DHuB | Room 2

EXHIBITION ROOM 2 | PARTICIPATING PROJECTS CREATED BY THE STUDENTS OF THE TUC SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

PROJECT 01

CANDY SCAPES

DESIGN TEAM:

PANAGIOTA ATHANAILIDI, ERIANNA GEROMITSOU, DIMITRIS KOUDOUNAKIS, AVRA TOMARA, GEORGE VELIVASAKIS

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

The “Candy Scapes” project deals with forms of pollution in the contemporary metropolis, produced by sound, light and CO2 emissions. A large number of turbine-based devices are placed within the cityscape, on existing urban infrastructure, such as street and traffic lights and under certain environmental and atmospheric conditions they absorb CO2 and produce a new cotton-candy-like material through a specified chemical process. Due to its crystallized structure, this new material floats in the air on different levels above the streets, filtering light and sound. When the sound and light conditions in the city reach an acceptable level, the Candy Scapes devices stop temporarily to work. At the same time the material already produced is being gradually decomposed.

REFERENCED PROJECT IN THE ECOREDUX ARCHIVE: 

No 93 | SPACE FORM MANIPULATION by Wolf Hilbretz and Joseph Mathis (1973)

PROJECT 02

CAVE_CUBE

DESIGN TEAM:

GEORGIOS ANDREASAKIS, HARA CHRISTOPOULOU, EIRINI KALOGEROPOULOU,                      MICHALIS  KANTARZIS, DIMITRIOS VAIMAKIS

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

Digging indicates reversion to a primitive way of familiarizing oneself with space. The act of removing -or pushing- the existing in order to re-construct what is needed constitutes an honest approach towards space as the users shape it in their own terms, with their own hands, according to their needs and wishes. These are the values of primitive space that were identified and extracted from project Habitat No.3 by Andre Bloc. In this “cavernous shelter” of the “walk-in sculpture” the voids are read like a refuge offered to the user for living and moreover for modifying according to personal preferences. This shelter provides not only protection and serenity but also a space for appeasing stressful feelings, questioning at the same time our everyday living spaces in terms of actual needs, qualities and ingredients. In our interpretation of Bloc’s work, we regard the contemporary city as a place where people are craving to find their own refuge. Trying to bring Habitat’s No.3 qualities up-to-date, we designed a box with flexible components where people are invited to use and transform at will. Placed at random though hard to find spots within the city grid, the box gives people the opportunity to re-evaluate their everyday needs. Seeking to find it presupposes the acknowledgment of the need and intensifies the craving for it, augmenting at the same time the use of the box and the sincerity of the feelings that shape it. Rooftops and other urban voids on various city levels are possible locations. The box itself consists of various layers of innovative material combinations. Its cavernous interior consists of a ductile material that people can manipulate and mold in their attempt to shape an environment of their liking. The box’s façades are comprised of flexible netting which supports planted capsules. When people re-shape, usually by pushing, the interior of the box, their actions are visible on the façade configuration. Moreover, the clay-like interior acts like a sponge in order to channel humidity to the capsules so that the plants are watered. Shaping the inside of the box is not only soothing for the user but it also triggers a simple mechanism devised to help the plantation of the exterior grow. The overall form of the box is in constant transformation. Once activated, it gets rid of the austere city-like form, manifesting a living, growing and ever changing natural environment.

REFERENCED PROJECT IN THE ECOREDUX ARCHIVE: 

No 10 | HABITAT 3 by Andre Bloc (1965)

 

PROJECT 03

THE COW PROJECT

DESIGN TEAM:

NIKOS BATAKIS, MARIEL CREMLIS, DESPINA LINARAKI, VAGGELIS MAISTRALIS, ELENI TSEVA

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

The “Cow_Project” draws its inspiration from the mammal’s unique digestive system comprised of four different parts. This procedure influenced our design program, inspiring a strategy on how to re-distribute cows and their products on a global level -as the 75% of earth’s population does not have access to them- and create new opportunities worldwide. Our proposal consists of “floating structures” upon which cows live and travel around the world. Those structures are actually re-used naval ships, such as aircraft carriers, redesigned to facilitate the cows’ herds. As the 2/3 of the earth’s surface is covered with water, our project deemed it necessary to release the land from congregated pastures and relocate them through design on autonomous ships suitable for grazing animals. Our project’s strategy turns this unfortunate phenomenon to an advantage, just by collecting the cows’ discharges and creatively converting them to an alternative energy source that fuels the floating pasturelands. Each former naval ship will be modified accordingly so as to meet all the necessary specifications that will make a cow’s life on-board harmonious. The floating farms look nothing like the former battle ships but have a new organization pattern similar to a cow’s digestive system. All processes are designed to be mechanized, using contemporary equipment of mechanical systems, sensors and actuators that keep everything in order. Moreover, when a ship anchors to a port, it will gather all useless organic waste from the area for cows to consume.

