10 things to do first in Xubuntu 16.04.x LTS Xenial Xerus


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Congratulations, you have installed a brand new Xubuntu 16.04.x Xenial Xerus! What's best for you to do first of all?

I have divided the actions into three categories:
- the absolutely essential ones (part 1);
- the recommended ones (not essential, part 2);
- and the maybe useful (part 3).

It's quite a list, but it'll give you a polished, nearly maintenance-free operating system that you'll be able to enjoy for years to come! Plus it's also a crash course in the use of Xubuntu.

Note: you'll find only relatively safe tips and tweaks here, because I think that the stability and reliability of your operating system should never be endangered. This website is serious about Xubuntu, so my approach is conservative.

I try to mention it whenever some risk is unavoidable, so that you can always make a balanced decision.

Note: this list is only meant for Xubuntu; the corresponding list for Ubuntu is here and the list for Lubuntu is here.

Do the following things, in this order:

Tip: you can download a checklist here, which you can print on paper. Then you can strike the items that you've done.

Are you unsure what Xubuntu version you have? You can check that as follows:

Launch a terminal window:
Menu button - Accessories - Terminal Emulator

Type (use copy/paste in order to avoid typing errors):
lsb_release -a

Press Enter.

Note: in the output you see then, Xubuntu is wrongly being identified as Ubuntu, but that's not important: it's the version number that counts.



Part 1

TEN ESSENTIAL ACTIONS:


Apply all available updates

1.1. First the updates, then the rest...

Click on the menu button (mouse icon) on the left in the upper panel - Settings - Software Updater

Let Software Updater check for available updates and apply them all.

Note: when you install updates by means of the red or orange notification icon in the system tray, then it's best not to choose directly for Install all updates. Because what follows is often confusing (the process may seem to stall, especially when large amounts of updates are involved), which regularly causes misunderstandings.

It's therefore better to choose Show updates first, and install the updates from the window that you get then.

Afterwards reboot your computer (not always necessary, but in this case, do it just to make sure).

Install missing drivers

1.2. Installing drivers is usually not necessary, because they are already present in the Linux kernel. Exceptions are printer drivers and proprietary restricted drivers for (among others) Nvidia graphics cards.

a. Install your printer and scanner in this way (*Click*).

b. For optimal performance of your Nvidia graphics card, or your Broadcom wireless card, you'll want to install the closed source restricted driver (the proprietary non-free driver). Like this:

Click on the menu button (mouse icon) on the left in the upper panel - 
Settings - Software & Updates - tab Additional Drivers.

When available for your system, you'll be shown one or more installable (usually non-free) drivers. Select them.

The required drivers are then automatically downloaded from the internet, from the software repositories of Xubuntu, and (also automatically) installed. Afterwards you will have to do a full reboot of your computer.

Note: Sometimes you're being offered several versions of the restricted driver for your video card. The order of preference is as follows:

1. nvidia-(from highest number to lowest number)
2. nvidia-(from highest number to lowest number)-updates
3. nvidia-experimental

Only choose from the versions that you're being offered, because only those support your video card! Start with the preferred number one, and only work your way down when it doesn't perform well.

Do you have a brand-new graphics card from Nvidia? Then it might be too new for the version of the proprietary restricted driver in the software repositories of Ubuntu. In that case you won't be offered any proprietary driver by Driver Manager.

If this happens, then you can look for another solution for your Nvidia card on this page.


For an AMD/ATI video card you have to stick to the default open source driver. Because the closed AMD Catalyst (fglrx) drivers are not compatible with Ubuntu 16.04.x.

These closed fglrx drivers are proprietary and so their code is not available. AMD indicated they no longer wanted to support them and urged their customers to use open-source drivers instead.

If you're using an AMD or ATI GPU in Xubuntu 16.04.x, the operating system will automatically select either the radeon or the amdgpu driver for you, and both of these open-source drivers are installed by default.

Optimize your Solid State Drive (SSD)

1.3. Do you have a Solid State Drive (SSD) instead of a conventional hard disk? Then optimize it for Xubuntu.

Install some useful tools

1.4. There are some useful applications for managing your system, that aren't installed by default: Leafpad, Pavucontrol, gksu, GDebi and Synaptic.

Synaptic and GDebi are useful installation tools, which sometimes are more useful than the default application Software.

Leafpad is a fine text editor for editing configuration files.

