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MAN-TORO (Ten-thousand Lantern Festival)

August 14 Friday  15 Saturday 

  The lanterns, 3000 in number, have been dedicated by people including the Fujiwara family since 800 years ago. In the past, the lanterns were lit every night while oil stuff lasted. The special rite called Manto, literally Ten-thousand Lanterns, was sometimes held in order to pray for rain. Since the Meiji Era, all the lanterns have been lit twice a year: at Setsubun (the day for purification by throwing beans) on February 3 or 4, and on August 14 and 15. This event is called "Mantoro of Kasuga." The Man-toro began to be held to meet the spiritual need of the Meiji people who were unsatisfied with the fact that the lanterns were not lit every night any more because of the shortage of oil stuff at that time. The world of illusion appears on the shadows of lanterns mirrored in the Mitarai River along the corridor, and the shrine presents a lively scene with worshipers enjoying the event. Bugaku, or a court music and dance, is performed at Setsubun in February and August 14.

Transportation

From JR Nara or Kintetsu Nara Station to kasugataisha-omotesando,
and 8 min. on foot.



DAIMONJI-OKURIBI (Great Bonfire Festival)

August 15 Saturday



The event of Daimonji Bonfire in Nara started in the 35th year of Showa (1960). Today, along with the burning of the Wakakusa-yama Hill conducted on January 15, this fire event in summer for sightseeing shows a serene and austere atmosphere of an ancient capital to the world. A special ceremony is held in Tobihino at 6:00 p.m., and Mt. Takamado is set on fire at 8:00 p.m. The Chinese character "dai," meaning "great," symbolizes the universe. The event helps to enhance our pure mind with which we extinguish our 108 earthly desires and console the spirits of the dead. There are 108 fire grates arranged so that they can form the letter "dai" when seen from far. The first stroke of the letter "dai," which goes horizontally, is 109 meters in length; the second stroke, from the top to the left, 164 meters; and the third stroke from the center to the right, 128 meters.

Transportation

From JR Nara or Kintetsu Nara Station - 15 min. on foot (Tobihino).




A beautiful and mystic musical theater lit up by bonfires in the evening darkness.

© Nara City Tourist AssociationTakigi O-Noh is a traditional Japanese musical drama performed on the open-air stage built on the lawn of Kofukuji Temple, which is registered as a World Heritage Site. The stage is made by placing large boards over the lawn, with bamboo poles set up and bound with rope, and the drama is performed amid the illumination of the bonfires which are set alight in early evening. Takigi Noh signifies 'a Noh traditional musical theater drama performed at a banquet held around a bonfire.' In the case of Kofukuji Temple, this is respectfully called Takigi O-Noh, the 'O' being an honorific prefix. Originally, such performances were carried out when sacred takigi (firewood) was delivered to the temple. Today, similar performances are also held in other towns, but this Bonfire Noh is believed to have originated in this temple in 869.

The Noh actors wear lacquer-coated wooden masks and are dressed in gorgeous costumes. Yet the actors never express emotions vocally. The music played by flutes and drums is also very simple and the theatrical stage is characterized by its mystical beauty. On the festival days, you can also see traditional comic drama which used to be performed during the intervals of the Noh. In contrast to the Noh which consists mainly of songs and dance, the traditional drama is performed by spoken lines and comical movements, often making the audience laugh.

If you wish to have a good look, we recommend that you arrive there early for a seat with a clear view. You can also reserve seats by buying either a 1-day ticket costing 3,500 yen or a 2-day ticket which costs 5,000 yen. For more information about tickets, please contact the Nara City Tourist Association.

On the same dates, Noh is also performed at the Kasuga Taisha Shrine in Kasugano-cho, Nara City. May 11th features a ceremony called Shushi Hashiri-no-Gi in the Maiden dance-hall and on May 12th, a ceremony known as Miyashiro Agari-no-Gi is staged in Wakamiya-jinja Shrine. The performance on the 12th is held on a smaller stage, which means that unless you take a seat near the stage, you might not be able to have a good view.

Information


[Walk]5 minutes' walk from Nara Station on JR and Kintesu Line.

