lima. Tourists take it to get to 
  • the ruins of Machu Picchu.
  • The world's largest alphabet is Cambodian, with 74 letters.
  • The world's largest art gallery is the Winter Palace and Hermitage in St. Petersburg, Russia. Visitors would have to walk 15 miles to see the 322 
  • galleries which house nearly 3 million works of art.
  • The world's largest art gallery is the Winter Palace and the Hermitage in Leningrad. Visitors walk fifteen miles to visit each of the 322 galleries, which 
  • house nearly 3 million works of art and archaeological remains.
  • The world's largest burrito weighed 4,217 lbs.
  • The world's largest Gothic cathedral is in new York City. It is the Cathedral of St. John the Divine on Amsterdam Avenue and 112th Street. The 
  • cathedral measures 601 feet long, 146 feet wide, and has a transept measuring 320 feet from end to end.
  • The world's largest mammal, the blue whale, weighs 50 tons at birth. Fully grown, it weighs as much as 150 tons.
  • The world's largest palace is the Imperial palace in the heart of Peking,
  • The world's largest rodent is the Capybara. An Amazon water hog that looks like a guinea pig, it can weigh more than 100 pounds.
  • The world's longest name is: Adolph Blaine Charles David Earl Frederick Gerald Hubert Irvin John Kenneth Lloyd Martin Nero Oliver
  • The world's longest suspension bridge opened to traffic on April 5, 1998. The 3,911-meter (12,831-feet) Akashi Kaikyo Bridge is 580 meters (1,900 
  • feet) longer than the Humber Bridge in England, the previous record holder.
  • The world's most popular hobby is stamp collecting.
  • The world's number one producer and consumer of fresh pork is China.
  • The world's smallest and oldest republic is San Marino. It's 25 square miles and is located mostly on top of a mountain entirely surrounded by Italy.
  • The world's smallest independent state is the Vatican City, with a population of about 1,000 and a zero birthrate.
  • The world's smallest mammal is the bumblebee bat of Thailand, weighing less than a penny.
  • The world's smallest winged insect, the Tanzanian parasitic wasp, is smaller than the eye of a housefly.
  • The world's tallest grass, which has sometimes grown 130 feet or more, is bamboo.
  • The world's tallest mountains, the Himalayas, are also the fastest growing. Their growth about half an inch a year is caused by the pressure exerted 
  • by two of Earth's continental plates (the Eurasian plate and the Indo-Australian plate) pushing against one another.
  • The world's termites outweigh the world's humans 10 to 1
  • The world's youngest parents were 8 and 9 and lived in China in 1910.
  • The worldwide "Spanish Flu" epidemic which broke out in 1918 killed more than 30 million people in less than a year's time.
  • The 'y' in signs reading "ye olde.." is properly pronounced with a 'th' sound, not 'y'. The "th" sound does not exist in Latin, so ancient Roman occupied 
  • (present day) England use the rune "thorn" to represent "th" sounds. With the advent of the printing press the character from the Roman alphabet 
  • which closest resembled thorn was the lower case "y".
  • The 'you are here arrow' on a map is called the IDEO locator.
  • The youngest mother on record was a Peruvian girl named Lina Medina. She gave birth to a boy by caesarean section on May 14, 1939 (which 
  • happened to be Mother's Day), at the age of five years, seven months and 21 days.
  • The youngest movie star to win an Academy Award was Shirly Temple who won an Oscar in 1934 at the age of 6.
  • The youngest person to give birth was a five-yr. old tribal girl (C-Section of course)
  • The youngest pope was 11 years old.
  • The yo-yo was introduced in 1929 by Donald F. Duncan. The toy was based on a weapon used by 16th-century Filipino hunters.
  • The yo-yo was originally a weapon in the Philippines.
  • The zebra is basically a light-colored animal with black stripes.
  • The ZIP in "ZIP code" means Zoning Improvement Plan.
  • Their wages in salt hence the word "Salary" derived.
  • Theodore Roosevelt was the only U.S. president to deliver an inaugural address without using the word "I". Abraham Lincoln, Franklin D. Roosevelt 
  • and Dwight D. Eisenhower tied for second place, using "I" only once in their inaugural addresses.
  • Ther very first bomb dropped by the Allies on Berlin during World War II killed the only elephant in the Berlin Zoo.
  • There are 1,218 peanuts in a single 28 ounce jar of Jif peanut butter.
  • There are 1,792 steps to the top of the Eiffel Tower.
  • There are 10 million people who share your birthday.
  • There are 10,000,000 bricks in the Empire State Building.
  • There are 100 tiles in a 'Scrabble' crossword game.
  • There are 11 points on the collar around Kermit the Frog's neck.
  • There are 1189 chapters in the Bible: 929 chapters in the Old Testament and 260 chapters in the New Testament.
  • There are 13,678 McDonald's fast food joints in the United States.
  • There are 132 rooms in the US White House.
  • There are 170,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 ways to play the ten opening moves in a game of chess.
  • There are 2,320 Navy SEALs.
  • There are 2,382,500 (rounded) Smiths in the U.S.
  • There are 2,598,960 five-card hands possible in a 52-card deck of cards.
  • There are 24 known "perfect" numbers. These are numbers that equal the sum of all its divisors except itself. For instance, six the lowest of these 
  • numbers is divisible by 1, 2, or 3 and 1+2+3=6. The largest of the known "perfect" numbers has 12,003 digits.
  • There are 293 ways to make change for a dollar.
  • There are 300 distinct different types of honey.
  • There are 31,557,600 seconds in a year.
  • There are 318,979,564,000 possible ways to play the first four moves per side in a game of chess.
  • There are 336 dimples on a regulation size golf ball.
  • There are 336 dimples on a regulation US golf ball. In the UK its 330.
  • There are 350,000 Italians living in Toronto, Canada, a population about the same as that of Venice, Italy.
  • There are 38 peaks in South America higher than Mt. McKinley, which is the highest point in North America.
  • There are 403 steps from the foundation to the top of the torch in the Statue of Liberty.
  • There are 41,806 different spoken languages in the world today.
  • There are 43,252,003,274,489,856,000 different color combinations possible on a Rubik's Cube.
  • There are 44,523,312,694,361,020,971,556,671,544,734,879,370,359,807,003,367,569,358,848,000,000,000,000 ways to order a deck of cards.
  • There are 45 miles of nerves in the skin of a human being.
  • There are 48 Gutenberg Bibles still in existence. Two of them were in Germany during World War II and are missing, but many book collectors believe 
  • them to be in private collections.
