RESPONSIBLE PROPERTY INVESTING CENTER. RESPONSIBLE PROPERTY

Responsible property investing center. Instruments financial investment. Short term long term investment.

Responsible Property Investing Center


responsible property investing center
    property investing
  • (Property Investment) Is Real Estate A good Investment? This report will try to answer that question.
    responsible
  • (of a job or position) Involving important duties, independent decision-making, or control over others
  • creditworthy: having an acceptable credit rating; "a responsible borrower"
  • Having an obligation to do something, or having control over or care for someone, as part of one's job or role
  • worthy of or requiring responsibility or trust; or held accountable; "a responsible adult"; "responsible journalism"; "a responsible position"; "the captain is responsible for the ship's safety"; "the cabinet is responsible to the parliament"
  • Being the primary cause of something and so able to be blamed or credited for it
  • (responsibility) duty: the social force that binds you to the courses of action demanded by that force; "we must instill a sense of duty in our children"; "every right implies a responsibility; every opportunity, an obligation; every possession, a duty"- John D.Rockefeller Jr
responsible property investing center - Think Property
Think Property and Grow Rich
Think Property and Grow Rich
HOW TO LIVE YOUR ULTIMATE LIFESTYLE THROUGH PROPERTY INVESTMENT How would you feel being able to live the exact lifestyle you dream about? It could be living in your perfect home, spending an unlimited amount of time with family and friends, taking international holidays, helping your family financially or having the choice to work or not. Do you want to know how investment properties can make this happen? Let this book help you. Melainie White has worked in the property industry since 1989 and her passion for property investment is evident. When Melainie commenced buying property for herself she purchased multiple properties within the first 12 months. Melainie has helped hundreds of people in building their property portfolio and has a strong desire to help investors in wealth creation through property investment.

HOW TO LIVE YOUR ULTIMATE LIFESTYLE THROUGH PROPERTY INVESTMENT How would you feel being able to live the exact lifestyle you dream about? It could be living in your perfect home, spending an unlimited amount of time with family and friends, taking international holidays, helping your family financially or having the choice to work or not. Do you want to know how investment properties can make this happen? Let this book help you. Melainie White has worked in the property industry since 1989 and her passion for property investment is evident. When Melainie commenced buying property for herself she purchased multiple properties within the first 12 months. Melainie has helped hundreds of people in building their property portfolio and has a strong desire to help investors in wealth creation through property investment.

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EA-6A Rotting away at AMARC
EA-6A Rotting away at AMARC
AMARC is responsible for more than 5,000 aircraft stored at D-M. An Air Force Material Command unit, AMARC is responsible for the storage of excess Department of Defense and Coast Guard aircraft. The center annually in-processes about 400 aircraft for storage and out-processes about the same number for return to the active service, either as remotely controlled drones or sold to friendly foreign governments. In order to provide a suitable location for vast numbers of surplus aircraft no longer needed in the Army Air Force operational inventory, the 4105th Army Air Force Base Unit was established at Davis­Monthan AFB in April 1946 to store aircraft and prepare them for one­time flight to depot for overhaul. The creation of the United States Air Force as a separate service in 1947 prompted a reorganization and name change and also saw reclamation in support of active flying units added to the center's mission. During the Korean conflict, the center provided aircraft and aircraft parts. At the cessation of hostilities, an influx of aircraft came into the center for storage. In February 1965, the center was renamed the Military Aircraft Storage and Disposition Center (MASDC) and it assumed the role of storage facility for aircraft from all Services. The mid­1960s also saw an escalation of the Vietnam conflict, and the center was again tasked with providing aircraft and parts. As this conflict started winding down, vast quantities of aircraft were once more funneled into MASDC for storage and reclamation. At the end of fiscal year 1973, the center's inventory ballooned to an all­time high of 6,080 stored aircraft. In 1981, a storage facility was added at Norton AFB, California, to preserve TITAN II, THOR, and ATLAS missiles used by the Space Division for its satellite launches. The center's name was changed in October 1985 to the Aerospace Maintenance & Regeneration Center (AMARC) to underscore the dynamic aspect of its mission and the fact that it is an active industrial complex that primarily promotes the regeneration of aerospace assets. AMARC's mission is to store and maintain aircraft, and other aerospace vehicles, withdraw aircraft from storage, reclaim parts, and to prepare aircraft for disposal after they are no longer needed and when all required parts have been removed. The center also stores a variety of aerospace­related items such as production tooling, pylons, engines, etc. During wartime or contingencies, AMARC is often tasked to withdraw airframes and components. Some aircraft depart by overland (rail or truck) or air shipment, while others fly out of AMARC. During Operation Desert Storm, parts from AMARC aircraft kept B­52, F­111, F­4, OV­10, C­130, A­7, and P­3 aircraft as well as some helicopters flying. AMARC is now tasked to provide support in accordance with the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) with the former Soviet Union. AMARC is designated to accomplish the task of eliminating approximately 365 B-52 aircraft during a three and a half year period. This is accomplished by using a 13,000-pound guillotine blade and Linkbelt crane with slip clutch that allows the guillotine blade to free fall, thereby severing the flight control surfaces and the fuselage at predetermined points. The Russians will again visit AMARC to confirm the elimination process. In fiscal year 1994, AMARC received 735 aircraft and processed 632 into storage. One hundred ninety-seven aircraft were withdrawn from the center, 75 by flyaway and 122 by overland. During this same period, 28,612 parts were removed from aircraft. That sum in FY94 was $994 million. Considering that it cost $49.1 million to operate the center, there is an $20.24 return for each dollar invested. AMARC is located within the city limits of Tucson, Arizona. Tucson is located in southeastern Pima County approximately 65 miles north of the international border and 130 miles west of the New Mexico border. AMARC consists of 2,597 acres with 81 real property buildings valued at almost $12 million. Total square feet ­ 690,520 is as follows: 455,527 shop space, 157,047 warehouse space, 77,946 administrative space. Number of aircraft stored (as of 30 September 1994) ­ 4,900 valued at $15.9 billion. Number of aerospace production equipment units stored ­ 72,850. For fiscal year 1994 AMARC's payroll was $28,100,516 for civilian employees and $340,989 for military employees. The total work force population at the center is 693 and is almost totally drawn from Pima County, which is where the city of Tucson is located. Pima County is the second largest Arizona county in population. The center draws its work force from a large number of retirees from the military services. These individuals acquired training while in active duty status and many worked in more than one career field. The center is able to hire at the journeyman level. Training is normally required for certification on newly received aircraft and recurrent training for
beckenham place stables
beckenham place stables
John Cator (1728-1806) was a wealthy timber merchant and landowner responsible for the layout of much of the areas around Blackheath, London and Beckenham in north-west Kent during the late 18th century. The son of a Herefordshire timber merchant and Quaker, Cator joined the family business which had relocated to a new London base in Southwark, and sought to capitalise on the growth of the capital by investing in property, mainly in south-east London and Kent. He was member of parliament for Wallingford from 1772 to 1780. Married to Mary Collinson (daughter of botanist Peter Collinson), he was Lord of the Manor of Beckenham from 1773 and devoted much of his energies to transforming the village into a significant suburban town, with opulent houses situated along wide tree-lined avenues. One of his first acts was to commission Beckenham Park Place, a Palladian-style mansion (attributed to architect Sir Robert Taylor) much admired by Dr Samuel Johnson, which today serves as the club-house of a golf club. Slightly closer to central London, he also planned a major estate today known as Blackheath Park or the Cator Estate to the east of the centre of Blackheath village, and south-east of the Heath itself. Work started in 1783 after Cator bought the Wricklemarsh mansion (formerly owned by Sir Gregory Page) and its 250 acre (1 km?) estate for a bargain ?22,250. The Palladian mansion (designed by architect John James) was demolished in 1787 and Cator began to break up the estate into small packages of land to be individually developed. Among the earliest commissions was one for architect Michael Searles to design a 14-house crescent, 'The Paragon', on the south side of the Heath some of the colonnades are said to incorporate pillars used in Page's mansion. Cator died in 1806 and was buried in the churchyard of St George's Church, Beckenham. His estates were inherited by his nephew John Barwell Cator, but became neglected, and it fell to another Cator, Albemarle Cator, to expand the developments of Beckenham and Blackheath to take advantage of the growth of the railway network during the early 19th century.

