Eco Pest Control




Eco pest control

First, See 
Love Insects,  and Compassionate Pest Control and learn to respect and to like our littlest kin in the animal family.

Then, see the links and information below to find compassionate ways to let the littler o nes around your house know you'd like for them to move elsewhere.

Here are some solutions that are pesticide-free, and compassionate:

for Ants

� Wash countertops, cabinets, and floor with equal parts vinegar and 
water to deter ant infestations. 

� Sprinkle powdered cinnamon o n ant trails. Several types of ants will 
not cross a barrier of cinnamon powder. 

� Use powdered charcoal, bone meal, talcum powder, or chalk as a barrier 
along ant trails. 

� Parrot cage legs can be placed within shallow pans filled with water--like 
small moats that ants cannot cross. 

� If you can find a hole where ants are entering the house, squeeze 
the juice of a lemon into the hole or crack. Then put the lemon peels all 
around the entrance. 

� Grow spearmint, peppermint, pennyroyal, southern wood, and tansy 
plants around the border of your home to deter ants and the aphids that they 
carry. 

Roaches


� Prevention--Close off all cracks around pipes and electric lines 
where roaches enter the house by using cement, screening, or Brillo pads. 
Caulk small cracks along baseboards, walls, cupboards, and around pipes, sinks, 
and bathtub fixtures. Seal food tightly. Rinse food off dishes that are left 
overnight. Do not leave pet food out overnight. 

� Release small geckos in your home and aviary. Provide dishes of water 
for them to drink. They will feast upon the roaches at night in the late evening, 
and sleep out of sight during daylight hours. 

� Cut Hedge Apples (Osage Orange) in half and place several in the 
basement, around in cabinets, or under the house to repel roaches. Osage Orange 
is a fast growing shrub which can be grown as a hedge around homes and aviaries. 

� Baking soda and powdered sugar mixed in equal parts and spread around 
infested area is  non-toxic.

� Diatomaceous earth (DE) can be sprinkled o n areas where roaches are 
seen. Parrots should not breathe the powder as it is being applied in the 
aviary. o ne brand available in natural food markets is "Concern" 
by Necessary Organics Inc. 

� Build a cockroach trap. Smear a thin layer of Vaseline around the 
inside lip of a pint jar to a width of about 2 inches. Place the jar upright, 
with bait inside, in an area frequented by cockroaches. Apple and potato make 
excellent bait for American, smoky-brown, and brown-banded roaches, while 
German roaches prefer banana peel. Change the bait often because fresh food 
is more appealing to roaches. Another trap can be made by dusting the inside 
of a jar lightly with talcum powder and using the same bait food. Roaches 
entering the jar are unable to climb back out over the petroleum jelly or 
talcum powder barrier. Then, take them miles away and release them.

Fleas

� Combine orange peels, grapefruit peels, 3 garlic cloves, 1 tablespoon 
rosemary, (optional) and o ne pint of water in blender. Blend until liquefied. 
Heat mixture o n low heat for 15 minutes. Cool and strain liquid into spray 
bottle. Spray o n pet, and massage thoroughly into pet's coat, avoiding their 
eyes. 

� Vacuum furniture and carpet frequently. Change bags after each use 
or store vacuum cleaner outside of home; clean your pet's favorite sleeping 
spots regularly and sprinkle with fennel or rosemary. A ratio of 1 teaspoon 
vinegar to o ne quart water used as drinking water helps to keep most pets 
free of fleas and ticks. 

� Spread leaves or shavings of Fennel, Rosemary, Red Cedar Shavings, 
Sassafras, Eucalyptus, or Pennyroyal under and around your pets' beds. 

� Dust powdered Rosemary (cooking herb) o nto the pet or areas where 
the pet sleeps. 

� Make a water trap by partially filling a shallow pan with water. 
Suspend light source securely above it. Fleas (and other bugs) are attracted 
to the light and fall into the water and drown. 

