Examples Of Context Clues

    context clues
  • Sources of information outside of words that readers may use to predict the identities and meanings of unknown words.
  • Good readers use this strategy during reading to help them understand unfamiliar vocabulary. Students determine the meaning of the new word by looking at the words around it. Teachers can facilitate the process by introducing students to important new words before reading.
  • Bits of information from the text that, when combined with the reader's own knowledge, allow the reader to "read between the lines," figure out the meaning of the text, or determine the meaning of unknown words in the text.
    examples
  • A thing characteristic of its kind or illustrating a general rule
  • A person or thing regarded in terms of their fitness to be imitated or the likelihood of their being imitated
  • (example) model: a representative form or pattern; "I profited from his example"
  • (example) an item of information that is typical of a class or group; "this patient provides a typical example of the syndrome"; "there is an example on page 10"
  • (example) exemplar: something to be imitated; "an exemplar of success"; "a model of clarity"; "he is the very model of a modern major general"
  • A printed or written problem or exercise designed to illustrate a rule
examples of context clues
examples of context clues - Context Clues
Context Clues & Figurative Language: 35 Reading Passages for Comprehension
Context Clues & Figurative Language: 35 Reading Passages for Comprehension
Repeated practice builds mastery, and this book provides exactly the practice students need to master the reading skills of using context clues and understanding figurative language. The 35 reproducible pages in this book feature high-interest nonfiction reading passage with short-answer practice questions that target one of these essential reading comprehension skills. Flexible and easy to use—in school or at home—the book also includes model lessons, assessments, and an answer key. For use with Grades 4-8.

A Unique and Important Roman Orichalcum Medallion of Severus Alexander (222-235 C.E.), Depicting the Newly Converted (from the Elagabalium) Temple of Jupiter Ultor on the Reverse
A Unique and Important Roman Orichalcum Medallion of Severus Alexander (222-235 C.E.), Depicting the Newly Converted (from the Elagabalium) Temple of Jupiter Ultor on the Reverse
Severus Alexander. AD 222-235. ? Medallion (37mm, 55.76 g, 12h). Rome mint. Special Emission of AD 224. IMP CAES M AVREL SEV ALEXANDER AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / IOVI VLTORI P M TR P III, COS P P in exergue, aerial view of the Temple of Jupiter Ultor: Jupiter, holding globe (or patera) and scepter, seated left within hexastyle temple facade set on four tiered base; figures in pediment; triumphal quadriga and trophies in acroteria; all within single story peristyle; front of temple complex composed of triple-bayed arch surmounted by figures; on either side, barrel vaulted porch. Gnecchi 7 = Cohen 102 var.; Banti 23 var.; BMCRE 208 var. (all are bimetallic). Good VF, green and brown patina, gently smoothed. Extremely rare issue, and the sole example in bronze. According to the Historia Augusta (Heliogab. 1.6), the Elagabalium was founded on the site of an earlier shrine to Orcus, a native Italic god of the underworld and a punisher of broken oaths. Topographical studies and archaeological evidence, however, have been unable to confirm the biography’s claim, suggesting that this statement was a literary device designed to create a sense of irony and make the temple’s construction and existence ill-omened. A portion of a capital from the Elagabalium, found in the Forum Romanum within the vicinity of the Palatine, makes its location on that hill much more probable (R. Turcan, The Cults of the Roman Empire, 10th ed. [2008], p. 181, pl. 21). This capital confirms the appearance of the cult image and includes images of Minerva and Juno, providing important clues to the claims of Herodian (5.6) and Dio (80.12) that the emperor transported the Palladium to the Palatine in order to wed her to El-Gabal and later included a second spouse by bringing the cult statue of Juno Caelestis, the Punic Tanit, from Carthage. By doing so, Elagabalus was recreating at Rome the Emesene triad consisting of El-Gabal, Atargatis (Minerva), and Astarte (Juno Caelestis), thereby superseding the traditional Capitoline triad of Jupiter, Juno, and Minerva. By the beginning of AD 222, Elagabalus became increasingly erratic. He refused to perform the traditional New Year’s rites at the Capitolium, the site of the temple to Jupiter Optimus Maximus, the supreme Roman god, leaving them to be completed by the urban praetor. The mention of the Capitolium in this context is significant, for it emphasizes the emperor’s attempt to subordinate Jupiter to El-Gabal, to promote the