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MTA – ATA – renfrow – Michael Jackson – addington – delay fundraiser/shim – Kansas city – Kansas=dole – see also early adopter of cellnet – and see also USATTYS

 

note also - phillip perry at dhs counsel - w/ jackson also counsel - and see krongard - schmitz dod - and terry nelson at dod media/PR - krongard/BW

 

perry=cheney son in law, san diego native,

 

Note gray at “human virology inst”

 

note also - had trouble in KC, went to visit umkc, lots of red trucks following, loosened lug nuts

 

RKG=RKG –

ATA – cipac

Trucks and chem -

 

 

 

Renfrow – cwlp – davlin – scrp - scdp

 

was a legislative consultant to the Illinois State Medical Society.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MWTA/MTA=CHAMBER/gray

 

Law council, state chamber joining forces / Merger to take place Jan. 1

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, December 13, 2001

Author/Byline: TIM LANDIS BUSINESS EDITOR
Section: MARKETPLACE
Page: 11

One of the state's oldest business organizations and one of its newest are merging Jan. 1.

Top executives of the Illinois State Chamber of Commerce and the Employment Law Council of Illinois announced the deal at a Statehouse news conference Wednesday, saying the merged organization would give member businesses a stronger say in state politics and legislative issues.

"It will bring a more unified voice to the business community and the process," said Jay Dee Shattuck, president of the Employment Law Council. He was joined by chamber president and CEO Douglas Whitley

The approximately 75 council members, including some of Illinois' largest trade associations, will become members of the state chamber. Shattuck will work on contract with the newly formed chamber arm.

Shattuck has headed the council since its formation in 1997. Member groups include the

Midwest Truckers Association , the

 

Association of Rural Electric Cooperatives,

 

Associated General Contractors, the Illinois Press Association and the

 

 Illinois Lumber and Materials Dealers Association.

He also has held top lobbying positions with the Associated Employers of Illinois, the former

 

Central Illinois Public Service Co. and the Independent Insurance Agents of Illinois. Shattuck also is head of Shattuck & Associates Consulting Inc. in Springfield.

Whitley said Shattuck would specialize in "human resources" issues important to business, including health-care costs, unemployment benefits, workers compensation and workplace mandates.

"Jay has a great reputation in the Capitol and has been in this arena for more than 20 years," Whitley said.

Whitley said the merger would help boost chamber membership, which is down to 3,500 from approximately 5,000 four years ago. Whitley, who was named to the top chamber post in September, said he is concerned that business has become complacent about issues such as health care, unemployment insurance and workers compensation during the booming economy of the past decade.

Those issues will take on new significance now that the state's economy has slowed and businesses are trying to cut costs, he said.

"I think many companies have just been waiting for the chamber to take the initiative," Whitley said.

Memo: ON WEB SITE

 

VOTERS GET A LAST CHANCE TO PICK THE STREETS CHIEF

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, October 29, 1987

Author/Byline: Doug Finke
Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: SPECIAL:ELECTION 1987
Page: 3A

For the last time next week, Springfield voters will elect someone to directly oversee their street repairs, snow-plowing and even their tree

replanting.

They will decide whether Todd Renfrow or Clyde Bunch will be the last person to sit as the elected official once called streets commissioner.

Under the new form of city government, the job title will change -- to director of public works -- and so will the duties, somewhat. Besides the traditional streets and sewer operations, the job now includes the traffic engineering department and Oak Ridge Cemetery, both of which used to be administered by the mayor.

Three years from now, when Springfield's city government evolves to a pure aldermanic form, the public works post will become an appointive one.

For their last selection, voters have a choice between two longtime Democrats. The difference is that Renfrow has the official party backing. He also has the backing of the Republican Party.

 

And he has most of the money, raising $29,000 through the end of August compared to Bunch's $1,800. Compounding Bunch's problems are that he and Renfrow don't always disagree greatly on the issues facing the office. For instance, both say city sewers will be a major problem for the new public works director. Their views differ only in degree.

"The problem is there, but I don't think it is as serious a problem as some say," Bunch said. "I don't believe there is a $30 million problem out there."

Bunch wants to reinspect some city sewers, using equipment the city already owns, before embarking on an upgrading program.

Renfrow says the city does have a major sewer problem, citing already completed studies that say the cost of repairs could hit $30 million.

That does not mean, Renfrow says, that the city should immediately embark on a $30 million repair program. He wants first to see what money can be obtained either through bond refinancing or from state and federal grants before determining what size of program to begin. As a last resort, sewer fees might have to be hiked, he said.

Although basement flooding is largely confined to northeast and southwest sections of the city, both Renfrow and Bunch believe it is the city's responsibility to stop it. Bunch's last-resort financing plan is a hike in the city portion of the sales tax. But he is not convinced that will be necessary.

Both say the penny-a-gallon gasoline tax Ossie Langfelder initiated to finance street resurfacing is here to stay.

Renfrow's major campaign plank is a promise to develop a comprehensive city public works program, a plan that would set priorities for everything from street improvements to sewer upgrades to utility improvements. He says that would mark a major departure from the city's commission system of government, where it was every department for itself and without a lot of coordination.

Renfrow also wants to do more advance planning for the area west of Veterans Parkway, which contains about 6,000 acres on the verge of explosive development.

"We go out west after everything is built up, and then they want to put the expressways through," Renfrow said. "I think we need to lay that out now and let everybodyknow what it's going to be like."

If that is done, Renfrow says, anyone who still chooses to build on busy streets shouldn't expect the city to reroute traffic around them.

Bunch also favors eliminating the idea of "government by expediency." He favors opening several west side streets like Iles Avenue despite the objections of west side residents.

However, Bunch said he's backed off an earlier stand to extend Laurel Street because it "will not serve the biggest purpose."

Bunch says the Streets Department already has the manpower to perform its duties. Renfrow agrees, even though he thinks the city should regionalize its public works operations. He says city employees spend too much time driving equipment from a central garage to remote areas of the city.

Regionalization will not give city officials an excuse to expand payrolls or patronage, he adds. Some people "always say everything we try to do is self-interest or patronage," Renfrow said. "I make the pledge that this can be done without any extra payroll, without any added personnel."

Bunch said he opposes an aggressive annexation policy, even if that means some people end up with free city services, such as street plowing.

"I think annexation should be done by petition by the people living there," Bunch says. "They shouldn't be forced in."

Renfrow also thinks the city should be careful about annexations, but says said the issue is one of cost to the city. The infamous "hole-in-the-doughnut" legislation that briefly brought the Laketown area into the city "would have caused monumental problems," Renfrow said.

"I don't think the city should pursue annexations it can't afford. The major problem (with Laketown) is we can't afford it."

Director of public works Clyde Bunch Age: 51 Occupation: Security guard for the secretary of state's office.

Home: 2118 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive.

Family: Married (Ruth), two children.

Education: Feitshans High School.

Previous public offices: Sangamon County Board member since 1978. Todd Renfrow Age: 53. Occupation: Lobbyist for the Midwest Truckers Association ; owner,

Renfrow Auto Parts.

Home: 43 Bellerive Road.

Family: Married (Helen), three children.

Education: Bachelor's degree, Illinois College.

Previous public offices: None.

 

 

 

BUSINESS GROUPS FEAR TAX WILL COST MILLIONS OF DOLLARS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, December 7, 1988

Author/Byline: Matt Krasnowski
Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: BUSINESS
Page: 26

State business groups fear that a state agency's interpretation of a law will cost them millions of dollars and drive hundreds of jobs from the

state.

The controversy stems from the state Department of Employment Security's requirement that employers pay unemployment insurance taxes for some "independent contractors," who before 1986 were considered exempt from the tax.

A DES official said Monday the department only has improved its auditing and collection enforcement practices and no legal change has been made.

Since 1986, Illinois employers that have been audited by DES have been required to pay back taxes from up to four years ago, plus interest and penalties.

Independent truckers, consultants, accountants, janitorial services, free-lance writers, free-lance photographers, construction workers and physicians were reclassified by DES, said representatives of employer associations opposed to the department's rule.

"Employers statewide are unknowingly facing millions of dollars in back taxes and interest in the state," said Jay Dee Shattuck, president of Associated Employers of Illinois.

Shattuck described DES as "insensitive" to the needs of business and their tax collection tactics "Gestapo-like."

Robert Jasmon, executive vice president of the Midwest Truckers Association , spoke of one Illinois trucking company moving to Missouri after receiving a $10,000 assessment from DES. Two other trucking companies -- one was assessed $200,000 and the other expects an assessment of millions of dollars -- also are contemplating moving out of the state, Jasmon said.

Trucking companies often commission independent truckers to haul their goods.

"These kinds of businesses simply cannot exist with this kind of activity," Jasmon said. DES "has interpreted this particular section of the law in one manner for over 50 years. Without any forewarning, with simply the stroke of the pen in the department, they started doing business differently."

David Bennett of the Illinois Press Association said several small Illinois newspapers will have to stop publishing or cut back news coverage because of DES's action.

Last summer, the General Assembly's Joint Committee on Administrative Rules unanimously agreed DES should stop the collection of unemployment insurance taxes.

The rules committee asked DES to establish a new set of rules to determine who is and who is not an independent contractor.

Jim Bray, spokesman for Gov. James Thompson, said the governor has not formally ruled on the recommendation.

DES Deputy Director Morton Friedman said the stepped-up enforcement on unemployment insurance taxes stemmed from an audit of the department that urged DES to more strictly audit businesses.

 

 

MWTA – boesdorfer - auburn

 

DEREGULATION OF TRUCKING INDUSTRY LEAVES MANY QUESTIONS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, November 27, 1994

Author/Byline: KEVIN McDERMOTT STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: BUSINESS
Page: 59

For Dennis Boesdorfer, the fact Illinois is getting out of the trucking regulation business means a smooth road ahead for the industry.

"I don't see a problem with it myself. I see a good side to it," said Boesdorfer, vice-president of Boesdorfer Trucking in Pleasant Plains, which runs more than 20 trucks. "The paperwork from the (Illinois) Commerce Commission will be gone. I won't miss that a bit.

"A small operation with one or two trucks, I think it will open up some markets for a lot of those people."

Think again, says Dick Flagg, owner of Flagg Trucking & Repair in Riverton. He believes that after Jan. 1, large companies like Boesdorfer's will be poised to barrel right over small companies like his.

"It's going to be a big problem," said Flagg, whose company generally has "five or six" trucks on the road. "I don't think the bigger ones will have any problems -- it's going to be the small companies with the problems."