REFERENCED PROJECT IN THE ECOREDUX ARCHIVE: 

No 17 | COWCICLE by Konrad Frey’s (1967)

 

PROJECT 04

BODY HEAT GENERATED INTERACTIVE SURFACES

DESIGN TEAM:

IOANNIS LIOFAGOS, ELENI ROUPA, ANGELIKI TEREZAKI, FOTEINI FOTOPOULOU

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

The "Body Heat Generated Interactive Surfaces" project reinterprets Michael Webb’s idea by utilizing the heat produced from the human body in order to trigger interactive inflatable surfaces and adjust them so as to facilitate various body actions like relaxing, sleeping, sitting, walking and so on. The surfaces are to be located in public places. A basic pattern is used to divide each surface into smaller cavities of various sizes and properties in order to correspond to a different activity. The design differentiates these cavities into rigid and soft, depending on the body action they are programmed to accommodate. Moreover, small scale Peltier devices are used to convert heat to electricity and emit the resulting cold air to the surrounding environment. The proposed surfaces can easily fold and unfold by deflating and inflating the cavities of the structure, in order to be transported where needed.

REFERENCED PROJECT IN THE ECOREDUX ARCHIVE: 

No 26 |  MAGIC CARPET AND FLUID AIR WALL by Michael Webb (1968)


 

PROJECT 05

AIRPOTITION

DESIGN TEAM:

MARILENA DIMOPOULOU, IASONAS PATERAKIS, ALMA TRALO, DIMITRIS VIDALIS,            GEORGIA VORADAKi

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

Airpotition is a lightweight structure designed specifically to take advantage of the outdoor parts of air conditioner units, which are located on building façades, as well as of their by-products. The project proposes an alternative use of those box-like parts, in order to collect and reuse the amount of condensate water that comes out of each unit when it works as well as to utilize the movement of the fan, transforming its kinetic energy to electrical and storing it for later use. The Airpotition forms a network of independent concave structures, made of metal and carbon fibers that are installed in front of the outdoor parts of the AC units. The part that takes advantage of the fan’s movement is also designed to exploit the wind and stores the produced electric energy to supplement the building’s power supply. Additionally, the collected water is used for the cultivation of hydroponic climbing plants so that gradually a “green” skin is created upon the building façade. As the plants grow, their parts are interwoven with a metal mesh that is placed upon the façade. Each building can have a different “green” skin based on the diversity of the meshes’ form and the types of hydroponic plants used.

REFERENCED PROJECT IN THE ECOREDUX ARCHIVE: 

No 66 |  TREE HOUSE by Stuart Lever (1971)

 

PROJECT 06

BACTERIA_BRICK

DESIGN TEAM:

YIANNIS APOSTOLOPOULOS, TZENY GORANTONAKI, ANNA NERATZOULI, EVANGELIA NTAFA, IOANNA THANOU

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

The project uses the idea of the common brick in order to utilize that useless, non-recyclable material from destroyed buildings, like sand, cement, concrete, natural and artificial aggregates, and so on. Recycled polyethylene terephthalete (PET), or in other words what is left from the huge amount of plastic bottles, is liquefied in order to encase the building debris parts in a block matrix and bind them together. The last component used for the design of the brick is purple bacteria, selected for their ability to capture the toxic dust as well as for the products of their metabolism which can reinforce the tensile properties of the produced brick. Moreover, the selected bacteria are phototrophic and produce energy through photosynthesis. This property implies a capacity that can be further researched in order to produce building parts that will be able to act as independent energy suppliers. In addition, the achievements of recombined DNA technology can be applied in the future to produce a range of bacteria with improved properties that could be used in material technology. In the end, what this project promotes is something more than the object itself; it is the methodology that describes the mechanism inside it. The project presents architecture with the opportunity to create a new world literally and metaphorically by re-using the wreckage of the old one, as well as the achievements of biotechnology. It describes a process that can take place on-site in places where human or natural intervention has brought destruction.

REFERENCED PROJECT IN THE ECOREDUX ARCHIVE: 

No 80 |  RECYCLING BUILDING COMPONENTS (1972)


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