Pavucontrol is a fine tool for managing sound.

gksu enables you to use Leafpad and other graphical tools safely as root.

Install them by means of the application Software. Or by the terminal, which is much quicker:

Menu button - Accessories - Terminal Emulator

Type (use copy/paste to transport this magical incantation to the terminal, it's one line):

sudo apt-get install gksu leafpad synaptic gdebi p7zip-rar pavucontrol

Press Enter. When prompted, type your password. Your password will remain entirely invisible, not even dots will show, this is normal.
Press Enter again.

Decrease the swap use (important!)

1.5. This is especially noticeable on computers with relatively low RAM memory (2 GB or less): they tend to be far too slow in Xubuntu, and Xubuntu accesses the hard disk too much. Luckily, this can be helped.

Note: does your computer have 4 GB RAM or more? Then you can skip this item, because with so much RAM you probably won't notice any benefits from applying it.

On the hard disk there's a separate partition for virtual memory, called the swap. When Xubuntu uses the swap too much, the computer slows down a lot.

Xubuntu's inclination to use the swap, is determined by a setting. The lower the setting number, the longer it takes before Xubuntu starts using the swap. On a scale of 0-100, the default setting is 60. Which is much too high for normal desktop use, and only fit for servers.

A detailed explanation can be found here (link dead? Then download this pdf file with the same content).

Now the how-to:

a. First make sure that you have installed the applications gksu and leafpad:

Menu button - Accessories - Terminal Emulator

Type (use copy/paste):
sudo apt-get install gksu leafpad

Press Enter and submit your password. Please note that the password will remain invisible, not even asterisks will show, which is normal.

b. Now check your current swappiness setting. Type in the terminal (use copy/paste):
cat /proc/sys/vm/swappiness

Press Enter.

The result will probably be 60.

c. To change the swappiness into a more sensible setting, type in the terminal (use copy/paste):
gksudo leafpad /etc/sysctl.conf

Press Enter.

Scroll to the bottom of the text file and add your swappiness parameter to override the default. Copy/paste the following two green lines:

# Decrease swap usage to a more reasonable level
vm.swappiness=10

d. Close the text file and reboot your computer.

e. After the reboot, check the new swappiness setting:

Menu button - Accessories - Terminal Emulator

Type (use copy/paste):
cat /proc/sys/vm/swappiness

Press Enter.

Now it should be 10.

Note: if your hard disk is an SSD, your machine will benefit from an even bigger decrease in swappiness. That's because too many write actions, like frequent swapping, reduce the lifespan of an SSD. For an SSD I advise a swappiness of 1. Also check these tips for optimizing an SSD for your Linux.

Install full multimedia support

1.6. Completing multimedia support in Xubuntu is easy.

a. Establish internet connection.

b. Now you're going to install "Xubuntu restricted extras". This contains a lot of various software, among which Microsoft fonts, Adobe Flash Player and mp3 playback support. Also it contains a series of gstreamer plugins, which are supporting files for mediaplayers.

Open a terminal window:
Menu button - Accessories - Terminal Emulator

Avoid errors: use your mouse to "copy and paste" this green line into the terminal:

sudo apt-get install xubuntu-restricted-extras

Press Enter. When asked, type your password and press Enter again. Your password will remain entirely invisible, not even dots will show, this is normal.

Now you'll be presented with a dialog in the terminal from Microsoft(!), requiring you to accept the license agreement for the Microsoft fonts.

Activate the OK button with the Tab key, press Enter and use the Tab key again to activate the Yes button in the next dialog. Press Enter again.


When the installation is finished, you can close the terminal window.

c. If you want to be able to play encrypted DVD's, you'll have to install support for it. Copy and paste this green line into the terminal:

sudo apt-get install libdvd-pkg

Press Enter. When asked, type your password and press Enter again. Your password will remain entirely invisible, not even dots will show, this is normal.

Now you'll be presented a couple of times with confirmation requests. Accept all requests.

d. Then copy and paste this green line into the terminal:

sudo dpkg-reconfigure libdvd-pkg

Press Enter. When asked, type your password and press Enter again. Your password will remain entirely invisible, not even dots will show, this is normal.

Again, you'll be presented a couple of times with confirmation requests. Accept them all. Note: this may take a while, especially on weak hardware. Wait patiently until it has finished.