That conflict -- large vs. small trucking firms -- is only one of the issues looming over Illinois' trucking industry as it prepares to roll free from most state regulations a little over a month from now.

Small companies worry that they won't be able to compete on routes or prices once the industry giants are free to roam Illinois' highways at will. Others have wondered whether roads, customer service and even safety might suffer.

Walking the line between those prospects are state legislators and other officials, many of whom agree with deregulation in principle, but are apprehensive about its effects.

"The lack of free competition has always bothered me," said state Sen.

Karen Hasara, R-Springfield. "The question is, what can we eliminate without hurting companies?" The federal government deregulated interstate trucking more than a decade ago, along with railroads, airlines and certain types of bus routes.

However, states were left with wide authority to regulate intrastate trucking -- that is, trucks taking goods from one point to another point within the same state.

Of the roughly 40 states that regulate intrastate trucking, Illinois' regulatory power is among the strictest. More than 100 staff members under the Illinois Commerce Commission oversee everything from the public filing of prices to the routes the state's 90,000 trucks take.

But earlier this year, Congress passed legislation gutting most powers of the states to regulate trucking within their own borders.

The legislation arose after Federal Express won a court fight in which it claimed it shouldn't be under the thumb of state regulators. FedEx's chief competitor, United Parcel Service, then lobbied for legislation to give other trucking firms the same freedom.

The legislation, signed by President Clinton this fall, goes into effect Jan. 1. What it means for Illinois is that the state government will be able to regulate trucking only on safety issues and a few other limited areas. Economic issues, such as pricing, routes and markets, will no longer be under state control.

"We always felt that (state) regulation helped maintain an orderly way of doing business," said Don Schaefer of the Midwest Truckers Association . "Now, it allows them to haul whatever they want, wherever they want, at any price they want."

The suddenness of the deregulation has stunned many observers, and even pro-business Republicans aren't quite sure how to view it. Still fresh in many minds is the earlier experience of airline deregulation, which drove small airlines out of business, reduced service to small airports and, some claim, compromised air safety.

"We're concerned that will happen with the trucking industry, too," said Hasara, one of many Illinois officials who have found lately that deregulation is easier to push as a philosophy than as a policy.

"We think some of it will be good. It will certainly open up competition," Hasara said. "But we're worried about safety issues, fraud, more truck traffic. And there will definitely be people who will go out of business."

Smaller firms are expected to be particularly vulnerable.

"It's good for (customers), but it's tough on the trucking industry," said Charles Flexter, owner of Char-Lynn Trucking Inc. in Dawson. "I hated to see it come down like that, because we needed some kind of control just to keep people honest."

Flexter, whose company has seven trucks, called deregulation a "free-for-all situation" in which trucking industry giants will expand routes and slash prices, trampling the smaller firms.

"Whether you survive depends on how loyal your shippers are," he said. "Are these (larger) guys going to be around when you need them?" Larry Marek, president of AC Distributing in Springfield, says his company doesn't anticipate any "major impact" from deregulation.

But he said the sizable firm, which operates statewide from five terminals, likely will expand its business as much as deregulation will allow. "We're always going to be aggressive. We're always interested in expanding into new areas."

For the Republican majority about to take over General Assembly, the trucking deregulation issue is especially tricky. It combines one of things the GOP hates most -- federal intrusion into state policy -- with the party's Holy Grail, deregulation. Notably, Gov. Jim Edgar has remained mostly silent on the subject.

For Hasara, even the prospect of laying off as many as 100 state regulators isn't the golden opportunity that other Republicans see, since her district includes a heavy percentage of government employees. The ICC currently plans to lay off as many as 100 of its staff members because of the trucking changes.

"I, for one, want to make sure we're not moving too quickly," she said.

As an alternative, arrangements are being made to transfer about 25 of those regulators -- currently ICC police officers -- to positions with the Illinois State Police. The rest of the workers might also be spared, at least for now.

Ultimately, some might be kept on to regulate areas of trucking not specifically addressed in the federal bill. And initial legal challenges to the bill in other parts of the country might put deregulation on hold anyway.

"I anticipate a bill that leaves everything in place until the beginning of the next fiscal year (which starts July 1)," Hasara said. "We're saying, `Hey, wait a minute, we want to slow down.' The whole issue is in court as to whether Congress can even do what it did."

Others say Illinois should simply accept deregulation without attempts to soften the blow or impose new regulations in other areas.

"Our position is, if we are going to be in a deregulated atmosphere, then we do not see a reason for additional types of regulations on trucking," said Schaefer, the lobbyist for Midwest Truckers Association , which represents about 2,500 trucking companies in and around Illinois.

Although the industry itself is divided on the question of deregulation, Schaefer said, it definitely doesn't want new regulations "just for the sake of perpetuating an unneeded bureaucracy." "Their livelihoods are dealing with regulations, and they want to keep regulations going," Schaefer said. "If Congress' intent was to deregulate the trucking industry, don't turn around and create new regulations."

 

 

RENFROW'S RUNNING PUBLIC WORKS CHIEF OPENS MAYORAL CAMPAIGN

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, November 27, 1990

Author/Byline: BERNARD SCHOENBURG STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 1

Springfield Public Works Director Todd Renfrow announced Monday that he's running for mayor, and wants to provide "vision and leadership" for the

city, which he said lacks direction under the incumbent, Ossie Langfelder.

The announcement ensures a battle in the Feb. 26 primary. Langfelder said he'll make no formal announcement but is seeking re-election. The non-partisan general election -- featuring the top two finishers in the primary -- is April 2. "The next mayor must provide the kind of leadership to build on our strengths and correct our inadequacies," Renfrow said at a news conference at the Springfield Hilton. "A mayor for the '90s should be forward-looking, progressive, a good communicator, aggressive rather than a caretaker, one having a solid relationship with the business community, a person who is, finally, forthright and candid."

He also characterized Langfelder as "a figurehead building a pension."

Langfelder said later that he makes it a policy of not responding to a candidate's criticism. But he added, "I think we've done an excellent job for the three short years that we've been in office.

"I've never been fired from a job," he added. "I don't intend to be fired from this one."

The April election will mark the end of a four-year transition in Springfield's form of government brought on by settlement of a voting-rights lawsuit. The new mayor will have expanded power, including control of nearly all of city government. Positions that were elective in 1987 -- directors of public works, utilities and public safety -- will become mayoral appointees next year.

Renfrow, 56, who was flanked Monday by his wife, Helen, their three daughters, three sons-in-law, and five grandchildren, said that he is "immensely proud" of what he has done since being elected public works director in 1987. He said those accomplishments have included beginning a long-overdue rehabilitation of sewers, a city-wide cleanup program including collection of used appliances, hiring a city arborist and long-range planning for tree-planting, development of a comprehensive traffic safety plan and accelerated sidewalk rehabilitation. He said he also "provided the leadership to make railroad relocation a reality," and his department is in the process of painting house numbers on curbs citywide to aid emergency workers.

As mayor, he said, his top goal will be preservation of City Water, Light and Power. He called the municipally owned utility "this city's most valuable asset."

He also said Springfield must develop a solid-waste policy. "Springfield presently has absolutely no plan for disposal of solid waste, yard waste, etc., unlike other communities that are light years ahead of us." He said the solid-waste handling proposal he brought to the council was fought by Langfelder.

He said he would take a leading role in housing policy and would appoint people to the Springfield Housing Authority with expertise in areas such as finance and real estate. He accused Langfelder of "ducking" the issue.

"I think he let the scattered-site housing issue go so far that it's polarized the community," Renfrow said. He said the scattered-site program should cease while other programsare tried. He also said that Langfelder has acted as if he can't control the SHA, when the mayor has appointed most of its members.

"That's what he's elected for," Renfrow said. "Where's he been for three years?" Langfelder, who last week said he wants a suspension of the scattered-site plan for now, responded by saying that his attempts to improve the housing situation have been clear.

"Anybody knowledgeable is well aware that I was not able to have a majority (of board appointments) until just this year," he said.

Renfrow also said he wants to raise the authorized number of city police officers from 200 to 230 -- to make sure the actual manpower level is 220 at all times. Public Safety Director Pat Ward, who has said he is not a candidate for mayor, has asked aldermen to pay for 20 new positions, and related equipment, in the next fiscal year.

Aldermen also need their own staff to help give them the information needed to provide effective checks and balances with the mayor's office, Renfrow said. He said such a staff could be created out of existing staffs from other departments, and could be developed with no added cost to taxpayers.

Renfrow also said he does not see a need for new taxes.

"I am not going to ask for any new taxes . . . unless the heavens fall," he said.

Among other items, Renfrow said, the next mayor and city council must lobby Congress to re-regulate cable television while more aggressively reviewing the performance of cable in Springfield and address the need for new city parks and paths for walking, biking and jogging.

"Our campaign will deal with issues and present and future needs of this city," he said. "It will not be a campaign of personalities, innuendoes, rumors or personal attack. We had enough of that kind of politics in November."

Langfelder said he thinks he has proven himself as mayor and before that as commissioner of streets. He said his accomplishments include redevelopment of the industrial site left by Fiatallis on the city's south side, advancement of a plan to build Hunter Lake to add to the city's water supply and running the new form of government more frugally than people thought possible -- and without a tax increase.

"I feel no formal announcement is really necessary because it's the accomplishments that speak for themselves," he added.

Renfrow, a Springfield native, is a graduate of Springfield High School and has an economics degree from Illinois College in Jacksonville. He was a long-time Sangamon County Democratic chairman, and led the Democratic County Chairmen's Association of Illinois from 1978 to 1985. His government positions have included a stint in 1977 and 1978 as executive assistant to then-Secretary of State Alan Dixon.

 

He was a Springfield Sanitary District trustee from 1979 to 1987.

 

He has also run an auto parts business(awoi) and

 

been a lobbyist for the Midwest Truckers Association , a small business advocate in the state attorney general's office

 

***********and a legislative consultant to the Illinois State Medical Society.

Renfrow predicted his campaign will cost $75,000 to $100,000, and he said he has about $20,000 in his campaign fund. Langfelder said his last run for mayor cost between $58,000 and $60,000, and he hopes it's not that high this time around. He also said he has about $20,000 in his campaign fund.

Official filing for the February primary is from Dec. 10-17. Two little-known candidates have also said they will run for mayor: Tony Luparell, who received less than 400 votes in a 1987 run, and Maurice Horton, who has been active in East St. Louis politics.

Caption: Surrounded by members of his family, Public Works Director Todd Renfrow announces his candidacy for mayor. At left is his wife, Helen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

G. Tommy Hodges, ATA First Vice Chairman

 

Chairman Titan Transfer, Inc., Shelbyville, Tenn.

