Past Fellows

Past Fellows Profiles
(1990-2010)

Capitol Hill Fellows

 

Erma Anderson
A mathematics teacher from Needmore, Pennsylvania 1990-1991 Fellow, Office of Senator Arlen Specter, (PA)
E-mail: ermaa@aol.com

 

Geri Anderson-Nielsen
A mathematics teacher from Washington, DC 1992-1993 Fellow, Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee.
E-mail: gerirose@aol.com
Anderson-Nielsen noted, "During my year as a fellow for the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee chaired by Senator Edward M. Kennedy, I was asked to research the role of the federal government in supporting the use of technology in schools. Eventually this led to my being the staff person assigned to work on SB 1040 - Technology for Education Act introduced in June of 1993. Although the bill itself never became law, the section on establishing an Office of Technology was included in Goals 2000 along with grant programs to support schools in entering the age of Information Technologies. Most of the remaining parts of SB 1040 were incorporated into the 1993 Reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act." Anderson-Nielsen returned to her position at the Georgetown Day School, Washington, DC when she completed her Fellowship.

 

Samantha Barow
A middle school science teacher from Durham, North Carolina. 2007-2008 Fellow, Office of Representative Silvestre Reyes (D-TX)
E-mail: missdassler@yahoo.com

 

Jennifer Berry-Rickert
A high school science teacher from Murfreesboro. Tennessee. 2007-2008 Fellow, Office of Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT)
E-mail: jennberry00@yahoo.com

 

Al Bird
A secondary science teacher from Charleston, Massachusetts 2004-2005 Fellow, the office of Senator Daniel Akaka (HI)
E-mail: abird@theworld.com
In the office of Senator Akaka, Al was asked to participate in many different activities. He functioned as a member of this congressional office's staff, and was included in all activities the same as any other staff person in the office. He was a member of the education team, and was expected to become informed on all education issues that might be of interest to the office and/or to the Senator and to make recommendations about them (through the Legislative Director) if and when asked. Al worked on an issue that was expected to lead to legislation, and helped develop the piece. He attended briefings, developed white papers to inform the Senator on issues, wrote summaries for the Senator and senior staff, and participated in any other activity needed at the time.

When asked about the most difficult and most rewarding aspects of his Fellowship, Al responded: "I have now started to realize how all the Acts/Bills/Legislation, etc. tie into the something real. I have been working with Westlaw [an online research tool for legal the community] reading/learning about the sections dealing with education and have learned about the United States Code. It is interesting to at least see a little of how this all occurs and results in something that might effect something (there is still a lot of confusion about this on my part). I am scheduled for three different training sessions on legal research and legislation development issues during the next few weeks. I hope these will remove even more of the haze from in front of my eyes."

 

Robert Blakely
A secondary science teacher from Lincoln Park, Michigan 2000-2001, Office of Senator Patty Murray (D/WA)
E-mail: bear48146@hotmail.com
As an education consultant assigned to Senator Patty Murray's office, Bob was engaged in a diverse number of activities as an Einstein Fellow. During the presidential campaign between Al Gore and George Bush, he was asked to construct a comparison between the two candidates on educational issues such as vouchers, funding, class size, accountability, and technology. He produced two studies-one based on issues (comparing the stand of each candidate) and a second that was a side-by-side comparison with projections of policy impact and legislative input. The second major project Bob undertook was the development of a resource covering all facets of teacher quality. Additionally, he helped prepare and edit speeches for the Senator, attended committee meetings, and helped with constituent correspondence. He felt that he became a functional part of the staff in the Murray office, helping with research for other projects like pipeline safety, the Violence Against Women Act, and natural resources.

 

Steve Boyarsky
A science teacher from Medford, Oregon 1991-1992 Fellow, House Education and Labor Committee
E-mail: boyarskys@charter.net
Boyarsky began his Fellowship helping the staff of the committee manage the Neighborhood Schools Improvement Act for the Chair of the committee, Representative Dale Kildee (D-MI). Boyarsky says, "I became a third member of the team, initially serving as an assistant for them and then taking the lead in the areas of content standards and school delivery standards." He says, "I became the eyes and ears of the staff," attending meetings, briefings and conferences. And, later, "Following my contributions to the committee report on H.R. 4323 I was asked to do some background work in framing the issues for potential legislation of technology in education." Boyarsky says, "Professionally [the Fellowship] fulfilled all my expectations and more. I . . . realize the importance of policy decisions, leadership and funding to proper functioning of schools. I have an understanding of the process of legislation . . . . I plan to be more involved in the political process within Oregon."

 

Bill Brent
A science teacher from Boonville, Missouri 1992-1993 Fellow, Office of Senator Mark Hatfield (R-OR)
E-mail: bbrent@stephens.edu
Brent noted he received five offers of places to serve his fellowship, but settled on Senator Hatfield's staff because "I definitely wanted to be in an office of a Senator with significant influence in [education issues.]" Brent spent most of his time working on the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). He drafted amendments including one that protected the math-science priority in the Eisenhower program and establishing the Elementary Math and Science Equipment Act. Brent reports, "I feel that I did make some contributions to the development of legislation, and I know that the program contributed to my growth as an individual."

 

Patrick Canan
A high school science teacher from Corvallis, Oregon 1992-1993 Fellow, Office of Senator Mark Hatfield (R-OR)
E-mail: cananp@onid.orst.edu
"I [was] involved in the education-related legislative initiatives of the Senator, particularly those relating to math and science. The specific legislative areas in which I worked were preparing for resubmission two bills from the 102nd Congress, the Elementary Science Equipment Act and the Educational Flexibility Act. . . . I prepared amendments for the Labor committee on Goals 2000 and have rewritten some as amendments to be introduced when the bill comes to the floor. Finally, I incorporated several of Senator Hatfield's initiatives in math/science education in reauthorization legislation for Eisenhower, including a pilot program, Science Start, that will provide training in sciences to Head Start Teachers." "... in Oregon I'll be able to give valuable advice to my professional organizations as to how they can be effective advocates for education... My students will ... hear civics mixed in with lessons on physics."

 

Lynne Campbell
A middle school science teacher from Grimes, Iowa. 2007-2008 Fellow, Committee on Education and Labor
E-mail: lcampbell03@earthlink.net

 

James Cherry
A high school chemistry teacher from Marlborough, CT 2003-2004 Fellow, Office of Senator Norm Coleman
E-mail: jamesdcherry@comcast.net
Jim Cherry served his fellowship in Senator Norm Coleman's office. While there, Jim met with groups from Minnesota, wrote talking points for speeches and met with lobbyists on a wide range of issues. Some of the issues Jim worked on were gun issues, school lunch programs, environmental concerns, child obesity, housing, and veteran issues. He also attended hearings and meetings with the National Rifle Association and the Corps of Engineers. He also wrote an op/ed piece on AIDS in Africa. Jim says, "the fellowship is an opportunity like no other."

 

Diane Cherkerzian
An elementary teacher from Brookline, Massachusetts 2004-2005 Fellow, the office of Senator Maria Cantwell (WA), and the Department of Energy
E-mail: cherkerzian@hotmail.com

 

Frances Coleman
A secondary science teacher from Ackerman, Mississippi 2000-2001 Fellow, Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee
E-mail: fcoleman@telepak.net
One of Frances' duties included reviewing the ESEA (Elementary and Secondary Education Act) as it was written by the Health, Education, Labor and Pension Committee (H.E.L.P. Committee) and advising the authors on some of the wording-particularly in Title II, where several of her suggestions were incorporated into the final bill as passed by the Committee. She wrote several sections of the Committee Report of the ESEA bill. Additionally, she arranged for a group of technologically savvy Mississippi students to come to Washington D.C. in order to brief Congressional staff members on the use of technology in education.

 

Gregory Coppa
A science teacher from Wickford, Rhode Island 1996 Fellow, Office of Representative Zoe Lofgren (D-CA)
E-mail: ride0278@ride.ri.net
Greg Coppa worked in the office of Rep. Zoe Lofgren. During his eight-month placement he assisted the Congresswoman by attending House and Senate hearings on many issues, including educational technology and internet copyright law. An important assignment was to conduct research on the copyright law's effect on internet providers.

 

Rob Culbertson
A secondary science teacher from Richmond, Virginia 2004-2005 Fellow, the office of Senator Joseph Lieberman (CT)
E-mail: culby@cox.net
Rob had the good fortune to work on Capitol Hill in the office of Senator Joe Lieberman. As a member of the Senator's staff, he tracked down and reviewed seemingly boundless volumes of information; prepared memos and talking points for the Senator; and met with lobbyists, constituents, and student groups from Connecticut. Rob worked closely with other Congressional offices, educational non-profit organizations, universities, and the Senate Legislative Counsel's Office to draft and garner support for several pieces of education-related legislation. He had a hand in assembling a floor debate book to prepare the Senator for amendments and other issues pertinent to the Senate's Intelligence Reform Bill, and was on the Senate Floor during its debate. When asked about his Fellowship experience, Rob responded: "I have often thought of my Einstein Fellowship experience on Capitol Hill as a year of cultural exchange. I was enthralled by my surroundings, the activity, and especially the intelligent and dedicated people with whom I worked. In return, I was able to provide practical skills, ideas, and analysis that were valued by the Senator and his staff."

 

Mark Davids
A high school science teacher from Grosse Pointe, Michigan 2002-2003 Fellow, office of Senator Maria Cantwell (D-WA)
E-mail: mark.davids@gpschools.org
Mark Davids worked on key issues related to education, science and technology as well as workforce development, the environment, and defense. He met with constituents and representatives from Federal agencies including the State Department, the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy. He drafted the first version of the $1.4 billion Genomes to Life bill. He also wrote the introduction to the bill which was later read on the Senate floor. Mark also assisted in writing speeches and briefing materials for the Senator including questions regarding the Columbia shuttle investigation. He says, "I have shared train rides between the Capitol and the Senate building with various senators and I still get a rush each time."

 

Amy Elverum
A middle school science teacher from Minneapolis, Minnesota.  2006-2007 Education and the Workforce Committee

 

Mickie Flores
A science teacher from Potsdam, New York 2004-2005 Fellow, the office of Senator Richard Durbin (IL)
E-mail: flores@cybertrail.net
In the office of Senator Richard J. Durbin, Mickie's role seemed all encompassing; she functioned in every capacity concerning Education. She met with constituents, answered phone calls and emails regarding education issues, and attended many meetings, forums, and briefings. She participated in a conference call concerning child nutrition and school lunch and she wrote talking points for the senator, letters to other members of congress as well as the secretary of defense. Within the first month of her Fellowship, Mickie had already written and submitted two floor statements for the Senator, which meant that her work is now incorporated in the Congressional record. Mickie says, "The hardest part of this experience is landing on another planet with unfamiliar terrain. I have had an insider tour of the Capitol and the Senate floor with multiple directives on how to obtain a pass, where to walk (behind the rail), and how to not sit in a chair with arms (those are reserved for Senators). My mind boggles at the thought of being armed with charts and graphs that I have generated, delivering them to the Cloak room, transferring them to the Senator, and having my work broadcast more widely than ever before. This imagined scene alters my rate of breathing. "The most rewarding is knowing my twenty years of experience afford me something of great value to share and now I have the opportunity to do that sharing. I remember the face in the third row of a classroom; I know the hopes and needs associated with that face. It is with great pleasure that I report my solitary rediscovery of the nonpublic elevator that takes one to the basement. Utilizing my Senate badge, I boarded the subway traveling toward the Capitol and puzzled my way underground from the Senate side to the furthest House side and attended a forum on "Higher Education Opportunities for Students with Disabilities." I obtained materials to send to my "home" school and increased my own knowledge base. And as I boarded the secret subway, first car, sole passenger traveling at amusement park speed, I found myself grinning widely and suppressing a loud "Woo-hoo!!""

