Home

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Spd – keen – buscher – Pennell – dyer – dhabalt – shaneman – madonia -

 

 

Keen 233 mp cmdr – links spd -scso williamson

Dyer dhabalt hayes – sex crimes

Shaneman – orkin – spd

Patterson – tavernor = spd – excessive force

Matt madonia is spd detective

Matt goulet – spd – goulet at spi cac –

Dyer fam – spd – ibt – spi clc – united way

Keen – john hayes as 233 cmdr

*jim Royer/Cellini – (ren hotel) p 157 (father)

Buscher – taney county

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spd – defendant – profiles – rough sketch

 

 

 

 

 

 

********************************

Spd - Cmdr. Cliff buscher, REID, LIUNA – taney county – delong – witness intimidation – outlaws mc – clubhouse –

(liuna link here is key)

*********************************

 

 

 

 

 

 

spd - dirt - jack campbell – big promotion - mclaughlin

 

 

 

spd - Jeff Royer – spd – ing – cmdr 233 – gillette

see also keen as cmdr

 

 

 

 

 

 

spd/scso - Adrian Guerrero briefly in spd? – see also under scso

 

 

svpd - Nik Clatfelter related to ibt clatfelter – sherman – timm – cogfa – poe – gray – ibt robinson/cwlp sec  - worked under dunbar at svpd – dunbar/hart – hart/scb noonan – hart/cellini -

 

spd - Deputy Chief Pat Fogleman – 2006 retirees

 

spd - Officer Joe Schweska  - llcc coll r’s relative –steroids – dvm - saathoff – 2006 retirees

 

spd - Lt. Ed Flesch

 

 

 

 ********************************************

spd – parks -  George judd - *explrs* - 

Deputy Chief of Operations

 

 

 

spd - uis - Don Mitchell evidence locker guy

 

spd - dhs - Ralph Caldwell, moves to champaign – bails – dhs – supposed to supervise carpenter/graham – similar to sacco/boesdorfer and dirt team – bikes – davlin -

 

sos - spd - Deputy Chief Charles Palazzolo – ryan admin – pol aspirant – county auditor palazzolo – us kiwanis prez

 

SPD – keith USHMAN – ushman fam – blessac – township – scb - crimestoppers

 

 

spd – bill neale – crimestoppers – *garage - 

 

 

 

spd – Charlie pennell – also close to mcu, supposed to supervise carp/graham, related to bill pennell and john pennell and pennell fam

 

spd – carpenter – mcu -

 

spd – graham - mcu

 

 

spd - Andy Selvaggio – jc’s – kc’s – caths – afl-cio ironworkers – shg boosters

 

 

SPD – LEROY JETTjett - minder – rebbe – APL – sharmin smith - dvm

 

SPD - DON MUMAW – cwlp pol connections – ghost payrolls – see also sfd mumaw – cwlp= ron mumaw

 

SPD – JIM CIMAROSSA – cim fam, isfm, pete – big fam – current ald and former ald -  frank at prairie farms -

 

 

 

 

 

*SGT. JENNIFER BATTERSON, Loami, military police; Springfield Police Department

 

 

 

 

 

SGT. 1ST CLASS RYAN MACHIN, Sherman, military police; Springfield Police Department

 

 

 

 

 

 

*SGT. CHRIS CUNNINGHAM, Springfield, military police ; Springfield Police Department

 

 

 

 

 

*SGT. EDWARD HIGGINSON, Springfield, military police team leader/plans NCO; Springfield Police Department

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

***************************************THIS IS A VERY IMPORTANT PERSON – LINKS – SPD TO ING* 233MP TO PESTICIDES

Sgt kevin keen – ing 233 cmdr – terminix link – 2006 retirees – busted – good case right here ***************************************

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

royer

 

 

 

 

 

 

Polk – is jax dir of doc/prison – denny polk see also rossi/cdb/blago at jax prison and dead IA guy

 

 

Link to coady – sfd – Bernie coady

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 28, 1991

 

Kallenberger-Coady Kelly Jan Coady and James Michael Kallenberger, both of Kansas City, Mo., were married at 11 a.m. June 15 at Blessed Sacrament Church. The Rev. Hugh P. Cassidy performed the ceremony.

The bride is the daughter of James and Dorothy Coady, 2300 Sylvan Ave. The groom is the son of Mrs. Gloria Kallenberger of Kansas City, Mo., and the late Leo Kallenberger.

Serving as matron of honor was Colleen Coady Reisz. Bridesmaids were Caren Coady Zentgraf and Jill Talkington.

Best man was Daniel Kallenberger. Groomsmen were Dick Vaeth and Jeff Royer . Ushers were Jeffrey Coady, Gregory Coady, Stephen Coady and Kevin Coady.

A reception was held at the bride's parents home.

The bride is a graduate of Sacred Heart Academy and the University of Virginia. She is employed as a registered nurse at Trinity Lutheran Hospital in Kansas City, Mo. The groom is a graduate of the University of Missouri and is employed by Burns and McDonnell Architects and Consultants.

The couple will reside in Kansas City, Mo.

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 31, 1997

 

Royer-Wright Angelia Kathleen Wright and Jason Todd Royer, both of Orlando, Fla., were married at 2 p.m. July 19 at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church by the Rev.

John Burnett.

The bride is the daughter of Steven and Diana Wright of Litchfield. The groom is the son of Jim and Jan Royer of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Brandy Quance, with Maggie Kossman, Bree Renthfro, Stephanie Hanger and LeAnn Cunningham as bridesmaids.

Serving as best man was Steve Beveridge, with Jeff Royer , Andrew and Adam Wright and

 

*************Todd Polk******************

 

as groomsmen. Serving as ushers were Craig Husman and Mike Lesczewicz.

A reception was held at the Springfield Motor Boat Club.

The bride is a graduate of Litchfield High School and Eastern Illinois University. The groom is a graduate of Southeast High School and EIU. Both are employed as certified athletic trainers.

The couple will reside in Orlando, Fla
.

 

 

 

The company

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL)

April 26, 2004

 

Estimated printed pages: 5

 

A total of 153 members of the 233rd Military Police Company returned Sunday to Springfield. Military officials said they could not provide a complete roster of the company for privacy reasons. With the help of officials at Fort McCoy, Wis., The State Journal-Register provided forms by which members of the company could authorize release of their names, and about 100 members of the 233rd indicated they were willing to be recognized for their service in print.

 

Those soldiers, their military specialties and, where provided, their civilian occupations are:

OFFICERS

 

CAPT. JEFF ROYER, Springfield, commanding officer; Springfield Police Department

 

 

 

 

 

FIRE, POLICE JOIN FORCES TO FIGHT ARSON / TWO OFFICERS ALSO SWORN IN

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, September 10, 1999

Author/Byline: LESLEY ROGERS STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 13

No one would have believed it five years ago.

But on Thursday, for the first time in Springfield's history, the police

and fire departments -- two separate entities that often compete for city funding and prestige –

 

jointly swore in four arson investigators as police officers.

Mayor Karen Hasara likened the event to the feeling parents have when their children get along. "For the first time, we are swearing in firefighters who will act in a very professional capacity to assist in arson investigation," Hasara said. "It delights me that this did not come from me, but from the fire department, with cooperation of the police department. In some cities, the police department would not be receptive and cooperative with such a project." Four longtime firefighters who serve as arson investigators trained for 340 hours to add police officer duties to their job titles. Now, the firefighters can oversee the investigation of a suspicious fire from beginning to end, including making the arrest. Before, firefighters started the investigation, and police officers took over after the source of the fire was determined.

Police officers will still continue to assist in the investigations.

Also on Thursday, Hasara helped Police Chief John Harris swear in

 

Springfield's two newest police officers,

 

Tanessa Ferguson and

 

Jeff Royer.

 

 

And the rookie officers, who start Sunday at midnight, were given personal gun safes to use when locking their city-issued weapons at home.

Last month, the Springfield City Council approved spending almost $50,000 to buy 285 portable firearms safes to comply with a new state requirement that guns be stored safely away from children. The police department isn't required to buy the safes, but Sgt. Bill Pittman said they take liability away from the city if a weapon is stolen, or if a police officer's gun gets into the hands of a child.

Pittman noted that several officers' guns have been stolen, with one turning up in the possession of a Springfield gang member.

The safes, which are accessed with a password, will be distributed to all 268 city officers. The remaining safes will be used in select police vehicles.

Ferguson, a 24-year-old Shelbyville native, has been working at the Sherman Police Department for 13 months. Royer, 30, a Springfield native who attended Southeast High School, was an officer in the Quincy Police Department for four years.

Both the new officers and the

 

firefighters taking the police officer oath

 

-- Peter Janssen,

Terry Johnson,

Dale Simpson and

Bill Hurrelbrink

 

-- were told by Harris to remember to balance work with family duties, and to be prepared to see "the very worst that society has to offer." Hurrelbrink, who has been with the fire department for 20 years, said investigating the source of a blaze is something a person with a long history of fighting fires can tackle best. "Trying to find what we call the origin of the fire and the cause of the fire, it is somewhat of an art," Hurrelbrink said. "I can't give you all my secrets, but people think they destroy evidence, but actually they create it." The idea of the police and fire departments conducting such extensive cross-training, and the swearing-in of firefighters as police officers would have made people laugh years ago, both Harris and Fire Chief J.D. Knox said after Thursday's ceremony. "This sort of cooperation in the city is light years away from what it was in the past," Harris said.

While the firefighters took police training and took oaths as police officers, they won't patrol or actually be considered police officers. But they will have the ability to make arrests, Knox said. "This gives them the police powers to take the case from A to Z," he said. "They can make arrests, investigate, carry guns, everything."

Caption: Springfield Police Chief

John Harris congratulates Tanessa Ferguson and Jeff Royer , newly sworn-in police officers Thursday in the city council chamber. Harris also swore in four arson investigators as police officers. / The Springfield Police Department has purchased combination safes for all of its officers with the help of a federal grant.
Memo: ON WEB SITE WITH PHOTO / B&W ON PAGE 14

 

 

 

 

JASINSKI PROMISES NO MIRACLES AT SE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL)

Tuesday, August 27, 1985

Author/Byline: Jim Wildrick
Edition: M1,M2,E1
Section: SPORTS
Page: 13

Jerry Jasinski is a man used to success.

He comes to Southeast High School from Danville Schlarman, where his teams

went 18-9. Prior to that, he was an assistant coach at Chicago Gordon Tech when that team won the first Class 6A state championship in 1980. Jasinski inherits a team that was 0-9 last season, 0-9 in 1983 and has had a losing record the last seven years.

SOMETHING HAS TO give here, right? "Coaches can't be miracle workers," said Jasinski. "Anyone who tells you he is is lying through his teeth. All we are is manipulators. We take what we're dealt, and it's our job to put it all together. If we put all the pegs in the right places, it works."

A year ago, the Spartans scored just 61 points while giving up 279, were guilty of 45 turnovers to 24 for their opponents and yielded more than twice as much yardage as they gained. Obviously, the pegs need to be repositioned. And Jasinski thinks the process has begun.

"I'm very encouraged by what I've seen so far," he said Monday. "The kids are working very hard, and they have a terrific attitude. They believe they can win."