 

 

Born in Nashville, TN and graduated from Donelson High School and University of Tennessee at Nashville. Married to Dean Helton Hodges and father to Amanda Hodges Cranford and Tom Hodges.

The "journey" into trucking began on a Dock at Tennessee Carolina Transportation (TCT) in 1965. Learning in 1966 to drive a tractor-trailer and was a city driver for TCT until 1970.

 

Uncle Sam beckoned two years were spent in the Army, serving in Viet Nam as A Military Policeman 1968-1969.

 

After military service, the management career began with a position with TCT as a dock supervisor/dispatcher.

In 1976, a company change was made, going to work for Spector Freight Systems as a salesman and subsequently held various positions in the transportation industry, from sales manager, terminal manager, Vice President of Sales, President and Owner.

Currently involved in our industry through several professional organizations. Served as Chairman of the Tennessee Trucking Association with two separate terms and currently serve as the President of the Tennessee Trucking Foundation. Currently serves as First Vice Chairman of American Trucking Associations, Chairman of the Chairman's Membership Sub-committee and past chairman of the Small Carrier Committee. Also serving on the executive committee of Southern Motor Carriers (SMC3) in Atlanta GA. Currently serving as an Elder at the Fairlane Church or Christ in Shelbyville, TN and former Chairman of the Tennessee Children's Home in Spring Hill TN. Chairman of the International Warehouse and Logistics Association Insurance Company (IWLAIC) and on the Kenco Group, Board of Advisors.

Business interests include Chairman of Goggin Warehousing LLC; Chairman of Titan Transfer, Inc.; Chairman of HEC Leasing, Inc; Chairman of IWLAIC Insurance Company (Group Captive Insurance Company), Chairman of Titan Transfer Logistics, Inc.: Chairman of S/M Transportation and Warehousing, Inc.

John M. Smith, ATA Vice Chairman

 

President & CEO CRST International, Inc., Cedar Rapids, Iowa

 

 

John M. Smith
CRST International, Inc.
P.O. Box 68
3930 16th Avenue, S.W.
Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52406
(319) 396-4400

Industry Affiliations/Committees:

American Trucking Associations, Inc.

 

COMMITTEES:
Board of Directors
Executive Committee

 

Truckload Carriers Association

 

Board of Directors
Executive Committee
Safety Council Chairman 1982-1987
Officer 1989-1994
President 1993-1994

 

Iowa Motor Truck Association

 

Board of Directors
Executive Committee
Past Chairman 1988

 

National Industrial Transportation League

 

Executive Advisory Council


Employment:
Employed at CRST since 1971
Currently: President/CEO
CRST International, Inc. (Since 1987)

Education:
BA in Economics, Cornell College – 1971
MBA, Cornell University School of Business - 1974

Civic Activities:
Past Chairman - Cedar Rapids Area Chamber of Commerce
Past President – Cedar Rapids Symphony Foundation
Board of Trustees – Mercy Medical Center, Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Board of Directors – U.S. Bank, Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Past Chairman – Young Presidents’ Organization – Iowa Chapter
Past President – Cedar Rapids Symphony
Past Chairman – Greater Cedar Rapids Community Foundation
Past Chairman – Red Cedar Chamber Music

Awards:
Regional Entrepreneur of the Year – 1992

Personal Information:
Married: Wife – Dyan
Children: Three
Hobbies: Sailing, Tennis, Golf, Reading

 

 

 

William D. Zollars, ATA Secretary

 

Chairman, President & CEO Yellow Roadway Corporation

 

 

As Chairman, President and CEO of Yellow Roadway Corp., Bill Zollars leads one of the largest less-than-truckload carriers in the United States. Mr. Zollars was named to his current position in November 1999.

Prior to taking Yellow Roadway’s top position, Mr. Zollars was President of its subsidiary Yellow Transportation, Inc., a position he had held since 1996, when the company underwent a major management transition.

Before joining Yellow, Mr. Zollars was Senior Vice President of Ryder Integrated Logistics, a $1.5 billion division of Miami-based truck rental and leasing company Ryder System, Inc. Mr. Zollars also spent 24 years in various executive positions at Eastman Kodak, including assignments in London, Toronto and Tokyo.

Mr. Zollars holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in economics from the University of Minnesota. He serves on the boards of ProLogis Trust,

 

The Midwest Research Institute,

 

National Association of Manufacturers,

 

Hear of America United Way, The Civic Council of Greater Kansas City and The Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota.

 

 

Executive Profiles

Dr. James L. Spigarelli, President and CEO

Dr. Dan E. Arvizu, Executive Vice President MRI and
Alliance President, Director of NREL

Dr. Michael F. Helmstetter, Executive Vice President MRI and
Director of Research Operations

Fred Cornwell, Vice President and Chief Financial Officer


Dr. James L. Spigarelli
President and Chief Executive Officer

As President and Chief Executive Officer of Midwest Research Institute, Dr. Spigarelli guides a staff of 1,800 scientists and other professionals performing research in more than 48 scientific and technical disciplines, including the field of energy at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. MRI has managed and operated NREL since its inception in 1977.

 

 

Dr. Spigarelli began his career at MRI after serving as a lieutenant in the U.S. Army Chemical Corps at Rocky Mountain Arsenal. During his first 17 years at MRI, his research activities focused on environmental analytical sciences with an emphasis on chemical agents, their degradation products, and agent demilitarization.

 

 He was appointed Vice President of MRI in 1978, Senior Vice President in 1991, Executive Vice President in 1997, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer in 1998, and President and Chief Executive Officer in 1999.

Education

B.A., Chemistry, Pittsburg State University
M.S., Chemistry, Pittsburg State University
Ph.D., Chemistry, Kansas State University

Honors and Awards

  • Pittsburg Alumni Meritorious Achievement Award
  • Rotary Business Executive of the Year
  • Rotary Service Award for Professional Excellence
  • Technology Leader of the Year, Silicon Prairie Technology Association
  • Alumni Fellow Award, Kansas State University

Community Involvement

  • Member of Civic Council of Greater Kansas City
  • Member of Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce Board
  • Member of Kansas City Area Development Council

Board Member or Trustee:

  • Current, Board of Directors, Kansas National Bio- and Agro-defense Facility Task Force
  • Current, Board of Directors, Alternative Energy Sources, Inc.
  • Current, Board of Directors, Kansas City Area Life Sciences Institute; 2000-2005 Chairman of the Board, Kansas City Area Life Sciences Institute; 1999, Chair, Civic Council’s Kansas City Area Life Sciences Initiative
  • Current, Vice Chairman, Board of Directors, Science Pioneers
  • Current, Board of Directors, Kansas State University Research Foundation
  • Current, Board of Directors, National Association of Corporate Directors
  • Current, Board of Directors, Sceptor Industries
  • Current, Board of Directors, Colorado Energy Science Center
  • Current, Trustee, University of Missouri— Kansas City
  • Current, Trustee, Rockhurst University

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Dr. Dan E. Arvizu
Executive Vice President MRI and
Alliance President,
Director of NREL

Dan Arvisu is MRI Executive Vice President, Alliance President, and Director of NREL. MRI is one of the two entities in the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC, that manages the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colo., for the U.S. Department of Energy. NREL is the country’s premier facility for the research, development, and deployment of energy form sun, wind, and plant life.

Dr. Arvizu has more than 30 years of experience in managing facilities and operations in the national laboratory environment as well as the commercial sector. Prior to joining NREL, he was Senior Vice President and Chief Technology officer for CH2M Hill. He joined CH2M Hill in Englewood, Colorado, in 1998 as Vice President and Director of the Energy and Industrial Systems Business Group, a newly created group. In 2002, after successfully leading the energy group into becoming a $100-million operation, he was promoted to Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer for the Federal and Industrial Client Sector, spanning seven business groups with combined annual revenues exceeding $2.5 billion. He held this position until his appointment to NREL.

Education

Ph.D. and M.S., Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University
B.S., Mechanical Engineering, New Mexico State University.

Honors and Awards

  • National Science Board
  • Army Science Board for the Department of Defense
  • National Coal Council for the Department of Energy
  • Board of Directors for the Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Award Conference
  • “Top 50 Most Important Hispanics in Business and Technology” by Hispanic Engineer & Information Technology Magazine
  • Technology Fellow of CH2M Hill
  • Hispanic National Achievement Award for Executive Excellence
  • Distinguished Alumnus, New Mexico State University

Community Involvement

  • Board of Advisors for the Greater Metropolitan Denver Salvation Army
  • Corporate Advisory Board for the Colorado School of Mines

back to top


 

Note inst of human virology= Maryland, Baltimore – RKG

 

IHV board of advisors

 

Robert Keith Gray

A Cabinet member in the Eisenhower administration,

Robert Gray took Gray and Company public, and later

became Worldwide Chairman of Hill and Knowlton.

He served as national communications director for the

Reagan-Bush campaign and became co-chairman of

Reagan Inaugural. He has a Harvard Masters degree in Business

Administration and has been awarded four honorary doctorates.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Michael F. Helmstetter
Executive Vice President MRI and
Director of Research Operations

As Executive Vice President and Director of Research Operations, Dr. Helmstetter participates in the planning, development, and implementation of MRI’s strategic operating goals. Dr. Helmstetter manages MRI’s divisions located throughout the U.S. including MRI’s Kansas City, Missouri, headquarters, as well as several major laboratories in Florida and Maryland. He oversees all operating divisions and departments except Human Resources and Business Management.

Dr. Helmstetter previously served as Senoir Vice President and Director of Research Operations, and prior to that served (respectively) as MRI’s Director of Technical Operations and as

MRI’s Director of East Coast Operations - encompassing MRI’s divisions in Florida and Maryland

. His efforts were instrumental in the growth and stability of the Florida Division, where he provided overall direction to this state-of-the-art, nationally recognized biodefense research laboratory.

 

 

He played a key role in MRI’s quick-start establishment of the National Capital Region Division in Rockville, Maryland, a critical laboratory serving the greater Washington, D.C., area.

Education

Ph.D., Oceanography, Old Dominion University
B.S., Aquatic Biology, Allegheny College.