 

Elizabeth (Betty) Gasque
A mathematics teacher from Pawleys Island, South Carolina 1991-1992 Fellow, Office of Senator Jeff Bingaman (D-NM) Jennifer Grogg A high school science teacher from Normal, Illinois 1994-1995 Fellow, Office of Senator Robert Kerrey (D-NE)
E-mail: jgrogg@ilstu.edu

 

Paula Hendry
A secondary science teacher from Arnold, Maryland 1999-2000 Fellow, Office of Representative Sherwood Boehlert (R-23rd/NY)
E-mail: 2hendry@comcast.net
Paula Hendry worked in the office of Congressman Sherwood Boehlert (R-NY) on education issues and outreach. She followed education legislation in committee and on the floor for the Congressman. In order to fulfill this responsibility, she attended forums that focused on education issues in addition to answering constituent mail, which required her to research a wide variety of issues. Hendry also communicated with school districts in the Congressional district both by phone and in person. She listened to their input on federal programs and proposed legislation and was involved in helping them to find federal money and private grants. Hendry states, "By helping to make . . . [Boehlert] and his staff more aware of the important [education] issues and by helping to create wider and stronger ties to schools in his district, I feel that I had a significant impact."

 

Robert Hickey
A high school physics teacher from Lexington, MA 2003-2004 Fellow, Office of Senator Joseph I. Lieberman (D-CT)
E-mail: robertch@rcn.com
Robert Hickey was involved with two long-term projects. The first involved developing legislation for the Higher Education Act. Specifically he wrote a proposal to create forty new teacher development institutes throughout the country over the next five years and establish a grant program to entice higher education institutions to design programs that increase minority graduation rates. His second project involved drafting a "Boomer Corps" bill. This bill would give monetary and educational assistance to retirees who perform some type of community service. The service could be helping the elderly or teaching/tutoring K-12 students in science and math. Bob's work paid off. His bill, S. 2538, was introduced on the Senate floor on June 17, 2004. The floor statement that Bob wrote to introduce the bill was recorded in the Congressional Record the same day. He says, "I feel very fortunate that I was given the opportunity to play such a vital role in the education-related issues of Senator Lieberman's office."

 

Kathryn Hilts
A secondary science teacher from Charleston, West Virginia 1999-2000 Fellow, Office of Senator Robert Byrd (D-WV)
E-mail: khilts@msn.com
Kathryn Hilts spent her second year as an Einstein Fellow in the office of U.S. Senator Robert C. Byrd (D-WV). She worked with the Senator's Legislative Division, particularly on education issues as well as some science and technology concerns. In addition, Hilts examined ways to improve the number of teachers seeking National Board Certification in rural states and was involved in programs to increase safe schools and healthy communities.

 

Norma Howell
A high school science teacher from Huber Heights, Ohio 2001-2002, Representative Tony P. Hall (D-3-OH)
E-mail: physixmom@aol.com
Howell's placement in the office of Congressman Tony P. Hall of Ohio gave her the opportunity to learn and work in a wide variety of areas, above, beyond, and including education issues. She did research on national, state, and local education issues and programs in order to effectively answer constituent requests and concerns as well as to meet with special interest groups. On top of the day-to-day work she did in the office, she was assigned major projects that required extended time frames, including follow-up to a letter to President George W. Bush to ensure sufficient allocation of funding for Science and Technology (S&T) Research within the Department of Defense (DoD). Another major project she implemented dealt with the origins of the Veterans Administration, originally known as the National Home (Asylum) for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, and the need to preserve the historic treasures currently falling into a state of disrepair around the nation. Because Congressman Hall's district included Wright-Patterson AFT, she was also assigned to some military issues. "Although the original intent of the Fellowship may have been for me to 'give' of my expertise, the overwhelming outcome has been of me 'receiving' so much for each and every experience. It has been the adventure of a lifetime and one I would not have traded for anything."

 

Ann Ifekwunigwe
A elementary school teacher from Los Angles, California 1999 Fellow, Office of Senator Patty Murray (D-WA)
E-mail: writetoann@hotmail.com
Ifekwunigwe worked closely with Greg Williamson, Senator Murray's Legislative Assistant in charge of education issues. Ann found it difficult to describe a "typical" day in this office, since things changed so quickly in the Senate. This rapid change of pace made it extremely important to be flexible and readily adaptable to whatever role she was asked to assume. Ifekwunigwe represented the Senator's office at a variety of different meetings, functions, and special events. She has met with many different constituents from Washington state who shared concerns about local education issues. She attended commission meetings and forums where experts in the field shared current research findings. She found these meetings to be very valuable, since some of the findings presented were eventually incorporated into the Senator's legislation. Ifekwunigwe drafted speeches, statements, and sections of legislation for the Senator. She also conducted research about specific issues, and written summaries and side by side analyses of education legislation. On several occasions, when the Senator met with her education team, Ifekwunigwe had the opportunity to contribute "my real world" classroom experience and perspective to the discussion. During the Class Size Reduction debate she was granted permission to be on the Senate Floor where she remained for the duration of the debate, until the final vote. Following the vote, she accompanied the Senator to a press conference with Senators Kennedy, Harkin, and Kerry. Sometimes her duties involved legwork--picking up bills from Legislative Council; finding archived legislation in the document room, dropping off paperwork at colleagues' offices, circulating letters for signatures, making copies in the printing room, collecting supplies from the stationery room, but Ifekwunigwe says, "I enjoyed all aspects of my job... I feel very fortunate to have had the opportunity to work with Senator Murray. Her commitment to improving education for children is genuine, and extremely admirable."
 
 
Deborah Koolbeck
A secondary physics and astronomy teacher from Chicago, IL, 2005-2006 Office of Representative Rush Holt (NJ)
E-mail: koolbeck01@hotmail.com

 

John A. Kounas
A secondary science teacher from Sloan, Iowa 2000-2001, Office of Senator Charles E. Grassley (R/IA)
E-mail: jkounas@hotmail.com
While in Senator Grassley's office, John was asked to read over and prepare information summaries for a series of education reports for the legislative educational aid. He also prepared information summaries for two topic items regarding funding proposals in S.1. The first summary detailed the value and impact of the National Writing Project for teachers and students in the State of Iowa and the nation. The second provided information related to Talented and Gifted Programs regarding their impact and relevance in offering educational challenges for students that are intellectually gifted. John also worked diligently on various education and non/education issues that directly involved the people of Iowa and its students. John states, " My Fellowship was one of those rare opportunities in life that come along, one that has provided so much in such a short time that when you start to ‘take them out,' to list and think about all the many different things you've done, you find it difficult to ‘put them back' -- there just isn't enough room."

 

Michael Lach
A secondary science teacher from Chicago, Illinois 1999-2000 Fellow, Office of Representative Vernon Ehlers (R-3rd/MI)
E-mail: mlach@cps.k12.il.us
Lach spent his Fellowship working in the office of Congressman Vernon Ehlers, a Republican from the 3rd district of Michigan. Representative Ehlers, who wrote Unlocking Our Future: Towards A National Science Policy, has held hearings and drafted legislation to address the issues of science teaching and learning. Lach coordinated the Congressman's efforts by collecting information and best practices, holding and attending meetings, working with the staff of both the House Science and House Education and the Workforce Committees, and encouraging other groups to raise awareness of science education issues. He reports that, "Working as a Fellow in Congressman Ehler's office was a wonderful experience. While moving from a classroom to a Congressional office is sure to be an exciting year, I felt my particular placement was particularly fortuitous. In Congressman Ehler's office, I was given significant tasks and great responsibility, and was also encouraged to learn as much as I could about the political process and life on Capitol Hill."

 

Luke Laurie
A middle school science and technology teacher from Santa Monica California.  2006-2007 Office of Representative Mike Honda

 

Arthur Lebofsky
A science teacher from NewCity, New York 1990-1991 Fellow, Office of Senator Jeff Bingaman, (D-NM)
E-mail: artsgnus@yahoo.com

Lebofsky worked closely with Ray Rameriz, Senator Bingaman's legislative assistant, drafting legislation related to the America 2000 effort being pushed by President Bush and Secretary of Education Lamar Alexander. Lebofsky said, "Ray and I geared up to move our two bills and create more legislation. We spent more time creating briefing books of information, possible speeches, talking points and data for Jeff". . . . [who] read the material, but used his own unique analytical style to determine what portions of the material, if any, he would use." Lebofsky also traveled to New Mexico for the Senator, visiting two dozen school districts, meeting in-state staff and helping Rameriz activate an association concerned with Hispanic issues. Returning to New York after his fellowship, Lebofsky has been active in statewide science education activities, has been elected to the Board of Directors of the National Science Teachers Association, and has gained "major funding and support for science education for females and minorities. Our successes in two years now have a district that is one third minority graduating a senior class where 90% have at least four years of science experience."

 

Bonnie Leitch
A high school mathematics teacher from New Braunfels, Texas 1993-94 Fellow, Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee
E-mail: bleitch@earthlink.net

 

Kevin Manning
A high school science teacher from Tulsa, Oklahoma 2001-2002, House Education and the Workforce Committee
E-mail: kevinjmanning@hotmail.com
Manning's Fellowship had a rocky start-the tragic events of September 11 followed by the discovery of anthrax in the building where he worked. However, he says that working on the U.S. House of Representatives' side of the Committee on Education and the Workforce offered a unique opportunity to see how the legislative process works, particularly with education bills like the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. It gave him a different perspective on what is done in education reform at the national level. Manning enjoyed the learning opportunities, new connections, and the fellowship time with the other Einstein Fellows. He says that he would not trade his experience as an Einstein Fellow for anything else he has done throughout his career.

 

Della McCaughan
A science teacher from Biloxi, Mississippi 1991-1992 Fellow, Office of Senator Thad Cochran (MS)

 

Kathleen McGarvey (Clark)
A high school mathematics teacher from Columbus, Mississippi 2001-2002, Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, Office of Senator Judd Gregg (R-NH)
E-mail: drkclark@gmail.com
Kathy Clark's Einstein Fellowship on the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee centered on work with the following pieces of legislation: NCLB, OERI, NSF, and IDEA. She also assisted with office work on various Senate hearings, GAO reports, and various New Hampshire issues related to NCLB. She also provided opinions and a professional perspective during meetings to assist with finalizing legislation concerning bi-lingual education, Title I programs, NAEP, and AYP. McGarvey states, "While working with the Committee, I realized just how many issues revolve around and depend upon teacher quality. I am hoping to help improve the way things are, even if it is just in the Mid-Atlantic region for now. I would have never realized how strong this passion is without my experience here."

 

Margaret Merrill
An elementary teacher from Dayton, Maine, 2005-2006 Office of Senator Joseph Lieberman (CT)
E-mail: mlmerrill1@comcast.net

 

Bradley Neu
A high school science teacher from Gainesville, Texas 2002-2003 Fellow, Representative Ruben Hinojosa (D-TX)
E-mail: neub123@hotmail.com
Brad Neu's work mainly involved looking at national programs for teachers and students in order to find grant opportunities for schools in the Congressman's district. Brad also wrote speeches and visited the Congressman's district to conduct a teachers' workshop. In addition, he secured support for the Excellence in Science, Technology, and Mathematics Education (ESTME) Week activities on Capitol Hill. Brad says that, "this experience has been informative, enjoyable, exciting and rewarding."

