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Track25: Social Media and Society

Track Chairs

Hanna Krasnova, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany, krasnovh@wiwi.hu-berlin.de
Natasha Veltri, University of Tampa, United States of America, nveltri@ut.edu
Christy Cheung, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong, ccheung@hkbu.edu.hk

Description

A myriad of social media platforms have emerged in recent years on the Internet and became popular (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Wikipedia, etc). These platforms rely on individual users for content creation and their success hinges on active user involvement and participation. As social media permeates all spheres of our lives, these applications transform the society we live in today: they change the way we develop friendships, communicate with each other, work, procure goods and services, obtain information and spend our free time. Recent developments in the Middle East and North Africa showcased the power of social media to incite political and social change.

Despite the ubiquitous nature of social media, the role and long-term consequences of these individual and societal transformations are not clear. On the one hand, proponents argue that digitally-enabled social media applications promote creation of bridging and bonding social capital, result in increased interconnectedness, and create unprecedented opportunities for collective action. Overall, by facilitating interpersonal communication and access to information, social media can create significant benefits at both individual and societal levels. On the other hand, opponents express strong concerns over the dangers of intense social media involvement. For example, looking at the sheer quantity and the sensitivity of the information users disclose, stakeholders express strong privacy concerns, fearing the potential misuse of the user data by various parties. Indeed, marketers, insurance companies, security agencies, human resource departments, stalkers and crooks can get access to the information one shares and use it to the detriment of the users. Even Facebook “friends” can inadvertently (or often on purpose) share one’s private details across their social graph. Beyond threatening user privacy, participation in social applications, sharks user free time, results in workplace cyberloafing, breeds envy and jealousy towards one’s friends and partner; causes feelings of inadequacy, depression, alienation, and can even lead to study underperformance, overspending and drug abuse.

Considering both positive and negative impacts of social media, policy-makers find themselves confronted with a complex choice of whether these platforms should be regulated and, if so, how. Even though a broad stream of research has emerged in recent years examining individual and organizational use of social media, the variety of social media applications continues to grow as does their use. In line with the overall conference theme “Beyond borders” this track seeks submissions examining the role social media plays in individual lives and beyond in the society at large. We especially encourage research that reaches out beyond IS theories, is grounded in multiple reference disciplines and applies new intriguing perspectives to document and understand the consequences (both negative and positive) and impact of social media use on society and individual. All methodological approaches are welcomed, including, but not limited to, qualitative studies, case studies, empirical studies, longitudinal studies as well as conceptual papers.

Full and research-in-progress papers can be submitted to this track.

Topics of interest

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
  •  social media and society
  • privacy management on social media
  •  social media and public policy
  •  social media and addiction
  •  social media and school performance
  •  social media and envy
  •  social media and jealousy
  •  social media and cyberloafing
  •  social media and information overload
  •  dark sides of social media
  •  social media in organizations
  •  social media and new social norms
  •  social media and consumer behaviour
  •  social media and social capital
  •  social media and civil action
  •  online communities and social support
  •  social media trends and issues

Associate Editors

Aschoff, Robinson, University of Zurich, Switzerland
Brauer, Claudia, Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien, Austria
Chang, Ludwig, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong
Eckhardt, Andreas, Frankfurt University, Germany
Goswami, Suparna, Technische Universität München, Germany
Grange, Camille, University of British Columbia, Canada
Gürses, Seda, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium
Hercheui, Magda, Westminster Business School, UK
Hsu, Carol, National Taiwan University, Taiwan
Ilie, Virginia, California Lutheran University, USA
Klier, Mathias, Universität Regensburg, Germany
Kummer, Tyge-F., Griffith University , Australia
Lee, Young Eun, Fordham University, USA
Lim, Eric T. K., University of Groningen, Netherlands
McNab, Anna, Niagara University, USA
Parrish, James, Nova Southeastern University, USA
Patil, Sameer, Indiana University, Bloomington, USA
Pogrebnyakov, Nicolai,Copenhagen Business School
Richter, Alexander, Bundeswehr University Munich, Germany
Riemenschneider, Cindy, Baylor University, USA
Riemer, Kai, The University of Sydney, Australia
Stefan Seidel, Universität Liechtenstein, Liechtenstein
Shen, Xiao-Liang, Wuhan University, China
Shim, J.T., Louisiana Tech University, USA
Stanoevska-Slabeva, Katarina, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland
Strano, Michele, Bridgewater College, USA
Tan, Chee-Wee, University of Groningen, Netherlands
Thadani, Dimple, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Trkman, Peter, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
Von Stetten, Alexander, Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg, Germany
Widjaja, Thomas, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany
Winkler, Till, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany
Xiao, Bo Sophia, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong
Zhang, Kem Z.K. University of Science and Technology of China, China

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