Turn on the firewall

1.7. The firewall is disabled by default, but in many cases it's better to turn it on. The how-to and the explanation can be found here.

Disable the upgrade button

1.8. Some months after a new Xubuntu LTS version has arrived, you'll receive a notification of that in the window of the Software Updater. That window then contains a button that you can use to upgrade your current Xubuntu LTS version (e.g. 16.04) to a newer LTS version (e.g. 18.04).

That looks easy, but I advise against using this button. So it's better to disable this notification entirely. You can disable it as follows:

Click on the menu button (mouse icon) on the left in the upper panel - Settings - Software & Updates

Click on the tab Updates

Notify me of a new Ubuntu version: set it to: Never

Note: on the tab Developer Options, do not enable "xenial-proposed"! Because that would make your system unstable and buggy.

Avoid 10 fatal mistakes!

1.9. There are 10 mistakes that you definitely want to avoid, for the sake of the health of your system.

Solve some known bugs

1.10. If you have a problem: look at the solutions for 17 bugs in Ubuntu. Don't skip this, when you have some problem! There's a big chance that you'll benefit from at least one of the workarounds presented at that page.....


Part 2

TWELVE RECOMMENDED ACTIONS (NOT ESSENTIAL):


Improve the settings of the updates

2.1. You can improve the configuration of the updates as follows.

Click on the menu button (mouse icon) on the left in the upper panel - Settings - Software & Updates

Click on the tab Updates

When there are security updates: change it into: Display immediately

Reason: it's always better when updates don't get installed automatically. Even when they're security updates. Because there's always the risk that an update might cause a problem (regression).

If you always install updates consciously, then you'll know immediately when a regression hits your system. So you can act rightaway to fix that problem.

Note: on the tab Developer Options, do not enable "xenial-proposed"! Because that would make your system unstable and buggy.

Clean up your desktop

2.2. By default, there are icons on your desktop for every partition on your hard disk. Long ago this was the same in Ubuntu, but if you've got many partitions, it's a messy sight.

Clean up the icon mess on your desktop:

Right-click on your desktop - Desktop Settings... - tab Icons: uncheck everything except the Trash.

Note: for this to have full effect, you may have to reboot your computer (or log off and on again).

There is however a small disadvantage to this: now you have to mount other hard drive partitions by clicking on them in the side panel of the file manager.

Optimize Firefox

2.3. With a couple of changes in the settings, you can improve the performance of Firefox in Xubuntu. These tweaks will make this fine web browser leaner and cleaner.

Tune Libre Office

2.4. You can tweak Libre Office like this.

Tame your mouse and touchpad

2.5. Your mouse and touchpad can perform better. Like this:

Menu - Settings - Mouse and Touchpad
Pointer speed: set the acceleration higher, to 4 (or thereabouts).

Click the Close button.

Furthermore, it's convenient to disable the touchpad (trackpad) of your laptop during typing, and tweak the delay. Especially on small laptops.

That's easy to configure:

a. First entirely undo any current disabling, because Xubuntu's ordinary tool disables mouse pointer movements as well, which is unnecessary and cumbersome:

Click on the menu button (mouse icon) on the left in the upper panel - 
Settings - Mouse and Touchpad

Click on the tab Touchpad

General: make sure the following option is not ticked:
Disable touchpad while typing

Close the mouse and touchpad settings window.

b. Now create a modified startup application:

Click on the menu button (mouse icon) on the left in the upper panel - 
Settings - Session and Startup

Click the tab Application Autostart

click Add

c. Fill out the fields as follows (use copy/paste, that's easiest):

Name:
Syndaemon

Description:
Disable touchpad while typing, with a reasonable delay and only for tapping and scrolling

Command:
syndaemon -i 1.0 -K -R -t

Click OK.

d. Reboot your computer (or log out and log in again).

e. Finally, check whether it's working, with the help of the following terminal command (copy/paste the line below in a terminal and press Enter):
ps aux|grep syndaemon

Note: this is a user preference, so repeat this in every user account.

Install an extra web browser

2.6. It's useful to have an extra web browser available. Firefox is a fine application, but now and then (especially when you've installed too many extensions or add-ons in Firefox), it doesn't function entirely well.

An excellent alternative to Firefox, is web browser Google Chrome. Unfortunately it's not in the software sources of Ubuntu, but you can download its 64-bit installer from the download page of Chrome.