The numbers are a little thin (14 seniors, 11 juniors, 11 letter winners), and consequently you're going to see a lot of Spartans playing on both sides of the football. "I hate it," said Jasinski. "I'd like to start 22 kids, but that's a luxury we can't afford."

The first change Spartan fans may notice is at quarterback, where incumbent Mike Gray is likely to be supplanted by Troy Halverson. Gray and Halverson were the second- and third-leading rushers, respectively, last season with 197 and 108 yards. Steve Wade, the leader with 224, left the team voluntarily, said Jasinski.

Pursued hard and often during 1984, Gray completed just 16 of 94 passes for 313 yards.

"Mike is a good, hard-nosed football player," assessed Jasinski, "and he is pushing Troy hard. But I have a feeling Mike would just as soon be a running back and not have to concern himself with the other aspects. He's a team player. He's not caught up in that me syndrome."

Of Halverson, Jasinski said: "I like his leadership and his coachability. He has a great desire to win, plus we'll run the option and he does that well.

"Gray and (5-foot-2, 175-pound junior) Steve Borders are running 1-2 at fullback, and Ricky West and Steve Cook are the leading candidates at tailback.

"Gray is a hard-nosed, strong, bull-type runner. Borders, being short, is awfully hard to tackle. West has what I would call exceptional speed and reads his blockers well. Cook is just a good, hard-working senior."

When Halverson throws, he'll likely be looking to Curtis Bazemore at split end, West at flanker, if he doesn't start in the backfield, and James Dayringer at tight end. Chuck Shanklin and Duane Green also figure in the plans.

"The passing game will do what we want it to do," said Jasinski. "We're not going to throw for 2,000, but our passing game will complement our running game."

The offensive line boasts experience and some size. The tackles are Jim McKinney (6-2, 230) and Tony Little (5-9, 205), the guards are Greg Gardner (6-0, 175) and John Evans (6-2, 175) and Bill Bacon is penciled in at center. Only Bacon, a 170-pounder, is a non-letter winner.

"They'll do a good job," predicted Jasinski. "As an old offensive lineman and offensive line coach, I believe that's the hardest job in football. You constantly have to think, react and play with tenacity."

DEFENSIVELY, JASINSKI'S squad will start in a 5-2 "and give you a lot of looks. We've got some kids who have shown a lot of enthusiasm and who aren't afraid to hit."

McKinney and 240-pound sophomore Jim Sanges are likely starters at tackle, with Little at noseguard. Evans and Gray are the probables at end. Dayringer will man one linebacker spot, while Halverson, Mike Belton, West and Cook are in the secondary picture.

"We've got adequate size, but size isn't as important as most people think," said Jasinski. "When we won the state championship at Gordon Tech, we had a 5-8, 155-pound center and didn't have a lineman over 200 pounds. How much you want to play is more important than size.

"Our speed and quickness, overall, is adequate. We're not mud runners, but I wish we had a little more speed."

Jasinski hopes the intangibles will be a strong suit.

"These kids have been through a lot the last two weeks, and I get a strong feeling of camaraderie. The senior class leadership has been excellent. Hey, no one wants to be beaten on by other people all the time. These kids walk by the kids from Griffin, Springfield and Lanphier on the streets. They want to be able to hold their heads up high and know that if they didn't win, at least they gave them a good game."

While offering no predictions on a record, Jasinski is looking forward to the end of what might be called the Rodney Dangerfield era of Southeast football.

"We're fighting for respect," said Jasinski. "I believe in these kids, and I think they believe in themselves. If we're able to sneak up on some people because of the lack of success in the past, that's fine with me."

SOUTHEAST ROSTER x-Chris Arnold E 155 Sr. x-Curtis Bazemore E 150 Sr. Chico Cavener E 185 Sr. x-Steve Cook RB 165 Sr. x-James Dayringer E 160 Sr. Leroy Dixon E 145 Sr. x-John Evans L 175 Sr. x-Greg Gardner L 175 Sr. x-Mike Gray QB 175 Sr. x-Troy Halverson QB 160 Sr. x-Tony Little L 205 Sr. x-Jim McKinney L 230 Sr. Chuck Shanklin E 140 Sr. Todd Smith E 150 Sr. Bill Bacon L 170 Jr. Mike Belton E 160 Jr. Steve Borders RB 175 Jr. Duane Green E 145 Jr. Darren Highland E 165 Jr. John Jenkins E 120 Jr. Bryan Rotherham QB 155 Jr.
Jeff Royer L 155 Jr. Mark Ryan QB 155 Jr. Ross Wagy E 150 Jr. x-Rick West E 155 Jr. Jeff Bridges E 145 So. Ted Charles E 150 So. Marlowe Douglas RB 150 So. Dan Foytlin QB 135 So. Brent Gerger QB 120 So. Rod Groth E 160 So. James Hofferkamp L 150 So. Bob Houston L 185 So. Bill Kendrick E 145 So. Simon Kiefer L 200 So. Mark Kunshek QB 140 So. Tony Plozizka L 180 So.

Chris
Reavis RB 150 So. Jim Spanges L 230 So. Mike Shields RB 140 So. Erik Siwak RB 125 So. Brian Stemmons RB 145 So. Aaron Taylor E 145 So. Kevin Van Houten L 155 So. Montes Wright E 125 So. Coach Jerry Jasinski Assistant coaches Tim Conkey, Kerry Crum, Steve Desecki, Greg McLaughlin Nickname Spartans Enrollment 1,500 Conference Mid-State 10 1984 conference record 0-7 1984 overall record 0-9 SOUTHEAST SCHEDULE Saturday At Belleville West, 8 p.m. Sept. 6 Springfield, 7:30 p.m., x Sept. 14 At Peoria Manual, 2 p.m., x Sept. 21 At Peoria Spalding, 2 p.m., x Sept. 27 Peoria Woodruff, 7:30 p.m., x Oct. 5 Pekin, 1:30, x Oct. 12 At Peoria Richwoods, 7:30 p.m., x Oct. 18 At Lanphier, 7:30 p.m., x Oct. 24 Griffin, 7:30 p.m.

Caption: Southeast captain Tony Little

 

 

Possible explanation of Kansas city problems – see also – usattys – Kansas city

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KEEN –

233 mp – spd/royer/gillette –

Pruitt – cocaine – Williamson  – mudra – terminix – COY

 

 

 

COCAINE WITH SIDENER AND PRUITT –

RELATED TO WILLIAMSON

ING – CMDR FOR 233 MP

SPD PIO –

TERMINIX LINK –

BAILS WITH OTHER 2006 RETIREES

Airports – Drugs

Maggiore - saladino

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateTue, May 22, 2007 at 10:33 AM

subjectpruitt gets 60 - sidener group was in bloomington - state farm

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details 5/22/07

 

 

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Seventh sentenced for role in cocaine ring

Jerrad A. Pruitt, son-in-law of sheriff, gets six years

By CHRIS DETTRO

STAFF WRITER

Published Tuesday, May 22, 2007

A 28-year-old Springfield man Monday became the seventh person to be sentenced in connection with a Springfield cocaine distribution ring that resulted in federal indictments in late 2005 and in 2006.

 

Jerrad A. Pruitt of the 4000 block of Hazelcrest Road was sentenced to six years in prison for his role in a conspiracy to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine from June 2000 to October 2003.

Pruitt, whose wife is the daughter of Sangamon County Sheriff Neil Williamson and the

 

 

stepdaughter of retired Springfield police Sgt. Kevin Keen,

 

 

pleaded guilty last August to conspiring to distribute cocaine he bought from Danny Sidener Jr. in Springfield, Bloomington and Carbondale.

Pruitt admitted at his plea hearing that he either paid Sidener outright for the drugs or obtained cocaine on a front or consignment basis, then sold or fronted the drugs to others for distribution.

Sidener also pleaded guilty to conspiring to distribute cocaine and has been sentenced to 11 years, nine months in prison.

Pruitt worked from Aug. 22, 2005, to July 20, 2006, as a Sangamon County 911 dispatcher. He took the $27,000 job after the drug conspiracy ended.

The government calculated Pruitt's federal sentencing guideline range to be between 108 and 135 months in prison based on the facts of the case and his criminal history. The government recommended a reduction because of Pruitt's cooperation in the case.

However, U.S. District Judge Jeanne Scott reduced the guideline range to a 97-month minimum, accepting defense attorney John "Mo" Madonia's argument that the seriousness of Pruitt's criminal history was overrepresented.

Madonia said Pruitt pleaded guilty when he was 19 to misdemeanor illegal consumption of alcohol.

He also pleaded guilty in 2000 to possession of a controlled substance, with the judgment withheld due to first-offender sentencing. The court ultimately determined he had successfully completed the probation period and dismissed the case, Madonia said.

Scott reduced Pruitt's sentence by an additional six months because he voluntarily removed himself from the conspiracy three years before he was charged.

"There was an additional reduction for the positive changes he made in his life," Madonia said.

He said Pruitt ended his involvement with drugs when he graduated from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale in 2003. Madonia said Pruitt used his education to obtain the dispatch job and that he married, bought a house and settled down

"It was after all that when his past caught up with him, and he found himself facing a multiple-year sentence of imprisonment for conduct that occurred while he was an immature college student attempting to make ends meet and further his educational endeavors," Madonia said.

The minimum sentence Pruitt could have received was five years in prison.

The charges were the result of an investigation by the Drug Enforcement Administration, Springfield Police Department and the Central Illinois Enforcement Group. Assistant U.S. attorney David Risley represented the government at sentencing.

The investigation resulted in nine people being charged in federal court and in formal charges being brought against three attorneys by the state Attorney Registration and Disciplinary Commission. To date, the seven people sentenced have received prison terms ranging from five to 191/2 years.

The office of the state appellate prosecutor also has been considering whether others should face criminal charges in the case.

Chris Dettro can be reached at 788-1510 or chris.dettro@sj-r.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keen – 233 mp CMDR

 

Very important –

 

 

 

 

Kevin keen = 233 comdr

 

Xa – terminix – mudra – coy

 

See also keen links – local police – “2006 retirees”

 

THE 233RD COMES HOME CHEERS GREET GULF WAR VETS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, May 15, 1991

Author/Byline: BRIAN FLIFLET STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 1

Members of the 233rd Military Police Company marched home Tuesday before a cheering crowd in front of the state Capitol, but its commander said the

heroes weren't the ones receiving the hero's welcome.

"War is a terrible thing," said 1st Lt. Kevin Keen, the 233rd's commander. "There are no winners, only survivors. There are no heroes standing before you in the 233rd.

"The real heroes are the American citizens," Keen said, referring to the support they gave to the war effort.

About 2,500 people gathered along both sides of Second Street between Monroe Street and Capitol Avenue to welcome the troops.

The 150-member company stopped in front of the statue of Abraham Lincoln to watch the ceremonies, and three UH-1H helicopters of the 106th Aviation Battalion flew overhead in tribute.

"On November 21, 1990, as your commander, I took from you your sons, your daughters, your husbands, wives and loved ones," Keen said. "My pledge to you then was to come home with everyone I left with. If I failed in any other mission along the way, I succeeded in the most important one -- everyone is home today standing in front of you."

State Adj. Gen. Harold Holesinger welcomed the troops, members of the Illinois National Guard, home on behalf of Gov. Jim Edgar.