 
Steve Obenhaus
A secondary school mathematics teacher from Olathe, Kansas.  2009-2010 Fellow, Senator Joseph Lieberman

As a Fellow, Obenhaus focused on the needs of the DC education system and the challenges related to urban education.  Obenhaus was responsible for overseeing pending legislation on STEM Education issues and ESEA reauthorization.  He also monitored how Federal policies affect Connecticut education.    In handling constituent inquiries, Steve was moved by the plight of a constituent who had been unfairly and adversely affected by federal law extending emergency benefits to the unemployed.  Finding that there were numerous others who had been similarly harmed by the law, Obenhaus worked to find a solution to the broader issues through the regulatory agencies and legislative staff.  Ironically, he says, this unemployment issue had done the most to confirm that he found the right place to serve his fellowship.  When his fellowship year ended, Obenhaus joined the faculty at the University of Kansas as a Master Teacher in the UKanTeach program which prepares math and science undergraduate majors to become certified to teach in secondary schools. 

 

 

Donna Osborn
A science teacher from West Lafayette, Indiana 1999-2000 Fellow, Office of Representative Peter J. Visclosky (D-1st/IN)
E-mail: dmo@bilbo.bio.purdue.edu
Donna Osborn served on Congressman Peter Visclosky's staff, which gave Donna the opportunity to learn and work in many areas. All education issues - elementary, secondary, and higher education - and children's issues were given to her. She did research and answered constituent mail on these topics. When constituents or lobbyists wanted to meet with a staff person or the Congressman, she was a part of the meeting. As news was made in these areas, she was expected to prepare a memo to brief the Congressman. As the Congressman traveled to the district for speeches, meetings, or town forums, Donna prepared information on education and children's bills which are now laws, bills which he introduced or cosponsored, and bills which would be discussed in the future. On top of the day-to-day work that Donna did in the office, she had several projects. First, she organized and planned a grants workshop for all of the schools in Visclosky's district in Indiana. Several Einstein Fellows and other individuals from Washington presented information regarding several topics, including federal agencies and grant funds which they provided for education. Second, since she was concerned about missing and exploited children and Congressman Visclosky was a member of the Congressional Missing and Exploited Children's Caucus, the office began to place missing children's pictures on the envelopes used for constituent mail. Finally, she organized a missing child alert program in Visclosky's district in Indiana. The emergency child abduction alert plan asked radio and television stations to provide quick, police-generated reports on abducted children as a public service. When asked if her experience as a Fellow affected her professionally, Donna stated, "I have learned about education at the national level in a way that is not possible for many. I saw the work that NEA and NCTM do at a national level and understand the importance of their work. I also learned a great deal about DOE and the excellent work that they do for education. I had the opportunity to meet the leaders in education in our country. I do admire them."

Kristina Peterson 
A secondary science teacher from Seattle, Washington.  2009-2010 Fellow, House of Representatives Committee on Education and Labor
E-mail: 2010kp@gmail.com
Peterson served her Einstein Fellowship with the K-12 team in the House of Representatives Committee on Education and Labor, chaired by Representative George Miller of California. While with the Committee she helped to craft a series of hearings on the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. She also assisted with reviewing legislation and gathereds input from constituent meetings and briefings. She is often asked to read materials with her “teacher hat on” so that staff members have a teacher’s perspective on issues. Peterson came to the Hill “to listen, learn, and question with the aim of contributing to policy and programs that keep in mind what is best for children.” 

 
 Althea Pearlman
A mathematics teacher from Boulder, Colorado 1991-1992 Fellow, Office of Representative Howard Wolpe (MI)
E-Mail:  apearlman99@hotmail.com
Pearlman says that ". . . in the personal office of Representative Howard Wolpe, a member of the Science, Space and Technology Committee and Chair of the Investigations and Oversight Subcommittee, I was able to continue to follow science education. For example, when I spotted a proposal to reinstate funding cut by the Department of Education for Women's Equity in Mathematics Education, I could make certain that my Congressman would cosponsor the pending legislation. I became my office's liaison to the Quality Education for Minorities monthly brown bag lunch meetings." Returning to her Colorado school Pearlman wrote, "I am enormously grateful for this experience."

 

 Anne Pfitzner Gatling
An elementary school science teacher from Soldonta, Alaska
2002-2003 Fellow, Senator Joseph Lieberman (D-CT)
E-mail: pfitzner@bc.edu
Anne Pfitzner wrote legislation for the Higher Education Act Reauthorization. To get ideas she met with university presidents, deans, professors, and specialists from education agencies and foundations. She created two bills, one incorporating key concepts to improve teacher preparation programs (teacher quality) and the other requesting funding for research on the risks and benefits of media on children. She also briefed the Senator, conducted research for Senate speeches and video statements and helped to prepare a children's section for the Senator's web page. Anne says that "the fellowship was an absolutely phenomenal experience, one that will continue to inform my next steps in the field of education."

 

William Philips
A science teacher from Dover, Delaware 1990-1991 Fellow, Office of Representative Howard Wolpe (MI)
E-mail: SciEd@delanet.com "...
I was able to assist Rep. Howard Wolpe with educational issues and legislation. As a legislative assistant in his office ALL educational issues were delegated to me -- even the work on an education exchange bill." "Benefits from my experiences on the Hill have opened many, many doors of opportunity which have benefited my students, fellow teachers and myself. I'll enumerate a few: While in Washington I made contact with the Council for Basic Education. Through them I received a grant which enabled me to set up a series of field studies for Delaware teachers in Arizona, Montana, Alaska and Hawaii. I became a legislative consultant for the Delaware State Education Association. My knowledge of politics has enabled me to lead a drive to educate the public on environmental esthetics. My performance as a legislative assistant was instrumental in helping me to receive a fellowship as an Antarctic Researcher through the NSF... I set up a website for students in Delaware to communicate with me while I was in Antarctica. I continue to use the site for other field study programs."

 

Laurie Pines
A high school mathematics teacher from San Jose, California 2002-2003 Fellow, Senator Jeff Bingaman (D-NM) and Representative Bart Gordon (D-TN)
E-mail: lauriepines@yahoo.com

 

Edward Potosnak 
A high school Chemistry teacher from New Jersey, 2008-2009 Fellow, Capitol Hill, Office of Congressman Michael Honda

 E-Mail:  edpiii@mac.com

 In his second year as an Einstein Fellow in the Office of Congressman Michael M. Honda, Mr. Potosnak was responsible for policy in the areas of education, the environment, global warming, the interior, water, government reform, and Japanese American confinement sites. He had the opportunity to engage in many legislative and professional development activities including researching legislation, drafting legislation, and education appropriations as part of the Labor-Health and Human Services-Education FY '09 Appropriations Bill. Mr. Potosnak's experience as a science teacher provided a practical perspective as Congress continued its efforts to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, often referred to as No Child Left Behind.  Following his second fellowship year, Potosnak became a staff person for Congressman Honda, leaving in 2010 to become a candidate for the U.S. House district that includes his New Jersey home town.

 
 
Steven Robinson
A high school science teacher from Eugene, OR, 2005-2006 Office of Senator Barack Obama (D-IL)
E-mail: stevejrob@gmail.com

 

Dorothy Ringer Sumner
A Secondary science and math teacher from Houston, TX 2003-2004 Fellow, Office of Senator Michael D. Crapo
E-mail: dlringersumner@aldine.k12.tx.us

 

Daniel Schab
A high school math teacher from Lansing, MI 2003-2004 Fellow, U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions
E-mail: Dschab7226@aol.com

 

Lisa Schunk
A middle school science teacher from Minneapolis, MN 2005-2006 Senate HELP Committee, Senator Enzi (WY) chair, Education Staff
E-mail: lisaschunk@hotmail.com

 

LaRon Smith
A high school mathematics teacher from Twin Falls, Idaho 1994-1995 Fellow, Office of Senator Mark Hatfield (R-OR)
E-mail: smithlaron@aol.com

 

Karen Sue Stiner

A Mathematics teacher from Oregon, 2008-2009 Fellow, Capitol Hill, House Committee on Science and Technology.  

E-Mail:  karen.stiner@gmail.com 

In her second fellowship year, Karen Stiner served with the Committee on Science and Technology of the U.S. House of Representatives, where her role enabled her to provide a classroom teacher’s perspective on STEM policy and program issues affecting K-12 education initiatives nationwide. She was able to share her commitment to helping girls—as early as the fifth and sixth grades—to become much more involved in science and mathematics education.  "Our girls and young women have the capacity to compete with the best and the brightest young minds across the world in mathematics, technology, sciences and engineering—the STEM disciplines.”
 

Linda Stroud
A science teacher from Raleigh, North Carolina 1996 Fellow, President's Office of Science and Technology Policy and the office of Senator Jeff Bingaman (D-NM)
E-mail: LMStroud@aol.com
Linda Stroud worked on policy issues in a joint assignment in the Executive Office of the President's Office of Science and Technology Policy and in the office of Sen. Jeff Bingaman. Stroud's focus was on issues affecting the National Science Standards, educational technology, and the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring Program.

 

Robert W. Taylor
A secondary science teacher from Delta Junction, Alaska 2000-2001, Office of Representative Sherwood Boehlert (R-23rd/NY)
E-mail: robtaylor@alaska.net
Rob stated that as a Capitol Hill Fellow, the beginning of his Fellowship seemed to have four phases: placement, scrambling to get on top of the issues, getting into the rhythm of the job, and lastly, the wrapping up of loose ends. A large part of his first month in the office was spent scrambling to read the active files on education legislation and policy, not only to be aware of what was happening in Congress in both houses, but also to get a feel for his Congressman's perspective on education issues. As his Fellowship progressed, he became actively involved in the office. Rob made key contributions to the National Mathematics and Science Partnerships Act H.R. 1858. He fought to ensure that science standards and eventually science testing would be part of ESEA legislation, that all subjects would be remembered in ESEA legislation, and that IDEA would be funded at the level that Congress promised. He secured his Congressman's support for rural education measures, tax credits to partially cover classroom supplies, a plan to increase dormitory fire safety, funding for school construction, funding for gifted and talented students, the We the People program, and funding for the use of educational television in the classroom. He also worked to support educational efforts at NSF, DOE, and ED-especially computerized access to programs and funding sources.

 

Stephanie Toney
A middle school science and mathematics teacher from Cary, North Carolina 2001-2002, Representative Rubén Hinojosa (D-15-TX)
E-mail: smhtoney@nc.rr.com
Though Toney had very little involvement with national education issues or programs other than attending hearings and writing appropriate questions for the Congressman (who sits on the House Education and the Workforce Committee) to use during hearings, she more than made up for it in involvement with Representative Hinojosa's Congressional District. Toney's work was a part of the Congressman's Math and Science Initiative in his District. She states that the Congressman wanted a Fellow who could take a hard, dispassionate look at the education efforts of his Congressional District and make reasonable recommendations on methods to improve the situation. Her motivation and independence were very important in this Fellowship because of the freedom that she was given. Toney states, "This has been a wonderful experience and will allow me to have a broader approach as I return to North Carolina, whether to the classroom or to an administrative position. The contacts that have been made during this year will continue to be an important part of my academic life. The other Fellows constitute a cohort of individuals that I may call on for idea generation and critiques for years to come."