responsible property investing center
responsible property investing center
Teen-Proofing: Fostering Responsible Decision Making in Your Teenager
John Rosemond is a renowned child psychologist who has helped millions of parents learn to raise their children and remain sane. In Teen-Proofing, he tackles the challenges of raising a teenager with his trademark user-friendly, humorous, and commonsense style. Rosemond lays out a perfectly sound and logical case for recognizing the realities of the teen-parent relationship, forming the foundation, and parenting with the Long Rope Principle. In short, the author demonstrates how Mom and Dad can avoid the pitfalls of becoming dictatorial Control Freaks, skirt the potholes of turning into permissive Wimps, and enjoy the freedom and rewards of parenting in a controlled (but not controlling) and relaxed manner. Teenagers, Rosemond readily admits, can be a challenge. But infusing young adults with a sense of personal responsibility, then showing them the results of good and bad choices, is a goal every parent can achieve.

Parents can protect toddlers--with their maximum mobility and minimum logic--by pasting plastic on electrical outlets and putting poisons out of reach. But protecting teenagers is not so simple, says family psychologist and author of Raising a Nonviolent Child John Rosemond. "Short of solitary confinement, you can't guarantee that a teen won't use drugs, shoplift, drink or crash the car. In the final analysis, teens must protect themselves." Rosemond's Teen-Proofing provides parents with tough-love strategies for managing teens so they make self-protective, rather than self-destructive, decisions.
Many parents will recognize the error of their ways in Rosemond's portraits of parents as "micro-managers" who try to control their children and "wimps" who let their children control them. He offers a compelling alternative by urging parents to be "mentors, who realize they can control the parent-child relationship, but not the child." The author explores critical parent-teen issues including curfews, cash, cars, and cohorts--detailing an approach that gives teenagers a "long rope" to make their own mistakes and also offers "creative consequences" to encourage responsible decision making.
The author offers smart and seasoned advice--from coping with middle school "tweenagers" to understanding why teens are vulnerable and how the culture diminishes a parent's influence. Yet he undermines his clarity with snide asides about mental health professionals and one too many smug and self-congratulatory examples of his own parenting of a son and daughter. These distractions are unnecessary; the book's unconventional and provocative suggestions will speak volumes to parents of teens. --Barbara Mackoff

John Rosemond is a renowned child psychologist who has helped millions of parents learn to raise their children and remain sane. In Teen-Proofing, he tackles the challenges of raising a teenager with his trademark user-friendly, humorous, and commonsense style. Rosemond lays out a perfectly sound and logical case for recognizing the realities of the teen-parent relationship, forming the foundation, and parenting with the Long Rope Principle. In short, the author demonstrates how Mom and Dad can avoid the pitfalls of becoming dictatorial Control Freaks, skirt the potholes of turning into permissive Wimps, and enjoy the freedom and rewards of parenting in a controlled (but not controlling) and relaxed manner. Teenagers, Rosemond readily admits, can be a challenge. But infusing young adults with a sense of personal responsibility, then showing them the results of good and bad choices, is a goal every parent can achieve.

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