"I saw you people off, and I welcomed you home when you first arrived in the states," he said. "And I can't tell you how proud I am each time I see you.

"Now's the time to shake the sand off your boots and enjoy the celebration."

Keen asked for special recognition for two members of the 233rd who volunteered to stay in Saudi Arabia and help with the pullout. Spec. Robert Aper and Spec. Jeffrey Patch will help ensure that equipment gets aboard ships safely. They will be home by Sept. 18, Keen said.

Friends and family members who came to greet their loved ones told about some of the ironies of this conflict.

Gabriel Kil was only 1 year old in 1945, when American soldiers liberated the German labor camp in which he and his family were held. As he waited Tuesday for his son Robbie to march down Second Street with the 233rd, Kil saw parallels between his liberation at infancy and his son's participation in the liberation of Kuwait.

"It's ironic that my son participated in that kind of action," said Kil, who was born in Poland. "Things are balanced out. What the Americans did for me and my family in 1945, my son was able to do for the Kuwaitis."

John Schneider, 20, was born in Vietnam and came to the United States in 1971 with his father, Ron, who served in Vietnam for 38 months. In telephone conversations from the Middle East, John had worried about a Vietnam-like reaction to the Persian Gulf War, his father said.

"He called and wanted to make sure it was being supported," Ron Schneider said. "Most of the guys are worried that they don't get screwed over like we did."

After the ceremonies at the Capitol, the troops boarded buses and went to Camp Lincoln for a private reception with their families, where they shared some of their experiences.

"Thank God for a Patriot missile or I wouldn't be here today," Sgt. Barry Nass of Springfield said. A Scud missile was headed for the unit's compound in Saudi Arabia,but it exploded overhead when a Patriot intercepted it, he said.

The 233rd was part of the 1st Infantry Division when the ground war was launched, Keen said. The unit collected, processed and transported more than 5,000 prisoners of war at the height of the conflict, he said.

"We weren't in the heat of battle, but we weren't out of harm's way," Keen said. "All of the prisoners that we had were armed, so at any time any one of them could have drawn on our soldiers."

Spec. John Bartello remembered walking through a minefield. "We realized we were in a minefield when we were in the middle of it," he said. "We waited for daylight to go through the rest of it."

The unit was 40 miles north of Kuwait City in an area they were told was secure when they found a bunker with two Iraqi soldiers who hadn't surrendered, Pfc. Francis Rutledge said.

Among the AK-47s and hand grenades in bunkers, the soldiers also found booby traps, said Pfc. Kevin McAnally and Pfc. Robert Roate.

"We looked in a tank and there was a trip wire across the entrance," NcAnally said.

McAnally said he found an Iraqi girl while on a courier run delivering food to another platoon. The camel she was riding stepped on a land mine. The camel and the girl's brother were killed.

In addition to processing POWs, the unit provided humanitarian assistance to refugees, Keen said, working with the 11th Aviation Brigade in AsSalman, Iraq, about 120 miles north of the Kuwaiti border.

"There was total destruction everywhere you looked," Keen said. "The tanks and the armor that preceded us wiped out everything in their path."

Keen and the other members of the 233rd won't be released from duty until May 20. They must report for armed formation at 9 a.m. today, Keen said.

Caption: Above, Bob Dorsey gets a hug from his 4-year-old daughter, Sarah, while still in the ranks of the 233rd Military Police Company during ceremonies outside the state Capitol. Right, Pete Ting gets a good look from the shoulders of Jon Launer as they cheer the return of Shawn and Eric O'Neill, two brothers who served in the Persian Gulf War with the 233rd.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateThu, Jan 25, 2007 at 12:37 PM

subjectlook at 233rd military police - spfld based - career path - mi - cifa - contractors

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233rd MP former cmdr – keen

 

 

Springfield Police Department spokesman will serve active duty

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL)

July 13, 2005

Author: JAYETTE BOLINSKI STAFF WRITER

Estimated printed pages: 2

 

Sgt. Kevin Keen, who has appeared in print and on television hundreds of times as spokesman for the Springfield Police Department, is leaving to serve 18 months of active duty with the U.S. Army Reserves.

 

Keen, 49, had planned to retire in March, so he will return to the force just long enough to file retirement paperwork once his reserve assignment is complete.

His replacement is longtime department veteran Sgt. Pat Ross, who will take over as spokesman next week.

 

Keen's last day on the job is Friday, and he will report for duty at Fort McCoy in Wisconsin on July 24. He said he had been aware for some time that his unit, based out of Fort Sheridan in Chicago, could be mobilized. He received official word last week.

 

Fort McCoy is a mobilization center, where soldiers go through training and administrative processing before being deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. Soldiers also go through demobilization at Fort McCoy once they return to the States.

 

"People have commented on the sacrifice of having to serve 18 months. Eighteen months is a long time, but my tour of duty at a stateside military post pales in comparison to the mobilization that other soldiers have faced for duty in Iraq and Afghanistan," he said.

 

Keen has been with the U.S. Army Reserves for 14 months, but he's been in the military 25 years. He enlisted in the Army in 1975 and has been a military policeman.

 

He joined the Illinois National Guard in 1986 and moved to the reserves in May 2004.

 

He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in January 2001. He was in the Illinois Air National Guard at Capital Airport for a year before joining the Illinois National Guard in 1986.

 

Keen commanded the 233rd Military Police Company of the Illinois National Guard for 183 days in Kuwait during Operation Desert Storm in 1991,

 

and he was awarded the Bronze Star.

 

He plans to remain in the military until he reaches the mandatory retirement date, which for him will be in 2015.

 

He has been at the police department since February 1980 and has been its spokesman and public information officer since 1999. He recalled Tuesday that he was on military duty in Korea when his wife phoned him to tell him he'd been promoted to sergeant and named the new PIO, a job he hadn't actually sought but quickly grew to enjoy.

 

"Despite the ups and downs that have come along the way, I don't regret it. There's not another job at the police department I'd rather have," he said.

 

"I'm proud to retire from this position, because I had the ability to impact the image of the police department and get the good news out. I always tried to present the police department in the most true and positive light that I could."

 

Keen's wife, Earlene, will remain in Springfield while he is at Fort McCoy. He has three adult children, including a daughter who is getting married in September. He also has four grandchildren.

 

"For the last 19 of my 25 years in the military, my wife has always supported me and whatever comes down the pike. It's just one of those things you learn to deal with," he said.

  Caption:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateTue, Jul 15, 2008 at 11:01 AM

subject233rd MP - SPD - SCSO - ISP

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details 7/15/08

 

 

Guard members report for duty / Springfield police, sheriff's office may lose officers

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - September 29, 2001

Author: DOUG FINKE and SARAH ANTONACCI STAFF WRITERS

 

More than 130 members of Illinois National Guard military police units reported for duty Friday in preparation for assignment as additional security at state airports.

 

The call-up could cost the Springfield Police Department eight officers, including two who currently work on the street, and remove three deputies from the Sangamon County Sheriff's Office.

 

The local officers are among the 76 members of the 233rd Military Police Company in Springfield called to duty along with 56 members of the 933rd Military Police Company in Chicago.

 

The soldiers will get training in airport security measures next week, but even National Guard officials do not know for sure what their troops will be doing.

 

"We really don't know what the mission will be," said Brig. Gen. Chuck Fleming, assistant adjutant general. "That depends on the regional coordinator of the Federal Aviation Administration. This thing is being put together as we sit here."

 

On Thursday, Major Gen. David Harris, head of the Illinois Department of Military Affairs, said a unit based in Freeport also would be called to duty. But Friday, Fleming said, "After further mission analysis, we decided to go with just those two companies" in Chicago and Springfield.

 

"They will go home on Sunday to get additional clothing and personal items they need for a 31- to 45-day period," Fleming said. "They will report back on Monday."

 

All of the soldiers will report to Bloomington to undergo training under the supervision of the FAA. They could be on duty at airports by the end of next week, Fleming said.

 

The military police officers will be assigned to 12 airports throughout the state, including Capital Airport in Springfield, the Greater Peoria Regional Airport and airports in Bloomington, Quincy, Decatur, Champaign and Moline.

 

Although the security mission of the National Guard is initially scheduled to last six months, Fleming said officers hope they can rotate personnel out after a month or 45 days.

 

Technically, the guard units were not called to active duty in the state, but rather for the federal government. The distinction means the soldiers are guaranteed their civilian jobs when their service is concluded.

 

In Springfield, Keen said the police department did not know as of Friday if all eight officers in the 233rd will have to report immediately.

 

But a plan is in place to keep just as many police officers on the street as before the call-up, he said.

 

"Of the eight, only two are in operations, and they will be replaced by within," Keen said. "The motoring public won't see any differences in the way the streets are patrolled."

 

Capt. Gary Stone of the sheriff's department said the agency could stand to lose two deputies from the second shift and one off the midnight shift if they all end up being called away.

 

"On Sept. 12, we sat around and discussed this, once we realized the implications of what happened the day before and based on what we saw in Desert Storm. We thought the mobility of the guard and reserves might be a real possibility and made a game plan," he said.

 

He said the department will be reorganized and personnel will be pulled from other units to cover those street officers' positions.

 

Springfield officers who are members of the 233rd are:

 

Jeff Royer,

 

Naythan Stewart,

 

Bobby Dorsey,

 

Kevin Donaldson,

 

Jeramie Mayes and three police recruits due to start Monday:

 

James Kollins,

 

Ed Higginson and

 

Jennifer Batterson. Stewart and Dorsey are street officers.

 

Sheriff's deputies who may be called away include

 

Adrian Guerrero ,

 

John Hayes and

 

John Gillette.

 

"We're not sure when they'll know, but they've been called to their units. They're not sure when they're going or where, but they have been told to prepare," Keen said.

Caption: Pfc.

 

Theresa Carwile

 

of Pesotum says goodbye to her mother, Cathy Ring of Pesotum, before reporting for duty at Camp Lincoln in Springfield. Carwile is among the National Guard members called to duty for airport security.

Memo: ON WEB SITE WITH PHOTO

 

 

 

 

 

Several in city and county law enforcement to retire

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, February 26, 2006

Author/Byline: JAYETTE BOLINSKI STAFF WRITER

Section: CITY/STATE

Page: 17

- Show quoted text -

It's tough to get Capt. Dennis Sloman to tout his accomplishments as the head of Illinois State Police District 9, the district based in Springfield.

 

He said any success he's had comes down to one thing: his "troops" make him look good.

 

"I don't view my job as doing anything. There's a good bunch of troops here. They're the ones that do the job. I'm real proud of all of them that are here now and those that have been here in the past," he said.

 

"I tell the story that I lived a young boy's dream. Every little boy wants to be a cop. I just never got out of that phase. I was a trooper here and got to wear the uniform and was fortunate enough to be able to come back and run the place."

 

Sloman's dream career will come to an end Tuesday, when he retires after nearly 27 years with the Illinois State Police. He is one of about a dozen local police officers who will retire this spring after lengthy careers in law enforcement.

 

Retiring March 3 from the Springfield Police Department are Deputy Chief Pat Fogleman,

 

Sgt. Kevin Keen,

 

detectives Al Brown and Terry Stouffe and officer Tommy Baughman. Officer Joe Schweska will retire March 19, and Sgt. Tim Young will retire April 7.