Event Information

Place: Kofukuji Temple, Nara City
Dates: Third week on Friday and Saturday of May
Dates and functions are subject to change without notice. Be sure to check the latest information in advance.
City: Noborioji-cho, Nara City

                                         












Cherry Blossom Spots 

   

Cherry Blossom Forecast 2015
 

Below is a list of Nara's most popular spots for cherry blossom viewing (hanami), including the typical timing for best viewing in the average year and japan-guide.com ratings. See also our nationwide list of famous cherry blossom spots.

Nara Park Early April
Starts a five minute walk from Kintetsu Nara Station
Admission: Free
About 1700 cherry trees are planted across spacious Nara Park, outnumbering the deer by around 500. One of the most pleasant hanami spots in the park is a large lawn encircled by cherry trees, a short walk southeast of Todaiji's main hall.

Heijo Palace Early April
15 minute walk from Yamato Saidaiji Station
Admission: Free
Quite a few cherry trees are planted on the large grounds of the former Heijo Palace, making for some pleasant picnic opportunities. Because the trees are quite exposed to the weather, they follow a blooming schedule which is typically a couple of days behind that of the trees in nearby Nara Park.


 
 

Wakakusayama Early April
30-40 minute walk from Kintetsu Nara Station
150 yen, 9:00 to 17:00
Wakakusayama is the grass covered hill behind Nara Park that gets lit on fire every January in the spectacular Yamayaki festival. Cherry trees are planted besides the hiking trail along the edge of Wakakusayama's main slope, allowing for some nice photos of cherry blossoms in combination with the city behind.

Ratings:    best of the best    best of Japan    outstanding

Any Questions? Ask them in our question forum.

How to get there



Tourch Festival in Nigatsu-do ,Todaiji 

 Omizutori          

This event goes back 1,000 years. Buddhist priests draw up healing waters and run about with huge pine torches.

Priests at Todai-ji Temple, famous for its enormous statue of Buddha, confess their sins before the Eleven-faced Kannon enshrined in Nigatsu-do Hall, and also pray for world peace and a rich harvest for 14 consecutive days. This ritual, called Shuni-e, has continued since 752.

During this period, an event known as Otaimatsu is really worth seeing. Priests run to and fro along the corridors of Nigatsu-do waving huge pine torches. It is believed that if you are showered with these fire sparks, you will be protected from evil things.

The Omizutori, the highlight of this event, is performed early on the morning of the 13th. Water which only springs forth in front of the temple building on this very day is drawn up and offered to the Buddhist deities. This water is said to have special powers for curing all disease.

This spring water is believed to reach Todai-ji after passing underground for more than 10 days from Obama City, Fukui Prefecture. Even today, the Omizuokuri ceremony is performed on March 2nd at Jingu-ji Temple in Fukui Prefecture to see off the departure of the divine water.

Water that has been drawn up is poured into a pot the following day, and to this pot they add water taken from a different pot which has been continuously replenished for over 1,200 years - the resulting mixture being preserved anew.

Information


[Walk]5 minutes' walk from Daibutsuden Kasuga-Taisha-mae bus stop.Daibutsuden Kasuga-Taisha-mae bus stop is on the Shinai-Junkan Bus route from JR Kintetsu Nara Station.

Event Information

Place: Todai-ji Temple
Dates: March 1st-14th
Dates and functions are subject to change without notice. Be sure to check the latest information in advance.
City: Zoshi-cho, Nara City














 












 






 









Naraiger, the Super Man of Nara, JAPAN
Once upon a time, the Hero of Yamato was born deep in the holy mountain forest of Kasuga.
As an eco fighter, he fought against the ambitions of the 'pollution empire' to pollute
 the rich natural Yamato Nara environment and conquer the earth thus protecting beautiful Yamato Nara and the earth.
Littering, which causes environmental destruction and is a breach of social manners by self centered, selfish people, is intolerable.
The hero uses 2 horns known as hyper horns to listen to people's cries for help!
He also has “somen flash” and “shika sen flash” powers! However he needs to eat Radzukena which is a hyper food that he eats to recharge his strength and energy!
Littering shall not be tolerated!!!


 





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