SEED MOTHS 

� Freeze bird seeds if possible to kill larvae and store all food in 
airtight containers. 

� Place basil leaves or mint teabags in bags or canisters of bird seed 
to repel moths. 

� Instead of using toxic mothballs in clothing storage areas, use cloves 
which work as well. Place them in cheese-cloth or spice bags and hang them 
in closets or stored bags of clothing. 

� Use 1/2 pound rosemary, 1/2 pound mint, 1/4 pound thyme, and 2 tablespoons 
ground cloves. Mix and put in cheesecloth bags and place in closets or drawers. 


� Make sachets of dried lavender or equal portions of rosemary and 
mint. Place in closets, drawers, or closed containers to mothproof garments. 


FLEAS 

� Combine orange peels, grapefruit peels, 3 garlic cloves, 1 tablespoon 
rosemary, (optional) and o ne pint of water in blender. Blend until liquefied. 
Heat mixture o n low heat for 15 minutes. Cool and strain liquid into spray 
bottle. Spray o n pet, and massage thoroughly into pet's coat, avoiding their 
eyes. 

� Vacuum furniture and carpet frequently. Change bags after each use 
or store vacuum cleaner outside of home; clean your pet's favorite sleeping 
spots regularly and sprinkle with fennel or rosemary. A ratio of 1 teaspoon 
vinegar to o ne quart water used as drinking water helps to keep most pets 
free of fleas and ticks. 

� Spread leaves or shavings of Fennel, Rosemary, Red Cedar Shavings, 
Sassafras, Eucalyptus, or Pennyroyal under and around your pets' beds. 

� Dust powdered Rosemary (cooking herb) o nto the pet or areas where 
the pet sleeps. 

� Make a water trap by partially filling a shallow pan with water. 
Suspend light source securely above it. Fleas (and other bugs) are attracted 
to the light and fall into the water and drown. 

FLIES 

� To prevent flies, keep kitchen garbage tightly closed. Sprinkle dry 
soap powder or flakes into garbage cans after they have been washed and allowed 
to dry. 

� In a small glass or jar, pour about o ne inch of real cider or red 
wine. Make a cover with saran wrap and a rubber band. Punch about six holes 
with a bamboo skewer or other shaper object. Flies will crawl in but cannot 
crawl out. 

� Scratch the skin of an orange or grapefruit and leave it out; the 
citrus acts as a repellent. 

� Hang muslin cloth bags of cloves to repel flies. 

� Mint planted around the home or grown in pots indoors repels flies. 


� Basil plants help to repel flies. Water potted plants from the bottom 
to produce a stronger scent. 

� Dried ground leaves of basil left in small bowls or hung in muslin 
bags are also effective. 

� The bruised foliage of the Kentucky Coffee Tree when sprinkled with 
sweetened water will attract and kill flies. 


MOSQUITOES 

� For prevention, encourage natural predators such as dragonflies or 
praying mantises, bats, or swallows.

� Eliminate pools of stagnant water. 

� Avoid wearing perfume, bright colors, flowery prints, and bright 
jewelry as these items attract mosquitoes. 

� Burn citronella candles to repel insects. 

� Plant tansy or basil around the patio and house to repel mosquitoes. 


� Neem products repel and affect the development of mosquitoes. Two 
percent neem oil mixed in coconut oil, when applied to exposed body parts, 
provides complete protection for twelve hours from bites of all anophelines. 


OUTDOOR PEST CONTROL

SLUGS AND SNAILS 

� Garter snakes, grass snakes, ground beetles, box turtles, salamanders, 
ducks, and larvae of lightning bugs all feed o n snails. 

� Place overturned clay flower pots near the shady side of a plant. 
Rest o ne edge o n a small twig or make sure that the ground is irregular enough 
for the slugs and snails to crawl under the rim. They will collect there during 
the warmest pan of the day. Remove slugs and snails regularly and drop in 
a bucket of  water. 

� Snails avoid protective borders of sand, lime, or ashes. 