  • There are 49 different foods mentioned in the Bible.
  • There are 60,000 miles of blood vessels in the human body.
  • There are 63,360 inches in a mile.
  • There are a million ants for every person on Earth.
  • There are about 2 chickens for every human in the world.
  • There are about 30 milligrams of caffeine in the average chocolate bar, while a cup of coffee contains around 100 to 150 milligrams.
  • There are about 450 types of cheese in the world. 240 come from France.
  • There are about 5,000,000,000 years of sunlight left
  • There are about 7.7 million millionaires in the world (more than 1/1000th of the population).
  • There are approximately 10 million bricks in the Empire State Building.
  • There are approximately 100 million acts of sexual intercourse each day.
  • There are approximately 13,000 identifiable varieties of roses throughout the world.
  • There are approximately 2,700 different species of mosquitoes.
  • There are approximately 250,000 sweat glands in your feet.
  • There are approximately 45 billion fat cells in an average adult.
  • There are approximately 7,000 feathers on an eagle.
  • There are approximately 75,000,000 horses in the world.
  • There are approximately 9,000 taste buds on the tongue.
  • There are approximately fifty Bibles sold each minute across the world.
  • There are around 2,600 different species of frogs. They live on every continent except Antarctica.
  • There are at least two words in the English language that use all of the vowels, in the correct order, and end in the letter Y: abstemiously & 
  • facetiously.
  • There are four main Blood types: A, B, AB and O and each Blood type is either Rh positive or negative. Blood types in the US Type O positive 38.4%, 
  • negative 7.7%, A positive 32.3%, A negative 6.5%, B positive 9.4%, B negative 1.7%, AB positive 3.2%, AB negative 0.7%
  • There are just over 7 million millionaires in the world (more than 1/1000th of the population).
  • There are more coffee drug addicts in the US than drug addicts of any other kind.
  • There are more insects in one square mile of rural land than there are human beings on the entire earth.
  • There are more kinds of bacteria in your mouth then there are people in the world
  • There are more plastic flamingos in America than real ones.
  • There are more plastic lawn flamingos in the United States than real ones.
  • There are more stars than all of the grains of sand on earth.
  • There are more statues of Sacajewa, Lewis & Clark's female Indian guide, in the United States than any other person.
  • There are more than 100 distinct ethnic groups in the former Soviet states.
  • There are more than 100 million dogs and cats in the United States. Americans spend more than 5.4 billion dollars on their pets each year.
  • There are more than 2,000 muscles in a caterpillar.
  • There are more than 40,000 characters in Chinese script.
  • There are more than 50,000 earthquakes throughout the world every year.
  • There are more than 500 varieties of banana in the world: The most common kinds are Dwarf Cavendish, Valery, and Williams Hybrid bananas. Other 
  • types of bananas include Apple and a small red banana called the Red Jamaica. A large type of banana called the plantain is hard and starchy and is 
  • almost eaten as a cooked vegetable. The Cavendish is the most common variety of bananas now imported to the United States. The Cavendish is a 
  • shorter, stubbier plant than earlier varieties. It was developed to resist plant diseases, insects and windstorms better than its predecessors. The 
  • Cavendish fruit is of medium size, has a creamier, smooth texture, and a thinner peel than earlier varieties.
  • There are more than 700 species of plants that grow in the United States that have been identified as dangerous if eaten. Among them are some 
  • that are commonly favored by gardeners: buttercups, daffodils, lily of the valley, sweet peas, oleander, azalea, bleeding heart, delphinium, and 
  • rhododendron.
  • There are more than 900,000 known species of insects in the world.
  • There are nine rooms on a 'Clue' game board. A forfeited baseball game is recorded as a 9-0 score.
  • There are no clocks or windows in any casino.
  • There are no female characters in Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island because he was following the instructions of his stepson, Lloyd 
  • Osbourne, for whom he wrote the book. Llyod wanted a story "about a map, a treasure, a mutiny and a derelict ship...No women in the story."
  • There are no geeze in the southern hemisphere.
  • There are no living descendents of William Shakespeare.
  • There are no public toilets in Peru.
  • There are no turkeys in Turkey.
  • There are no words in the dictionary that rhyme with orange, purple, or silver.
  • There are one million ants for every person in the world.
  • There are only 12 letters in the Hawaiian alphabet.
  • There are only 4 words in the English language which end in "dous": tremendous, horrendous, stupendous, and hazardous.
  • There are only 81 stable chemical elements. Rhenium was the last one to be found in 1925. Fifteen other elements have been discovered since then, 
  • but they are all radioactive.
  • There are only four words in the English language that end in "-dous": tremendous, horrendous, stupendous, and hazardous.
  • There are only two sequences of four consecutive letters that can be found in the English language: "rstu" and "mnop." Examples of each are 
  • understudy and gymnophobia.
  • There are orange peels and raisins in A-1 Steak Sauce.
  • There are over 3,500 bras hanging behind the bar at Hogs and Heifers, a bar in Manhattan. So many, in fact, that they caused a beam to collapse in 
  • the ceiling.
  • There are roughly 6,500 spoken languages in the world today. However, about 2,000 of those languages have fewer than 1,000 speakers. The most 
  • widely spoken language in the world is Mandarin Chinese. There are 885,000,000 people in China that speak that language.
  • There are seven suicides in the Bible: Abimelech. Samson, Saul, Saul's armor-bearer, Ahithophel, Zimri, Judas.
  • There are six U.S. Presidents with the first name James: Madison, Monroe, Garfield, Buchanon, Carter, Polk.
  • There are songs in all of Shakespeare's plays except The Comedy of Errors.
  • There are ten human body parts that are only three letters long: eye, hip, arm, leg, ear, toe, jaw, rib, lip, and gum.
  • There are ten million bricks in the Empire State Building.
  • There are thirteen languages spoken by more than 100 million people. They are: Mandarin Chinese, English, Hindi, Spanish, Russian, Arabic, Bengali, 
  • Portuguese, Malay-Indonesian, French, Japanese, German, and Urdu.
  • There are two credit cards for every person in the U.S.
  • There are two credit cards for every person in the United States.
  • There are two words in the English language that have all five vowels in order: "abstemious" and "facetious."
  • There are, on average, 259 raisins in a box of Raisin Bran and 388 in a box of Premium Raisin Bran.
  • There has never been a time in Super Bowl history where a punt return resulted in a touchdown.