Honors and Awards

  • Who’s Who in the South and Southeast , 1996
  • Who’s Who International , 1996
  • Who’s Who in the World , 1994
  • Who’s Who in Science and Engineering , 1992
  • Who’s Who in America , 1992
  • Atlantic Estuarine Research Society “Best Paper” Award, 1991
  • Phi Kappa Phi, 1990
  • Atlantic Estuarine Research Society “Best Paper” Award, 1990

Board Member or Trustee:

  • Current, Institutional Advisory Committee, Kansas City Area Life Sciences Institute
  • Current, Board of Directors, KU Medical Center Research Institute; Member KU Medical Center Research Committee
  • Current, Veterinary School Board, Kansas State University
  • Current, Board of Directors, Labconco Corporation
  • Current, Board of Directors, Missouri Bio Industry Organization
  • Current, Board of Directors, Dycor Technologies, Ltd.
  • Current, Advisory Committee, KSU Biosecurity Research Institute

back to top


Fred Cornwell
Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

As Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Midwest Research Institute, Mr. Cornwell is responsible for corporate financial issues and regulatory and compliance work, including finance, accounting, and purchasing.

 

 

 

 

 

He serves as interim president of MRI Ventures, which is MRI’s commercialization division.

 

Mr. Cornwell also leads a development investment project for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

He joined MRI in 2001 as Director of Business Management, a position in which he was responsible for many critical business functions including contracts, pricing, accounting, and purchasing. For three years in a row, he led MRI’s United Way campaign to record contributions. Prior to joining MRI, Mr. Cornwell served in a variety of financial and management positions at organizations including Ernst & Young LLP, Oread Laboratories, and Promo Holdings.

Education

BBA, University of New Mexico
MBA, University of Kansas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See addington as ATA SVP

 

Private sector career

Before returning to DOT in 2001, Mr. Jackson worked in the private sector as Chief Operating Officer at Lockheed Martin IMS’s Transportation Systems and Services. IMS’s transportation group provided high technology services to toll authorities, freight companies and 35 state governments. From 1993 until 1997, Mr. Jackson was Senior Vice President at the AmericanTrucking Associations, where he managed inter modal, international and technology policy matters.

He has been a researcher at the American Enterprise Institute and taught political science at the University of Georgia and at Georgetown University. Mr. Jackson studied at the University of Houston (B.A.) under Ross M. Lence and received a Ph.D. with distinction from the Government Department at Georgetown University in 1985.

 

 

 

Springfield Mayor Tim Davlin

GROUPS - 2003 PRIMARY DEBATE – handout given to audience

 

SCSO - "NON MERIT" DEPUTY - SIMPLE ENOUGH

 AXA ADVISORS/ V PAUL SMITH

 MWTA/RENFROW, (MIDWEST TRUCKERS ASSOCIATION)

 BREAK TIME

 COBBLESTONE,

 CATH CHARITIES/BUNN

 SJBL

 FAM BACKGROUND LDRSHP IN KC'S - FORMER IL PREZ

 

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateThu, Jun 25, 2009 at 6:54 PM

subjectmichael jackson - gwb admin - american trucking associations - see complaint - ITA

mailed-bygmail.com

 

michael jackson - gwb admin -

ATA - see complaint - ITA

univ of hou - delay - randy - dot -

 

dhs - iema - steil

 

 

Michael P. Jackson

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Michael P. Jackson

 

 

 

 

 

3rd Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security

 

Preceded byJames Loy

Succeeded byPaul A. Schneider

 

 

 

Alma materUniversity of Houston, Georgetown University

 

Michael P. Jackson served as the Deputy Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, until the time of his resignation on October 26, 2007.

Contents

[hide]

1 Government career

1.1 Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security

1.2 Deputy Secretary of the United States Department of Transportation

2 Private sector career

3 Resignation

4 References

5 External links

 

 

[edit] Government career

[edit] Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security

On March 10, 2005, Michael P. Jackson was confirmed by the United States Senate to serve as Deputy Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security. In this role, Mr. Jackson served as Department of Homeland Securitys' chief operating officer, with responsibility for managing the day-to-day operations.

[edit] Deputy Secretary of the United States Department of Transportation

Mr. Jackson served as Deputy Secretary of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) from May 2001 to August 2003. As Deputy Secretary, Mr. Jackson was the Department’s chief operating officer, with responsibility for day-to-day operations of an organization that, following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, grew to a $68 billion annual budget supporting over 179,000 employees.

His tenure was particularly focused on DOT’s response to the terrorist attacks, including standing up the new Transportation Security Administration and management of recovery efforts for the nation’s aviation industry. He served as a member of the Board of Directors of Amtrak and was chairman of its Audit Committee.

In 2004, Mr. Jackson was appointed to serve on the President's Commission on Implementation of United States Space Exploration Policy, which provided management recommendations to the President on NASA and its future mission management.

Mr. Jackson also held positions working for two earlier Presidents. In the Administration of President George H. W. Bush, he served at the White House as Special Assistant to the President for Cabinet Liaison and later as Chief of Staff to the Secretary of Transportation. He held several positions reporting to the Secretary of Education in the Administration of President Ronald Reagan.

[edit] Private sector career

Before returning to DOT in 2001, Mr. Jackson worked in the private sector as Chief Operating Officer at Lockheed Martin IMS’s Transportation Systems and Services. IMS’s transportation group provided high technology services to toll authorities, freight companies and 35 state governments. From 1993 until 1997, Mr. Jackson was Senior Vice President at the AmericanTrucking Associations, where he managed inter modal, international and technology policy matters.

He has been a researcher at the American Enterprise Institute and taught political science at the University of Georgia and at Georgetown University. Mr. Jackson studied at the University of Houston (B.A.) under Ross M. Lence and received a Ph.D. with distinction from the Government Department at Georgetown University in 1985.

[edit] Resignation

On September 24, 2007, Jackson announced he would resign his position as DHS Deputy Secretary effective October 26, 2007, "for financial reasons I can no longer ignore."[1]

He has not yet announced his future plans.

[edit] References

^ Eilenn Sullivan (2007-09-24). "Homeland Security's Jackson resigns". Associated Press. http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070924/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/jackson. 

[edit] External links

"Deputy Secretary: Michael P. Jackson". Department of Homeland Security. October 4, 2006. http://www.dhs.gov/xabout/structure/biography_0121.shtm. Retrieved on January 8 2007. 

 Reply Forward

 

 Reply |Dennis Delaney

show details Jun 25

 

 

Images are not displayed.

Display images below - Always display images from dwdelaney@gmail.com

Bush dhs allows police abuse of IC assets

 

Local police get unfettered access to DHS – IC – DOD – data,  satellite imagery – tracking, etc. (bad idea)

 

 misuse of authority - spd - scao - ing - isp -

 

 

 

 

 

Politics & Economics: Fighting Terrorism By Sharing Data; Homeland Security Plans To Improve Cooperation With Police Departments

Robert Block. Wall Street Journal. (Eastern edition). New York, N.Y.: Oct 16, 2006. pg. A.6

 

Abstract (Summary)

In an interview, Mr. [Michael Jackson] said the moves follow months of "frank" discussions between police chiefs and Homeland Security officials. The disconnect has become a campaign issue, with House Democrats releasing a report accusing the administration of failing to reach out to the country's 800,000 state and local police officers to determine their needs in fighting terrorism. "Five years after 9/11, critical failures of imagination continue to leave these 'first preventers' as a largely untapped resource in the war on terror," the report said.

Currently, security doors and protocols separate police sitting on what the department calls the "low-side" of their intelligence operation from DHS and other federal analysts on the "high-side." "There will be no more high-side and low-side and the department will clear as many cops as necessary and will work with police chiefs on a plan to clear more law-enforcement officers," Mr. Jackson said.

 »  Jump to indexing (document details)

Full Text (649  words)

 

(c) 2006 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. Reproduced with permission of copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission.

Under intense criticism from local officials, the Department of Homeland Security will revamp its information-sharing programs and the way it works with police in the fight against terrorism.

"We have heard the complaints and are working on fixing the problems," said Michael Jackson, deputy secretary of Homeland Security.

The initiatives are set to be unveiled today in Boston when Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff speaks to the annual meeting of the International Association of Chiefs of Police. Among the changes he is expected to announce are plans to speed up security clearances for local police; to provide faster, better threat intelligence; and to improve coordination among police and the federal agencies in charge of collecting and analyzing information about terrorist attacks, plots and trends.

In an interview, Mr. Jackson said the moves follow months of "frank" discussions between police chiefs and Homeland Security officials. The disconnect has become a campaign issue, with House Democrats releasing a report accusing the administration of failing to reach out to the country's 800,000 state and local police officers to determine their needs in fighting terrorism. "Five years after 9/11, critical failures of imagination continue to leave these 'first preventers' as a largely untapped resource in the war on terror," the report said.

While police departments from several big cities have representatives working full-time with DHS to glean sensitive intelligence information about terror threats, many police officials say they still are denied access to timely, relevant information about threats and terrorist activity.

Trouble came to a head over the summer when DHS officials removed a Washington, D.C., police liaison officer from the department's National Operations Center over a misunderstanding about her security clearance level and sometimes would deny nonclassified information to police liaison officers there even though they were authorized to see top-secret information.

In June, the Washington police department and other local law- enforcement agencies considered pulling out of DHS's information- sharing programs unless they were given greater access to intelligence data that they could share with their officers.

Mr. Jackson said he is confident such issues will be resolved with his department's hiring of a private company to accelerate security clearances for police officers working with DHS in Washington and elsewhere. Next year, the department also plans to place police liaison officers in a new national operation center that breaks down the barriers, both physical and cultural, between local law- enforcement and department officials.

Currently, security doors and protocols separate police sitting on what the department calls the "low-side" of their intelligence operation from DHS and other federal analysts on the "high-side." "There will be no more high-side and low-side and the department will clear as many cops as necessary and will work with police chiefs on a plan to clear more law-enforcement officers," Mr. Jackson said.

The department also aims to send permanent DHS intelligence officials to 38 state and local intelligence fusion centers that are now operating around the country, over the next two years. The officials will bring with them the ability to send classified information back and forth between local police and Washington.

The department will also create "fellowships" for senior police to work in Washington alongside Homeland Security analysts and intelligence officials from other security agencies. According to Mr. Jackson, the fellowships will last between three months and one year and will enable police to help tailor real-time terrorist intelligence information for police needs.

Some police officials who were contacted about the plans say they are encouraged but reserved judgment until they saw the programs implemented. "There has been real progress," said Los Angeles Police Chief William J. Bratton, who has been one of Homeland Security's toughest critics. He cautioned that rising violent crime rates are stretching police forces' resources to deal with counter-terrorism duties. Police also face pressure from civil-liberties advocates concerned that local police involvement in domestic intelligence work might lead to abuses of authority.

 

 

 

 

 

Deputy At DHS Steps Down

Robert Block. Wall Street Journal. (Eastern edition). New York, N.Y.: Sep 25, 2007. pg. A.10

 

Abstract (Summary)

In an email to staff, Mr. [Michael P. Jackson] said he will leave his post effective Oct. 26. "Today I become, in Washington's argot, a lame duck," he wrote.