 

The Sangamon County Sheriff's Office will lose five deputies to retirement by the end of March. Detective Leah Boston will retire March 22, and Lt. Pat Davlin and deputies John Diefenback, Roger Stuart and Dave Shaneman will retire March 31.

 

"We're going to probably lose 130 years of experience," Sheriff Neil Williamson said. "When you lose five people, it's rather significant. That's the key to our whole existence, just the people who work here. When you lose good people who have experience, you can't just walk out on the street and say, 'Come be a deputy and fill these shoes.'"

 

Sloman, 53, grew up in on a farm in Montgomery County and graduated from Pawnee High School. A clerking job at the Springfield FBI office got him interested in a career in law enforcement.

 

He landed his first Illinois State Police job in 1979 as a trooper based in Macomb. He eventually was transferred to District 9. He was promoted to sergeant in 1985, master sergeant in 1990, lieutenant in 1996 and captain in 1997. He was head of the district investigations unit and worked in the agency's Division of Internal Investigations and its Strategic Planning and Analysis Bureau.

 

One of Sloman's more notable assignments was as officer in charge of the 39-day Roby standoff in 1997.

 

He became commander of District 18 in Litchfield in the summer of 1998 and was named commander of District 9 in February 1999.

 

"We've run some good operations, had some good details," he said.

 

Sloman has no specific retirement plans. He lives in Pleasant Plains with his wife, Nancy, to whom he has been married for 32 years. He has two children, Tyler and Amanda, and a 2-year-old grandson and is expecting twin grandchildren in July. He retired in 2000 after 26 years with the 183rd Illinois Air National Guard.

 

No replacement has been named for the District 9 commander's position. The agency is expected to post the opening in the next week or so.

 

"District 9, because of the capital and the headquarters being here, is kind of a popular one," he said. "It's unique because of the capital and the headquarters. The fair is a big deal. We've worked on details on every president since Jimmy Carter."

 

Fogleman, head of the Springfield Police Department's Administrative Services Division, also is departing after 27 years on the force. He had a short career with the Lake Springfield police before being hired by the city department in February 1979.

 

He worked for nine years as a second-shift patrol officer in the southeast part of town, then went to the police academy to be a training officer, eventually being promoted to assistant commander in charge of the academy. After a year he went back to being a patrolman on the day shift, working the north end and the Enos Park area.

 

Fogleman, 50, was promoted to sergeant in 1996 and to lieutenant in 2000. In 2002, he was transferred to the department's internal affairs division, where he spent three years until being promoted to his current job.

 

He said among the most notable points in his career were the department's transition from revolvers to automatic pistols while he was at the academy and his involvement in the department's community policing programs.

 

His proudest moments, however, involve training rookie officers.

 

"I think some of the rewarding stuff now is some of the guys who I was their FTO (field training officer) to see where they're at in the department now. My most rewarding time was in the training field," he said. "I just think it's a more positive environment in the world of police work, which is all so negative, anyway."

 

His advice for up-and-coming officers?

 

"Number one, don't ever forget where you came from. That comes from good old Mike Walton (former Springfield police chief). The second thing would be to treat the people you deal with like you would like to be treated or like you would like to have your mother or sister dealt with."

 

Fogleman, a motor sports junkie, said he has no specific retirement plans. He is married to Marsha Fogleman and has two sons, Nick, 24, and Pat, 21. He said he is proud of his time as a city police officer.

 

"Even with all the negative that's going on with the Springfield Police Department, I still think it's probably one of the best police departments in the country," he said.

 

Lt. Ed Flesch will be promoted to Fogleman's position.

 

The other retiring officers and deputies are taking a great deal of valuable experience with them, said Williamson and Springfield Police Chief Don Kliment.

 

From the sheriff's office:

 

* Davlin will retire after 21 years. His most recent assignment was head of the department's crime prevention unit. Prior to that, he was a lieutenant supervising deputies on patrol.

 

 

* Boston, a longtime detective, will retire after 29 years. She specializes in child abuse cases and works with the Child Advocacy Center.

 

"It takes a special person to be able to sort through all that trash and get down to talking to the youngsters and the victims," Williamson said.

 

* Diefenback will retire after 22 years. He is a deputy assigned to the traffic division, enforcing traffic and DUI laws, truck weights, school bus enforcement, seat belt details, roadside safety checks and underage alcohol audits.

 

* Stuart will retire after 20 years. He is a deputy assigned to crime prevention and has worked as the department's senior citizens officer and is a hostage negotiator.

 

* Shaneman will retire after 20 years. He is a deputy on the midnight shift and has been on the emergency response team.

 

From the Springfield Police Department:

 

* Keen will retire after 26 years. His most recent job was as the public information officer for the department and head of its crime prevention unit.

 

* Baughman will retire after 26 years. He most recently was a day-shift patrol officer.

 

* Schweska will retire after 24 years. Much of his career was spent as a third-shift patrol officer but he also has worked in crime prevention, as a DARE officer and in the evidence section.

 

* Both Stouffe and Brown will retire after 27 years. Both are detectives.

 

* Young, a veteran detective with many decorations, will retire with 26 years on the force.

 

Kliment said he wishes the retirees the best and thanks them for their service.

 

"Obviously, they've meant a lot not only to the police department but to the city of Springfield as a whole, and their friendships will be missed," he said.

Caption: While packing his belongings Friday, Illinois State Police Capt. Dennis Sloman dusts off an old state trooper hat that decorated his office at the District 9 headquarters. Sloman will retire Tuesday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, August 5, 1986

 

Kenneth K. Keen Sr.

 

Kenneth K. Keen Sr., 60, of Springfield died at 12:01 a.m. Monday at St.

 

John's Hospital.

 

He was born Nov. 28, 1925, in Glenarm, the son of Joseph F. and Oma Mae Cundiff Keen . A lifelong resident of Springfield, Mr. Keen was married to Joan P. Barnum in 1968 and she died in 1985. He attended Roanoke Baptist Church. Prior to his retirement,

 

he was a controller for the Terminix International Inc., for 29 years.

 

Surviving are three sons, Kenneth K. Jr. of Petersburg, Joseph of Jacksonville and

 

Kevin of Springfield;

 

one stepson, Melvin Barnum of Belleville; one brother, Edward of Springfield; one sister, Mrs. Ellen Williams of Fort Walton Beach, Fla.; nine grandchildren; several nieces and nephews.

 

Services will be at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday at Vancil Memorial Funeral Chapel, with the Rev. LaRue DeFrates officiating. Burial will be in Roselawn Memorial Park.

 

TITLE: ANNIVERSARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, April 30, 1996

Keen -45th Mr. and Mrs. Edward E. Keen of Springfield celebrated their 45th wedding anniversary with a family brunch hosted by their children at Baur's Restaurant.

 

Keen and the former Margaret A. Clark were married April 21, 1951, at St.

 

Patrick's Church by the Rev. James Haggrity.

 

Mr. Keen has been employed by Terminix International for 32 years.

 

Mrs. Keen has been employed by Illinois Bell Telephone for 43 years.

 

They are the parents of four children, Kimberly Murphy of Raymond, Machele Thomas of Chatham, Shawn of Duvall and Patrick of Springfield. There are seven grandchildren.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateWed, Mar 25, 2009 at 3:42 PM

subject collaboration on youth - employee - theresa mudra - saladino - graham - orkin

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details Mar 25

 

 

Maggiore-Mudra

Theresa Marie Mudra and

Todd Alan Maggiore, DMD, both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. July 12 at Christ the King Church by the Rev. David Lantz.

 

The bride is the daughter of Joe and Donna Mudra of Springfield. The groom is the son of Richard and Helen Maggiore of Springfield.

 

Serving as maid of honor was Lori Mitchell, with Gina Graham as bridesmaid.

 

Serving as best man was

Jermey Maggiore, with Tim Kell serving as groomsman. Serving as ushers were

 John Saladino, Mike Hawkins and Jim File.

 

A reception was held at Panther Creek Country Club.

 

The bride is a graduate of Lanphier High School, Springfield College in Illinois and Illinois State University.

 

She is employed by the Illinois Collaboration on Youth .

 

The groom is a graduate of Griffin High School, SCI, the University of Illinois, Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville School of Dental Medicine. He is a practicing dentist with Dr.

 

Dennis

Hayes.

 

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Williamson – Pruitt – keen - cocaine

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

to"infoweb@newsbank.com" <infoweb@newsbank.com>

 

dateWed, Feb 21, 2007 at 2:10 PM

subjectscso - 911 dispatch - pruitt

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details 2/21/07

 

 

pruitt was leaving the room and calling people on his cel phone to give them a heads up that the police were on the way or that that they were being investigated. this is the sheriff's son in law; placed in a sensitive position by the sheriff himself. watch out for representation by madonia. see also pruitt and construction deals

 

 

On 2/20/07, infoweb@newsbank.com <infoweb@newsbank.com> wrote:

Paper: State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL)

Title: Cocaine investigation over / Latest to plead guilty has ties to law enforcement

Author: SARAH ANTONACCI and JOHN REYNOLDS STAFF WRITERS

Date: August 24, 2006

Section: NEWS

Page: 1

 

A 27-year-old man pleaded guilty in federal court Wednesday to a charge that he distributed drugs in Springfield and other communities.

 

 

Jerrad A. Pruitt of the 4000 block of Hazelcrest Road admitted to conspiring to distribute cocaine. He is to be sentenced Dec. 18 and faces five to 40 years in prison.Pruitt is married to the daughter of Sangamon County Sheriff Neil Williamson and stepdaughter of retired police Sgt. Kevin Keen, longtime spokesman for the Springfield Police Department. He is also a former emergency dispatcher with the Sangamon County 911 system.

 

 

During Wednesday's hearing before U.S. Magistrate Judge Byron Cudmore, information was revealed that between June 2000 and October 2003, Pruitt purchased cocaine from another defendant in the case, Danny J. Sidener Jr., and then sold or fronted the drugs to other people in Springfield, Bloomington and Carbondale.

 

 

Pruitt, the ninth person charged in an ongoing investigation, also admitted in court that he had used cocaine.

 

 

Williamson, reached at another child's wedding in Colorado, said he's not particularly close to Pruitt and had no idea of his drug involvement until late June, when he was contacted by the U.S. attorney's office to let him know Pruitt was being interviewed as part of the cocaine investigation.

 

 

He said he didn't hear what his son-in-law had been charged with until Wednesday morning. The couple married about a year ago, he said.

 

 

"I wasn't privy to any ... information about the investigation, and I'm glad I wasn't," Williamson said, adding that he feels he's come in for some undue scrutiny because of his position.

 

 

"You can't control who your kids get involved with. If I was a meat cutter at Shop 'n Save, no one would say anything," he said.

 

 

And, the sheriff noted, his is not the first family to be touched by drug abuse.

 

 

"You could walk on the mall at the Old State Capitol and stop 100 people, 80 of them would have a close relative who broke the law in one way or another. I pray for them," Williamson said.

 

 

"I'm sorry it happened, but if he did something wrong, he has to pay for it. I put drug dealers in jail. People make poor choices in life. Everybody makes mistakes, but you hope you learn from them."

 

 

Keen could not be reached Wednesday.