 

LeRoy Wenstrom
A secondary science teacher from Columbus, Mississippi.  2006-2007 Office of Senator Trend Lott

Patrick White
A mathematics teacher from Clark Fork, Idaho 1996 and 1997 Fellow, Office of Senator Jim Jeffords (R-VT)
E-mail: pwhite@ismtc.org
In 1996 Pat White worked in the office of Senator Jim Jeffords and assisted the Senator on educational technology issues and was a staff representative to the Senate Educational Technology Working Group, which is developing policy on educational technology. Senator Jeffords found White to be so helpful that he requested to have White's fellowship continue for another term. In 1997 White continued his activities in Senator Jeffords' office and the Educational Technology Working Group. In addition, he assisted in preparing the Vocational Educational Legislation that is up for reauthorization in 1998. (White left Washington to accept the position of Science and Math Coordinator for the state of Idaho.) "I spent the first eight months of 1996 on Senator Jeffords' staff focusing on education technology and during that time became coordinator of the Senate Education Technology Working Group (SETWG), a bipartisan forum on technology applications to improve education, formed by Senator Jeffords and Senator Robert Kerrey (D-NE). During my fellowship the Group worked to support discounted rates for schools and libraries to gain access to Internet resources through the Universal Service Provisions of the Telecommunications Act as well and to increase the funding for existing education technology legislation." "In 1997 I was asked to return as an Einstein Fellow for a period of five months and was placed on the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee which Senator Jeffords chairs. I continued to act as coordinator of SETWG and worked with committee staff to write legislation reauthorizing vocational education." "My experiences as a fellow taught me that teachers can have significant impact on government policies that affect education. Legislators and their staff members do listen to what teachers have to say, but far too few [educators] provide their governmental representatives with the important insights about the benefits or detriments of a particular education policy that can only come from experience in the classroom."
 
 
 Brenda Wright
A middle and secondary school science and math teacher from Henniker, New Hampshire.  2006-2007 HELP Committee Senator Ted Kennedy

 

June Yamashita
A mathematics teacher from Honolulu, Hawaii
E-mail: june91361@yahoo.com
1990-1991 Fellow, Office of Senator Mark Hatfield (R-OR) When the 102nd Congress convened in January 1991, Yamashita was given the responsibility of taking over Senator Hatfield's education legislative agenda. She prepared for the Senator drafts of education bills, floor statements and "Dear Colleague" letters, responded to phone inquiries on education matters, met with Oregon educators and students, conferred with federal agency liaisons, and drafted replies to a vast range of correspondence related to education. At the completion of her fellowship in June, 1991, the Senator asked her to stay on until the end of the first session of the 102nd Congress (December 1991).


 

Department Of Energy Fellows

Wendy Beavis
A middle school science teacher from Fairbanks, Alaska 2000-2001, U.S. Department of Energy
E-mail: AKWendy50@gmail.com
Wendy's duties as an Einstein Fellow were numerous and varied. Two programs she was actively involved in were the Einstein Fellowship Program and the Undergraduate Research Participation Programs-ERULF, CCI, and PST. She also worked on website design, beta testing, and trouble shooting. She worked as a Science Judge and Moderator at regional and national Science Bowl competitions in addition to recruiting Fellows to help at the regionals and doing question validity testing. Wendy attended numerous meetings, conferences, and share-a-thons across the country where she represented the DOE Office of Science, disseminated materials, presented, etc. She was also actively involved in the Presidential Early Career Awards in Science and Engineering (PECASE). 
 

Arlene Vidaurri Cain
A science teacher from Lake Charles, Louisiana 1996 Fellow, U.S. Department of Energy
E-mail: arlene.cain@cpsb.org
Arlene Cain, a high school chemistry and physics teacher from Sam Houston High School in Lake Charles, Louisiana, worked on joint educational programs between DOE and the National Science Foundation. Her assignments included developing laboratory science action items that support effective program management, monitoring science technology education issues, and working with the U.S. Global Climate Change Research Program.

 

Jess Todd Clark
A high school science teacher from Murfreesboro, North Carolina 2001-2002, U.S. Department of Energy
E-mail: jtoddclark@gmail.com
During his Fellowship at the Department of Energy (DOE), Clark accomplished the following: (1) wrote articles in several publication to promote undergraduate research opportunities sponsored by the U.S. Department of energy; (2) managed the DOE website and online application process for undergraduate research programs; (3) assisted with the planning and implementation of the National Science Bowl and the National Middle School Science Bowl competitions at the regional and national levels; (4) advised members of the DOE's Office of Science regarding the establishment of a program allowing in-service teachers to perform research during the summer at DOE National Laboratories; and (5) evaluated undergraduate research programs at Office of Science laboratories that run summer research programs for students. Clark said the following about his Fellowship, "My Fellowship experience has been outstanding. I have thoroughly enjoyed being in the Washington, DC area and taking advantage of the professional development opportunities here such as the Carnegie Institute lectures, the Smithsonian Resident Associates Program, and the American Youth Policy Forum presentations. I have also enjoyed interacting with the other Einstein Fellows socially and as part of the monthly field trips. I sincerely believe that one of the most important benefits of this Fellowship is the chance for teachers to network and become part of a community of professionals."

 

Jennifer Coughlin
A secondary chemistry and physics teacher from Albuquerque, New Mexico. 2005-2006, U.S. Department of Energy
E-mail: Coughlin@aps.edu

Jonathan Davies
A secondary school science teacher from Portland, Oregon.  2009-2010 Fellow, US Department of Energy
E-Mail:  jsdavies@me.com

During his time at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy he worked on a number of projects, a highlight of which was working to define energy literacy.  This definition, as it relates to the DOE will eventually lead to a Strategic Education Plan for the office.  It will allow program managers to assess their current involvement in education efforts and effectively target new programs and curriculum efforts to fill any gaps in their program’s overall education portfolio.  As well, he was involved in workforce development in the STEM arena as it relates to the energy sector, especially in the ‘green’ workforce. 

 
Jeffery Dilks
A secondary science teacher from Ames Iowa.  2006-2007 US Department of Energy Office of Science
At the end of his fellowship, Dilks became a member of the Department of Energy staff.
 
Tracey Lin Beckendorf-Edou
A middle school science teacher from Seattle, Washington.  2009-2010 Fellow, DOE- Office of Science
Tracey Edou served in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science, Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists. There, she facilitated organizational structure for Academies Creating Teacher Scientist, a research-based teacher professional development program. She also served as a co-editor of the Journal of Undergraduate Research, participated in outreach activities, and collaborated on a number of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education initiatives.  After her Fellowship, she began work as an Education Project Manager at Oak Ridge Associated Universities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.
 

Peter Faletra
A secondary science teacher from Warren, New Hampshire 1999-2001, U.S. Department of Energy
E-mail: 

While working at the Department of Energy-Office of Science, Peter was instrumental in the creation and administration of a number of national science programs. These programs offered laboratory fellowships at the Office of Science National Laboratories to undergraduates interested in science and technology careers. He also worked with programs for students wishing to make teaching a career and junior faculty members at small colleges wishing to further their research experience. Peter also spent time traveling to the various Office of Science laboratories to find out how to improve the programs. When he was asked to describe what his workday was like he responded, "I work with a dynamic group of people whose overriding theme is providing new and interesting opportunities at one of our nation's greatest resources . . . the National Laboratories."

 

Kevin Hartmann
A secondary science and technology teacher from Williamstown, Massachusetts.  2006-2007 US Department of Energy Office of Science
 
Stephan Graham
A high school science teacher from Denver, Colorado.  2007-2008 Fellow US Department of Energy


Kathryn Hilts
A secondary science teacher from Charleston, West Virginia 1998-1999 Fellow, DOE
E-mail: khilts@msn.com
Hilts spent her first year as an Einstein Fellow (1998-1999) working with the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. She worked with the Energy Research Undergraduate Laboratory Fellowships (ERULF) in coordination with the National Energy Laboratories and assisted in piloting a Community College Initiative. She also worked with the National Science Bowl and served as a scientific judge at both the regional (Washington, DC, Maryland, and Virginia) and the national finals of the competition. She served on a White House Taskforce on "Diversity for the 21st Century Workforce" and as a member of the steering committee of the collaborative efforts for the year 2000's National Summit on Science Initiative. She helped coordinate the Faculty and Student Undergraduate Research Conference in Chicago where she also conducted a workshop on grant writing.
 
Kirk Janowiak
A secondary school science teacher from West Lafayett, Indiana.  2009-2010 Fellow, DOE- Office of Science

During his fellowship year, he was posted at the Department of Energy’s Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Scientists and Teachers (WDTS). There he leveraged his background, expertise, and classroom experience in WDTS’s efforts to evaluate and improve STEM education across DOE programs. In addition, he co-edited the DOE Journal of Undergraduate Research, provided evaluative research and analysis of the STEM workforce, acted as a WDTS program analyst, gave STEM Education and STEM Workforce presentations, and participated in a number of Inter-agency Workgroups and Committees where he worked to improve communication and STEM education efforts between the various U.S. Government science mission agencies.  Janowiak returned to his classroom after his fellowship.

 

Richard Jones
A high school science teacher from Billings, Montana 2002-2003 Fellow, Department of Energy
E-mail: rmjones@montana.edu

 

Kaye Kamp
An elementary and secondary science and math teacher from Post Falls, Idaho 2002-2003 Fellow, Department of Energy
E-mail: kayekamp@yahoo.com


Mubina Khan
A high school Biology and Psychology teacher from New York City, 2008-2009 Fellow, Department of Energy, Biological and Environmental Research Office (BER) 
E-Mail:  mubina.sufiya.anis.khan@gmail.com
During her Fellowship, Mubina Khan Schroeder was involved in a variety of programs related to cutting-edge science and science education. In the Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Office in the Department of Energy (DOE), she helped with the review and organization of graduate student speakers. She also worked with BER to help them re-think their educational outreach strategies. "I'm amazed at the amount of science research that the Department of Energy supports. Education goes hand-in-hand with producing world-class science and DOE supports that notion. I think it's a matter of making the right connections between the scientific community and the educational community."

 
 
Aaron Schuetz
A high school physics teacher from Roanoke, VA 2003-2004 Fellow, Department of Energy
E-mail: ajschuetz@yahoo.com
 
 

Lorna Vazquez

A high school Math teacher from Wisconsin, 2008-2009 Fellow, Department of Energy, Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) 

E-Mail:  lornatvazquez@gmail.com 

Lorna Vazquez lent her teacher perspective to many WDTS projects. She served as co-editor of the Journal of Undergraduate Research, coordinating the peer review of papers, working with authors to prepare papers for publication, and managing design and formatting duties. She wrote and edited program plan documents and reviewed various proposals for funding. She traveled to several National Laboratories to learn more about the education programs offered there, touring the facilities and working with staff on improving existing internship programs. As a fully integrated member of the WDTS staff, she had the opportunity to learn about the intricacies of the operations, resources and programs of a Federal Agency and how that agency fits within the broader scope of the Federal Government.


 

National Institutes of Health

Heidi Coleman
A secondary science teacher from Caldwell County, NC, 2005-2006 National Institutes of Health (NIH)
 

Peggy Deichstetter
A high school biology teacher from Chicago, IL 2003-2004 Fellow, Office of Science Education, National Institutes of Health
E-mail: pdeichstetter@yahoo.com
Peggy Deichstetter While at NIH, Peggy traveled throughout the country presenting workshops to teachers on the Teaching Supplements developed by NIH. She also field tested and reviewed new supplements and polled teachers about how to improve the supplements at national teacher conventions. She also actively worked to align the supplements to State Science Standards. Peggy says, "The NIH Office of Science Education depends on independence and motivation. When told, 'There is a workshop I need you to do in New Jersey in April,' the office knows that I will be there and be prepared." She was also involved in all aspects of the development of new curriculum supplements.