Possible successors include Stewart Baker, the department's assistant secretary for policy, and Paul Schneider, DHS undersecretary for management.

 »  Jump to indexing (document details)

Full Text (222  words)

 

(c) 2007 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. Reproduced with permission of copyright owner. Further reproduction or distribution is prohibited without permission.

WASHINGTON -- The Homeland Security Department's second-in-command is stepping down, citing personal financial reasons.

Michael P. Jackson, the department's deputy secretary, has had a major hand in running the large department, particularly in putting the current management team in place.

In an email to staff, Mr. Jackson said he will leave his post effective Oct. 26. "Today I become, in Washington's argot, a lame duck," he wrote.

Mr. Jackson, 53 years old, was deputy secretary of the Transportation Department in 2001 to 2003, during which time he helped to set up the Transportation Security Administration. He came to the Homeland Security Department in March 2005.

At DHS, in recent weeks he was criticized for rewriting a blueprint to guide national response to a disaster or terrorist attack. Emergency responders said Mr. Jackson had thrown out their recommendations and created a plan that was difficult to understand and gave too big a role to the federal government.

 

He also was seen as weighing in heavily on the day-to-day operations of the department's component agencies, particularly the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

 

Congressional leaders are anxious that a successor be named as soon as possible, saying the department suffers from too many vacancies in senior leadership positions.

Possible successors include Stewart Baker, the department's assistant secretary for policy, and Paul Schneider, DHS undersecretary for management.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateThu, Jul 9, 2009 at 1:19 PM

subjectRe: barton - tauzin - shimkus - mwta - renfrow - awoi - madonia - vince - tex-mex bbq - ATA - ITA - delay -

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details Jul 9

 

 

Boesdorfer – mwta – renfrow – madonia

 

And see ITA – ATA – Shimkus – delay – barton - tauzin

 

 

AWOI= “vince” link – madonia – renfrow – (cwlp)

 

 *And see mwta – one block from hall’s  apt. on price st. – note esp. ITA and see ATA – barton and Tauzin Shimkus and delay fundraiser – “tex mex bbq”

 

Mwta not affiliated w/ ata, note similarities

 

RENFROW KEEPS BUSY AT STATEHOUSE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, April 29, 1988

Edition: M1,M2,S1

Section: EDITORIAL

Page: 9

SPRINGFIELD PUBLIC Works Director Todd Renfrow has been seen quite a bit lately at the State house, and those appearances have been followed by low

 

rumbling noises from those who follow city politics.

 

Renfrow 's friends say his presence at the Statehouse means he's hard at work for the taxpayers. His political enemies grumble that he's lobbying when he ought to be back at the Municipal Building.

 

Renfrow acknowledges that he's done some lobbying since the spring session began, and that not all his lobbying has been on municipal business.

 

But he said he isn't paid for his lobbying efforts, and he sees no confict of interest if he appears at committee sessions on legislation of interest to the city or the associations to which he belongs.

 

"As far as spending a lot of time over there, I don't plan to," he added.

 

IN ADDITION TO serving as an elected city official, a status that allows him to appear on city business,

 

Renfrow is a former lobbyist for the Midwest Truckers Association and a member of the Automotive Wholesalers of Illinois. He also serves as a director of the wholesalers' political action committee.

 

 

 

As far as he's aware, Renfrow said, he is allowed to testify on legislation in either capacity.

 

"I'm not a registered lobbyist any more," he said. "I can lobby for the city of Springfield because I'm a director. (For) the other two, I sign in as a member of the association."

 

Earlier this week, Renfrow said he worked on a bill that would affect the ability of City Water, Light and Power to provide electricity to recently annexed areas and on auto parts legislation of interest to the Automotive Wholesalers.

 

He said several city officials, including Utility Director Frank Madonia and Ward 2 Ald. Frank McNeil, have been involved with the CWLP issue.

 

THE BILL, H3308, would give cooperatives and other utilities the right to retain service to areas annexed by municipalities. It is strongly desired by Central Illinois Light Co., which lost a court battle last year to serve the Harrison Park subdivision on the west side of Springfield.

 

"I was over there on 3308 a week ago and again yesterday," Renfrow said Wednesday. "They brought it up, and we stopped it last week in committee. But they may try to bring it up again."

 

Renfrow said he was asked to lend a hand on the auto parts legislation because he was involved in earlier negotiations on the issue. He said he sees no problem in doing so again.

 

"If one of the associations calls and says, `Todd, we've got a problem and need your help,' I don't see any conflict of interest," he said. "If there was, I'd stay away from it."

 

Should a legislative issue come up on which the city's interest were to conflict with that of either association, Renfrow said, he would not get involved in that issue.

 

And he said he doesn't intend to let his lobbying activities take time away from the city job he was elected to do.

 

"As a member (of the associations) , I have a right to be over there," he said. "But as far as living over there, I don't plan to."

 

 

http://www.mid-westtruckers.com/services.html

 

 

Mid-West Truckers Association, Inc.

 

2727 North Dirksen Parkway

Springfield, IL 62704

 

Phone: (217) 525-0310

Fax: (217) 525-0342

 

E-mail: info@mid-westtruckers.com

Services Available to MTA Members

 

Legislative Representation - Our own lobbyists stand up for truckers' rights before the Illinois General Assembly. Members are kept informed through legislative "hotlines" and Keep on Truckin' News. Below are some of our accomplishments:

 

A. Introduced and had successfully passed legislation to increase weight variance from 1,000 to 2,000 lbs. on both axle and gross. Have stopped several attempts to entirely eliminate variance. Increased variance on portable scales. Introduced and passed legislation to broaden allowances for truck lengths on all routes.

 

B. MTA was totally responsible for expansion of the state designated highway system by over 8,000 miles, and increases of weight, width and length requirements.

 

C. Responsible for legislation allowing greater access on local, county and township roads.

 

D. Helped to reduce Federal Highway Use taxes from proposed $1,600 per vehicle per year, thus saving you $1,050 per vehicle per year.

 

E. Annually defeat bills that would require every truck to be tarped, loaded or unloaded.

 

F. Won lawsuit against State of Illinois Department of Revenue to protect your exemption from state sales/use taxes; millions of dollars refunded to truckers - this action is still saving you thousands of dollars each year. Continue to stop legislation to remove tax exemption.

 

G. Successfully secured passage of legislation to preserve Rolling Stock tax exemption.

 

H. Have successfully defeated or decreased numerous license fee and motor fuel tax increases, saving you thousands each year.

 

I. Secured passage of landmark legislation defining owner-operator as an independent contractor - saving millions in potential fines and legal fees.

 

Industry Representation - Our Executive Vice-President is an industry advisor to the National Governor's Conference on Uniformity of State laws, industry advisor to American Motor Vehicle Administrators Association, member of State of Illinois Interagency Committee on Uniform Regulations, member of Illinois Department of Transportation Work Zone Safety Committee, member of Illinois Commerce Commission Motor Carrier Advisory Committee, chairman of Secretary of State Truck Advisory Committee, member of Illinois Highway Users Association, member Board of Directors of Professional Truck Drivers Institute of America, on Board of Employment Law Council of Ill.

 

 

 

On Mon, Mar 30, 2009 at 11:52 AM, Dennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com> wrote:

 

Buyers Up • Congress Watch • Critical Mass • Global Trade Watch •Health Research Group • Litigation Group

Joan Claybrook, President

Ralph Nader, Founder

1600 20

th

Street NW • Washington, DC 20009 • (202) 588-1000 • www.citizen.org

CHRONOLOGY OF EVENTS

June 20, 2003

Summary of Basis for Public Citizen’s Complaint

A Special Committee of the Board of Directors of Westar Energy, the largest electric utility in Kansas, in

May 2003 released internal documents of prior Westar management uncovered in investigations of fraud

and other offenses. These documents include Exhibits 236 and 237, internal memoranda and emails

describing a program for campaign contributions, allegedly requested by specific Members of Congress to

be made by Westar executives to Members of Congress or to their designees, in order for Westar to obtain

an exemption from regulation by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) under the Investment

Company Act, a statute for the protection of stock purchasers.

According to press reports in September 2002, the exemption sought by Westar was critical for it and its

executives to allow then CEO David Wittig and vice president Douglas Lake to split up the company in a

deal that would garner Wittig as much as $15 million and Lake as much as $12 million. [Washington

Post, 6/7/03] The exemption was also critical to split Westar’s regulated utility from the rest of its

businesses to enable Westar to transfer more than $3 billion in debt to the utility company. The utility

could then try to pass those costs to its customers through utility rate hikes. [AP Newswire 6/6/03, Yost].

For this reason, the Kansas Corporation Commission, in addition to the Securities and Exchange

Commission, had opposed the exemption (see below).

The campaign contributions requested in the communications were in fact made by the indicated Westar

executives to those recipients named in the communications, according to Federal Election Commission

and IRS filings. The requested Westar exemption was in fact inserted into the House comprehensive

energy bill during conference committee by one of the Members of Congress discussed in the

communications. In addition, seven other representatives, including some of those mentioned in the

communications, gave their proxy votes to defeat a motion to delete the Westar exemption.

Public Citizen believes that these facts, as laid out in detail below, constitute a prima facie case of

possible violations of the bribery statutes, more than sufficient to warrant further investigation by the

Department of Justice and requests such investigations.

Westar Released Memos and Emails

5/17/02

Doug Lawrence, Westar vice president for public affairs, sends memo to at least 12 top

Westar executives outlining a plan for Westar and its executives to contribute nearly

 

 

Page 2

 

2

$56,500 to House Majority Leader, Tom DeLay, and several different competitive

congressional campaigns. In the memo, Lawrence outlines “the total budget for our

Washington efforts regarding the Federal Energy Bill and its impact on our financial

restructuring plan…[the] budget allocation [is] according to current needs as recommended

by our Washington Lobbyist." The memo lays out the dollar amounts for each executive

listed and the campaigns to which they should contribute. The memo is attached and can

be found at www.citizen.org/cmep or at www.westarenergy.com as Exhibit 236 to the

Special Committee Report.

The memo outlines a plan to give “$31,500 in hard money (individual).” From May 31,

2002 through July 31, 2002, thirteen Westar executives and three employees of

Governmental Strategies (the Virginia-based lobbying firm hired by Westar) donated

$24,050 to DeLay, Tauzin, Rep. John Shimkus, Rep. Anne Northup, Rep. Sam Graves,

Rep. Shelly Moore Capito and Tom Young (see Appendix).