latter god’s rites, and emphasize the emperor’s unique connection with his god. Herodian’s statement (5.5) that Elagabalus demanded the Senate to honor El-Gabal before all other gods when performing their traditional sacrifices, provides further evidence of Elagabalus’ promotion of his god. And, the Elagabalium was to be the new center of this worship where, as mentioned earlier, the cult figures of other divinities were to be deposited and set up as competing triad to that of Jupiter. When Elagabalus became increasingly distrustful of Alexander, going so far as to order the murder of his successor, the emperor was himself murdered by the soldiers. Once in power, Alexander wasted little time in undoing the work of Elagabalus. In AD 224, he restored and rededicated the Elagabalium to Jupiter (Herodian 6.1, SHA, Heliogab. 17.8), and returned the baetyl to Emesa, where it appears on later coins of that city, including issues of the usurper Uranius Antoninus. The temple complex depicted on the reverse of the bronze medallions of Elagabalus and Severus Alexander are the only known representations of the appearance of the Elagabalium and its conversion into the Temple of Jupiter Ultor. The type of temple varies according to the medallion: the medallion of Severus Alexander shows a hexastyle temple, while that of Elagabalus shows only a tetrastyle one. Both temples, however, are richly decorated and are surrounded by ornately decorated, multi-story distyle wings of a peristyle seen in perspective with a triumphal entrance consisting of three epistyla, each with closed doors and double intercolumnation between them. The decoration along the roof line of this triumphal entrance originally displayed four quadrigas facing, each bearing a replica of the baetyl – these were removed and replaced with other statuary when the whole complex was renovated. The smaller medallion has an eagle on the summit of each wing flanking the entrance, while the large medallion has an eagle on the left wing only. A long staircase approached the precinct and at the base was a protective fencing that separated the sacred enclosure. Where on the Palatine the Elagabalium/Temple of Jupiter Ultor was located has been a matter of speculation. In his discussion of the excavations on the Palatine, published in 1888, the Italian archaeologist, Rodolfo Lanciani related the 1730 discovery and possible destruction there of a large, brown, lava-like stone found among the ruins of what appeared t
ca. 1213-1219 - 'seal-die of Robert Fitzwalter', English, The British Museum, London, England
ca. 1213-1219 - 'seal-die of Robert Fitzwalter', English, The British Museum, London, England
A seal-die is an engraved stamp used to impress a design onto hot wax in order to seal documents. This impressive example is made of silver and engraved to the highest standard. It relates to the career of Robert Fitzwalter (died 1235). It is inscribed with the legend: + SIGILLVM: ROBERTI: FILII: WALTERI and represents a knight on horseback in combat with a dragon. The owner's identity is established by the inscription and by the heraldry on the knight's shield and on the trappings of the horse. However, a second shield with a different coat of arms is placed in front of the horse. Whose shield is this, and why was it placed on Fitzwalter's seal? His political affiliations provide us with a clue. He was one of the most influential barons of the early thirteenth century and played a significant part in the baronial revolt which resulted in the signing of the Magna Carta in 1215 by King John (1199-1216). John was said to hate three men above all others - Archbishop Stephen Langton, Robert Fitzwalter and Saher de Quincy. It is de Quincy's arms which appear on the second shield. Fitzwalter and de Quincy were close political allies and de Quincy also included the arms of Fitzwalter on his seal. The details of the armour and the figurative style indicate a date of about 1213-19 which is supported by the political context. Saher de Quincy died in 1219. Inscriptions Inscription Type: inscription Inscription Position: obverse Inscription Language: Latin Inscription Content: +SIGILLVM: ROBERTI: FILII: WALTERI: Inscription Translation: Seal of Robert Fitz Walter. Dimensions Diameter: 7.35 centimetres
examples of context clues
examples of context clues
Context Clues & Figurative Language: 35 Reading Passages for Comprehension
Repeated practice builds mastery, and this book provides exactly the practice students need to master the reading skills of using context clues and understanding figurative language. The 35 reproducible pages in this book feature high-interest nonfiction reading passage with short-answer practice questions that target one of these essential reading comprehension skills. Flexible and easy to use—in school or at home—the book also includes model lessons, assessments, and an answer key. For use with Grades 4-8.