 

George Dewey
A science teacher from Fairfax, Virginia 1996 Fellow, Office of Science Education, National Institutes of Health
E-mail: george.dewey@fcps.edu

 

JoAnne Dombrowski (Mowczko)
A high school science teacher from Yuma, Arizona 1997 Fellow, Office of Science Education, National Institutes of Health
E-mail: jmowczko@hotmail.com
JoAnne developed an on-line health curriculum targeted at minorities and women. The program is being tested at Eastern High School (Washington, DC) and Wheaton High School (Montgomery County, MD) as well as at her Yuma, AZ school, Cibola High School. A unique feature of the program is student use of the Internet to exchange laboratory information among the three pilot schools. She says, "The Fellowship was a wonderful opportunity for growth, an experience . . . never to be . . . forgotten. I have stayed in association with the Office of Science Education of NIH by continuing with the curriculum work. We will be piloting it in April with students and I will work on revisions in DC in July, 1998."

 

Barbara Houtz
A secondary science teacher from State College, PA, 2005-2006 National Institutes of Health (NIH)
E-mail: bhoutz@mail.com

 

Ruth Rand
A chemistry and physics teacher from Albuquerque, New Mexico 1999 - 2000 Fellow, Office of Science Education, National Institutes of Health
E-mail: ruthrand@comcast.net
Ruth Rand helped with curriculum development, one of which was to develop an online collaborative nutrition study. This is a new way to teach nutrition to high school students. Students would record and analyze nutrient intake; pool data online with participating students in their own school and cross schools; compare analysis of personal dietary intake with dietary components recommended for disease prevention and health maintenance. Rand also played a major role in the development of the NIH Health Science Virtual Mentor. The goals of the NIH Virtual Mentor are to foster career success for students who are, or who may be, interested in health professions and to connect students with others interested in health careers She also helped to develop teacher training for the NIH Health Science Curriculum Supplements. Ruth is continuing this teacher training in her home state by coordinating a Distance Learning Workshop. The workshop will be presented by NIH scientists who will broadcast live from Bernalillo, New Mexico to four other sites in the state.

 

NASA Fellows

Ann Coren
A secondary science teacher from Columbia Maryland who teaches chemistry for Montgomery County Public Schools.
E-mail: anncoren@hotmail.com


Diedre Adams
An eighth grade Science and Math teacher from Indiana, 2008-2009 Fellow, NASA 

E-Mail:  diedreadams@yahoo.com 

Working with NASA, Diedre Adams said, gave her the opportunity to meet people and learn things she could never have imagined. She attended briefings on Capitol Hill, corresponded with students from around the world and met with leaders from numerous federal agencies and educational institutions. Diedre had the opportunity to converse with astronauts on the space station, judge regional and national student competitions and was certified to carry moon rocks to schools around the country.  Diedre stayed in touch with the classroom by developing and presenting several lessons dealing with careers in STEM, NASA products in everyday life, and the history of NASA. She had the opportunity to travel across the country and to Europe for these presentations. She also attended numerous local and national educational conferences and courses in an effort to broaden her educational experiences.  Some of her days were spent in front of a computer researching federal documents or reviewing educational websites or CDs. Others were spent attending meetings, developing presentation materials or watching the taping of interviews with the astronauts, scientists or engineers. Through all of her experiences with NASA, Diedre accessed information and resources that she has shared with students and other teachers as well as people in her community. The fellowship, she said, gave her the opportunity to have a broader impact than the average classroom experience.

 

Joel Albright
A high school mathematics teacher from Box Elder, South Dakota 1997 Fellow, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
E-mail: jalbright@rushmore.com

 

Liz Burton Burck
A (retired) secondary science teacher from Kenai, Alaska. 2006-2007 Fellow, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
E-mail: lizburck@gmail.com

 

Patricia Colbert-Cormier
A high school science teacher from Lafayette, Louisiana 1998-1999 Fellow, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
E-mail: p53colbert@cox.net

 

Naveen Cunha
An elementary teacher from College Station, TX. 2004-2006 NASA Educator Astronaut Program
E-mail: ncunha86@yahoo.com

 

Sonja Godeken
A secondary mathematics and astronomy teacher from Tacoma, Washington 1999-2000 Fellow, NASA
E-mail: sgodeken@hotmail.com
Sonja Godeken worked in NASA's Education Division and was involved in various projects, one of which was the poster development for "Premiere Women in Aerospace" which was presented at the Women in Aviation Conference held in Memphis, Tennessee, in March of 2000. She researched women aviators and looked for photographs in the archives of the National Air and Space Museum. Godeken worked with her direct supervisor at NASA, Debbie Gallaway (Manager of NASA's Teacher Enhancement Programs), and Anne Holbrook (an elementary teacher from Ohio who was also an Einstein Fellow at NASA), and the graphics department at NASA to design this career-focused poster. Additional duties included: working on a curriculum project celebrating "100 Years of Flight; traveling to various conventions and conferences; writing and editing short curriculum and marketing pieces; and assisting her supervisor by doing correspondence, e-mail, and phone calling.

 

Danita Guarino
An elementary science teacher from Highstown, New Jersey 1998 Fellow, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
E-mail: deeguarino@comcast.net

 

John Henry
A technology teacher from Woodbury, New Jersey 2004-2005 Fellow, NASA
E-mail: jhenry@eirc.org
John worked at NASA Headquarters, primarily with the NASA Explorer Schools (NES) Program. He worked on analyzing NES demographics and gave input regarding changes in NES program. John attended a NES Professional Development Conference where mission directorates and individual space center plans for the upcoming year with Explorer Schools were covered. He represented NASA Headquarters at a NASA Explorer School Kick-off in Maryland. John also worked on a Mathcounts activity, participated on the committee with Astronaut Barbara Morgan to help develop habitat activities related to her flight in 2006. John also assisted with the NES History of Winter workshop in Lake Placid NY, as well as representing NES for the SUB SEM and sounding rocket program along with the Virginia Space Grant Consortium at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

John remarks that, "There are so many opportunities and projects that I became involved with and many professional development events I attended. The pace when I started was very busy... the learning curve was steep, not problematic, just steep." However, in the end, the program was by far, the best experience of my life.

Among the most rewarding aspects of John's Fellowship: John has been amazed at the opportunity to work with so many "intelligent people with experience in many different areas and vast knowledge of mission directorates. It has been exciting attending meetings and listening to ideas for possible future and current educational directions and opportunities for students and teachers offered by NASA. From the Einstein Fellowship program I feel I have more experience and resources to offer, not only at my school district but at a regional level to assist and guide other teachers with their endeavors."

 

Letitia Hoaas
A secondary science and math teacher from Shreveport, LA 2003-2004 Fellow, NASA Explorer Schools

 

Donald Hoff
A high school science teacher from Velva, North Dakota 1997 Fellow, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
E-mail: donald.hoff@vcsu.edu
"I . . . learned so much about how our national government works and even more about NASA and its role in education. I continue to share what I have gained with my students and fellow educators. Example, I am presenting an update on Space Sciences and Hands on Activities to fellow educators next Saturday at our state spring science conference. . . . U.S. Senator Byron Dorgan . . . visited my school last fall and we talked of my experiences as an Einstein Fellow."

 

Anne M. Holbrook
An elementary science and math teacher from West Chester, Ohio 1999-2001, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
E-mail: aholbroo@verizon.net Anne had her Fellowship extended for a second year at NASA. During her Fellowship, she designed two Flight Education/Centennial posters, organized the membership for the National Middle Level Science Teachers Association, and networked with different enterprises in a diplomatic fashion to increase NASA student/teacher opportunities. She also attended and participated in 12 national or congressional briefings on science and/or mathematics education. Anne helped to develop curriculum and reviewed website information for the NASA Student Involvement Program and participated in development committees for both MathCounts and National Engineer's Week. Additionally, she reviewed proposals and was chair for the National Science Teachers Association's regional convention in Columbus, OH. One of the highlights of Anne's Fellowship was the opportunity to travel to Singapore to observe mathematics and science teachers and students in their learning environment.

 

Leesa Hubbard
E-mail: AstroPoet@aol.com
A science and special education teacher from Lebanon, Tennessee 2002-2003 Fellow, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

 

Caryn Long
An elementary school science teacher from Indian Trail, North Carolina 2002-2003 Fellow, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
E-mail: nasateach@yahoo.com

 

Pam Newberry
A high school mathematics and technology education teacher from Wytheville, Virginia 1996 Fellow, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
E-mail: pampltw@embarqmail.com
"I worked . . . with Deborah Gallaway, Director of Pre-Service and In-Service Programs for Teachers . . . participate[d] in NASA Educational Workshops for Elementary School Teachers and for Mathematics, Science and Technology Teachers . . . . and I coordinated the use of mathematics materials with other materials from the NASA Educational Database. ". . . opportunities to collaborate with the other Einstein Fellows, three of whom worked in the legislative branch, permitted me to make connections and develop a greater understanding of the importance of being informed about how our government works. "My professional life has made major turns due to my opportunities as an Albert Einstein Fellow." Newberry reports that she has been selected to work as Senior Research Associate with the International Technology Education Associations Technology for All Americans Project. She works with the Appalachian Education Laboratory to train teachers in implementing and promoting the standards for science and mathematics, and has become active in the Virginia Technology Education Association's Government Relations Committee which she co-chairs.

Erin E. Peters
A middle school science teacher from Springfield, Virginia.  2006-2007 NASA - Exploration Systems Mission Directorate
Dr. Peters is now an Associate Professor of Education at George Mason University

Judy Sink
An elementary science teacher from Boone, North Carolina 1998-1999 Fellow, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
E-mail: sinkjr@bellsouth.net
While as an Einstein Fellow with NASA, Judy states that she experienced first hand the application of science, math, and technology skills for research and development in seven of the ten NASA Centers across the U.S. At Headquarters, she worked in the Education Division writing and editing materials for the educational community and assisting with preparations for the NASA Education summer workshops. She believes her greatest contribution was working with the Mars Millennium Project, a joint initiative between NASA, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Department of Education. Judy believes that because of her experiences, she returned the following year to her district prepared to implement new programs in her school, to share knowledge and new ideas with colleagues, and to provide greater leadership within her state.

 

Cassandra Soeffing
A secondary science teacher from Sioux Falls, SD 2005-2006 NASA Science Mission Directorate, Earth-Sun Systems Division
E-mail: csoeffin@hq.nasa.gov

 

Peggy Steffen
A high school science teacher from Ottumwa, Iowa 2000-2002, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
E-mail: Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov
Steffen assisted the educational technology and teacher enhancement programs at NASA Headquarters. She was the program manager of the NASA-Iowa Connection Project, evaluation team leader for the SEE NASA program in Florida, and provided numerous workshops about technology integration and distance learning to NASA personnel and science educators. She also advised and was involved in the development of the next generation of professional development opportunities for educators. "My Fellowship experience . . . has allowed me to assert my independence and demonstrate motivation in many arenas. I have appreciated the atmosphere of cooperation with NASA teams at Headquarters and at the NASA Centers and the trust they have shown in using my background knowledge and providing challenges," notes Steffen.