The memo also suggests that $25,000 in “soft money” contributions should be given by

Westar in support of its exemption. In May, 2002, Texans for a Republican Majority, an

IRS Section 527 group conttrolled by Rep. DeLay, received a $25,000 corporate

contribution from Westar Energy. In total, Westar, its executives and three of its lobbyists

contributed $49,050 between May 31 and July 31.

5/20/02

Westar Executive Douglas T. Lake sends email to Lawrence asking: “who is Shimkus,

who is Young. Delay [sic] is from TX what is our connection?… I am confused.”

Lawrence replies by email to Doug Lake. The email details how targeting Representatives

Tom DeLay, Billy Tauzin, Joe Barton and their allies will help Westar “get a seat at the

table” in their efforts to win a grandfathered exemption from the Investment Company Act

enforced by the Securities and Exchange Commission for Westar as an exempt PUHCA

company, in order to help Westar’s restructuring efforts. The requested exemption is

referred to as the “PUHCA grandfathering clause” although, as explained below, it was an

exemption for a utility company that is currently exempt under PUHCA from the

Investment Company Act, a statute designed to protect the national public interest and the

interests of individual stockholders from unscrupulous investment companies. “PUHCA”

is the Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935” that regulates utility parent

companies, and is also enforced by the SEC. The emails are included in the Appendix, and

can be found at www.citizen.org/cmep and at www.westarenergy.comas Exhibit 237 to

the Special Committee Report:

“Right now, we are working on getting our grandfather provision on PUHCA repeal into

the senate version of the energy bill. It requires working with the Conference committee to

achieve. We have a plan for participation to get a seat at the table, which as been

approved by David [Wittig, Westar CEO]the total of the package will be $31,500 in hard

money (individual), and $25,000 in soft money (corporate). Right now, we have $11,500 in

immediate needs for a group of candidates associated with Tom Delay [sic], Billy Tauzin,

Joe Barton and Senator Richard Shelby. Delay [sic] is the House Majority Leader. His

agreement is necessary before the House Conferees can push the language we have in

place in the House bill. Shimkus is a close associate of Billy Tauzin and Joe Barton, who

are key House Conferees on our legislation. They have made this request in lieu of

 

 

Page 3

 

3

contributions made to their own campaigns. Tom Young is Senator Shelby's Chief of staff

who is running for the House in Alabama. Shelby is a member of the Senate Energy

Committee and the Banking Committee?and is the lead republican on all Senate PUHCA

related matters. He is our anchor on the Senate side. He's made a substantial request of us

for supporting Young's campaign. These seem disconnected, but ultimately the plan is

directed at getting a strong position at the table on both the Senate and House Side [sic].”

[emphasis added]

Fund-raising events hosted by Tauzin and Barton on behalf of Shimkus, Northup, Graves

and Capito confirm that the Representatives receiving money from Westar executives were

close associates of Tauzin and Barton.

Background: Rep. Barton’s Bill

3/1/01

Governmental Strategies, a Virginia-based lobbying firm, registers as a lobbyist for Westar

Energy. Among the lobbyists working the account are William Kenworthy, Richard

Bornemann and Timothy Smith. [Governmental Strategies filing with the U.S. Senate

Office of Public Records.]

8/2/01

The House passes H.R. 4, a comprehensive energy bill, which does not include either

language on grandfather exemptions for utility holding companies from the Investment

Company Act or language providing special exemptions for Westar Energy. H.R. 4 also

does not include language on electricity deregulation. [See Thomas website]

10/17/01

Governmental Strategies lobbyist Richard Bornemann gives $1,000 to campaign of

Representative Joe Barton (R-Texas) [Federal Election Commission (FEC) database], the

Chairman of the Subcommittee on Energy and Air Quality, who was drafting an electricity

deregulation bill.

12/5/01

Barton introduces his electricity deregulation bill, H.R. 3406, including Section 125 that

would grandfather all affiliates of utilities then subject to the Public Utility Holding

Company Act (PUHCA) from being regulated under the Investment Company Act if

PUHCA were repealed as H.R. 3406 also proposes. [Thomas.website.] (Utility affiliates

have an automatic exemption from the Investment Company Act as long as they are

subject to PUHCA.) [Investment Company Act of 1940, Section 3(c)(8).]

1/30/02

Reps. Dingell/Markey write to SEC Chairman Harvey Pitt (cc:d to Representatives Tauzin,

Barton and Boucher) asking whether the SEC believed that the exemption for PUHCA

utility affiliates from the Investment Company Act as provided by Section 125 of H.R.

3406 would be in the public interest. [Rep. Markey’s website]

2/13/02

SEC Chairman Harvey Pitt forwards to Reps. Dingell and Markey a memorandum written

by SEC staff (Division of Investment Management) opposing Section 125 of H.R. 3406 as

being ill-advised in that it would create a large group of unregulated investment

companies. [Rep. Markey’s website] SEC Commissioner Hunt testifies before Barton’s

subcommittee and addresses the SEC’s opposition to a special exemption for utility

affiliates from the Investment Company Act. [Subcommittee website, testimony at note 7.]

 

 

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4

Rep. Barton replies on the record to Rep. Markey’s attack on the exemption provision:

“That particular provision in the bill was put in for a company or companies in the

midwest, and it has nothing to do with Mr. Green’s company, and we have already told at

the staff level that due to the concerns of Mr. Dingell and yourself, that we will be very

willing to clarify the specific language in it, and if it is controversial, we will take it out in

its entirety….” [Subcommittee on Energy and Air Quality website, hearing transcript,

p. 141, 2/13/02.]

4/02

Richard Bornemann with Governmental Strategies, which Westar paid $60,000 in 2002 to

lobby Congress [Senate Office of Public Records], begins on behalf of Westar to obtain

fundraiser schedules for Tauzin and Barton. The fundraisers are all organized and

coordinated by Virginia-based Epiphany Productions, www.epiphanyproductions.com,

which lists Senator Shelby and Reps. Tauzin, Barton, DeLay, Northup, Oxley, Shimkus,

Gillmor, Alabama Republican House primary candidate Tom Young, and the National

Republican Congressional Committee as clients. [EP, Washington Post, 6/10/03 story by

Juliet Eilperin].

4/23/02

Tauzin & Barton stage their first of eight “Tex-Cajun cookout” fund-raisers for fellow

House Republicans, this one for Rep. John Shimkus (R-IL) at noon at the Capitol Hill

offices of the American Trucking Association. [Epiphany Productions (EP)] In less than a

month on 5/15/02, Shimkus receives a $1,000 check from Douglas T. Lake. [FEC records]

4/24/02

Tauzin and Barton co-host a fundraiser for Rep. Sam Graves (R-MO) at lunchtime at the

Capitol Hill offices of Jack Fields’ 21

st

Century Group. [EP] Two months later on 6/28/02,

Rep. Graves receives a $1,000 check from Westar CEO David Wittig [FEC]

4/25/02

The Senate passes its version of an energy bill triggering a House-Senate energy

conference committee in order to work out the differences between the two bills.

Neither bill contains a provision grandfathering PUHCA affiliates in general or

Westar only from regulation under the Investment Company Act. [Thomas]

5/14/02

Tauzin and Barton co-host a fundraiser for Rep. Anne Northup (R-KY) at noon at the

Capitol Hill offices of the American Trucking Association. [EP] Less than one month later,

on 6/10/02, Northup’s campaign received two checks, one from Westar CEO David Wittig

($500) and one from Westar’s General Counsel Larry D. Irick ($350). [FEC]

5/15/02

Tauzin and Bartonco-host a fundraiser for Rep. Shelly Moore Capito (R-WV) at noon at

the Capitol Hill offices of the American Trucking Association. On June 25, Robert

Mitchell Delk, Freddie Mac’s chief Washington lobbyist and Republican activist who

hosted many of the Ephiphany Production fundraisers in 2002, hosted another fundraiser

for Capito at the DC restaurant Galileo (Rep. Michael Oxley was listed as a “Special

Guest.”). [EP] Five days after this second Capito fundraiser, two Westar executives

(Richard Dixon and Peggy Loyd) deliver a total of $1,000 to Capito’s campaign. [FEC]

5/02

Westar delivers $25,000 to DeLay’s fund-raising organization, Texans for a Republican

Majority [IRS Form 8872 filing by Texans for a Republican Majority PAC] (after Doug

Lawrence writes “Corporate Soft Money: $25,000” in one of his May 2002 memos.)

 

 

Page 5

 

5

5/31/02

Seven Westar executives and three of their DC lobbyists contribute a total of $15,000 to

Sen. Richard Shelby’s former chief-of-staff Tom Young, who is running for Congress in

the Republican primary in Alabama. All 10 contributions are made on May 31, 2002.

[Young goes on to lose the primary in June]. [FEC]

6/5/02

Tauzin and Barton co-host a fundraiser for Rep. Rob Simmons (R-CT) at noon in the

Capitol Hill offices of the American Trucking Association. [EP] In October 2002, two

Westar executives (Douglas Lawrence and Leroy Wages) each make $500 contributions to

Simmons’ campaign. [FEC]

6/02

Westar lobbyist Richard Bornemann attends a Tauzin fundraiser in Louisiana. Tauzin

spokesperson, Ken Johnson, says that Tauzin recognized Bornemann and ordered his staff

to throw him out. Johnson said the lawmaker had barred Bornemann from his office years

earlier after the lobbyist misled Tauzin on a railroad matter. [Washington Post 6/10/03,

Eilperin]. Bornemann, however, in what the AP called a “public spat,” claimed that he had

not made the initial contact, but was simply responding to faxed invitations from the

organizers of the eight Tauzin-Barton fund-raising events, while Johnson said that

Bornemann had called and asked for the list. Bornemann replied that he was “shocked, hurt

and surprised” by the criticism from Tauzin’s office. [Associated Press Newswires,

6/10/03, Yost.].

7/9/02

Tauzin and Barton co-host a fundraiser for Rep. Tom Latham (R-IA) at noon in the Capitol

Hill offices of Jack Fields’ 21

st

Century Group. [EP] On October 29, 2002, two Westar

executives (General Counsel Larry Irick and Bruce Akin) each give $500 to Latham’s

campaign. [FEC]

7/10/02

Tauzin and Barton co-host a fundraiser for Rep. Robin Hayes (R-NC) at noon in the

Capitol Hill offices of Jack Fields’ 21

st

Century Group. [EP] In late October 2002, two

Westar executives (Caroline Williams and Peggy Loyd) each contribute $500 to Hayes’

campaign. [FEC]

7/24/02

Marianne K. Smythe, a partner with the DC law firm Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering, registers

as a lobbyist for Westar Energy to advocate an “exemption from [the] Investment

Company Act for [a] Single Company,” thereby documenting Westar’s corporate interest

in obtaining this exemption. [Senate Office of Public Records.]

