Website Links‎ > ‎

STEM skills for many jobs

[Hold CTRL as you click the link and the webpage will open in a new window that can be accessed from a tab at top of your browser screen; otherwise you will be moved away from this current web page.]


some key points from this article:

there's a key distinction here: it might not be that there's a shortage of stem workers. it might be there's a shortage of stem skills, even in non-stem jobs.

......................................................................

Sigelman also notes that Burning Glass recently found the number of job openings for "analysts" of any kind had surpassed registered nurses. That RNs have been overtaken by this more business-focused occupation could be seen as a sign that the need for more advanced math skills is spreading into all sorts of occupations.

"I think what we're seeing is a widening of the scope of jobs that require a quantitative background," says Sigelman. "While at the same time actually the demand for jobs that are kind of oriented around the pure sciences may — I don't want to say it's dropping, but it's a smaller share of STEM jobs than it used to be."

In other words, producing lots more college science graduates isn't necessarily going to solve the nation's STEM problems. The solution will have to be much more focused on exactly which skills — not which degrees — employers need

..............................................................

The other, more superficial issue in the STEM shortage debate is that changing technology means STEM skills in demand will constantly be changing. Brookings also picked apart how much different skills are worth. At the top are computer and math skills, which are worth $76,600 on average. Then again, there are a total of nearly 1,300 skills in that category.