That web page should automatically recognize that you're running Xubuntu: it should offer you a preselected installer for Debian/Ubuntu.

Double-click the installer, which has the extension .deb, as if it were a .exe installer in Windows. Then it'll install itself automatically.

Furthermore, it'll add the software source for Chrome to your software sources list, so that Update Manager will automatically offer you updates for Google Chrome as soon as they become available.

Note: do you have a 32-bit operating system? Then you can't install Google Chrome. In that case select Chromium, which can be installed by means of the application Software.

Most plug-ins that you've installed for Firefox (not the add-ons and extensions, but things like Java) work automatically in Chrome as well. No need for further action for that. Not even for Adobe Flash Player, because Chrome already contains it by default.

You can find tips and tweaks for Chrome and Chromium here.

Disable the fast user switch

2.7. It's possible to switch from one user account to another, by means of the button called "Switch Users" in the menu. It's best to avoid that button, because this might lead to unexpected malfunctions.

Furthermore, it's technically much better to simply log off from user account A before logging into user account B. For the simple reason that only then you have full system power available, for the user account that you're using.

You can remove the switch button like this:

In your desktop panel, right-click on the Menu button - Properties
Tab Commands: remove the tick for: Switch Users

Note: user preference, so repeat this in each user account.

(continued in the column on the right)


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Enable the key combination Ctrl+Alt+Backspace

2.8. Xubuntu almost never freezes. But when it does happen, it's often enough to perform a "partial reboot" (only the graphical environment). That's technically better than a hard reboot by the physical power button.

For a partial reboot you can enable the key combination Ctrl+Alt+Backspace. That used to be enabled by default, but some time ago the wise Linux gurus have unfortunately deemed it better that you have to enable it first.

In Xubuntu you can enable it as follows:

a. First make sure that you have installed the applications gksu and leafpad.

b. Now type in the terminal (use copy/paste to avoid errors):
gksudo leafpad /etc/default/keyboard

Press Enter. Your password will remain entirely invisible, not even dots will show, this is normal.

Find the line:
XKBOPTIONS=""

Replace it by this line (use copy/paste):
XKBOPTIONS="terminate:ctrl_alt_bksp"

c. Save the modified file and close it.

d. Reboot your computer.

e. After logging in again, you can test it: Ctrl+Alt+Backspace should reboot only the desktop and throw you back into the login window.

Note: when you log in again after this "partial reboot", you might be confronted with one or more error reports. Strictly speaking, you could safely ignore this error report, because it was triggered by the irregular partial reboot.

But in order to prevent it from returning again and again, go partly along with the report: enter your password and then remove the tick for sending in the error report.

Speed up your Xubuntu

2.9. You can probably speed up your Xubuntu noticeably, by applying these safe speed tweaks (written for Ubuntu, but mostly useful for Xubuntu as well).

Consider to pin the kernel version

2.10. You can pin Xubuntu to a certain kernel version. That may be useful, e.g. when you've manually installed a driver which would become unusable in a newer kernel.

It can also be useful to prevent "disk pollution" because of older kernels, because in the course of time, you get a lot of kernel updates....

The risk of such a pinning of the kernel is limited, especially for desktop users (servers are another matter). Because although kernel updates may contain security fixes, those are almost never relevant for desktop users. Linux Mint doesn't get kernel updates by default, by the way.

If you want to pin the kernel, this is how to do it.

Multiple accounts: prevent other users from accessing the files in your account

2.11. Does your computer have multiple user accounts? Then you can easily prevent other users from accessing and seeing the files in your account, without taking radical measures like encryption. In the following way:

Launch a terminal window.
(You can launch a terminal window like this: *Click*)

Type (copy/paste):

chmod -v 700 $HOME

Press Enter.

Repeat this in each user account that needs the same protection.

Note: this doesn't protect you from someone with root permissions! It won't stop a determined and experienced snooper, but it's an effective measure to "keep the honest people out". If that's not enough for you: encryption of files or even of your entire home folder, is much more secure....

Should you ever wish to undo this (but why?), that's easy as well. For undoing you can use this command:
chmod -v 755 $HOME

Backup your panel

2.12. The panel of Xubuntu can be modified in many ways; sometimes a bit too easily. Therefore it's wise to backup its settings, so you can always quickly restore its previous state. Like this:

Launch a terminal window.
(You can launch a terminal window like this: *Click*)

Type (use copy/paste):
sudo apt-get install xfpanel-switch

Press Enter. Type your password when prompted; this remains entirely invisible, not even dots will show when you type it, this is normal. Press Enter again.