7/24/02

Barton holds a dinner fundraiser for his Texas Freedom Fund PAC on Capitol Hill. [EP]

Three Westar executives eventually give a total of $4,000 to Barton and his PAC. [FEC]

7/24/02

Barton meets with Westar officials as arranged by Westar lobbyist Borneman

[Washington Post, 6/10/02.]

7/31/02

Tauzin hosts his own lunchtime fundraiser at the Capitol Hill Club. [EP] That same day,

four Westar executives deliver checks totaling $2,800 to Tauzin’s Bayou Leader PAC.

[FEC]

9/16/02

Tauzin “and the Energy and Commerce Committee Members” host an evening fundraiser

for the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) at The Galleria at

 

 

Page 6

 

6

Lafayette Center. [EP] One month later, on October 23, 2002, three Westar executives

gave a total of $1,150 to the NRCC. [FEC]

9/18/02

Barton inserts Westar grandfather provision in energy conference bill. [Washington

Post, p. A 2, 6/7/03.]

9/19/02

Barton defeats Rep. Markey motion to strike Westar provision from energy

conference bill; wins on party line vote, 8 to 6. Barton votes for himself and votes

proxies for Reps. Barton, Tauzin, DeLay, Michael Bilirakis, Richard Burr, Paul

Gillmor, Cliff Stearns and Fred Upton to preserve the Westar exemption. According

to conference transcript, Barton said: “This really is a policy decision here that the

committee, the conference needs to make…This particular provision benefits one

company. That company is…Western Resources in Topeka, Kansas.” Western Resources

is the former name of Westar. (emphasis supplied). [Washington Post 6/10/03, Eilperin.]

9/19/02

Robert Mitchell Delk, Freddie Mac’s chief Washington lobbyist, hosted a dinner fundraiser

for Rep. Michael Oxley at the upscale DC restaurant Galileo. [EF] One month later, three

Westar executives contributed a total of $2,000 to Oxley and his Leadership PAC 2002.

[FEC]

9/27/02

Westar Energy publicly announces for the first time that the company was in serious

trouble when it acknowledged that it had been served with a federal grand jury subpoena

by the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Kansas for various counts of fraud. [SEC 8-K filing.]

9/27/02

Kansas Corporation Commission Chair John Wine writes to Rep. Markey (cc:d to Kansas

Senators, Congressmen) to object to Westar Energy proposal to seek an exemption from

the ICA in conference committee on H.R. 4. [Markey website]

9/30/02

Rep. Markey sends letter to Rep. Tauzin and Sen. Bingaman of conference committee

suggesting that the committee should rethink the insertion of the Westar exemption, which

they call an “Enron-like loophole,” in light of the announced investigations of Westar for

fraud, money laundering, etc. [AP Newswire, 6/6/03, Yost; Markey website]

10/02

House Republicans withdraw their support ofthe Westar exemption in light of the

investigations of the company. [AP Newswire, 6/6/03, Yost]

11/22/02

David Wittig resigns as CEO of Westar after being indicted. [Westar 14(a) filing at SEC]

12/6/02

Westar executive vice president Douglas T. Lake is placed on unpaid leave. [Westar 14(a)

filing at SEC]

2/7/03

Westar CFO Paul R. Geist resigns. [Westar 14(a) SEC filing]

5/03

A Special Committee of Westar’s Board of Directors releases hundreds of internal

communications implicating most of its former top executives in various illegal and

unethical behavior. (See emails listed on first page.) [Westar 14(a) SEC filing]

Joan Claybrook, President

Ralph Nader, Founder

1600 20

th

Street NW • Washington, DC 20009 • (202) 588-1000 • www.citizen.org

CHRONOLOGY OF EVENTS

June 20, 2003

Summary of Basis for Public Citizen’s Complaint

A Special Committee of the Board of Directors of Westar Energy, the largest electric utility in Kansas, in

May 2003 released internal documents of prior Westar management uncovered in investigations of fraud

and other offenses. These documents include Exhibits 236 and 237, internal memoranda and emails

describing a program for campaign contributions, allegedly requested by specific Members of Congress to

be made by Westar executives to Members of Congress or to their designees, in order for Westar to obtain

an exemption from regulation by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) under the Investment

Company Act, a statute for the protection of stock purchasers.

According to press reports in September 2002, the exemption sought by Westar was critical for it and its

executives to allow then CEO David Wittig and vice president Douglas Lake to split up the company in a

deal that would garner Wittig as much as $15 million and Lake as much as $12 million. [Washington

Post, 6/7/03] The exemption was also critical to split Westar’s regulated utility from the rest of its

businesses to enable Westar to transfer more than $3 billion in debt to the utility company. The utility

could then try to pass those costs to its customers through utility rate hikes. [AP Newswire 6/6/03, Yost].

For this reason, the Kansas Corporation Commission, in addition to the Securities and Exchange

Commission, had opposed the exemption (see below).

The campaign contributions requested in the communications were in fact made by the indicated Westar

executives to those recipients named in the communications, according to Federal Election Commission

and IRS filings. The requested Westar exemption was in fact inserted into the House comprehensive

energy bill during conference committee by one of the Members of Congress discussed in the

communications. In addition, seven other representatives, including some of those mentioned in the

communications, gave their proxy votes to defeat a motion to delete the Westar exemption.

Public Citizen believes that these facts, as laid out in detail below, constitute a prima facie case of

possible violations of the bribery statutes, more than sufficient to warrant further investigation by the

Department of Justice and requests such investigations.

Westar Released Memos and Emails

5/17/02

Doug Lawrence, Westar vice president for public affairs, sends memo to at least 12 top

Westar executives outlining a plan for Westar and its executives to contribute nearly

 

 

Page 2

 

2

$56,500 to House Majority Leader, Tom DeLay, and several different competitive

congressional campaigns. In the memo, Lawrence outlines “the total budget for our

Washington efforts regarding the Federal Energy Bill and its impact on our financial

restructuring plan…[the] budget allocation [is] according to current needs as recommended

by our Washington Lobbyist." The memo lays out the dollar amounts for each executive

listed and the campaigns to which they should contribute. The memo is attached and can

be found at www.citizen.org/cmep or at www.westarenergy.com as Exhibit 236 to the

Special Committee Report.

The memo outlines a plan to give “$31,500 in hard money (individual).” From May 31,

2002 through July 31, 2002, thirteen Westar executives and three employees of

Governmental Strategies (the Virginia-based lobbying firm hired by Westar) donated

$24,050 to DeLay, Tauzin, Rep. John Shimkus, Rep. Anne Northup, Rep. Sam Graves,

Rep. Shelly Moore Capito and Tom Young (see Appendix).

The memo also suggests that $25,000 in “soft money” contributions should be given by

Westar in support of its exemption. In May, 2002, Texans for a Republican Majority, an

IRS Section 527 group conttrolled by Rep. DeLay, received a $25,000 corporate

contribution from Westar Energy. In total, Westar, its executives and three of its lobbyists

contributed $49,050 between May 31 and July 31.

5/20/02

Westar Executive Douglas T. Lake sends email to Lawrence asking: “who is Shimkus,

who is Young. Delay [sic] is from TX what is our connection?… I am confused.”

Lawrence replies by email to Doug Lake. The email details how targeting Representatives

Tom DeLay, Billy Tauzin, Joe Barton and their allies will help Westar “get a seat at the

table” in their efforts to win a grandfathered exemption from the Investment Company Act

enforced by the Securities and Exchange Commission for Westar as an exempt PUHCA

company, in order to help Westar’s restructuring efforts. The requested exemption is

referred to as the “PUHCA grandfathering clause” although, as explained below, it was an

exemption for a utility company that is currently exempt under PUHCA from the

Investment Company Act, a statute designed to protect the national public interest and the

interests of individual stockholders from unscrupulous investment companies. “PUHCA”

is the Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935” that regulates utility parent

companies, and is also enforced by the SEC. The emails are included in the Appendix, and

can be found at www.citizen.org/cmep and at www.westarenergy.comas Exhibit 237 to

the Special Committee Report:

“Right now, we are working on getting our grandfather provision on PUHCA repeal into

the senate version of the energy bill. It requires working with the Conference committee to

achieve. We have a plan for participation to get a seat at the table, which as been

approved by David [Wittig, Westar CEO]the total of the package will be $31,500 in hard

money (individual), and $25,000 in soft money (corporate). Right now, we have $11,500 in

immediate needs for a group of candidates associated with Tom Delay [sic], Billy Tauzin,

Joe Barton and Senator Richard Shelby. Delay [sic] is the House Majority Leader. His

agreement is necessary before the House Conferees can push the language we have in

place in the House bill. Shimkus is a close associate of Billy Tauzin and Joe Barton, who

are key House Conferees on our legislation. They have made this request in lieu of

 

 

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3

contributions made to their own campaigns. Tom Young is Senator Shelby's Chief of staff

who is running for the House in Alabama. Shelby is a member of the Senate Energy

Committee and the Banking Committee?and is the lead republican on all Senate PUHCA

related matters. He is our anchor on the Senate side. He's made a substantial request of us

for supporting Young's campaign. These seem disconnected, but ultimately the plan is

directed at getting a strong position at the table on both the Senate and House Side [sic].”

[emphasis added]

Fund-raising events hosted by Tauzin and Barton on behalf of Shimkus, Northup, Graves

and Capito confirm that the Representatives receiving money from Westar executives were

close associates of Tauzin and Barton.

Background: Rep. Barton’s Bill

3/1/01

Governmental Strategies, a Virginia-based lobbying firm, registers as a lobbyist for Westar

Energy. Among the lobbyists working the account are William Kenworthy, Richard

Bornemann and Timothy Smith. [Governmental Strategies filing with the U.S. Senate

Office of Public Records.]

8/2/01

The House passes H.R. 4, a comprehensive energy bill, which does not include either

language on grandfather exemptions for utility holding companies from the Investment

Company Act or language providing special exemptions for Westar Energy. H.R. 4 also

does not include language on electricity deregulation. [See Thomas website]

10/17/01

Governmental Strategies lobbyist Richard Bornemann gives $1,000 to campaign of

Representative Joe Barton (R-Texas) [Federal Election Commission (FEC) database], the

Chairman of the Subcommittee on Energy and Air Quality, who was drafting an electricity

deregulation bill.