 

Jamalee Stone
A high school math teacher from Gordon, NE 2003-2004 Fellow, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
E-mail: Jamalee_Stone@hotmail.com

 

Tyson Tuchscherer
A secondary math teacher from Lakeview, OR, 2005-2006 NASA Explorer Schools
E-mail: tuchscherert@gmail.com

 

Karol Yeatts
An elementary mathematics teacher from Miami, Florida 1998 Fellow, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
E-mail: kjyeatts@verizon.net

 

Department Of Education Fellows

Betsy Mabry
A middle school science teacher from Enid, Oklahoma 1997 Fellow, U.S. Department of Education
E-mail: bmabry3@suddenlink.net

 

Deborah Patonai
A high school mathematics teacher from Akron, Ohio 1997 Fellow, U.S. Department of Education
E-mail: dpatonai@stvm.com

 

National Science Foundation Fellows

Pam Abreu
An elementary teacher from Las Vegas, NM 2005-2006 National Science Foundation, Division of Elementary, Secondary, and Informal Education - ESIE
E-mail: abreupam@hotmail.com 


Julie Angle

A high school Science teacher from Oklahoma, 2008-2009 Fellow, NSF, Office of Cyberinsfrastructure (OCI)

E-Mail:  julie.m.angle@gmail.com 

During her Fellowship, Angle had the opportunity to work on the strategy and policy side of pre-college, undergraduate and graduate cyber-enabled learning.  She found that her opportunities were enhanced by the timely publication of a new NSF Cyberlearning report: Fostering Learning in the Networked World: the Cyberlearning Opportunity and Challenge.  Because the OCI is a cross directorate office, she served on several planning committees and working groups with other federal agencies and NSF directorates, such as the Networking and Information Technology Education and Workforce Strategic Planning Committee, the Cyberlearning Subcommittee Working Group, the Science of Learning Center Coordinating Committee, Broadening Participation Working Group and the OCI Learning & Workforce Development Taskforce.   In addition to the educational experiences during her Fellowship,  she found herself working with individuals “who were truly devoted to the enhancement of the learning of science and the implementation of cyber-enabled learning to aid in strengthening the democratic ideals of a 21st century educated society."
 
Cherlyn Anderson
A middle school science teacher from Cayce, South Carolina.  2007-2008 NSF Office of Informal Science Education

Cathy Barthelemy
An elementary science and mathematics teacher from Southlake, Texas 2001-2002, National Science Foundation-Informal Science Education, Division of Elementary, Secondary and Informal Education
E-mail: cathybarthelemy@hotmail.com
While at the National Science Foundation (NSF)-Informal Science Education, Division of Elementary, Secondary and Informal Education, Barthelemy's Fellowship activities included: reviewing proposals for several NSF divisions, attending Informal Science conferences and meeting with conferees, facilitating a GK-12 program meeting, reviewing and making recommendations for the Math and Science Partnership solicitation, preparing a report on the history of Supplemental Research Awards, critiquing NSF-sponsored videos for staff development, reviewing training videos for the Presidential Awards program, assisting with all aspects of the Presidential Awards program, creating web lessons for NASA's Centennial of Flight program, and attending a wide range of NSF-sponsored lectures and presentations. Barthelemy states, "I have tried to make every minute of my experience count; and because of this, I believe that I have gained many things that will help me in the future. The Fellowship has given me numerous opportunities to open doors that would have remained closed otherwise. I will value this experience always."

 

Susan Brown
A middle school science teacher from Annapolis, Maryland.  2007-2008 NSF-Integrative Grad Ed & Research Traineeship Program

Nick Cabot
A secondary science teacher from Seattle, Washington 2001-2002, National Science Foundation-Division of Undergraduate Education
E-mail: nicabot@seattleschools.org
While at the National Science Foundation (NSF), Cabot spent most of his time working on and supporting activities associated with NSF Teacher preparation initiatives. He was an active member of grant selection and program review committees that affected the training of pre-service K-12 math and science teachers. His biggest project was the preparation of a comprehensive report of "best practices" stemming from the work of the NSF-funded Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation. Cabot states, "This has been a great learning opportunity for me, both as to the role of the government in science education reform and in my own professional development as an educator."

Marti Canipe
An elementary and middle school science teacher from North Carolina.  2009-2010 Fellow, NSF Office of Polar Programs

Marti spent her Fellowship Year at the National Science Foundation’s Office of Polar Programs.  One of her tasks was planning the Joint Science Education Tour in Greenland, which brings together a group of educators and students from Denmark, Greenland, and the United States to visit scientific sites in Greenland including the Summit Research Station on the Greenlandic Ice Sheet.  Marti has developed a Delicious™ site of polar education resources for teachers that are categorized by grade level and subject area.  She has also compiled a list of polar researchers by state to encourage classroom visits, and developed a guide for scientists who are planning classroom visits that was featured on the NSF website.  She was also selected as one of 120 teachers to attend the International Polar Year Science Conference in Oslo, Norway.  While in Oslo, Marti gave a presentation detailing NSF’s investments in information science education during the International Polar Year.  Mari is now a doctoral candidate at the University of Arizona.

Daniel Carpenter
A secondary science teacher from Lincoln, NE 2005-2006 National Science Foundation Division of Graduate Education
E-mail: dcarpen@lps.org

 

Carrie Chiappetta
A middle school Mathematics teacher from Stamford, Connecticut.  2006-2007 NSF-Division of Graduate Education


Charlene Dindo
E-mail: cdindo@bcbe.org
An elementary school science teacher from Mobile, Alabama 2002-2003 Fellow, National Science Foundation

 

Carol Engelmann
A science teacher from Omaha, Nebraska 2004-2005 Fellow, National Science Foundation-Division of Elementary, Secondary, and Informal Education
E-mail: engelmann.carol@gmail.com

 

Linda Ewing
E-mail: ljgewing@juno.com
A middle and high school science teacher from Boynton Beach, Florida 2002-2003 Fellow, National Science Foundation Linda's main responsibilities centered on the GK-12 program. She organized several National Science Foundation-sponsored meetings for the program including the fall meeting (over 300 participants), an evaluators meeting (50 independent evaluators), and the Principal Investigators meeting for newly funded projects. She monitored the GK-12 projects through site visits and reviewed grants for other divisions throughout NSF. She also assisted with the NATO grants program and the Graduate Research Fellowships program. Linda attended over two dozen lectures, presentations and training sessions as part of her fellowship. She says that, "the working atmosphere has been one of acceptance, humor and encouragement. It has truly been a uniquely satisfying experience."

Kent Franklin
A secondary science teacher from Minnesota.  2007-2008 SF- Integrative Grad Ed & Research Traineeship Program

 

Sandra Geisbush
An elementary teacher from San Antonio, TX 2003-2004 Fellow, Division of Research, Evaluation, and Communication, National Science Foundation
E-mail: sgeisb@neisd.net

 

Docia Generette
A secondary science teacher from Memphis, Tennessee.  2006-2007 Fellow NSF--PAEMST Program

 
Kathleen Gorski
A middle school science and technology teacher from Hampden, Massachusetts.  2007-2008 Fellow NSF- Office of Polar Programs
 
 

Mark Hannum

A high school Math and Science teacher in the District of Columbia, 2008-2009 Fellow, NSF Graduate Teaching Fellowships in K-12 Education Programs (GK-12) 

E-Mail:  markhannum@gmail.com 

During his fellowship year, Hannum had the opportunity to explore the relationship between cutting edge scientific research and its implementation in the K-12 classroom. He examined the questions of how teachers can be exposed to, and then use the results of scientific research to raise student engagement, use real data, address social and societal needs, explore the nature of science, and expose students to the life of a scientist.  Mr. Hannum has also used his year as a fellow to explore the issues of underrepresented minorities in the STEM fields. Through his work at the NSF he has developed a better understanding of the issues facing the STEM pipeline with special emphasis on opportunities for minorities and women to move into Science, Technology, or Engineering professions.  Hannum now teaches at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Arlington, Virginia.

 
 
Katylee Hoover-McInerney
E-mail: KatyleeHoover@Westat.com
An elementary science teacher from Greensboro, North Carolina 1998-2000, National Science Foundation-Division of Undergraduate Education
Katylee worked with the Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) at the National Science Foundation. DUE is part of the Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR). One of her duties included monitoring the on-going evaluation component of the Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP) that began with a conference in 1998 and continued as a national effort to measure outcomes and gather Government and Performance and Results Act (GPRA) data regarding the activities of the Collaboratives. Another of her duties was site visits to Collaboratives, including on-site observation of K-16 classrooms including discussion with K-12 teachers, preservice students, and college and university faculty with formal written reports to the NSF of all site visits. She compiled necessary information about the Collaboratives for the Committee of Visitors to the NSF. Katylee also assisted in the planning of national meetings for the Principal Investigators of CETP projects. Her job entailed daily interaction with university professors, Project Managers, Principal Investigators, community college instructors, preservice teachers, and K-12 teachers involved in the Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation.

 

Jenelle Hopkins
A science teacher from Las Vegas, Nevada 2004-2005 Fellow, National Science Foundation-Division of Earth Sciences
E-mail: jhopkins@interact.ccsd.net

Jenelle worked directly with the Directorate of Geosciences Program Officer who is in charge of Geosciences Education and Diversity Programs. Jenelle did a little of everything, from reading and summarizing reports, to organizing data, to planning and attending meetings. She helped with K-12 solicitations, did background research for working group meetings, hunted for statistical reports and summarized the findings. She attended many meetings and conferences and was frequently asked to give a classroom science teacher perspective. She was invited to sit in on grant panels and encouraged to attend any other types of meetings that she may have found useful or interesting. Jenelle was very busy giving presentations to working groups and advisory committees, having meetings with principal investigators for Geoscience Education grant proposals, organizing and participating in review panels and working group meetings, and attending geoscience and science teacher conferences and workshops both in DC and around the country. "My supervisor ... is giving me a lot of responsibilities... I am doing a lot of research and data collection for various meetings that she goes to. I will be going to three conferences in the next two months. I will be trying to promote diversity in the Geosciences - talking up the two solicitations that we are now having as well as making new contacts for ad hoc reviewers and panel members. And I love it!! I am really learning to work outside of my comfort level, and expanding my 'envelope of expertise'. NSF is a very exciting place to work." Jenelle's passion was to raise the respectability of earth science courses K-12, and to develop K-12 and post-secondary programs that will create more minority geoscientists. Jenelle says, "Professionally, the most rewarding part of this Fellowship is getting a chance to be involved with cutting edge research in all aspects of the Geosciences. I have the time to read about research programs that are advancing our geologic knowledge of Planet Earth. And I am meeting researchers from around the country and am able to talk with them personally about their programs."

 

Kathleen House
A high school mathematics teacher from Frederick, Maryland 2001-2002, National Science Foundation-Teachers Enhancement Program, Division of Elementary, Secondary and Informal Education
E-mail: kbhouse@verizon.net
"This year has been an extraordinary experience," states House. "I have learned about the broad scope of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and thus about programs that are on the forefront of educational research. I have learned about national issues, and I have had he opportunity to meet leaders in the field of science and education. I have also had the privilege of meeting a remarkably talented group of teachers. I will always treasure this year; and I know I take back to Frederick, MD, new insights and knowledge." While working in the Division of Elementary, Secondary, and Information Education (ESIE) at NSF, House's work primarily focused on the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching (PAESMT). She revised the application packet for the PAEMST and disseminated the changes in the application to state coordinators, curriculum coordinators, and prospective applicants. She was also involved in the plans for the PAEMST week activities. Houses also reviewed and critiqued proposals and videos for NSF teacher programs and participated in the national conferences for both science and math teachers.