  • There have been about 30 films made at or about Alcatraz, the now-closed federal prison island in San Francisco Bay, including The Rock (1996), 
  • Birdman of Alcatraz (1962), and Escape from Alcatraz (1979).
  • There have been no recorded instances of anybody being killed by a meteorite.
  • There have been over 600 lawsuits against Alexander Grahm Bell over rights to the patent of the telephone, the most valuable patent in U.S. history.
  • There is a 1 in 4 chance that New York will have a white Christmas.
  • There is a 6-foot tall stone monument dedicated to the cartoon character Popeye in Crystal City, TX. .
  • There is a butterfly found in Brazil that has the smell and color of a chocolate.
  • There is a flower called the Scarlet Pimpernel that can forecast the weather. If the flower is closed up, rain is coming and if it is opened up, the day 
  • will be sunny.It is a.k.a 'the poor man's weatherglass'
  • There is a Massachusetts law requiring all dogs to have their hind legs tied during the month of April.
  • There is a member of the spider family called the demodex folliculorum that lives at the root of people's eye lashes. It's harmless and normal.(so they 
  • claim) To look for them, grab a handful of your eyelashes and dunk them in warm water. They'll start swimming out. It is prevalent in nearly 100% of 
  • old people in the U.S.
  • There is a sea squirt (found in the seas near Japan) that digests its own brain. When the sea squirt is mature it permanently attaches itself to a 
  • rock. At this point it does not need to move anymore and has no need for a brain.
  • There is a seven letter word in the English language that contains ten words without rearranging any of its letters, "therein": the, there, he, in, rein, 
  • her, here, ere, therein, herein.
  • There is a street in Canada that runs for a distance of nearly 1900 kms.
  • There is a way of writing 1 by using all ten single-digit numbers at once: 148/296 + 35/70 = 1.
  • There is a word in the English language with only one vowel, which occurs five times: "indivisibility."
  • There is about 1/4 pound of salt in every gallon of seawater.
  • There is about 200 times more gold in the oceans than has been mined throughout history.
  • There is actually no danger in swimming right after you eat, though it may feel uncomfortable.
  • There is air in space, but very little of it. In fact, it is equivalent to a marble in a box 5 miles wide. Most of the gas is captured by the gravitational 
  • pull of other celestial bodies.Thanx M.Lerner
  • There is an average of 61,000 people airborne over the US at any given moment.
  • There is an extra leg in the Iwo Jima memorial statue and extra hand. While the legend is that these extremedies belong to God, who is helping the 
  • Marines win, they are actually there for added support to the statue, and designed not to look like a metal rod going throught the middle of the 
  • group of Marines.
  • There is coffee flavored Pez.
  • There is cyanide in apple pits.
  • There is more bacteria in your mouth than the human population of U.S and Canada combined. Thanx Julie for this and a couple more
  • There is no alcohol left in food that's cooked with wine. The alcohol evaporates at 172 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • There is no difference in flavor or nutritional value between brown and white eggs. Aside form color, they are identical. Most white eggs come from 
  • White Longhorns and browns come from a commercial cross of Rhode Island Reds and Barred Plymouth Rocks.
  • There is no ice covering Iceland.
  • There is no single cat called the panther. The name is commonly applied to the leopard, but it is also used to refer to the puma and the jaguar. A 
  • black panther is really a black leopard.
  • There is no solid proof of who built the Taj Mahal.
  • There is no such thing as a banana tree. Bananas grow on plants.
  • There is only ONE word in the English language with THREE CONSECUTIVE SETS OF DOUBLE LETTERS.... Bookkeeper
  • There is over 70,000,000 rats in New York, That is an average of about 9 rats per person
  • There is zero gravity at the center of the earth.
  • There really was a Cyrano de Bergerac. He lived from about 1620 to 1655, had a big nose and dueled. He was also a science fiction writer who was 
  • the first person in history to suggest that a rocket could carry someone into space.
  • There was no soap in the ancient Mediterranean world. Olive oil was used to wash the body in addition to cooking.
  • There was once a law in Salem Virginia that made it illegal to leave home without knowing where you were going.
  • There were 840 soldiers in the regular army when the U.S. War Department was established in 1789. Their job was to supervise public lands and 
  • guard the Indian frontier.
  • There's a town in New Mexico called Pie Town that consists of two restaurants and a post office. It was originally a stoppong place along a long 
  • stretch of road. It's famous for having good pies!
  • There's an average of of 178 sesame seeds on a Big Mac bun.
  • There's Arsnick(a dangerous poison) in dirt
  • There's enough water preassure in one onion cell to cause a steam engine to explode.
  • Thirteen muscles are used to make a person smile.
  • Thirty-five percent of the people who use personal ads for dating are already married.
  • This is what the red, white, and blue on the US flag represent: The Continental Congress left no record to show why it chose the colors. However, in 
  • 1782, the Congress of the Confederation chose these same colors for the Great Seal of the United States and listed their meaning as follows: white 
  • to mean purity and innocence, red for valor and hardiness, and blue for vigilance, perseverance, and justice. According to legend, George 
  • Washington interpreted the elements of the flag this way: the stars were taken from the sky, the red from the British colors, and the white stripes 
  • signified the secession from the home country. However, there is no official designation or meaning for the colors of the flag.
  • This may have been true on an older $5 bill, but I just scanned in one of the new ones and took a real close look and found nothing. If anyone finds 
  • it on an old one, please send in a pic or let me know.
  • This one is deep...think about the cultural impact this could have: NO WAR HAS BEEN FOUGHT WHERE BOTH COUNTRIES HAD A McDonalds
  • This sounds feasible, but isn't true! Crapper actually invented the automatic shut-off mechanism used in the modern toilet.
  • Thomas Edison got patents for a method of making concrete furniture and a cigar which was supposed to burn forever.
  • Thomas Edison was afraid of the dark.
  • Thomas Edison, lightbulb inventor, was afraid of the dark
  • Thomas Jefferson invented the dumbwaiter.
  • Thomasville, North Carolina, prohibits airplanes from flying over the town on Sundays during the hours between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.
  • Those British are sophisticated people, in almost everything except their choice of coffee. They still drink instant ten-to-one over fresh brewed.
  • Those hard, plastic points on the ends of shoelaces are called aglets.
  • Though it goes to 10, 9 is estimated to be the point of total tectonic destruction from an earthquake (2 is the smallest that can be felt unaided.)
  • Thousands of people watched the Battle of Bunker Hill take place. People in the Boston area sat on rooftops, in trees, on church steeples, and in the 
  • rigging of ships in the harbor to watch the American revolutionaries battle the British.