 

 

Mallorie Teubner, director of Sangamon County Central Dispatch, said Pruitt was employed from Aug. 22, 2005, to July 20 as a 911 dispatcher. She said Pruitt resigned from the $27,248 position, and that prior to his resignation, he had been on paid leave.

 

 

At a news conference Wednesday afternoon, U.S. Attorney Rodger Heaton pointed out that Pruitt's employment with the dispatch center came after the drug conspiracy ended.

 

 

"Our investigation confirmed that there was no impact or threat to the work that he did there," Heaton said.

 

 

According to Sangamon County court records, Pruitt was convicted of possession of cocaine in 2000, but authorities said the offense was wiped from his record because he successfully completed his probation. State law allows the cleansing of a first-time offender's record if probation is completed successfully, authorities said.

 

 

Teubner said she couldn't discuss Pruitt's record.

 

 

"I can only talk about our hiring process in general. In general, on our application we ask the applicant if he has an arrest. The only thing that precludes them from being employed with us is a felony conviction."

 

 

She said a candidate would not be specifically asked about a criminal record during an interview.

 

 

"We have a set list of questions we ask all applicants and don't deviate from that list of questions in the interview," she said.

 

 

Williamson said he had nothing to do with getting Pruitt his job.

 

 

"He applied like everyone else. We've got no control over 911. It's a total separate entity. They go through an interview, a background check. I wasn't even listed as a reference," he said.

 

 

Williamson said he was aware of Pruitt's past problems and had talked to his daughter, Karen, about them.

 

 

"She said she didn't know anything about it and had never seen anything and didn't know anything about it," he said.

 

 

Pruitt's attorney, John "Mo" Madonia, said there's good reason for that. He said that Pruitt quit any involvement with drugs when he graduated from college.

 

 

"This is a regrettable set of facts and circumstances," Madonia said. "It was income for him in college. It all pertained to a time when he was in college. He was a childhood friend of Danny Sidener, and it became too easy for him to engage in that course of conduct."

 

 

Madonia said Pruitt graduated from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, met his wife, "settled down and never thought to look back. Unfortunately it caught up with him. He's ready and did accept responsibility and hopes to get consideration for that."

 

 

Heaton also said that it appeared Pruitt had come to some sort of life change in 2003.

 

 

"My understanding is that Mr. Pruitt's activities sort of came to a self-imposed end," Heaton said. "He had moved on in his life. I think he even started his new marriage and personal relationship after the time that he was involved in this conspiracy. I don't know whether there is a direct connection between the two or not."

 

 

Pruitt's case was investigated by Springfield police, Illinois State Police and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration.

 

Author: SARAH ANTONACCI and JOHN REYNOLDS STAFF WRITERS

Section: NEWS

Page: 1

 

All content is (c) Copyright 2006 The State Journal-Register, a division of Copley Press, Inc. All rights reserved. No material may be reproduced electronically or in print without written permission.

 

 

 

 

 

 Reply Forward

 

 Reply |Dennis Delaney to infoweb

show details 2/26/07

 

 

most of the communication leaving the 911 room from pruitt was by cell phone text message. this allowed discreet messages and they could be coded to the individual; ie 911, 007 etc.

 

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateTue, May 22, 2007 at 9:33 AM

subjectpruitt gets 60 - sidener group was in bloomington - state farm

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details 5/22/07

 

 

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Seventh sentenced for role in cocaine ring

Jerrad A. Pruitt, son-in-law of sheriff, gets six years

By CHRIS DETTRO

STAFF WRITER

Published Tuesday, May 22, 2007

A 28-year-old Springfield man Monday became the seventh person to be sentenced in connection with a Springfield cocaine distribution ring that resulted in federal indictments in late 2005 and in 2006.

 

Jerrad A. Pruitt of the 4000 block of Hazelcrest Road was sentenced to six years in prison for his role in a conspiracy to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine from June 2000 to October 2003.

Pruitt, whose wife is the daughter of Sangamon County Sheriff Neil Williamson and the stepdaughter of retired Springfield police Sgt. Kevin Keen, pleaded guilty last August to conspiring to distribute cocaine he bought from Danny Sidener Jr. in Springfield, Bloomington and Carbondale.

Pruitt admitted at his plea hearing that he either paid Sidener outright for the drugs or obtained cocaine on a front or consignment basis, then sold or fronted the drugs to others for distribution.

Sidener also pleaded guilty to conspiring to distribute cocaine and has been sentenced to 11 years, nine months in prison.

Pruitt worked from Aug. 22, 2005, to July 20, 2006, as a Sangamon County 911 dispatcher. He took the $27,000 job after the drug conspiracy ended.

The government calculated Pruitt's federal sentencing guideline range to be between 108 and 135 months in prison based on the facts of the case and his criminal history. The government recommended a reduction because of Pruitt's cooperation in the case.

However, U.S. District Judge Jeanne Scott reduced the guideline range to a 97-month minimum, accepting defense attorney John "Mo" Madonia's argument that the seriousness of Pruitt's criminal history was overrepresented.

Madonia said Pruitt pleaded guilty when he was 19 to misdemeanor illegal consumption of alcohol.

He also pleaded guilty in 2000 to possession of a controlled substance, with the judgment withheld due to first-offender sentencing. The court ultimately determined he had successfully completed the probation period and dismissed the case, Madonia said.

Scott reduced Pruitt's sentence by an additional six months because he voluntarily removed himself from the conspiracy three years before he was charged.

"There was an additional reduction for the positive changes he made in his life," Madonia said.

He said Pruitt ended his involvement with drugs when he graduated from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale in 2003. Madonia said Pruitt used his education to obtain the dispatch job and that he married, bought a house and settled down

"It was after all that when his past caught up with him, and he found himself facing a multiple-year sentence of imprisonment for conduct that occurred while he was an immature college student attempting to make ends meet and further his educational endeavors," Madonia said.

The minimum sentence Pruitt could have received was five years in prison.

The charges were the result of an investigation by the Drug Enforcement Administration, Springfield Police Department and the Central Illinois Enforcement Group. Assistant U.S. attorney David Risley represented the government at sentencing.

The investigation resulted in nine people being charged in federal court and in formal charges being brought against three attorneys by the state Attorney Registration and Disciplinary Commission. To date, the seven people sentenced have received prison terms ranging from five to 191/2 years.

The office of the state appellate prosecutor also has been considering whether others should face criminal charges in the case.

Chris Dettro can be reached at 788-1510 or chris.dettro@sj-r.com.

 

 

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateWed, Aug 20, 2008 at 10:32 AM

subjectinlaws and outlaws - williamson - bikes - motorcycles - outlaws mc - LCN - detroit - chi

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details 8/20/08

 

 

see bikes and cops, new bikes from halls, caldwell bikes with davlin before hired, see bomke and bikes and bomke and neff at LIUNA JAX/smith

 

see also parker at CIS, whis is now ABLE/CELLINI

 

see also bike exhaust

 

 

On Wed, Aug 6, 2008 at 11:52 AM, Dennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com> wrote:

 

Feds allege Outlaws tied to mob

08/06/2008, 10:03 am

Comment on this story | Print this story | Email this story

 

 

 

 

 

Two men arrested when federal agents raided Outlaws Motorcycle Club meeting places in Kankakee and several Chicago-area locations last week allegedly set a pipe bomb that wrecked a suburban business on orders from the Chicago mob, officials said Tuesday.

Prosecutors filed court papers drawing a link between organized crime and the Outlaws -- a motorcycle club with chapters nationwide and a history of violence in a number of states.

The company that was the target of the February 2003 bombing, C&S Coin Operated Amusements, was horning in on the mob's $13 million video gaming business, prosecutors said. They said the bomb that blew out windows and tore up the building was organized crime's way of sending a warning.

"The government's investigation has established that C&S was bombed at the orders of the Chicago Outfit," prosecutors said. "C&S was in competition with Outfit-run gambling operations."

U.S. Magistrate Judge Maria Valdez has set a hearing for today on efforts by two men arrested in last week's raid, Mark Polchan, 41, and Samuel Volpendesto, 84, to win their release on bond pending trial.

Prosecutors said they should be held behind bars pending trial because they present a risk of flight and a danger to the community.

Witnesses have described Polchan as "a ranking member of the Outlaws Motorcycle Club and a criminal associate of the Chicago Outfit," according to the court papers. They said he was arrested 14 times between June 1984 and February 1996 and convicted twice.

~ The Associated Press

Print this story

 

 

Comments

 

3 comments on this article

Posted by showme at 10:33AM on Wednesday, 8/6/08

 

i wonder how much the mob make s off the illegal poker machine s in kankakee county because the police refuse to enforce the law or they are getting paid not to

Posted by btowngirl at 11:21AM on Wednesday, 8/6/08

 

a number of area businesses were nailed a few years ago for poker machines - it was a state and federal investigation, not a local one. locals should enforce it, but at least at that time, the sting was from higher up.

Posted by btowngirl at 11:22AM on Wednesday, 8/6/08

 

either way, i'm finding it harder and harder to believe the claim that the outlaws are "great guys"!

 

 

 

 

On Wed, Oct 4, 2006 at 1:06 PM, Dennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com> wrote:

 

AUGUST 31, 2006

Family ties

Sheriff denies giving relative special treatment

 

BY DUSTY RHODES

 

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Sheriff Neil Williamson

 

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Sangamon County Sheriff Neil Williamson came under scrutiny last week when son-in-law Jerrad Pruitt pleaded guilty to cocaine-distribution charges in federal court. Pruitt, 27, had worked as a dispatcher in the Sangamon County Central Dispatch System 911 call center, despite his record showing a previous felony cocaine charge [see "Snow job," Aug. 24].

But Pruitt wasn't the only person with family ties to the sheriff to get away with questionable behavior.

SCSO Deputy Troy Sweeney, whose daughter Crystal is married to Williamson's son Stephen, has had a colorful career that includes excessive absenteeism, a drunken-driving conviction, and charges of domestic battery. Internal investigations show that he drank alcohol in uniform in his marked squad car and that he drank a beer at the Outlaw motorcycle club while on duty and in uniform.

Sweeney declined to comment for this article. Williamson, contacted last week, said he never gave Sweeney any special treatment, pointing to the fact that Sweeney — a 20-year veteran of the department — was demoted. Williamson couldn't say what prompted the demotion, but sources in the SCSO indicate that it was the Outlaw incident.

Williamson also objects to the notion that Sweeney could be classified as a relation.

"He's not family. His stepdaughter married my son. They'd been going together 10 or 15 years, long before I was sheriff," Williamson says. "So here I am sheriff, and Troy has a string of personnel issues. He's got a black cloud over his head."

Sweeney's disciplinary history includes:

* Orders of protection filed against him in 1989 and 1994 by his then-wife, Sandra.

* A guilty plea to a drunken-driving charge in January 1998, after Springfield police noticed Sweeney driving erratically at a high rate of speed. He flipped a friend's truck after veering up the railroad embankment near Fifth Street and Stanford Avenue.

* A charge of domestic battery filed in 1999 by Sandra Sweeney. Williamson placed Troy Sweeney on 12 days' paid administrative leave, calling it a "cooling off" period after which he would reinstate the deputy. However, Williamson changed his mind and assigned Sweeney to unarmed desk duty until the case was resolved (as trial began, Sandra Sweeney decided not to press charges). According to a State Journal-Register report, Williamson rethought the disciplinary decision after callers to a WMAY (970 AM) talk show made critical comments.