 

John Jackson
An elementary science teacher from Altadena, California 2000-2002, National Science Foundation-Division of Graduate Education
E-mail: john.jackson@alumni.usc.edu Jackson found his work at the National Science Foundation with the Graduate Teaching Fellows in GK-12 Education to be very satisfying. He states that, "Being selected as an Einstein Fellow was the highlight of my professional career. The Fellowship offered me new and unique opportunities to learn and explore the world of education policies in a federal agency. This was a very positive experience."

 
Kera Johnson

A high school Mathematics teacher from Maryland, 2008-2009 Fellow, NSF, Division of Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings (DRL) 

E-Mail:  kdej22@aol.com 

Johnson was selected as an Einstein Fellow in 2008 and served in the National Science Foundation’s Directorate for Education and Human Resources in the Division of Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings with the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching Program.  At the end of her Fellowship, Kera was invited to return as a 2009-2010 Einstein Fellow to support various aspects of the CISE Pathways to Revitalized Undergraduate Computing Education (CPATH) program.   In her new role, Kera has helped facilitate PI meetings and conferences, assisted with research and data collection of CPATH projects, and prepared summary information for current and historical awards through the program.  Additionally, Kera provided support to the CISE Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Sites program.

 

 

Melvina Jones
An elementary science teacher in the District of Columbia.  2007-2008 Fellow NSF- PAEMST (Presidential Awards)


David Kapolka
A mathematics teacher from Grand Rapids, Michigan 2004-2005 Fellow, National Science Foundation - Division of Elementary, Secondary, and Informal Education
E-mail: kapolka@iserv.net
At the NSF Directorate for Education and Human Resources - Division of Elementary, Secondary, and Informal Education, David's work was focused around the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching (PAEMST) Program. His role at NSF was to work on all aspects of the Presidential Awards Program. He was involved in the preparation for awards week and participated in many of the activities during the week. David communicated with former Presidential Award winners and worked on presentations for the program. He gave numerous presentations and spoke at many regional and national conferences. In addition, spoke at the Michigan Council of Teachers of Mathematics Annual Conference and in Grand Rapids at the Math-in-Action Conference.

David's other duties involved NSF-TPC (Teacher Preparation Continuum), where he was involved with grant proposals and review panels. Einstein Fellows cannot officially write a panel review, but they do write "ad hoc" reviews, which may also be included in reports and evaluations. David worked on the review panel process for evaluating grant proposals for possible funding in mathematics as well as the Presidential Awards program.

David says, "The Einstein Fellowship afforded me the opportunity to work with some of the most respected math and science experts in the United States. I was privileged to meet and work with senators, congressmen, astronauts, Nobel Laureates, and was especially thrilled to attend a ceremony attended by and honoring Stephen Hawking. My work at NSF prepared me to deal with large scale projects with major impact on the nation's schools. It was valuable training for my new career as a national technology consultant in mathematics."

 

Mark Klawiter
A science teacher from Ladysmith, Wisconsin 2004-2005 Fellow, National Science Foundation - Division of Research, Evaluation, and Communication
E-mail: mklawiter@wasdinet.org
In the Division of Research, Evaluation, and Communication (REC) at NSF, Mark worked with every Program Officer and technology staff person in REC in various capacities. Mark's first task was editing and collaborating on a report, "China's Science & Technology System: Challenge and Change." This also included working closely with Chinese visiting scientists, embassy fellows, scholars, and dignitaries, as well as those here in the US. He served as a "translator" for the visiting Assistant Director General of the Chinese Academy of Science while she spent a month at NSF learning our systems and strategies.
Grant proposals demanded a significant amount of Mark's time and he assisted in reading proposals, assisting in the writing of declinations, and in the use of Fastlane (NSF's online system). He also with other colleagues in the creation of a matrix to assist in improving the accessibility of vital components of funding awards. Mark assisted in organizing a REC committee for the purpose of increasing the diversity of REC panels. He created a means of review of existing strategies, researched what other divisions have done, and transcribed notes from committee meetings and from our REC retreat. More recently, he reviewed the synopses written by REC members at our recent PI meeting, and edited and reformatted the report.Mark Interacted with other NSF Einstein Fellows in planning events, both work related and play related. He attended numerous talks and lectures and signed up for several conferences. As a capstone project, Mark wrote a report describing the history of NSF K-12 science education initiatives from a personal perspective, beginning in 1952, when his father was enrolled in one of the first "summer institutes" for science and mathematics teachers.When asked, what is the most difficult aspect of your Fellowship experience so far? Mark responded, "All aspects, at first. But in all cases "difficult" has turned to "pleasantly challenging.""

 

Nicole LaDue

A high school Earth Science teacher from New York, 2007-2009 Fellow, NSF, Directorate for GeoSciences 

E-Mail:  nicoleladue@gmail.com 

Throughout the two years of her fellowship with the Directorate for Geosciences at the National Science Foundation, Nicole actively participated in facilitating the merit review process for the Geoscience Education and Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in the Geosciences solicitations. These programs gave her a deeper awareness of the breadth of projects occurring nationally in Geoscience education. She also had the opportunity to travel extensively to local and national conferences to represent NSF and learn more about climate change and education issues.  One of the projects Nicole enjoyed working on was the Earth Science Literacy Initiative (www.earthscienceliteracy.org). This effort gathered geoscientists to create community consensus about the most important themes that people should know about the solid earth and hydrologic sciences. The resulting set of Earth Science Literacy Principles complements the Ocean, Climate and Atmospheric Science Literacy Principles.  Nicole and two other fellows aligned the Earth Science Literacy Principles to the National Science Education Standards in order to make it more useful for state-level standards writers, professional developers, curriculum writers and textbook companies.

 
Efrenia MacLean
An elementary teacher from Ann Arbor, MI 2003-2004 Fellow, Division of Elementary, Secondary and Informal Education, National Science Foundation
E-mail: femaclean@comcast.net

 

Jaime Malwitz
An elementary school science teacher from Fon du Lac, Wisconsin 2002-2003 Fellow, National Science Foundation
E-mail: jmalwitz@wasdinet.org

 

Ruth McDonald
 A middle school math, science and technology teacher from Oregon.  2007-2008 Fellow, NSF - Office of International Science and Engineering

Joseph McInerney
An elementary science and mathematics teacher from Acton, Massachusetts 1998-2002, National Science Foundation-Division of Research, Evaluation, and Communication
E-mail: JosephMcInerney@Westat.com
Joseph McInerney began his Fellowship with the Division of Elementary, Secondary and Informal Education at the National Science Foundation (NSF) where he worked with the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching (PAEMST) program. One year later, in 1999, he began working in the Division of Research, Evaluation and Communication (REC) where he was involved in a myriad of programs and projects including the GK-12 Evaluation (Graduate Research Fellows in K-12 Education), CSEMS Evaluation (Computer Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Scholarships), and NSDL Evaluation (The National Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology Education Digital Library). He was also on the Federal Interagency Committee on Education (FICE) which seeks to coordinate all federal programs, policies, and administrative practices affecting education. Mr. McInerney feels that the most important thing an Einstein Fellow can do is "to bring the voice and knowledge of an experienced classroom teacher to the educational efforts of the federal government." He describes many professional highlights regarding his Fellowship years including writing the draft report for REC/NSF regarding science education in the G-8 nations; meeting mathematics educator Liping Ma in China and introducing her to a standing-room audience at NSF a few months later; speaking at plenary sessions on evaluation for two GK-12 Principal Investigators Annual Meetings; and writing five curricular pieces on the Wright Brothers for the 2003 NASA Centennial of Flight. As for personal highlights, McInerney continues, "I made many extraordinary friends at NSF and among the Fellow cohorts. The greatest blessing of all was meeting the love of my life, Katylee Hoover. We were the first Einstein Fellows to marry!"

 

Mimi McClure
A technology educator from Apopka, Florida 2003-2005 Fellow, National Science Foundation - Division of Graduate Education
E-mail: mmcclure@nsf.gov
Mimi was very busy at NSF, "It is still my responsibility to jump in and be the extra hands wherever I am most needed. There is no sitting around and waiting for someone to assign tasks. There is no sitting around!" I work with all three of the graduate education programs. I do a lot of what I did as a fellow but now I do it for all the programs instead of just GK_12. I still spend a lot of time looking at the information that our division collects and deciding where and how it should be disseminated. The job is exciting. I love being in this environment. It provides an exciting view of the education realm, "Our programs are charged with supporting the frontiers of science, research and education."

"As a successful classroom teacher, I was fortunate to be on the front end of what was taking place in the classroom, the school, and the district. In this position, I have a front row seat on the cutting edge. It's not just the horizon; it is a view of the new frontiers."

 

Tiah E. McKinney
A secondary science teacher from Detroit, Michigan.  2006-2007 Fellow, NSF - GEO - Directorate for Geosciences
 
Allan Miller
A middle and secondary school science teacher from Alaska.  2006-2007 Fellow, NSF - OISE - Office of International Science and Engineering

Egda Morales
A secondary science teacher from San Juan, PR 2005-2006 Fellow, National Science Foundation, Division of Molecular & Cellular Biosciences -- MCB
E-mail: emorales_01@yahoo.com

 
Dennis Newell
A middle school science and math teacher from Emporia, Kansas.  2009-2010 Fellow, NSF- ISE

During his Fellowship at the National Science Foundation’s DRL (Division of Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings), Newell’s experience with ISE (Informal Science Education), ITEST (Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers), and PAEMST (Presidential Awards for Excellence in Math and Science Teaching) has provided  insight into new research and funding of those ideas.  Newell returned from his Fellowship to his school district’s virtual school encouraged by the use of cyber learning as a way to learn anytime, anywhere. He believes that every person needs to develop of wide range of skills to successfully live in a world that has yet to be created.

 

Heather Pacheco

A high school  science teacher in Massachusetts.  2009-2010 Fellow, NSF-GEO

E-Mail:  pacheco.heather@gmail.com

Pacheco spent her Fellowship year with the Directorate for Geosciences at the National Science Foundation where, in addition to the Geoscience Education and Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in the Geosciences programs managed by her sponsor’s office, she focused on three main arenas: Best practices for broader impacts involving K-12, Climate Change Education and Earth Systems Science in America.

 Pacheco will be attending Arizona State University after she leaves NSF in pursuit of a PhD in Science Education. Her research will be focused on leveraging broader impacts efforts across STEM disciplines to provide continuous support excellent K-12 teacher and student programs.

 

Nancy Pejouhy
A middle and high school mathematics teacher from Woodstock, Vermont 2002-2003 Fellow, National Science Foundation
E-mail: nancypj2@aol.com

 

 

Anthonette Pena

An 8th grade Science teacher from Florida, 2008-2010 Fellow, NSF, Division of Research and Learning (DRL) in Formal and Informal Settings 

In 2008 Peña was selected as an Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow and was assigned to the Division of Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings at the National Science Foundation (NSF) where she helped to coordinate the Presidential Award for Excellence in Math and Science Teaching (PAEMST) program.  She was asked to return for a second year and continued to be a member of the PAEMST team.   

In her role as an Einstein Fellow, she assisted with coordinating the National Selection Committee meeting where panelists came to NSF to read, review and select PAEMST awardees.  She has helped to plan and coordinate Recognition Week when the PAEMST awardees come to Washington DC to celebrate their award and participate in a professional development program.  She  also participated in the planning and coordination of the PAEMST State Coordinators Meeting as well as updating and revising the application.   