  • Three chemicals are used to execute criminals by lethal injection. First, Sodium Thiopental is injected, causing the inmate to fall into a deep sleep. 
  • The second chemical agent, Pancuronium Bromide, a muscle relaxer, follows. This causes the inmate to stop breathing due to paralyses of the 
  • diaphragm and lungs. Finally, Potassium Chloride is injected, stopping the heart.
  • Three million people in the United States have an impairment of the back or limbs that is a direct result of an accidental fall.
  • Three-hundred-million cells die in the human body every minute.
  • Throughout his career, DeWolf Hopper recited Casey at the Bat" over 10,000 times.
  • Tiger Woods is the only person to hold all four major championships at one time, although it did not happen in the calendar year. He also currently 
  • holds the scoring record for all four majors.
  • Tiger Woods' real first name is Eldrick. His father gave him the nickname "Tiger" in honor of a South Vietnamese soldier his father had fought 
  • alongside with during the Vietnam War.
  • Tigers have striped skin, not just striped fur.
  • Tigers' paw prints are called pug marks.
  • Time magazine's "Man of the Year" for 1938 was Adolf Hitler.
  • Timmie Jean Lindsey of Houston, TX became the first person to get silicone breast implants in 1962.
  • Tina Turner's real name is Annie Mae Bullock.
  • Title 14, Section 1211 of the Code of Federal Regulations, implemented on July 16, 1969, makes it illegal for U.S. citizens to have any contact with 
  • extraterrestrials or their vehicles.
  • To "testify" was based on men in the Roman court swearing to a statement made by swearing on their testicles.
  • To an observer standing on Pluto, the sun would appear no brighter than Venus appears in our evening sky.
  • To avoid long encounters with the press, President Ronald Reagan often took reporters' questions with his helicopter roaring in the background.
  • To determine the percentage of alcohol in a bottle of liquor divide the proof by two.
  • To find out almost the exact temperature... Listen to a cricket chirping and count the number of chirps in a minute. Add fifty, divide by four then add 
  • 40.
  • To go one lunar day, adjust your watch to lose two minutes and five seconds every hour.
  • To keep your feet warm, put on a hat: 80% of all body heat escapes through the head.
  • To make things easier while mixing the American Graffiti sound track, George Lucas and sound designer Walter Murch labeled all of the film reels R and 
  • all of the dialogue tracks D, and then numbered each of them sequentially, starting with 1. When Murch later asked Lucas for Reel 2 Dialogue 2 or 
  • more precisely, R2 D2 Lucas liked the way it sounded so much that he made a note of the name for another project he was writing.
  • To prevent some numbers from occurring more frequently than others, dice used in crap games in Las Vegas are manufactured to a tolerance of 
  • 0.0002 inches, less than 1/17 the thickness of a human hair.
  • Tobacco smoke contains over 4,000 chemicals, including at least 50 that cause, initiate or promote cancer such as tar, ammonia, carbon monoxide, 
  • oxides of nitrogen and benzopyrene.
  • Today's commercial bananas are scientifically classified into the genus Musa of the Musaceae family.
  • Toilets in Australia flush counter clockwise.
  • Tokyo is the largest city by population (35million), followed by New York (21 million), then by Seoul (21 million), then Mexico City (20 million).
  • Tom Cruise, John Travolta and Anne Archer are members of the Church of Scientology
  • Tommy McDonald, a receiver for the Philadelphia Eagles, was the last NFL player to wear a helmet without a face mask.
  • Tony Hawk has made more money from video games and tv commercials than from skateboarding.
  • Toothbrushes should be kept 6 feet away from the toilet to avoid being contaminated by airborne stuff stirred up after flushing
  • Top corporate executives take separate planes in case one crashes.
  • Tortoises drink water through their noses.
  • Tossing coins into fountains, dates back more than 2,000 years ago.
  • Townsend Speakman of Philadelphia mixed fruit flavor with soda water in 1807, creating the first flavored soda pop, he called it Nephite Julep.
  • Traces of cocaine were found on 99% of UK bank notes in a survey in London in 2000.
  • Triskaidekaphobia means fear of the number 13. Paraskevidekatriaphobia means fear of Friday the 13th (which occurs one to three times a year). In 
  • Italy, 17 is considered an unlucky number. In Japan, 4 is considered an unlucky number.
  • Truffles, or mushrooms that grow below the ground, are one of the world's most expensive foods. One variety, Tuber melanosporum, can cost 
  • between $800 and $1,500 a pound.
  • Turkey began to roast and grind the coffee bean in the 13th Century, and some 300 years later, in the 1500's, the country had become the chief 
  • distributor of coffee, with markets established in Egypt, Syria, Persia, and Venice, Italy.
  • Turkeys can reproduce without having sex. It's called parthenogenesis
  • Turkeys drown in the rain
  • Turtles can breathe through their butts.
  • Turtles have no teeth.
  • Twinkies have a shelf life of about 25 years.
  • Two in every three car buyers pays the sticker price without arguing.
  • Two normal kidneys contain 2 million tiny blood filters which filter 50 gallons of blood every day!.
  • Two thirds of all left-handed people are men.
  • Two U.S. Presidents with the initials "J.M." followed each other as president.
  • Two-thirds of the world's coffee comes from Brazil.
  • Two-thirds of the world's eggplant is grown in New Jersey.
  • Underfund and underground are the only two English words which start and finish with "und."
  • Unique animals. Hippopotami cannot swim (ppl have said that a hippo can swim, but i dont think its classified as swimming. I'll check), whales can't 
  • swim backwards, tarantulas can't spin webs, crocodiles can't chew and hummingbirds can't walk
  • Unlike most fish, electric eels cannot get enough oxygen from water. Approximately every five minutes, they must surface to breathe, or they will 
  • drown. Unlike most fish, they can swim both backwards and forwards.
  • Unprosperousness is the longest word in which every letter occurs at least twice.
  • Until 1896, drivers in Great Britain had to warn of their presence by having a person precede their car on foot, waving a red flag.
  • Until 1965, driving was done on the left-hand side on roads in Sweden. The conversion to right-hand was done on a weekday at 5 p.m.
  • Until 1967 it wasn't illegal for Olympic athletes to use drugs to enhance their performance during competition.
  • Until the 1870s, baseball was played without the use of gloves.
  • Until the 18th century coffee was almost always boiled.
  • Until the 18th century India produced almost all the world diamonds.
  • Until the late 1800's, people roasted their coffee at home. Popcorn poppers and stove-top frying pans were favored.