* In 2004, while working an off-duty job at the Old Luxemburg Inn, Sweeney consumed several bottles of beer, first in his marked squad car and later inside the restaurant. He then reported for duty in an intoxicated state, at one point brandishing his service weapon above his head in the briefing room. Sweeney attributed his behavior to a mixture of medications he was taking, according to an internal-investigation summary obtained by Illinois Times.

* Also in 2004, Sweeney drove his marked squad car to the Outlaw Motorcycle Club, on South Grand Avenue, tried to apply for membership, and asked to be served a beer. When club members refused, Sweeney retrieved a bottle of Miller Lite from his squad car, drank it inside the club, and left a handwritten note stating that the "5-0" had been consumed by a uniformed on-duty law officer, according to an internal-investigation summary.

Williamson adamantly denies showing Sweeney any leniency.

"That's ridiculous. Whoever says that doesn't know what they're talking about. He's one of the very few people [ever demoted]," Williamson says.

"He screwed up, and I busted him back down to deputy."

Contact Dusty Rhodes at drhodes@illinoistimes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dyer – dhabalt – hayes – sex abuse cases

 

 

Dyer and dhabalt – sex offenders

 

 

 

Dave dyer and rick dhabalt do sex offender investigation

 

 

 

And see spd – ken dhabalt – I’ve seen this guy before, I’ve talked to him

 

 

JOHN HAYES – LGPD – ING 233 MP – SPI CAC

 

 

 

 

 

Dhabalt is shg coach - SPD

 

 

And – buraskistierenmulcahy

 

on same SHG golf team

 

*(see mulcahy at NGAOI, SHG – social network)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Police check on sex offenders on Halloween


By RHYS SAUNDERS (rhys.saunders@sj-r.com)

THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER

Posted Nov 01, 2009 @ 12:14 AM

Last update Nov 01, 2009 @ 07:54 AM


Parents inevitably worry about their children’s safety when they go trick-or-treating on Halloween.

There’s the danger of inattentive drivers after sunset and those homemade treats from a stranger’s house.

But what about sex offenders on Halloween night?

There are 229 registered sex offenders within the city limits, 190 of whom are child sex offenders, according to statistics provided by the Springfield Police Department.

Springfield police, like departments throughout the nation, conduct patrols to ensure those registered offenders are not using Halloween as an opportunity to have contact with children.

There are a few things police check for when driving by the house of someone who is a registered sex offender convicted of crimes involving children, according to Springfield Police Sgt. Dave Dyer.

*       Offenders are not allowed to have their porch lights on because children typically trick-or-treat at lit houses.

*       Offenders can’t decorate their homes with Halloween decorations.

Saturday night, Dyer and detectives Amy Strawn and Rick Dhabalt made nearly 15 stops throughout the city to check on registered sex offenders. The visits resulted in no arrests.

During the Saturday night detail some offenders were home, and all of those who were home and answered the door appeared to be complying with the law.

At each stop, the officers reminded those offenders who were home that they could not hand out candy. The officers also checked licenses and the offenders’ place of employment.

In cases where a sex offender was not at home, the officers left paperwork indicating the offender must check in with the department by Monday.

In cases in which the offender wasn’t at the residence and someone else claimed to live there, police asked the current tenant to fill out a report testifying the registered offender does not live there.

Rhys Saunders can be reached at 788-1521.

In Springfield

*       Sex offenders: 229

*       Child sex offenders: 190


On the Net

Illinois State Police’s sex offender database: www.isp.state.il.us/sor/

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Comments (22)

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dmgaqua

2 days ago

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You don't need to worry about registered sex offenders most any time. It is the ones that have not gotten caught that are the real threat and the real risk. Most sex offenders are not repeat offenders. I am sure I will get all kinds of responses from this but the truth is that the scarlet letter only gives false sense of security for the public and helps politicians get votes. Spending all of the time with the police checking on these offenders is a waste of time and forces that could be used elsewhere.

localperson

2 days ago

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'Most sex offenders are not repeat offenders' Actually dmgaqua, sex offenders have the HIGHEST rate of re-offending. Most of them are repeat offenders

TMP

1 day ago

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dmgaqua: Do the terms 'serial rapist' , 'habitual sexual offender' and 'sexually dangerous person' mean anything to you? They should. Having spent many years investigating and arresting sexual offenders (mostly pedophiles) I assure you that they have a relatively high rate of recidivism. That is the truth, and the facts (available for local review) bear it out.

demented

1 day ago

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What if the sex offender left town for a week? Took a vacation or something? How is that person supposed to check in by monday, and if he doesn't check in, does he get in more trouble?

Most sexual offenses occur by NON-registered offenders. The scarlet letter is a feel-good do-little law.

Naughtius Maximus

1 day ago

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Nice use of resources.. 'I'm gonna have to confiscate this pumpkin, Mr. Smith. Book him, boys.'

Desperado

1 day ago

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Most of you are missing the point that in most cases, the victim is known to the offender on a personal level. By that I mean someone that is already involved in the victims life such as uncle, brother, pastor, etc. This mass hysteria about having a sex offender in the neighborhood is ridiculous. People need to start paying attention to their own families and circle of friends if they want to find the next offender.

BTW, the statistics from the Department of Justice bear out the claims that recidivism for sex offenders is much lower than what the politicians and law enforcement would have the general public believe. Unfortunately, those statistics don't fit in with the mass hysteria concerning the current sex offenders.

I reiterate, look to the circle of people you know for the next sex offender. It'll be closer to home than you think.

MoeDinero

1 day ago

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I believe the list and statistics may be watered down by the fact that many offenders do not actually belong on the list but were victims under statutory rape but not much older than the victim. These folks are victims of disapproving parents. The fact is that a pedophile seeks the opportunity to be with children much as a hunter hunts in the wild rather than hunting in the inner city. A pedophile will try to be a youth minister, scout leader, clown, etc. John Wayne Gacy was all of the above. A pedophile will always have a strong sexual attraction for children and should try to remove himself from circumstances that will led to temptation. Do not invite children to your door like a hunter in a deer blind.

riverhawk

1 day ago

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I can see not allowing RSO's to hand out candy to kids, but not letting them decorate? That's a bit too much in my opinion.

Captain America

1 day ago

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Naughtius, dmgaqua, riverhawk...
Are you guys kidding? What better for the police to do then check on these offenders? Why would you want sex offenders decorating their homes to make them attractive to children? If not letting them decorate in the whole state of Illinois just saves 1 or 2 kids a year isn't it worth it? And as for the 'statutory' defense that is a load, go look on the sex offender registry, you will see a ton of 'victim under 13 y/o, suspect 20,30.40.etc. etc. How about less defense of the sick criminals and more defense of the innocent Naughtius?

Tyler W

1 day ago

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You folks are uptight. Offenders are aware of the law, get a grip. Lets check on all of the drug dealing, i.e., huge amount of crack sales going on in Springfield.

Tyler W

1 day ago

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What about all of the street level gang activity and cocaine sales in Spfld going on daily ?? Why are there no reports on that ?? Interesting.

Tyler W

1 day ago

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Why would offenders be decorating their home if they are aware of the compliance and regulations?
No one said they were brain dead.

dmgaqua

22 hours ago

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By the way 'TMP' the three categories you did mention are the groups that have a relatively high rate of recidivism and that is why they are, if caught, in prison already. Does 'serial' and habitual' mean anything to you? Keep in mind that most sex offenders are not pedophiles. Tell me if you can, how many on the SO registry are of the 'serial rapist' , 'habitual sexual offender' and 'sexually dangerous person' category. Heck you can be a Sexual Predator label if you are 5 years older than your girl friend if she is say 17 and you are say 22. In the state of Illinois. Is that a serial rapist? sexually dangerous person? My point is that the Sex offender laws create a sense of safety that is not there. SO registries are watered down and do not tell much to anyone in the public eye.

Captain America

16 hours ago

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Tyler W. says 'Why would offenders be decorating their home if they are aware of the compliance and regulations?
No one said they were brain dead. '
I am sure when they raped the lady, molested the child, etc. etc. they knew that was illegal also Tyler, but they did it anyway.
WOW I never knew that sex offenders were such a beloved group in Sangamon County, Naughtius, Tyler, dmgaqua, sorry we offended you all by wanting to make sure that criminals behaved on a nite when children are out en mass going to strangers houses. And again, go to the website and just type in your zip code, you will see that the majority are not these 'statutory' cases you keep trumpeting.

Captain America

16 hours ago

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Alright champions of sex offenders and proliferators of the lie that 'most are boyfriends of 17 y/o etc. etc.' Go to http://www.isp.state.il.us/sor/sor.cfm and type in zip code 62704 and count the first 15 people, check their info, see a pattern? YOUNG KIDS being assaulted. None of that 'mad parents telling on kids' bologna. Wake up, call evil what it is, evil. And quit defending the criminal and start defending the victims.

Ray Brown

12 hours ago

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The ones who think the police are wasting money checking up on child sex offenders, either don't have kids or never talked to their kids when they were young. Child sex offerenders are never cured, they all belong behind bars for the rest of their lives. This is about S/O not drug problems. As for the 17 and 22 age, if the woman says NO, then you are wrong and the law is their to protect her. Then you would be listed as a Sex Offender. That is the law, so don't do it.

Naughtius Maximus

9 hours ago

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Captain America, Ray Brown - don't generalize about us that merely point out the facts about 'sexual predators'. I protect my kids from harm, I don't need the state or the cops to look out for them. The government and the media has successfully demonized a certain segment of criminals and misinformed the public. I am just trying to lend a little humor to the situation. I find it ridiculous that someone is not allowed to put up Halloween decorations. This is truly the Nanny State many of you talk about.

MoveAllZigs

8 hours ago

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Ray Brown - If the 16 year old girl's parents suddenly 'object' to their chaste little girl having sex with her 18 or 19 year old boyfriend (there are 18 and 19 year-olds in high school folks!) consensually, then that young man could be in serious trouble. The parents unwillingness to accept that their little girl is growing up, is making adult decisions, and consented to having sex with her boyfriend CAN AND DOES end up with young people getting labeled as sex offenders for the rest of their lives. This is absolutely wrong, and I say that as the mother of a daughter who is 20, but once dated a guy who was 19 when she was 16. I approved of the young man, he was and still is a good kid. Is this the majority of sex offender cases? NO and I'm not saying that. And the example you used of the 17 year old saying 'no', well that gets a big 'DUH' from me. Sex without consent is always a crime, period. But the scenario you laid out isn't what the posters above are talking about I don't believe.

Sarahb

8 hours ago

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At first I thought that the idea of not allowing them to decorate was a bit absurd, especially since Halloween is hardly just for kids anymore, but than I thought back to this past Friday and a few years past in which I saw children coming up to doors with no lights o, but that still had decorations. The mindset obviously being that if they went to the trouble to decorate, than they must be willing to hand out candy.

I am more than happy that the police check up on these people, besides if they want to decorate, there is always the inside of their house.