This has installed a fine backup tool for the panel. Then start using it:

Menu button - Settings - Xfce Panel Switch

Below in the application window, backup your current panel settings by clicking on the second button on the left ("Save Configuration").

Note: now you've only made a backup of the settings of the panel in your own user account, so repeat this in all other user accounts (if there are any).


Part 3

TEN NEUTRAL ACTIONS (MAYBE USEFUL):


Repair a display error (window borders that disappear)

3.1. In some rare cases, on certain hardware combinations, you might encounter an annoying bug from time to time: the window borders disappear, leaving you with application windows without window buttons.

Whenever this happens, you can restore normality as follows:

Menu button - Accessories - Terminal Emulator

Type (use copy/paste):
xfwm4 --replace

Press Enter.

With that, you restart the window manager, and then everything is normal again (for the time being).

Note: do NOT use sudo in this particular command line! Because in this case you mess up the permissions when you use sudo, which causes all kinds of mysterious malfunctions.

Lighten up your wallpaper

3.2. The default wallpaper is rather dark and gloomy. Lighten it up with a picture of your own, or select one of the default set of alternative wallpapers: right-click with the mouse on your desktop - Desktop Settings... - and there you see them under the tab "Background".

Move the window buttons to the left

3.3. By default, the window buttons of Xubuntu are placed on the right. Like in Windows. But on the left is far more convenient: like in Ubuntu and Apple Mac OS.

You can move them like this:

Click on the menu button (mouse icon) on the left in the upper panel - 
Settings - Window Manager (not "Window Manager Tweaks"!)

Tab Style:
Button Layout: drag and drop the buttons where you want them.

For example the defaults in Ubuntu:
Close - Hide - Maximize - Title

See the screenshot below (click on it to enlarge it):
https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/first-xubuntu/Screenshot-bb6.png

Add a weather report to the upper panel

3.4. Always handy: a nice weather report in the upper panel of your desktop.

See the screenshot below (click on it to enlarge it):

https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/first-xubuntu/Screenshot-bb3.png

You can add the weather report to your panel like this:

Right-click on the panel - Panel - Add New Items... - click Weather Update - click the Add button. Click Close.

Now configure the new item:
Right-click No Data (in the far right in the panel) - Properties - Tab Location - Location name: click the button Change... and fill out the name of your city, or of a city near you.

Now remove an irritating animation: click on the tab Scrollbox and remove the entries Wind direction (WD) and Wind speed (WS). Click Close.

When you click the item normally (a left-click also), a forecast pops up of the next four days.

Turn Num Lock on automatically

3.5. Does your keyboard (laptop?) have a separate numeric keypad on the right? Then it's useful for Num Lock to be switched on automatically, when you start Xubuntu.

Note: this instruction is only meant for desktops and laptops that have a separate numeric keypad! It's definitely not desirable to have the Num Lock on by default on a laptop that has no such separate keypad.

You can achieve that as follows:

a. Menu - Accessories - Terminal Emulator
Copy/paste the following command into the terminal:

sudo apt-get install numlockx

Reboot your computer. The numeric keypad should turn on automatically after you log into your user account. If not, read on below.

b. It's possible that during login, Xubuntu will turn Num Lock off again (sigh). If that happens, you can counteract that irritating behaviour as follows:

Menu button - Settings - Session and Startup

Click Add

Name:
Numlock on

Command:
sh -c "sleep 20 && numlockx on"

Click OK.

This will turn Num Lock on, 20 seconds after login. This delay is necessary, because you have to make sure it happens after Xubuntu has turned Num Lock off.

Note: user preference: repeat this in each user account.

Remove the option 'save session' from the logout window

3.6. In the logout dialog, you can enable saving the session. But that's generally a nuisance, especially for beginners with Xubuntu. So it's best not to enable this.

a. You can remove old sessions like this:

Menu button - Accessories - Terminal Emulator

Type (use copy/paste):
rm -r -v ~/.cache/sessions/*

Press Enter.

Note: user setting, so repeat this in each user account.

