Data


Nova Mon 2012 = PNV J06393874+0553520

Nova Mon 2012 was the first nova detected first in gamma rays before being identified as an optical transient. Following its initial discovery on 2012 Jun 22, it was confirmed to be an optical transient on 2012 Aug 12 (http://www.cbat.eps.harvard.edu/unconf/followups/J06393874+0553520.html).




Nova Sco 2012 =MOA 2012 BLG-320


Subsequent identification as a gamma ray producing source. (http://www.astronomerstelegram.org/?read=4224)





Nova Sgr 2012 = PNV J17452791-2305213

Nova Sgr 2012 was first observed with the JVLA two days after the optical discovery, on 2012 Apr 23 = MJD 56040, at 32 GHz. A preliminary reductions gives a non-detection with a nominal flux density of 32 +/- 25 microJy/beam at the position of the source.




Nova Oph 2012 = PNV J17260708-2551454

Nova Oph 2012 was first observed with the JVLA on 2012 Apr 23 = MJD 56040, at 32 GHz. A preliminary reductions gives a non-detection with a nominal flux density of -13 +/- 32 microJy/beam at the position of the source.


T Pyx

The recurrent nova T Pyx went into an unexpected outburst on 14 April 2011, and the JVLA Nova Team has initiated a monitoring campaign with the JVLA. We have made the first radio detection of T Pyx , and it has now brightened significantly.

We estimate that the nova eruption began on MJD 55665.0 (Schaefer et al. 2011); the data are plotted relative to this time.

T Pyx JVLA Light Curves



T Pyx JVLA Spectra

T Pyx radio spectra

V1723 Aql

The JVLA Nova Team has been monitoring V1723 Aql since 25 September 2010, around two weeks after the initial optical discovery. Below, we plot spectra as well as lightcurves. We will update these plots as new data are acquired. Also, check out our paper on V1723 Aql , published in the JVLA special issue of ApJ Letters.

Note that the nova eruption was observed to begin on MJD 55450.5 (IAUC 9167); the data are plotted relative to this time.

V1723 Aql JVLA Light Curves



Lightcurve for V1723 Aql, with a fit of ejected mass=2e-4 M_solar, D=6.7 kpc, v=1500 km/s, v2/v1=0.2, Te=10^4 K.


V407 Cyg 

The JVLA Nova Team has been monitoring V407 Cyg since 3 April 2010, around three weeks after the system erupted. For most monitoring epochs, we have frequency coverage from 1.5 - 45 GHz. Below are the radio light curves and spectra, updated as we acquire new data.

Note that the nova eruption was observed to begin on MJD 55265.8 (CBET 2199); the data are plotted relative to this time.

V407 Cyg JVLA Light Curves


V407 Cyg JVLA Spectra

V407 Cyg radio spectra

V1312 Sco

We have begun an investigation of the recent classical nova V1312 Sco ( discovered 1 June 2011). Our first observations took place just 11 days after discovery, but all of our observations yielded non-detections, consistent with a distant (> 10 kpc) nova.

DateFreqFlux Density
(UT)(GHz)(microJy)
12.1 July 201133< 161
26.1 July 20116< 26
9.1 Aug 201133< 106
19.1 Aug 201133.1<22

V5588 Sgr

We observed the classical nova V5588 Sgr, which showed an interesting quadruple-peaked optical light curve. Our JVLA observations began on 21 April 2011 (25 days after the initial discovery on MJD 55647.9, and around the time of the start of the secondary rise), and are described in a series of ATels ( #3319, #3397#3539). Essentially, V5588 Sgr emits unsteadily, brightening and fading by factors of several on timescales of weeks. The detections on May 14/15 and June 15 are roughly coincident with peaks in the light curve, perhaps hinting that that the maxima are related to shocks, either internal to the ejecta or with surrounding material. We can estimate a lower limit on the distance using the 33 GHz non-detection on June 2.3, and assuming that the radio emission is due to optically-thick thermal emission from a 10^4 K sphere expanding at 900 km/s (IAUC #9203). We find that V5588 Sgr is quite distant (>9 kpc; likely associated with the Galactic center), and therefore have ceased JVLA monitoring.

DateFreqFlux Density
(UT)(GHz)(microJy)
21.5 April 20115.9< 24
30.3 April 201132.0< 150
1.3 May 20115.9< 22
14.5 May 201133.1394 +/- 55
15.4 May 20115.049.3 +/- 9.1
15.4 May 20116.7569.0 +/- 7.5
2.2 June 201133.1< 129
2.2 June 20115.9< 25.2
15.4 June 201133.1841 +/- 24
27.1 July 20115.9< 25.5

V5587 Sgr

The JVLA Nova Team has observed the classical nova V5587 Sgr, and reports non-detections in ATel #3227:

"We observed the nova V5587 Sgr (CBET 2644, IAUC 9196 ) with the JVLA on three dates ranging from 8 to 40 days after discovery (2011 Jan 25.9); all observations yielded non-detections. Below are the UT dates, flux density measurements with 1-sigma uncertainties, and lower limits on the distance. The distance limits derive from the assumption that the radio emission is thermal free-free emission from an optically thick expanding sphere with a temperature of 10^4 K and a radius that increases at a rate of 1650 km/s."

DateFreqFlux DensityDistance
(UT)(GHz)(microJy)(kpc)
1.6 Feb 20115.0-6.6 +/- 8.3> 1.1
1.6 Feb 20116.8-7.9 +/- 7.7> 1.6
8.5 Feb 201132-28 +/- 45> 5.9
5.5 Mar 20115.0-2 +/- 11> 5.1
5.5 Mar 20117.4-0.9 +/- 9.6> 8.1
5.5 Mar 201132-17 +/- 92> 11.3

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