Big Monkey

7 hours ago

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I have no problem with the police checking on registered sex offenders. Seriously, the story doesn't say that the entire police force was out enmass checking on these offenders. The story says it was a few detectives checking on some of the offenders on the list to ensure that they were complying with the rules they have to live by.
Whether a person is likely to repeat their crime or whether they actually committed the crime for which they were convicted of is irrelevent.
They are currently registered as sex offenders and as thus they have some limitations on what they can do.

johninsangamon

5 hours ago

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I agree with Capt. American and Ray Brown. As for Naughtius, in my opinions sex offenders demonize themselves. Society and the media dont have to do it for them. What about sexual abuse, especially by child predators, is not demonic? Sex offenders often get off with a few months or years in jail, while the victims suffer, emotionally, sometimes for the rest of their lives. The least the sex offender should get is to be branded as such for the rest of his life. Should the victim forgive? Sure, but for their own benefit, so they can allow themselves to move on. But nothing says the victim, nor society has to ever forget, nor in my opinion should they. Don't like it, then don't do it in the first place, or be prepared to deal with your demonization as a result of your intolerable actions.

Tyler W

26 minutes ago

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# 1., No one is defending sex offenders. That statement is so ludicrous it is obscene. # 2., We all know that the world is full of severe dangers, and there are lions and tigers and bears out there, etc. it is a damgerous world. Given that, why are kids being abducted left and right ? # 3., Why in the world are people not supervising their your children ? Why are you leaving your kids alone with strange adults around ???? And no, I am not blaming parents. I know where my son always and he is supervised and taught the cautions of the world. Why would your minor children be trick or treating alone or why would you even let the circumstance happen? Children are abducted by these animals because the child is not being supervised by you or another responsible adult that you know and can trust. Use some common sense, please.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keen - JOHN HAYES – LGPD – ING 233 MP – SPI CAC

 

 

Sheriff's office initially mum about recent sex assault

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, June 20, 2009

Author/Byline: JAYETTE BOLINSKI, THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER
Section: homepage

Sangamon County sheriff's detectives are continuing to investigate the early morning sexual assault of a 12-year-old girl by a stranger in her home last week.

The assault happened around daybreak June 12 at an apartment in the 1300 block of Denison Drive.

The scene of the crime is in the city of Springfield's jurisdiction; however, the Child Advocacy Center assigns investigations to various local police agencies on a rotating on-call basis.

The Sangamon County Sheriff's Office was assigned this case and is overseeing the investigation.

Sheriff's officials released no details about the assault until Wednesday afternoon, after The State Journal-Register pressed for information.

After consulting with the state's attorney's office, the county released a brief statement that did not identify the victim as a youth, did not specify which neighborhood it happened in and did not say what time it happened. It indicated only that an assault happened "in the southwest portion of Springfield during the early morning hours of June 12th."

Chief deputy Jack Campbell on Friday said investigators did not put out any information right away because they initially did not believe it was a random attack.

"There was information provided to us by the victim and her family that we needed to verify," he said. "We continue to look for a person of interest in this case."

Police would not discuss whether there have been additional reports of random assaults in the same area or elsewhere. The State Journal-Register has filed a Freedom of Information Act request with the sheriff's office, seeking additional information.

The attacker is described as a dark-skinned black male between 18 and 30 years old and about 5 feet, 10 inches tall with a medium build. His hair was braided on one side. He wore dark clothing, and his face was covered with a mask or piece of cloth during the assault.

Anyone who believes they can identify the man or has information about the incident is urged to call Sangamon County detectives Joe Roesch or John Hayes at 753-6840.

Tips also can be called in anonymously to Crime Stoppers at 788-8427 or submitted online at www.cashfortips.us. Tips can also be sent by text by typing TIP672 and a message and sending it to CRIMES.

Jayette Bolinski can be reached at 788-1530.

 

 

New Springfield police officers sworn in

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, September 1, 2000

Author/Byline: SARAH ANTONACCI STAFF WRITER
Section: LOCAL
Page: 17

Three people, including one woman and a Hispanic man, were sworn in as new Springfield police officers Thursday as part of the department's most diverse class of rookies ever.

The recruitment class lost one black man and one woman, both of whom resigned after starting at the academy. Eight of the 25 candidates originally accepted into the training program have either resigned or failed a physical test since last weekend, officials said.

Two others, both white men, resigned, and four white men failed physical testing procedures that included a 1 1/2 mile run, sit-ups, weight-lifting and a flexibility test. The requirements are set by the state.

Even with those losses, it's a di verse class, said Police Chief John Harris.

"We're very excited about this group," he said. "There's two reasons. One, we've had a large number of retirements, and it's important to get this class in. Secondly, we did some heavy recruitment, and this class is reflective of that."

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People sued the city in May claiming that unfair and discriminatory testing procedures accounted for low minority numbers in both the police and fire departments.

The most recent police recruitment list and the large number of minority candidates hired recently - two black men, one black woman, a Hispanic man and four other women - may sway the organization to drop the suit entirely, the NAACP said earlier this month.

The three new officers sworn in Thursday do not have to attend the state police academy because they had already done police work elsewhere:

* William Orengo, 31, who is Hispanic, had been a West Virginia state trooper before moving to Illinois and working at the Department of Corrections for the past two years. He is originally from New York City.



* John Hayes , 29, is a Springfield native who worked for the

Rochester,

Leland Grove and

Bloomington police departments.



* Kim Roberson, 25, is a Benton native who worked as a Rochester police officer.

Orengo said he had no idea the Springfield department was working so hard to recruit minorities. In the original testing process, he scored third out of the 189 candidates on the list. In West Virginia, he was one of 27 officers hired out of more than 2,000 potential candidates.

He moved here to be closer to his fiancee, Swan King, who is originally from Springfield, and his daughter. The couple met while they were in the military.

"What brought me here was my daughter and my daughter's mother. There came a point in my life where I had to decide if I wanted to be with my family, and I did," he said.

"I wasn't aware of the minority emphasis. My goal from day one, when I made my decision to come here, was to get on at the police department. Now, everything is just beginning for me. The hard part is over. You don't just get hired at a police department. The process is intense, competitive and tough."

Roberson said she's most interested in the opportunities presented by the Springfield Police Department. Having worked in Rochester, she said she feels she has a solid foundation.

"I'm very excited about this," she said. "There's so many opportunities here to do so many different things. This has really expanded my options."

Roberson said the department's emphasis on recruiting women was very apparent.

Hayes, who graduated in 1989 from Ursuline Academy, said he's glad to be home again.

"I feel pretty fortunate to be able to come back," he said. "I was only in Bloomington for six months, and I wanted to come back home. I was born and raised here and have made a lot of friends here."

All three will begin a 15-week field-training program Sunday, working side by side with other officers.

 

 

Guard members report for duty / Springfield police , sheriff's office may lose officers

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, September 29, 2001

Author/Byline: DOUG FINKE and SARAH ANTONACCI STAFF WRITERS
Section: NEWS
Page: 1

More than 130 members of Illinois National Guard military police units reported for duty Friday in preparation for assignment as additional security at state airports.

The call-up could cost the Springfield Police Department eight officers, including two who currently work on the street, and remove three deputies from the Sangamon County Sheriff's Office.

The local officers are among the 76 members of the 233rd Military Police Company in Springfield called to duty along with 56 members of the 933rd Military Police Company in Chicago.

The soldiers will get training in airport security measures next week, but even National Guard officials do not know for sure what their troops will be doing.

"We really don't know what the mission will be," said Brig. Gen. Chuck Fleming, assistant adjutant general. "That depends on the regional coordinator of the Federal Aviation Administration. This thing is being put together as we sit here."

On Thursday, Major Gen. David Harris, head of the Illinois Department of Military Affairs, said a unit based in Freeport also would be called to duty. But Friday, Fleming said, "After further mission analysis, we decided to go with just those two companies" in Chicago and Springfield.

"They will go home on Sunday to get additional clothing and personal items they need for a 31- to 45-day period," Fleming said. "They will report back on Monday."

All of the soldiers will report to Bloomington to undergo training under the supervision of the FAA. They could be on duty at airports by the end of next week, Fleming said.

The military police officers will be assigned to 12 airports throughout the state, including Capital Airport in Springfield, the Greater Peoria Regional Airport and airports in Bloomington, Quincy, Decatur, Champaign and Moline.

Although the security mission of the National Guard is initially scheduled to last six months, Fleming said officers hope they can rotate personnel out after a month or 45 days.

Technically, the guard units were not called to active duty in the state, but rather for the federal government. The distinction means the soldiers are guaranteed their civilian jobs when their service is concluded.

In Springfield, Keen said the police department did not know as of Friday if all eight officers in the 233rd will have to report immediately.

But a plan is in place to keep just as many police officers on the street as before the call-up, he said.

"Of the eight, only two are in operations, and they will be replaced by within," Keen said. "The motoring public won't see any differences in the way the streets are patrolled."

Capt. Gary Stone of the sheriff's department said the agency could stand to lose two deputies from the second shift and one off the midnight shift if they all end up being called away.

"On Sept. 12, we sat around and discussed this, once we realized the implications of what happened the day before and based on what we saw in Desert Storm. We thought the mobility of the guard and reserves might be a real possibility and made a game plan," he said.

He said the department will be reorganized and personnel will be pulled from other units to cover those street officers' positions.

Springfield officers who are members of the 233rd are: Jeff Royer, Naythan Stewart, Bobby Dorsey, Kevin Donaldson, Jeramie Mayes and three police recruits due to start Monday: James Kollins, Ed Higginson and Jennifer Batterson. Stewart and Dorsey are street officers.

Sheriff's deputies who may be called away include Adrian Guerrero, John Hayes and John Gillette.

"We're not sure when they'll know, but they've been called to their units. They're not sure when they're going or where, but they have been told to prepare," Keen said.

Caption: Pfc. Theresa Carwile of Pesotum says goodbye to her mother, Cathy Ring of Pesotum, before reporting for duty at Camp Lincoln in Springfield. Carwile is among the National Guard members called to duty for airport security.

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS –

(gleason – lgpd, bruner – ucm/Cellini)

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 2, 1998

Edwards-Sandberg Jennifer Ann Sandberg and Richard Leroy Edwards, both of Springfield, were united in marriage at 2 p.m. June 20 at Williamsville Christian Church by the Rev. Bob Anderson.

The bride is the daughter of Charles and Jean Sandberg of East Alton. The groom is the son of Ron and Liz Edwards of Springfield.

Maid of honor was Kerry Sandberg. Bridesmaids were Terri
Gleason, Jeannine Arduini, Kristie Nix, Robin Bruner and Shauna Hopkins. Flower girl was Muriah Bauer.

Best man was Ron Edwards. Groomsmen were John Hayes , John Yarko, Christopher Kohlrus, Dave Moore and Ron Edwards. Ushers were Eric Sandberg and Dave Dodson. Ringbearer was Mark Yarko.

A reception was held at St. John's Vianney in Sherman.

The bride is a graduate of the University of Missouri in Columbia. She is employed with Norwest Mortgage Inc. The groom is a graduate of Johnson and Wales University, Charleston, S.C. He also is employed with Norwest Mortgage Inc.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, November 20, 2005

Wilderson-Rambach

Rebecca Arlene Rambach and Richard Joshua Wilderson, both of Springfield, were married at 6 p.m. June 18, 2005, at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception by Monsignor John Ossola.