In order to prevent mistakes, you can remove this option from the logout window for all users like this:

b. First make sure that you have installed the applications gksu and leafpad:

Menu button - Accessories - Terminal Emulator

Type (use copy/paste):
sudo apt-get install gksu leafpad

Press Enter and submit your password. Please note that the password will remain invisible, not even asterisks will show, which is normal.

c. Now type in the terminal (use copy/paste to avoid errors):
sudo mkdir -v /etc/xdg/xfce4/kiosk

Press Enter. Type your password when prompted; this remains entirely invisible, not even dots will show, this is normal. Press Enter again.

d. Then copy/paste this command into the terminal:
gksudo leafpad /etc/xdg/xfce4/kiosk/kioskrc

Press Enter.

In that empty text document, copy/paste the following text:
[xfce4-session]
SaveSession=NONE
e. Save the modified file and close it.

f. Reboot your computer. The option for saving the session should have disappeared from the logout screen.

For little RAM: enable zRam

3.7. When your computer has very little RAM (768 MB or less), then the lack of memory will remain a problem, which will cause your system to slow down from time to time. Even when the swappiness has been decreased to 5 (see item 1.5 on this page).

In that case, you might achieve better results by enabling the experimental kernel module zRam. zRam creates a compressed swap file in your RAM. The compression factor is the gain: with that, you "increase" your RAM.

Note: this hack might make your system unstable! So do not apply it on important computers.

The price you pay for this, is threefold:

- Your processor (CPU) is being taxed more heavily, because it'll have to compress and decompress all the time;

- When the system has filled the RAM swap, it'll start swapping on the hard drive as well. With a heavy burden: the chunk of memory that has been sacrificed for the RAM swap.

- For the time being it's still an experimental module, so this extra layer of complexity might cause instability.

That's why, for the time being, I advise zRam only for computers with very little RAM, and even then only in combination with a swappiness that has been decreased to 5. Furthermore, zRam isn't suitable yet for production computers, but only for test machines and other, non-essential computers.

You can install it as follows:

Menu button - Accessories - Terminal Emulator

Type (use copy/paste):
sudo apt-get install zram-config

Press Enter. Type your password when prompted; your password will remain entirely invisible, not even dots will show, this is normal.

Reboot your computer.


Check

Now check whether it works, like this:

Menu button - Accessories - Terminal Emulator

Copy/paste the following terminal command:

cat /proc/swaps

Press Enter.

If all has gone well, you should receive a report about one or more /dev/zram "partitions". zRam is active then; no need for further action.


Removal

When you want to remove zRam, it can't be done by the simple terminal command "apt-get remove". So:

a. Menu button - Accessories - Terminal Emulator

Copy/paste the following terminal command:

sudo apt-get purge zram-config

Press Enter. Type your password when prompted; your password will remain entirely invisible, not even dots will show, this is normal.

b. Reboot your computer.

c. Now check whether the removal has succeeded, like this:

Menu button - Accessories - Terminal Emulator

Copy/paste the following terminal command:

cat /proc/swaps

Press Enter.

If all has gone well, you should receive no report anymore about one or more /dev/zram "partitions".

Access your network disk with Gigolo

3.8. You can use Gigolo to access your network disk (NAS).

Migrate your e-mail from Outlook (Express) in Windows, to Xubuntu

3.9. It's easy to migrate your e-mails and e-mail settings from Outlook (Express) in Windows, to Thunderbird in Xubuntu. Simply apply this how-to.

Trick for shortcuts on the desktop

3.10. In Xubuntu, there's an annoying and useless "protection of the user against himself": whenever you want to launch a newly-made application shortcut on the desktop, Xubuntu issues a warning for that, because.... the file is supposedly in an insecure location!

That's nonsense, of course. So you can simply click "Mark Executable", as shown in the screenshot below:


Want more tips?

4. Do you want more tips and tweaks for Xubuntu? There's a lot more of them on this website! Like these:

Security in Ubuntu and Xubuntu

Four popular myths and 11 tips about wireless security (for wifi)

How to clean Ubuntu and Xubuntu

How to create a strong password that's easy to remember (the answer might surprise you!)

Find help on the Ubuntu forums

5. Xubuntu is an officially recognised derivative of main version Ubuntu.

That's why the regular Ubuntu forums are also available for your help requests concerning Xubuntu. It's convenient though, when you write in your help request that you are using Xubuntu.


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