  • Until the time of Michelangelo, many sculptors colored their statues, and most from ancient Greece and Rome at one time had been painted or 
  • "polychromed." Over the course of years, rain washed the colors off the marble.
  • Until the time of Michelangelo, many sculptors colored their statues. Most of the statues from ancient Greece and Rome at one time had been 
  • painted or polychromed. Rain through the ages washed off the paint and the statues were left in their natural marble.
  • Up until the early 20th century, New Jersey and Wisconsin had laws allowing the castration of epileptics.
  • Upper and Lower case letters are so named because when print had to be set by individual letters the upper case letters were stored in a case 
  • above the case that held the lower case letters.
  • URanus' axis is at 97 degrees. which means that it orbits on its side. (Most of the planets spin on an axis nearly perpendicular to the plane of the 
  • ecliptic but Uranus' axis is almost parallel to the ecliptic.)
  • Uranus is the only planet that rotates on its side. Venus is the only planet that rotates clockwise.
  • Uranus was originally called George, in honour of King George III of Britain
  • US Dollar bills are made out of cotton and linen.
  • US gold coins used to say "In Gold We Trust".
  • US Presidents who died on July 4th: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson died in 1826, James Monroe died in 1831.
  • US presidents who have been assassinated: Abraham Lincoln in 1865, James A. Garfield in 1881, William H. McKinley in 1901, and John F. Kennedy in 
  • 1963.
  • US Presidents who never attended college: Grover Cleveland, Abraham Lincoln, Harry S Truman, and George Washington.
  • US Presidents who never had children: George Washington, known as the "Father of the Country," James Madison, Andrew Jackson, James Polk, 
  • James Buchanan, and Warren Harding.
  • US Presidents who never held any other elective office: U. S. Grant, William H. Taft, Herbert Hoover, Dwight D. Eisenhower.
  • US Presidents who owned slaves : George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Andrew Jackson, John Tyler, James K. Polk, Zachary 
  • Taylor, Andrew Johnson, and Ulysses S. Grant.
  • US presidents who served an entire term without a vice president: John Tyler, Millard Fillmore, Andrew Johnson, and Chester Arthur.
  • US presidents who were survived by their fathers: John F. Kennedy and Warren Harding.
  • US Senator Strom Thurmond of South Carolina set a filibuster record in the U.S. Senate on August 19, 1957. He spoke for 24 hours and 18 minutes.
  • 'Vaimonkanto' or 'Wife Carrying' is a sports event. The 'Carry an Old Gel' championship games are held anually in Sonkajarvi, Finland.
  • Van Camp's Pork and Beans were a staple food for Union soldiers in the Civil War.
  • Vanilla is the extract of fermented and dried pods of several species of orchids.
  • Vaseline was created by Robert Chesebrough in 1870. He developed it after visiting Titusville, PA in 1859. While there he noticed that workers were 
  • treating cuts and burns with grease that accumulated on drill rods from the oil fields.
  • Vatican City is the smallest country in the world. It's just 0.17 square miles. Monaco is the second smallest at 0.7 square miles.
  • Vatican City is the smallest country in the world. The whole country is only 108.7 acres, which a population of just 1,000 (approx.).
  • Venus is the only planet in the solar system to spin backwards.
  • Venus rotates so slowly that in a typical day lasts approximately 244 Earth days (5,856 hours).
  • Vermont, admitted as the 14th state in 1791, was the 1st addition to the original 13 colonies.
  • VHS stands for Video Home System.
  • Victor Hugo's Les Miserables contains one of the longest sentences in the French language 823 words without a period.
  • Victor Mills, an inventor with Proctor & Gamble, invented the disposable diaper in 1961 because he didn't want to deal with his daughter's soiled 
  • (crapped) diapers. You know them as Pampers.
  • Vincent van Gogh didn't start to draw until he was 27 years old.
  • Vincent van Gogh is known to have sold only one painting during his lifetime.
  • Virgina Woolf wrote all of her books standing.
  • Virginia law forbids bathtubs in the house; tubs must be kept in the yard.
  • Volkswagen was the first foreign company to open a factory in the United States. The auto plant opened in 1978 in Pennsylvania.
  • Waldo Hanchett invented the modern dentist's chair in 1848.
  • Walt Disney got the idea for Mickey Mouse from watching mice play in a garage, where he was forced to work, because he could not afford to rent 
  • an art studio.
  • Walt Disney named Mickey Mouse after Mickey Rooney, whose mother he dated.
  • Walt Disney provided the voice of Mickey Mouse in Steamboat Willie.
  • Walt Disney was afraid of mice.
  • Walt Disney's first cartoon character was called Oswald the Rabbit.
  • Walt Disney's youngest daughter is named Sharon.
  • Walter Huston and his son John become the first father-and-son team to win Oscars as director of and an actor in "Treasure of Sierra Madre" in 
  • 1949.
  • Warn your hubby that after lovemaking in Ames, Iowa, he isn't allowed to take more than three gulps of beer while lying in bed with youor holding 
  • you in his arms.
  • Warren Beatty and Shirley McLaine are brother and sister.
  • Warren G. Harding was the first American President to visit Canada. He stopped in Vancouver, British Columbia while he was on his way to Alaska.
  • Warren G. Harding's middle name is Gamaliel.
  • Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln, and Teddy Roosevelt are the four US presidents whose faces are carved on Mt. Rushmore.
  • Water based mammals like dolphins and whales swish their tails up and down. Only fish move them sideways.
  • Watermelon is grown in over 96 countries worldwide. Over 1,200 varieties of watermelon are grown worldwide. There are about 200 varieties of 
  • watermelon throughout the US.
  • Watermelon, considered one of America's favorite fruits, is really a vegetable (Citrullus lanatus). Cousin to the cucumber and kin to the gourd, 
  • watermelons can range in size from 7 to 100 pounds.
  • Watermelons grown along the Tigris River have been known to reach as much as 275 pounds.
  • We [humans] only use 10% of our brains.
  • We blink eyes 25 times each minute.
  • We blink our eyes once every six second i.e. in the course of a life time we blink about 250 million times.
  • We lose half a litre of water a day through breathing. This is the water vapour we see when we breathe onto glass.
  • Wearing headphones for just an hour will increase the bacteria in your ear by 700 times.
  • Wedding cake was originally thrown at the bride and groom, instead of eaten by them.
  • Wesley Snipes has a 5th Degree Black Belt.
  • Wesley Snipes installed public telephones while struggling to become an actor in New York.