� Protect young plants by encircling them with a food can with both 
ends removed. Push the bottom of the can into the soil. 

� Snails avoid garlic, chives, and wormwood plants and spices. 

MICE 

From The Buggy Professor's "CLUB THE BUGS & SCARE THE CRITTERS"

by Dr. Myles H. Bader

"Rodents, and especially mice, are allergic to OIL OF PEPPERMINT and 
will not frequent areas where they can smell it. Place o nLY A FEW DROPS of 
oil of peppermint o n a piece of cotton and place it where there is a mouse 
problem. Use o nly the "real" oil of peppermint -- NOT peppermint 
extract -- for best results.

MOLES 

� Blend o ne tablespoon castor oil and two tablespoons liquid detergent 
until the mixture is like shaving cream. Add six tablespoons water and whip 
again. Keep this mixture out of the reach of children and pets. Fill a garden 
sprinkling can with warm water. Add 2 tablespoons of the oil mixture and stir. 
Sprinkle immediately over the areas of greatest mole infestation. For best 
results, apply after a rain or thorough watering. 

GENERAL PEST REMEDIES 

� Diatomaceous earth (DE) can be sprinkled o n areas where pests are 
found. It contains the spent shells of tiny sea creatures that are sharp enough 
to damage the exoskeleton and cause insects to dehydrate. DE is harmless to 
humans and animals. Some insect eggs also are susceptible to the dehydrating 
power of DE which has a drying effect o n ants, roaches, fleas and ticks. DE 
is widely recognized as safe for use around pets and humans. Parrots should 
not breathe the powder as it is being applied in the aviary. o ne brand available 
in natural food markets is "Concern" by Necessary Organics. 

� The most effective insecticide that instantly kills flying and crawling 
insects o n contact but does no harm to mammals or birds is the dried and crushed
flowers of the Pyrethrum Plant. This brown powder will kill or stun the insects 
the moment it touches them but does no harm to pets when sprinkled o n their 
coats. This member of the daisy family is a beautiful ornamental and will 
complement any garden or flower bed. While very effective, the dried powder 
only lasts for o nly a few days. You can prolong its use throughout the year 
by freezing fresh flower heads in zip-lock bags and drying and crushing them 
as needed. 

� Neem--the seed kernels of the neem tree (Azadirachta indica, Meliaceae) 
are rich in limonoids, bitter tasting chemicals that effectively block development, 
feeding and egg laying in many species of insects. The most powerful limonoid 
(azadirachtin) has been certified by health authorities in the USA and Europe 
as being non-toxic to birds, animals and humans, but highly effective against 
insects. It has been registered for pest control in the US and in several 
other countries. Azadirachtin does not have a knock-down effect o n insects 
but acts against an insect's sense of taste and so disrupts its feeding and 
egg-laying. 

� Ivory liquid dishwashing detergent, diluted with water to a 1 to 
2% solution, provides insect control o n many plants and is easy to mix. Spray 
plants until they are drenched. 


� Frogs, spiders, ladybugs, praying mantis, and dragon flies will help 
to reduce pest populations around the home and garden. 

� o ne bat will eat up to 600 mosquitoes, harmful moths and other insect 
pest per hour at night. Bats do not attack people or harm pets and can be 
encouraged to inhabit "bat houses" o n your property. See 
Beautiful Bats.




products listings

http://www.ecosafetyproducts.com/Natural-Pest-Control-IPM-s/8.htm?gclid=CPm4rJ7LzYUCFR-7IgodgFXr0w


From AskCarla.com, the Compassionate Caring Consumer Genius

I have an ant problem. I�d rather not kill the ants, but I do want to get rid of them. What should I do?