12/5/01

Barton introduces his electricity deregulation bill, H.R. 3406, including Section 125 that

would grandfather all affiliates of utilities then subject to the Public Utility Holding

Company Act (PUHCA) from being regulated under the Investment Company Act if

PUHCA were repealed as H.R. 3406 also proposes. [Thomas.website.] (Utility affiliates

have an automatic exemption from the Investment Company Act as long as they are

subject to PUHCA.) [Investment Company Act of 1940, Section 3(c)(8).]

1/30/02

Reps. Dingell/Markey write to SEC Chairman Harvey Pitt (cc:d to Representatives Tauzin,

Barton and Boucher) asking whether the SEC believed that the exemption for PUHCA

utility affiliates from the Investment Company Act as provided by Section 125 of H.R.

3406 would be in the public interest. [Rep. Markey’s website]

2/13/02

SEC Chairman Harvey Pitt forwards to Reps. Dingell and Markey a memorandum written

by SEC staff (Division of Investment Management) opposing Section 125 of H.R. 3406 as

being ill-advised in that it would create a large group of unregulated investment

companies. [Rep. Markey’s website] SEC Commissioner Hunt testifies before Barton’s

subcommittee and addresses the SEC’s opposition to a special exemption for utility

affiliates from the Investment Company Act. [Subcommittee website, testimony at note 7.]

 

 

Page 4

 

4

Rep. Barton replies on the record to Rep. Markey’s attack on the exemption provision:

“That particular provision in the bill was put in for a company or companies in the

midwest, and it has nothing to do with Mr. Green’s company, and we have already told at

the staff level that due to the concerns of Mr. Dingell and yourself, that we will be very

willing to clarify the specific language in it, and if it is controversial, we will take it out in

its entirety….” [Subcommittee on Energy and Air Quality website, hearing transcript,

p. 141, 2/13/02.]

4/02

Richard Bornemann with Governmental Strategies, which Westar paid $60,000 in 2002 to

lobby Congress [Senate Office of Public Records], begins on behalf of Westar to obtain

fundraiser schedules for Tauzin and Barton. The fundraisers are all organized and

coordinated by Virginia-based Epiphany Productions, www.epiphanyproductions.com,

which lists Senator Shelby and Reps. Tauzin, Barton, DeLay, Northup, Oxley, Shimkus,

Gillmor, Alabama Republican House primary candidate Tom Young, and the National

Republican Congressional Committee as clients. [EP, Washington Post, 6/10/03 story by

Juliet Eilperin].

4/23/02

Tauzin & Barton stage their first of eight “Tex-Cajun cookout” fund-raisers for fellow

House Republicans, this one for Rep. John Shimkus (R-IL) at noon at the Capitol Hill

offices of the American Trucking Association. [Epiphany Productions (EP)] In less than a

month on 5/15/02, Shimkus receives a $1,000 check from Douglas T. Lake. [FEC records]

4/24/02

Tauzin and Barton co-host a fundraiser for Rep. Sam Graves (R-MO) at lunchtime at the

Capitol Hill offices of Jack Fields’ 21

st

Century Group. [EP] Two months later on 6/28/02,

Rep. Graves receives a $1,000 check from Westar CEO David Wittig [FEC]

4/25/02

The Senate passes its version of an energy bill triggering a House-Senate energy

conference committee in order to work out the differences between the two bills.

Neither bill contains a provision grandfathering PUHCA affiliates in general or

Westar only from regulation under the Investment Company Act. [Thomas]

5/14/02

Tauzin and Barton co-host a fundraiser for Rep. Anne Northup (R-KY) at noon at the

Capitol Hill offices of the American Trucking Association. [EP] Less than one month later,

on 6/10/02, Northup’s campaign received two checks, one from Westar CEO David Wittig

($500) and one from Westar’s General Counsel Larry D. Irick ($350). [FEC]

5/15/02

Tauzin and Bartonco-host a fundraiser for Rep. Shelly Moore Capito (R-WV) at noon at

the Capitol Hill offices of the American Trucking Association. On June 25, Robert

Mitchell Delk, Freddie Mac’s chief Washington lobbyist and Republican activist who

hosted many of the Ephiphany Production fundraisers in 2002, hosted another fundraiser

for Capito at the DC restaurant Galileo (Rep. Michael Oxley was listed as a “Special

Guest.”). [EP] Five days after this second Capito fundraiser, two Westar executives

(Richard Dixon and Peggy Loyd) deliver a total of $1,000 to Capito’s campaign. [FEC]

5/02

Westar delivers $25,000 to DeLay’s fund-raising organization, Texans for a Republican

Majority [IRS Form 8872 filing by Texans for a Republican Majority PAC] (after Doug

Lawrence writes “Corporate Soft Money: $25,000” in one of his May 2002 memos.)

 

 

Page 5

 

5

5/31/02

Seven Westar executives and three of their DC lobbyists contribute a total of $15,000 to

Sen. Richard Shelby’s former chief-of-staff Tom Young, who is running for Congress in

the Republican primary in Alabama. All 10 contributions are made on May 31, 2002.

[Young goes on to lose the primary in June]. [FEC]

6/5/02

Tauzin and Barton co-host a fundraiser for Rep. Rob Simmons (R-CT) at noon in the

Capitol Hill offices of the American Trucking Association. [EP] In October 2002, two

Westar executives (Douglas Lawrence and Leroy Wages) each make $500 contributions to

Simmons’ campaign. [FEC]

6/02

Westar lobbyist Richard Bornemann attends a Tauzin fundraiser in Louisiana. Tauzin

spokesperson, Ken Johnson, says that Tauzin recognized Bornemann and ordered his staff

to throw him out. Johnson said the lawmaker had barred Bornemann from his office years

earlier after the lobbyist misled Tauzin on a railroad matter. [Washington Post 6/10/03,

Eilperin]. Bornemann, however, in what the AP called a “public spat,” claimed that he had

not made the initial contact, but was simply responding to faxed invitations from the

organizers of the eight Tauzin-Barton fund-raising events, while Johnson said that

Bornemann had called and asked for the list. Bornemann replied that he was “shocked, hurt

and surprised” by the criticism from Tauzin’s office. [Associated Press Newswires,

6/10/03, Yost.].

7/9/02

Tauzin and Barton co-host a fundraiser for Rep. Tom Latham (R-IA) at noon in the Capitol

Hill offices of Jack Fields’ 21

st

Century Group. [EP] On October 29, 2002, two Westar

executives (General Counsel Larry Irick and Bruce Akin) each give $500 to Latham’s

campaign. [FEC]

7/10/02

Tauzin and Barton co-host a fundraiser for Rep. Robin Hayes (R-NC) at noon in the

Capitol Hill offices of Jack Fields’ 21

st

Century Group. [EP] In late October 2002, two

Westar executives (Caroline Williams and Peggy Loyd) each contribute $500 to Hayes’

campaign. [FEC]

7/24/02

Marianne K. Smythe, a partner with the DC law firm Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering, registers

as a lobbyist for Westar Energy to advocate an “exemption from [the] Investment

Company Act for [a] Single Company,” thereby documenting Westar’s corporate interest

in obtaining this exemption. [Senate Office of Public Records.]

7/24/02

Barton holds a dinner fundraiser for his Texas Freedom Fund PAC on Capitol Hill. [EP]

Three Westar executives eventually give a total of $4,000 to Barton and his PAC. [FEC]

7/24/02

Barton meets with Westar officials as arranged by Westar lobbyist Borneman

[Washington Post, 6/10/02.]

7/31/02

Tauzin hosts his own lunchtime fundraiser at the Capitol Hill Club. [EP] That same day,

four Westar executives deliver checks totaling $2,800 to Tauzin’s Bayou Leader PAC.

[FEC]

9/16/02

Tauzin “and the Energy and Commerce Committee Members” host an evening fundraiser

for the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) at The Galleria at

 

 

Page 6

 

6

Lafayette Center. [EP] One month later, on October 23, 2002, three Westar executives

gave a total of $1,150 to the NRCC. [FEC]

9/18/02

Barton inserts Westar grandfather provision in energy conference bill. [Washington

Post, p. A 2, 6/7/03.]

9/19/02

Barton defeats Rep. Markey motion to strike Westar provision from energy

conference bill; wins on party line vote, 8 to 6. Barton votes for himself and votes

proxies for Reps. Barton, Tauzin, DeLay, Michael Bilirakis, Richard Burr, Paul

Gillmor, Cliff Stearns and Fred Upton to preserve the Westar exemption. According

to conference transcript, Barton said: “This really is a policy decision here that the

committee, the conference needs to make…This particular provision benefits one

company. That company is…Western Resources in Topeka, Kansas.” Western Resources

is the former name of Westar. (emphasis supplied). [Washington Post 6/10/03, Eilperin.]

9/19/02

Robert Mitchell Delk, Freddie Mac’s chief Washington lobbyist, hosted a dinner fundraiser

for Rep. Michael Oxley at the upscale DC restaurant Galileo. [EF] One month later, three

Westar executives contributed a total of $2,000 to Oxley and his Leadership PAC 2002.

[FEC]

9/27/02

Westar Energy publicly announces for the first time that the company was in serious

trouble when it acknowledged that it had been served with a federal grand jury subpoena

by the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Kansas for various counts of fraud. [SEC 8-K filing.]

9/27/02

Kansas Corporation Commission Chair John Wine writes to Rep. Markey (cc:d to Kansas

Senators, Congressmen) to object to Westar Energy proposal to seek an exemption from

the ICA in conference committee on H.R. 4. [Markey website]

9/30/02

Rep. Markey sends letter to Rep. Tauzin and Sen. Bingaman of conference committee

suggesting that the committee should rethink the insertion of the Westar exemption, which

they call an “Enron-like loophole,” in light of the announced investigations of Westar for

fraud, money laundering, etc. [AP Newswire, 6/6/03, Yost; Markey website]

10/02

House Republicans withdraw their support ofthe Westar exemption in light of the

investigations of the company. [AP Newswire, 6/6/03, Yost]

11/22/02

David Wittig resigns as CEO of Westar after being indicted. [Westar 14(a) filing at SEC]

12/6/02

Westar executive vice president Douglas T. Lake is placed on unpaid leave. [Westar 14(a)

filing at SEC]

2/7/03

Westar CFO Paul R. Geist resigns. [Westar 14(a) SEC filing]

5/03

A Special Committee of Westar’s Board of Directors releases hundreds of internal

communications implicating most of its former top executives in various illegal and

unethical behavior. (See emails listed on first page.) [Westar 14(a) SEC filing]