  • Wet sand weighs less than dry sand.
  • Whale hunting is strictly prohibitted throughout the entire state of Oklahoma.
  • Whales can never focus both their eyes on the same object at once
  • What does a Dead Leaf, Paper Kite, Blue Striped Crow,Julia and Great Egg Fly have in common? They're all butterflies!Thanx Bijou
  • What we call the sky is merely the limit of our vision into the atmosphere. The sky, like the horizon, is always as far away as one can see.
  • What word can you take the first letter of, put it as the last letter, and make it the past tence of the original word? Answer: Eat (ate)
  • Wheat is the world's most widely cultivated plant; grown on every continent except Antarctica.
  • When a coffee seed is planted, it takes five years to yield consumable fruit.
  • When a female horse and male donkey mate, the offspring is called a mule, but when a male horse and female donkey mate, the offspring is called a 
  • hinny.
  • When a giraffe is born, it has to fall around six feet to the ground.
  • When a male skier falls down, he tends to fall on his face. A woman skier tends to fall on her back.
  • When a man was hanged in Mississippi in 1894 the noose came undone and the prisoner fell to the ground. He was set free and and since his 
  • innocence was later established he was granted ,$5000.
  • When a person dies, hearing is generally the last sense to go. The first sense lost is usually sight. Then follows taste, smell, and touch.
  • When a person dies, hearing is the last sense to go. First off would be your sight.
  • When a person is wide awake, alert, and mentally active, he is still only 25% aware of what various parts of his body are doing. (2-1-04)
  • When a queen bee lays the fertilized eggs that will develop into new queens, only one of the newly laid queens actually survives. The first new 
  • queen that emerges from her cell destroys all other queens in their cells and, thereafter, reigns alone.
  • When Alexander Graham Bell Was working on the telephone in 1876, he spilled battery acid on his pants and called out to his assistant, "Watson, 
  • please come here. I want you." Watson, who was on another floor, heard the call through the instrument he was hooking up, and ran to Bell's room. 
  • Bell's words became the first ever successfully communicated using a telephone.
  • When angered, the ears of the tazmanian devil turn pinkish red.
  • When ants find food, they lay down a chemical trail, called a pheromone, so that other ants can find their way from the nest to the food source.
  • When armadillos are pregnant they always have quadruplets of the same sex.
  • When Bob Marley died they found 19 different species of lice in his dreadlocks.
  • When Bugs Bunny first appeared in 1935, he was called Happy Rabbit.
  • When Catherine de Medici married Henry II of France (1533) she brought forks with her, as well as several master Florentine cooks. Foods never 
  • before seen in France were soon being served using utensils instead of fingers or daggers. She is said to have introduced spinach (which "à la 
  • Florentine" usually means) as well as aspics, sweetbreads, artichoke hearts, truffles, liver crépinettes, quenelles of poultry, macaroons, ice cream, 
  • and zabagliones.
  • When Charles Darwin published his theory on human evolution in The Descent of Man in 1871, not a single fossil that was known to be pre-human 
  • had been found to back up his ideas. Although his theory was later proved to be true, it was formulated entirely without physical evidence and based 
  • almost completely on speculation.
  • When Christopher Columbus and crew landed in the New World they observed the natives using a nose pipe to smoke a strange new herb. The pipe 
  • was called a "tabaka" by the locals, hence our word tobacco.
  • When cows lay down, they get up back feet first...so if you get enough people to sit on their rear end, they won't be able to stand again. Doctors 
  • use this when operating and giving shots.
  • When Disneyland opened in 1955, Tomorrowland represented a city from 1986.
  • When gentlemen in medieval Japan wished to seal an agreement, they urinated together, crisscrossing their streams of urine.
  • When George Washington ran for the Virginia House of Burgesses in 1757, he was accused of trying to win votes by plying voters with 28 gallons of 
  • rum, 50 gallons of rum punch, 46 gallons of beer and 34 gallons of wine.
  • When George Washington was elected President, there was a King in France, a Czar in Russia, an Emperor in China, and a Shogun in Japan. Only the 
  • office of President remained.
  • When glass breaks, it showers TOWARDS, not away from the force that broke it. To reiterate, I will repeat it again one more time, to recap, 
  • TOWARDS the force, not away.
  • When Henry Aaron hit his 715th Home Run, breaking Babe Ruth's record, the pitcher who served it up was Al Downing of the Los Angeles Dodgers. 
  • They were both wearing number 44.
  • When honey is swallowed, it enters the blood stream within a period of 20 minutes.
  • When Leonardo Da Vinci was young he drew a picture of a horrible monster and placed near a window in order to surprise his father. Upon seeing the 
  • picture his father believed it to be real and set out to protect his family until the boy showed him it was just a picture. Da Vinci's father then enrolled 
  • his son in an art class.
  • When Mahatma Gandhi died, an autopsy revealed that his small intestine contained five gold Krugerrands. (not verified)
  • When Mount Vesuvius erupted in in the year 79, over 2,000 citizens of Pompeii ran into their cellars to wait until everything had ended. Excavators 
  • found them still there 1,800 years later.
  • When movie directors do not want their names to be seen in the credits, they use the pseudonym "Allen Smithee" instead. It has been used over 50 
  • times, starting with "Death of a Gunfighter" (1969).
  • When opossums are playing 'possum, they are not "playing," They actually pass out from sheer terror.
  • When possums are "playing possum" they're not playing they are actually passed out from sheer terror.
  • When potatoes first appeared in Europe in the seventeenth century, it was thought that they were disgusting, and they were blamed for starting 
  • outbreaks of leprosy and syphilis. As late as 1720 in America, eating potatoes was believed to shorten a person's life.
  • When potatoes were brought from South America over to Spain, it took about 200 years before it was recognized as a food.
  • When potatoes were first introduced to Europe, people were skeptical and only ate the leaves, which made them sick. They would then throw away 
  • the rest, including the actual spud.
  • When pure gold is beaten with a mallet and made into gold leaf, the average thickness runs between 1/200,000th to 1/250,000th of an inch.
  • When Scott Paper Co. first started manufacturing toilet paper they did not put their name on the product because of embarrassment.
  • When sharks bite down, their eyes automatically close in case their prey starts squirming trying to get free, and thereby cause damage to the 
  • shark's eyes in the process.
  • When snakes are born with two heads, they fight each other for food.
  • When someone commits suicide while jumping off a building, so much adrenaline builds up that you have a heart attack and die before hitting the 
  • ground. Thus making this way of commiting usicide basically the easiest.