 

Kitchka Petrova

A middle school Science teacher from Florida, 2008-2009 Fellow, NSF, Graduate Teaching Fellowships in K-12 Education Programs (GK-12)

E-Mail:  kpetrova@mdc.edu 

During her fellowship year, Kitchka Petrova had the opportunity to visit colleges, universities and schools throughout the US.   Petrova was the first foreign-educated Einstein Fellow and found the visits to numerous schools to be very beneficial, allowing her to understand better the status of science education in the US.  She visited schools in the impoverished Appalachian region, in Newark’s inner city, in rural Louisiana, in South Carolina, Georgia, Delaware, District of Columbia, Virginia and Arizona.  Petrova found her fellowship year to be “an amazing experience to see the passion and dedication that college professors and administrators, graduate students, teachers and principals put into improving science education." 

Richard Pieper
A secondary math teacher from Cokeville, WY 2003-2004 Fellow, National Science Foundation
E-mail: rpieper56@hotmail.com

 

Stephen Scannell

A middle school and high school Science teacher 2008-2009 Fellow, NSF, Information Science Education (ISE)

 E-Mail:  sgscannell@gmail.com

 As an Einstein Fellow, Stephen’s projects at the NSF included work on the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching (PAEMST), Informal Science Education (ISE), and the Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) programs. He coordinated a group of NSF Einstein Fellows to develop recommendations and strategies around K12 issues addressing NSF’s focus on Cyberlearning.  In addition to work at the NSF, Stephen was very active in attending special briefings on Capitol Hill on STEM education, attending conferences, and learning about education policy.  He was particularly interested in how STEM, as a conceptual framework, could be used to improve math skills and achievement, to attract and engage students who are struggling in school, and to provide a relevant framework for students to integrate their learning.
 

Wanda G. Shaffer
A middle school science teacher from Fullerton, California 2000-2001, National Science Foundation-Division of Elementary, Secondary, and Informal Education
E-mail: wshaf6676@aol.com
During her Fellowship at the National Science Foundation-Division of Elementary, Secondary, and Informal Education, Wanda played a major role in the coordination of the many phases of the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching (PAESMT) program at NSF and the White House She was involved in virtually all aspects of the program. Her many duties included the following: She contacted state and territory coordinators, screened applicants for compliance with guidelines and correctness of information, fielded questions about the program, acted as the primary contact with the associations connected to PAESMT, and assisted at ALL events for the Presidential Awardees' week in DC, etc. Additionally, she also read and reviewed proposals, was a panel reviewer, and entered the panel summaries in NSF's Fastlane. She participated and offered input at all ESIE division meetings and at some NSF Board meetings. Wanda also made all arrangements for the NSF booth at the NSTA national convention and contacted all developers to enlist their presentations and to display their materials at the NSF booth. She took advantage of the many opportunities afforded her during her Fellowship to attend forums, luncheons, press releases, "Brown Bags" offered by NSF, etc. She also helped at the DOE regional and national Science Bowl.

 

Rhonda Spidell
A secondary science teacher from Albuquerque, NM 2005-2006 National Science Foundation Division of Earth Sciences -- GEO
E-mail: spidellr@hotmail.com

 

Kevin Swanson
A middle school science teacher from Minnesota.  2006-2007 Fellow, SF-Graduate Teaching Fellowships in K-12 Education Program
 

Jennifer Thompson

A teacher of kindergarten and first grade students from Alaska, 2008-2009 Fellow, NSF, Office of Polar Programs 

E-Mail:  jenjuneau@aol.com 

Jennifer helped to organize the 2009 Joint Science Education Tour, becoming a member of the group during her fellowship year, and traveling to Greenland.  She coordinated teachers and students from Greenland, Denmark and the United States, giving her hope for future connections and collaboration between these three countries. A small group of High School age students traveled with their teachers to Kangerlussuaq, Greenland to prepare for a three day expedition on the summit of Greenland. During the three days at the Summit Station at 10,000 feet, students learned from the scientists as they shared their research, explanations of instruments and goals for the projects. Students were able to take snow samples, hold ice cores, get a perspective of living in a research camp and ask questions to gain perspective of the information gathered at the Summit Station. As a PolarTREC teacher Jennifer documented the expedition in Journal entries with photos on her website.   During her fellowship, Jennifer also had the opportunity to assist with the development of a book about Antarctica for middle school age students. She says she learned a lot about the icy continent in the process and hopes to work on additional resources about both poles for elementary age students in the future. “Young students are curious about their world and supporting those first investigations in elementary school can often be the beginnings of a life long interest in science!” 

 
Tonia Thompson
An elementary science teacher from Binghamton, New York 1997-1998 Fellow, Division of Elementary, Secondary, & Informal Education, National Science Foundation
E-mail: thompsot@binghamtonschools.org
 
Chris Tolbert
 A high school engineering and technology teacher from West Wilkes High School in Wilkes County, North Carolina.  2009-2010 Fellow, NSF, OCI
Tolbert views the Einstein Fellowship as a unique opportunity and challenge that helped him contribute positive growth and direction to STEM education. The fellowship allowed him to grow professionally and acquire skills and resources needed to improve the EV program and STEM education in Wilkes County.  Tolbert’s opportunities at the National Science Foundation (NSF) in the Office of Cyberinfrastructure (OCI) includes being an NSF Open Government Initiative Moderator, grant portfolio analyst, ADVANCE representative, and an assistant in the development of programs whose goal is to reach the underserved, at-risk, and students with disabilities in K-12 education. 
 
 Ben Van Dusen
A secondary school science teacher from Boulder, Colorado.  2009-2010 Fellow, NSF ENG
 

Kerry R. Venegas
A secondary science teacher from Gallup, New Mexico 2000-2001, National Science Foundation-Division of Educational Systems Reform
E-mail: curv6@yahoo.com
Kerry worked with the National Science Foundation's Division of Education System Reform, acting as a teacher consultant to the Rural Systemic Initiative program (RSI) and contributing to the positive recognition of teachers as partners in the process of reforming mathematics and science education by assuming the responsibility of organizing and implementing the first RSI Lead Teacher Conference in Albuquerque, NM March 2001. She participated in other NSF run programs such as the Urban Systemic Initiatives, Local Systemic Reform projects and Centers for Excellence in Teacher Preparation program. During her Fellowship, Kerry researched, wrote about, and focused on issues of special needs students, underserved population, and teacher leadership efforts and began doctorate work in the Systems Change program at George Washington University. In addition, she had the opportunity to travel to many difference parts of the country to visit schools, classrooms, and programs making a difference in students' lives. Kerry expresses her gratitude and appreciation to Dr. Costello Brown, Dr. Jerry Gipp, and Dr. Lura Chase of NSF for the experiences and opportunities to develop as a person and an educator during her tenure as an Einstein Fellow. Says Kerry, "This experience reinforced my views about giving all people a voice and working together to improve education and the world."

 

Sarah Yue

A high school chemistry teacher from California, 2008-2010 Fellow, NSF, Office of International Science and Engineering (OISE) 

E-mail:  sarah.vos@hotmail.com  

Sarah served both years of her Einstein Fellowship at the National Science Foundation (NSF) Office of International Science and Engineering. While at NSF, Sarah served as a point person for research and education activities in the Americas region, particularly in Central America and the Caribbean. She also worked closely with NSF’s International Research Experiences for Students program. Following her fellowship, Sarah accepted a position at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of Education, where she helps coordinate funding for formal and informal education through NOAA’s Environmental Literacy Grants program.

 
 

National Institute of Standards and Technology

Celani Dominguez
A high school science teacher from Austin, Texas. 2001-2002 Fellow, National Institute of Standards and Technology
E-mail: cdominguez@swisd.net
Celani Dominguez states that she found the Einstein Fellowship an invaluable learning experience. While working at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, she accomplished the following: She participated on the team addressing issues for the Baldrige National Quality Award in Education and gained valuable expertise in the application of the Baldrige Criteria for Performance excellence in education settings. Dominguez co-presented a work session on applying for the Baldrige National Quality Award at the national convention for the Association of Supervision and Curriculum Development in addition to presenting at a National Seminar of the American Association of University Women on the challenges of leadership in K-12 schools. Additionally, she presented at various educational workshops and seminars. She also served as a National Science Foundation (NSF) K-12 Grant Reviewer Panelist for educational organizations applying for NSF Research Grants. Dominguez is applying the valuable lessons learned through application of the Baldrige Criteria for Excellence in her present university setting and future education settings as well. Dominguez has finished her Ph.D. and is now at Clark University in Massachusetts helping prepare future teachers and working with math and science teachers to improve their practice in the Worcester Independent School District through action research projects in math and science.

 

Carolyn Schwennsen
A high school chemistry teacher from Omaha, NE.   2003-2004 Fellow, National Institute of Standards and Technology
E-mail: cschwennsen@mchschool.org

 

Linda Selvig
A high school science teacher from Boise, Idaho 2002-2003 Fellow, National Institute of Standards and Technology
E-mail: selvigl@meridianschools.org
Linda performed low-level radiochemistry research at NIST. She also learned the techniques necessary to carry out analytical procedures in the laboratory. She presented her published paper on the research at the Mark VI Radiochemistry Conference in Kona, Hawaii in April 2003. She also developed radiochemistry contacts for networking and edited a textbook chapter on Quality Assurance and mentored two undergraduate students placed in the laboratory for the summer. She says of her experience, "Once the scientists know that I am a teacher, they are eager for me to learn about what they are doing and willing to share their knowledge and skills." 


Ann Swain
An elementary teacher from Woodinville, WA.  2005-2006 Fellow, National Institute of Standards and Technology
E-mail: anndotcalm@gmail.com

 

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
 
 

Kirk Beckendorf

An 8th grade Science teacher from Texas, 2008-2010 Fellow, NOAA Office of Education 

E-Mail:  kirkbeckendorf@gmail.com 

Beckendorf began his fellowship working with the Environmental Literacy Grants Team to help develop and plan future funding opportunities and he led the effort to evaluate the office’s historic grants portfolio.  He also edited NOAA’s 2009 Strategic Education Plan and reviewed the public comments as they were submitted.  His sponsor asked him to stay a second year to help develop a new NOAA Education website.  During this second fellowship year, he was significantly involved in the website’s design and development. Beckendorf organized a focus group of teachers (including Einstein Fellows) to help guide this process and he also performed a literature review of the research on teacher use of websites and the efficacy of education websites. As a result he wrote a white paper to guide NOAA’s online education resources. As a member of the NOAA Outreach Team, Beckendorf was an exhibiter and presenter at all eight of the NSTA conventions over the two years.  Presentation topics included Climate Change, Coral Reefs, the Teacher At Sea Program, and using NOAA Data in the Classroom. In addition, he was asked to be a member of the Hurricane Awareness Tour, flying onboard (and actually flying) a NOAA Hurricane Hunter P3-Orion aircraft.

 

Rene Carson
A middle level science teacher from Little Rock, AR.  2005-2006 Fellow, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
E-mail: rtcarson@sbcglobal.net

 

Christine Donovan
A high school science teacher from Tucson, Arizona.  2007-2008 Fellow NOAA - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration


Beth Jewell
A secondary science teacher from Burke, VA, 2005-2006 Fellow, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
E-mail: beth.jewell@fcps.edu

 

Judy Reeves
A secondary school science teacher from Montgomery, Alabama.  2006-2007 Fellow, NOAA - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Joseph Shewmaker
A secondary school science teacher from West Palm Beach, Florida.  2006-2007 Fellow, NOAA - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Joyce Stark
A science teacher from Sunnyside, Washington 2004-2005 Fellow, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
E-mail: jepstark@bentonrea.com