Avoid using insect sprays. Pesticides are the number two cause of household poisonings in the U.S., as people and companion animals breathe in the toxic air. The best way to keep ants out of your house safely and naturally is by using products you may have in your kitchen cabinets right now. Try pouring a line of cream of tartar, red chili powder, paprika, or dried peppermint at the place where you think ants might be entering the house; they won�t cross it. You can also try washing countertops, cabinets, and floors with equal parts vinegar and water. To keep insects out in the first place, fill holes and cracks in walls with caulk or white glue. Finally, probably the most important thing you can do is to avoid giving insects a food supply, by keeping living areas clean. Be careful to sweep up crumbs, wash dishes immediately, store food in tightly sealed containers, and empty garbage frequently.

  What about insects and other �pests�?

All animals have feelings and have a right to live free from unnecessary suffering�regardless of whether they are considered "pests" or "ugly."

As with our dealings with our fellow humans, the determination of when lethal defense against insects and animals is acceptable must be judged o n a case-by-case basis, taking into account the level of the threat and the alternatives that are available. As Albert Schweitzer o nce said "Each of us must live daily from judgment to judgment, deciding each case as it arises as wisely and mercifully as we can."

We realize that aggressive methods of defense must sometimes be resorted to under dire circumstances, whether the attacker is a flea, a bear, or a knife-wielding mugger. But PETA encourages nonlethal methods of insect and rodent control whenever possible.

Fortunately, you can control most insects safely and naturally with products that you probably have in your kitchen cabinets right now.

Ants in your kitchen, bathroom, or basement? Pour a line of cream of tartar, red chili powder, paprika, or dried peppermint at the place where ants enter the house�they won�t cross it. You can also try washing countertops, cabinets, and floors with equal parts vinegar and water.

If cockroaches have moved in, place whole bay leaves in several locations around the infested rooms, including inside kitchen cabinets. Bay leaves smell like dirty socks to cockroaches! For a serious infestation, you may need to resort to an insect growth regulator, called Gentrol, which nips the cockroach reproductive cycle in the bud. (Cockroaches exposed to it produce sterile offspring.)

Mosquitos have few friends when the weather heats up .Taking B-complex vitamings or eating brewer�s yeast daily (including taking it in tablet form) during the summer months will help keep you mosquito-bite-free. Oil of citronella and oil of pennyroyal mint are both effective repellents when diluted with vodka or vegetable oil and dabbed o n the skin. Mosquitos also hate the smell of fresh basil, so consider placing a few basil plants around your house.

A humane and great-smelling alternative to mothballs is to place cedar chips around clothes or store sachets made out of dried lavender or equal parts dried rosemary and mint in drawers and closets. To repel flies, hang clusters of cloves in a room, or leave an orange skin out. Click here to view PETA�s factsheet o n safely combatting fleas.

Are there spiders sharing your home? If you must evict them, carefully trap them in an inverted jar and release them outside. If you find predators such as ladybugs, snakes, and praying mantises in your yard or garden, the best policy is to let them stay�they�ll help eliminate other "pests."

Whatever you do, don�t buy cruel glue traps to catch mice. Mice die slowly in these sticky contraptions, breaking tiny limbs in an effort to escape or suffocating to death when their faces become mired in the glue. See PETA�s factsheet o n glue traps for more information. Visit PETAMall.comto order a humane box trap that can be used to release mice, unharmed, outdoors.

Don�t give insects or rodents a food supply; keep living areas clean. Be careful to sweep up crumbs, wash dishes immediately, store food in tightly sealed containers, and empty garbage frequently. Often this will be enough to make unwelcome guests move o n in search of better accommodations. Prevent insects and mice from entering your home in the first place by filling holes and cracks in walls with white glue or caulk.

Some More Eco Pest Control Links

The Very Easiest Bug Control?
A library at Yale rid itself of roaches merely by turning the heating off in winter: the "powerful US pest-control industry" would, apparently, rather you didn't know about 
this

Compassionate Pest Control

Eco Pest Control

Love Insects

The Mother of All Brains

http://www.bugrepel.com/

http://www.landofvos.com/articles/wingtips/safepest.html

http://www.safesolutionsinc.com/


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