  • When Swiss cheese ferments, a bacterial action generates gas. As the gas is liberated, it bubbles through the cheese leaving holes. Cheese-makers 
  • call them "eyes."
  • When the Black Death swept across England one theory was that cats caused the plague. Thousands were slaughtered. Ironically, those that kept 
  • their cats were less affected, because they kept their houses clear of the real culprits, rats.
  • When the English colonists sat down for their first Thanksgiving dinner on February 22, 1630, an Indian chief named Quadoquina offered a deerskin 
  • bag filled with freshly popped corn. Thus popcorn made its first appearance to non-native North Americans.
  • When the German army invaded France in WWI, they actually followed the schedules of the local trains to invade (it was faster by rail and they 
  • wanted to surprise France), checking the timetable and abiding by it. And France, whose army was waiting at the border, sent taxis to pick up and 
  • transport the troops to counter the attack!
  • When the income tax first started in 1861, the maximum tax was 3%.
  • When the moon is directly over your head, you weigh slightly less.
  • When the temperature drops, the eyesight reaction time of insects (like the dragonfly and some animals like tortoises) decrease and thats why they 
  • can be caught early in the morning or at night by predators like birds whose eyesight reaction times are unaffected by temperature.
  • When the Titanic sank, 2228 people were on it. Only 706 survived.
  • When the Titanic sunk there was 7,500 lbs. of ham on it
  • When the University of Nebraska Cornhuskers play football at home, the stadium becomes the third largest city in the state.
  • When the X-ray was discovered, a law in New Jersey was written forbidding the use of "X-ray opera glasses."
  • When Thomas Edison died in 1941; Henry Ford captured his last dying breath in a bottle.
  • When you flush a toilet, an invisible cloud of water [full of germs] shoots six feet in the air.
  • When you give someone roses, the color can have a meaning. The meaning of rose colors: Red = Love and respect, Deep pink = Gratitude, 
  • appreciation, Light pink = Admiration, sympathy White = Reverence, humility, Yellow = Joy, gladness,Orange = Enthusiasm, desire, Red & yellow blend 
  • = Gaiety, joviality,Pale blended tones = Sociability, friendship
  • When you put a seashell to your ear, the sound you hear is not the waves, but actually the echo of the blood pulsing in your own ear.
  • When you see a sign "City of Timbukto 40 miles" it means actually it is 40 miles to the city hall of that city sign.
  • When you sneeze, all your bodily functions stop, even your heart.
  • Whenever people accidentally trip over themselves whilst walking, they automatically go into 'survival mode' and try to pretend like they meant it 
  • (eg. they start into a jog). How hilarious is it watching someone do that?!
  • While fighting with the French underground during World War II, Jacques-Yves Cousteau invented the aqualung, the self-contained device that 
  • supplies air under pressure for underwater divers.
  • While many treaties have been signed at or near Paris, France (including many after WWI and WWII), nine are actually known as the "Treaty of 
  • Paris": Seven Years' War (1763), American Revolutionary War (1783), French-Swede War (1810), France vs Sixth Coalition (1814), Battle of Waterloo 
  • (1815), Crimean War (1856), Spanish-American War (1898), union of Bessarabia and Romania (1920), establishment of European Coal and Steel 
  • Community (1951).
  • While sailing along the Caribbean coast of South America in 1499, the Spanish explorer Alonso de Ojedo saw Indian houses built on stilts over the 
  • water. The area reminded him of Venice, and he named it Little Venice, which in Spanish is Venezuela.
  • While seeking a name and package design for the world's first self-rising pancake mix, creator Chris L. Rutt saw a vaudeville team known as Baker 
  • and Farrell whose act included Baker singing the catchy song "Aunt Jemima" dressed as a Southern mammy. Inspired by the wholesome name and 
  • image, Rutt appropriated them both to market his new pancake mix.
  • While sleeping, one man in eight snores, and one in ten grinds his teeth.
  • While the US government's supply of gold is kept at Fort Knox, its supply of silver is kept at the Military Academy at West Point, NY.
  • Whiskey was first brewed in the United States in 1640. It was made from a mixture of corn and rye.
  • Whitcomb L. Judson, the inventor of the zipper, originally intended his invention to save people the trouble of buttoning and unbuttoning their shoes 
  • every day. He named it the "Clasp locker and unlocker for shoes."
  • White out was invented by the mother of Mike Nesmith (Formerly of the Monkees).
  • Whoever submitted the erroneous Spanish info should be pelted with soggy tacos and refried beans. HOMBRE is "man," HOMBRO is "shoulder," and 
  • HOMBURG is a kind of hat just as it is in English.
  • Whole wheat bread has more iron, vitamins and dietary fiber than white bread.
  • Why? It is a felony for a wife to open a husband's mail.
  • Widow is the only female form in the English language that is shorter than its corresponding male term (widower).
  • Wild Bill Hickok was killed playing poker, holding two pairs aces and eights, which has become known as 'Dead Man's Hand.'
  • William Fox, the founder of 20th Century Fox, was bankrupt a few years after selling his studio, and served a prison sentence in Pennsylvania for 
  • bribing a judge.
  • William Henry Harrison (1773-1841) was the first US president to die in office. At 32 days, he also had the shortest term in office.
  • William Howard Taft had a bathtub that could hold four people installed in the white because he couldn't fit into the present one.
  • William Howard Taft was the first President to own a car.
  • William Penn purchased a pound of coffee in New York in 1683 for $4.68.
  • William Shakespeare used a vocabulary of 29,066 different words. By way of comparison, the average person uses about 8,000 different words.
  • William Shatner is credited for being the first person on TV to say "hell" as well as to have the first inter-racial kiss (with Nichelle Nichols), both in 
  • episodes of Star Trek.
  • William Taft is only man to become President and then chief justice.
  • Willow bark, which provides the salicylic acid from which aspirin was originally synthesized, has been used as a pain remedy ever since the Greeks 
  • discovered its therapeutic power nearly 2,500 years ago.
  • Windmills always turn counter-clockwise except in one country.
  • Wine grapes, oranges, figs and olives were first planted in North America by Father Junipero Sera in 1769.
  • Wine is kept in tinted bottles because it will spoil if it's exposed to light.
  • Wine will spoil if exposed to light, hence tinted bottles.
  • Winston Churchill was born in a ladies room during a dance.
  • Witchcraft was first legalized in the colony of Pennsylvania.
  • With a 3 by 5 card you can make a paper ring that can go around 3 adults
  • With the exception of Antarctica, all continents are wider in the north than in the south.
  • Women blink nearly twice as much as men.
  • Women burn fat more slowly than men, by a rate of about 50 calories a day.
  • Women say that the part of a man's body that they admire the most is his buttocks.
  • Women shoplift more often than men; the statistics are 4 to 1.
  • Women wear engagement and wedding rings on the third finger of the left hand because an ancient belief held that a delicate nerve runs directly 
  • from that finger to the heart.
  • Women who are housewives are, as a whole, more faithful than working women.
  • Women who respond to sex surveys in magazines have had five times as many lovers as non-respondents.
  • Women's hearts beat faster than men's.
  • Wonder Woman was the world's first comic book superheroine. She was introduced in All Star Comics in December 1941 and created by psychologist 
  • William Moulton Marston.
  • Woodbury Soap was the first product to use a picture of a nude woman in its advertisements. In 1936, a photo by Edward Steichen showed a rear 
  • full-length view of a woman sunbathing.
  • Work on St. Peter's Basilica, Rome, began in 1506. Construction took over a century, reaching completion in 1612.
  • Worker ants may live seven years and the queen may live as long as 15 years.
  • Worldwide, the most common environmental allergy is dust.
  • Worn or outdated US Flags are destroyed, preferably by burning.
  • Would you believe that pigs are smarter than dogs? On the human intelligence scale, pigs are third removed from humans, while dogs are 13th 
  • removed, and only primates and dolphines are smarter than pigs. They are quick one time learners, and some learn by watching others. (I dont know 
  • how much of this is true, coming from a site called Pig's Peace Sanctuary
  • Wrigley's gum was the first product to have a bar code on the packaging.
  • Wrigley's promoted their new spearmint-flavored chewing gum in 1915 by mailing 4 sample sticks to each of the 1.5 million names listed in US 
  • telephone books.
  • Writing in ancient Greece "hadnospacebetweenthewords."
  • Wyoming was the first state to allow women to vote.
  • X-ray technology has shown there are 3 different versions of the Mona Lisa under the visible one.
  • Xylophones(Greek xylon,"wood"; phone,"sound") were actually developed in South East Asia in the 14th centuary
  • Yellowstone is the world's 1st national park. It was dedicated in 1872.
  • You are born with 300 bones, but when you get to be an adult you only have 206.
  • You are more likely to be killed by a champagne cork than by a poisonous spider.
  • You blink about 25,000 times a day.
  • You breath 13 pints of air per minute.
  • You burn more calories sleeping than watching television.
  • You burn more calories sleeping than you do watching TV.
  • You can lead a cow upstairs but not downstairs.
  • You can not kill yourself by holding your breath.
  • You can now buy a coffin which can be used as a wine rack, table, and / or bookcase before you are buried in it.
  • You can only smell /20th as well as a dog.
  • You can only tell the gender of a Macaw through an operation. They lack exterior genetials.
  • You can see how hydrated you are by checking the color of your urine. If it's a dark yellow to yellowish-green, you are under-hydrated. If it's light 
  • yellow to clear, you're very well hydrated.
  • You can see stars from the bottom of a well even in day light.
  • You can sometimes tell the hobbies and race of a person by their skeleton.
  • You can tell how a rabbit is feeling (emotion-wise) through the position of its ears. If the ears are standing tall, pointing forward, the rabbit is happy 
  • and curious. If the ears are laid completely flat on its back and are pointing backwards, the rabbit is more than likely pissed off or frightened. If one 
  • ear is halfway up and somewhat cocked towards you, and the other one is standing compeltely up, but facing away from you, then the rabbit is 
  • confused, and curious as to what the heck you're doing.
  • You can tell the sex of a turtle by the sound it makes, A male grunts, A female hisses.
  • You can test for a two way mirror by putting your fingernail on the surface, if there's space between the tip and the image, then its a normal mirror, 
  • if not, its two way.
  • You can usually tell how good the picture of a TV will be by how black the screen is when the TV is off. The blacker, the better.
  • You can walk from Boston to New York City in fewer than a million steps.
  • You cannot sneeze with your eyes open.
  • You can't kill yourself by holding your breath.
  • You can't sneeze on the streets of Asheville, North Carolina.
  • You could walk from New York to Boston in less than one million steps.
  • You forget 80% of what you learn each day.
  • You have enough red blood cells in your body to circle (the veins) the planet 2.5 times.
  • You may legally participate in a duel in Paraguay if both participants are registered blood doners.
  • You may not sell your oragns in Indiana to cover travel expenses.
  • You need 120 drops of water to fill a teaspoon.
  • You need approximately 2,000 berries to make one pound of coffee.
  • You share your birthday with at least 9 million other people in the world.
  • You share your birthday with at least nine million other people around the world.
  • You sit on the biggest muscle in your body, the gluteus maximus a.k.a the butt. Each of the two cheeky muscles tips the scales at about two 
  • pounds (not including the overlying fat layer). The tiniest muscle, the stapedius of the middle ear, is just one-fifth of an inch long.
  • You speak about 4,800 words per day.
  • You will have to walk 80 kilometers for your legs to equal the amount of exercise your eyes get daily.
  • You would need to travel at 6.95 miles per second to escape the Earth's gravitational pull. This is equivalent to traveling from New York to 
  • Philadelphia in about twenty seconds.
  • Your body releases growth hormones when you sleep.
  • Your brain will stop growing in size when you are about 15 years old.
  • Your fingernails can turn yellow from wearing nail polish and from the sun.
  • Your fingernails grow up to 7 times faster than your toenails.
  • Your head can be shaved against your will for violating their islamic code.
  • Your nose smells best when you are about 10 years old.
  • Your nostrils take turns inhaling.
  • Your right lung takes in more air than your left one does.
  • Your skin weighs about 3.2kg
  • Your stomach produces a new layer of mucus every two weeks so that it doesn't digest itself.
  • You're born with 300 bones, but when you get to be an adult, you only have 206. (apparently they fuse together such as the parietal, occipital of 
  • the skull) thanx Christie
  • You're more likely to be a target for mosquitoes if you consume bananas.
  • You're more likely to get stung by a bee on a windy day that in any other weather.
  • Zebras are members of the Equus genus.
  • Zebras are not black with white stripes, but are actually white with black stripes, coz if any of you animal lovers happen to stare at it's butt, you'll 
  • notice that the black stripes end there.
  • Zero point energy is a source of energy which is released when atoms stop moving, at -273 Celcius.
  • Zipporah was the wife of Moses.
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