The bride is the daughter of Stephen and Elizabeth Rambach of Springfield. The groom is the son of Richard and Nancy Wilderson of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Colleen Horgan. Bridesmaids were Erin Wilderson, Valerie Kamhi, Debi Mitra, Jessica Kolb, Carrie Harbour, Katie O'Fallon, Danielle LeBlang and Michelle Johnson. Flower girls were Becky and Katie Donnelly. Singers were Rachel Friedman and Linda Younkin.

Best man was Richard Wilderson. Groomsmen were Stephen Rambach, Zach Rambach, Rob Rambach, Roger Taylor, Bryan Forister, Andrew Heckenkamp, Phil Maggio and Jeff Schukai. Ushers were John Bohan, Jake Bohan, John Hayes and Jeff Hayes.

A reception was held at the Crowne Plaza.

The bride is a graduate of Springfield High School and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. She is employed by Hazelwood School District in St. Louis. The groom is a graduate of Sacred Heart-Griffin High School and Western Illinois University. He is employed by the St. Louis Police Department.

The couple resides in St. Louis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dhabalt is shg coach - SPD

 

 

And – buraski – stieren – mulcahy

 

on same SHG golf team

 

 

 

MULCAHY LEADS BLAZERS TO SECTIONAL GOLF TITLE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, October 14, 1992

Edition: M1,M2
Section: SPORTS
Page: 17

CHARLESTON -- Senior Kourtney Mulcahy led a strong team effort Tuesday as Sacred Heart-Griffin High School won the nine-team Charleston Sectional to

advance to the girls state golf tournament.

Mulcahy recorded an 83 to tie for third in individual competition. Petersburg Porta junior Jamie Smith finished sixth with an 84 to qualify for state individual competition, as well.

"Kourtney played about the way she always does," SHG Coach Dan Dhabalt said. "I know she finished first for us every time out. She's just so consistent."

In addition to Mulcahy, senior Jen Gronewold shot a 91 at Pleasant Grove Greens. Freshman Heather Buraski added a 99, and Laura Smith and Lisa Stieren tied for fourth on the team with 108s.

"Jen and Heather shooting that well were somewhat surprising," Dhabalt said. "We showed a lot of consistency and played well up and down."

The Blazers shot seven strokes better than second-place Alton, winning the sectional 381-388. SHG, Alton and Carbondale all advance to next week's state finals at Bloomington. o At Dunlap, senior Jason Pope shot a 9-over-par 81 at Arrowhead Country Club to lead Petersburg Porta High School to the Class A State Tournament in boys golf.

Pope's score was good for seventh overall and advanced him to the finals in the individual competition. Rochester's Cory Wells was the top area finisher, totaling a 79 at Arrowhead and finishing in a tie for third, good enough for a state berth.

Porta tied Fieldcrest High School for third in the team competition with a 346. Rochester sophomore Bret Borota, who finished eighth at 84, also advanced to the state finals next week.

Caption: Mulcahy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ORKIN – shaneman – spd -

 

Mudra – coy – scientology – SCSO/shaneman – 2006 RETIREES - maggiore – saladino –

 

(Maggiore/saladino) – madonia – shg coach SALADINO, iepa saladino,

dave saladino/SHG etc.

 

 

 

 

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, November 11, 2003

J. Stephen Shaneman

MCLEAN - J. Stephen Shaneman , 56, of McLean, formerly of Springfield, died Sunday, Nov. 9, 2003, at St. Joseph's Hospital in Bloomington.

He was born Feb. 3, 1947, in Springfield, the son of John Arthur and Frances Able Shaneman .

He married Connie Simmons in 1970 in Springfield. A son, John Allen Shaneman preceded him in death.

Mr. Shaneman graduated from Springfield High School in 1964 and

 

managed Orkin Pest Control for more than 23 years.

 

He was a former mayor of McLean. He was a U.S. Navy veteran, serving from 1967-2003. He served in Vietnam and a tour in Desert Storm. He was a master chief hospital corpsman. He was a

 

member of American Legion Post 573 in McLean and a board member of Illinois Pest Control Association.

Survivors: wife, Connie; a son, Michael Shaneman of Bradenton, Fla.; two grandchildren; mother, Frances Shaneman of Springfield; and a brother,

 

 

 

*David Shaneman of Buckhart.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Several in city and county law enforcement to retire

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, February 26, 2006

Author/Byline: JAYETTE BOLINSKI STAFF WRITER

Section: CITY/STATE

Page: 17

- Show quoted text -

It's tough to get Capt. Dennis Sloman to tout his accomplishments as the head of Illinois State Police District 9, the district based in Springfield.

 

He said any success he's had comes down to one thing: his "troops" make him look good.

 

"I don't view my job as doing anything. There's a good bunch of troops here. They're the ones that do the job. I'm real proud of all of them that are here now and those that have been here in the past," he said.

 

"I tell the story that I lived a young boy's dream. Every little boy wants to be a cop. I just never got out of that phase. I was a trooper here and got to wear the uniform and was fortunate enough to be able to come back and run the place."

 

Sloman's dream career will come to an end Tuesday, when he retires after nearly 27 years with the Illinois State Police. He is one of about a dozen local police officers who will retire this spring after lengthy careers in law enforcement.

 

Retiring March 3 from the Springfield Police Department are Deputy Chief Pat Fogleman,

 

Sgt. Kevin Keen,

 

detectives Al Brown and Terry Stouffe and officer Tommy Baughman. Officer Joe Schweska will retire March 19, and Sgt. Tim Young will retire April 7.

 

The Sangamon County Sheriff's Office will lose five deputies to retirement by the end of March. Detective Leah Boston will retire March 22, and Lt. Pat Davlin and deputies John Diefenback, Roger Stuart and Dave Shaneman will retire March 31.

 

"We're going to probably lose 130 years of experience," Sheriff Neil Williamson said. "When you lose five people, it's rather significant. That's the key to our whole existence, just the people who work here. When you lose good people who have experience, you can't just walk out on the street and say, 'Come be a deputy and fill these shoes.'"

 

Sloman, 53, grew up in on a farm in Montgomery County and graduated from Pawnee High School. A clerking job at the Springfield FBI office got him interested in a career in law enforcement.

 

He landed his first Illinois State Police job in 1979 as a trooper based in Macomb. He eventually was transferred to District 9. He was promoted to sergeant in 1985, master sergeant in 1990, lieutenant in 1996 and captain in 1997. He was head of the district investigations unit and worked in the agency's Division of Internal Investigations and its Strategic Planning and Analysis Bureau.

 

One of Sloman's more notable assignments was as officer in charge of the 39-day Roby standoff in 1997.

 

He became commander of District 18 in Litchfield in the summer of 1998 and was named commander of District 9 in February 1999.

 

"We've run some good operations, had some good details," he said.

 

Sloman has no specific retirement plans. He lives in Pleasant Plains with his wife, Nancy, to whom he has been married for 32 years. He has two children, Tyler and Amanda, and a 2-year-old grandson and is expecting twin grandchildren in July. He retired in 2000 after 26 years with the 183rd Illinois Air National Guard.

 

No replacement has been named for the District 9 commander's position. The agency is expected to post the opening in the next week or so.

 

"District 9, because of the capital and the headquarters being here, is kind of a popular one," he said. "It's unique because of the capital and the headquarters. The fair is a big deal. We've worked on details on every president since Jimmy Carter."

 

Fogleman, head of the Springfield Police Department's Administrative Services Division, also is departing after 27 years on the force. He had a short career with the Lake Springfield police before being hired by the city department in February 1979.

 

He worked for nine years as a second-shift patrol officer in the southeast part of town, then went to the police academy to be a training officer, eventually being promoted to assistant commander in charge of the academy. After a year he went back to being a patrolman on the day shift, working the north end and the Enos Park area.

 

Fogleman, 50, was promoted to sergeant in 1996 and to lieutenant in 2000. In 2002, he was transferred to the department's internal affairs division, where he spent three years until being promoted to his current job.

 

He said among the most notable points in his career were the department's transition from revolvers to automatic pistols while he was at the academy and his involvement in the department's community policing programs.

 

His proudest moments, however, involve training rookie officers.

 

"I think some of the rewarding stuff now is some of the guys who I was their FTO (field training officer) to see where they're at in the department now. My most rewarding time was in the training field," he said. "I just think it's a more positive environment in the world of police work, which is all so negative, anyway."

 

His advice for up-and-coming officers?

 

"Number one, don't ever forget where you came from. That comes from good old Mike Walton (former Springfield police chief). The second thing would be to treat the people you deal with like you would like to be treated or like you would like to have your mother or sister dealt with."

 

Fogleman, a motor sports junkie, said he has no specific retirement plans. He is married to Marsha Fogleman and has two sons, Nick, 24, and Pat, 21. He said he is proud of his time as a city police officer.

 

"Even with all the negative that's going on with the Springfield Police Department, I still think it's probably one of the best police departments in the country," he said.

 

Lt. Ed Flesch will be promoted to Fogleman's position.

 

The other retiring officers and deputies are taking a great deal of valuable experience with them, said Williamson and Springfield Police Chief Don Kliment.

 

From the sheriff's office:

 

* Davlin will retire after 21 years. His most recent assignment was head of the department's crime prevention unit. Prior to that, he was a lieutenant supervising deputies on patrol.

 

 

* Boston, a longtime detective, will retire after 29 years. She specializes in child abuse cases and works with the Child Advocacy Center.

 

"It takes a special person to be able to sort through all that trash and get down to talking to the youngsters and the victims," Williamson said.

 

* Diefenback will retire after 22 years. He is a deputy assigned to the traffic division, enforcing traffic and DUI laws, truck weights, school bus enforcement, seat belt details, roadside safety checks and underage alcohol audits.

 

* Stuart will retire after 20 years. He is a deputy assigned to crime prevention and has worked as the department's senior citizens officer and is a hostage negotiator.

 

* Shaneman will retire after 20 years. He is a deputy on the midnight shift and has been on the emergency response team.

 

From the Springfield Police Department:

 

* Keen will retire after 26 years. His most recent job was as the public information officer for the department and head of its crime prevention unit.

 

* Baughman will retire after 26 years. He most recently was a day-shift patrol officer.

 

* Schweska will retire after 24 years. Much of his career was spent as a third-shift patrol officer but he also has worked in crime prevention, as a DARE officer and in the evidence section.

 

* Both Stouffe and Brown will retire after 27 years. Both are detectives.

 

* Young, a veteran detective with many decorations, will retire with 26 years on the force.

 

Kliment said he wishes the retirees the best and thanks them for their service.

 

"Obviously, they've meant a lot not only to the police department but to the city of Springfield as a whole, and their friendships will be missed," he said.

Caption: While packing his belongings Friday, Illinois State Police Capt. Dennis Sloman dusts off an old state trooper hat that decorated his office at the District 9 headquarters. Sloman will retire Tuesday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateWed, Mar 25, 2009 at 3:42 PM

subject

 

collaboration on youth - employee - theresa mudra - saladino - graham - orkin

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details Mar 25

 

 

Maggiore-Mudra

Theresa Marie Mudra and

Todd Alan Maggiore, DMD, both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. July 12 at Christ the King Church by the Rev. David Lantz.

 

The bride is the daughter of Joe and Donna Mudra of Springfield. The groom is the son of Richard and Helen Maggiore of Springfield.

 

Serving as maid of honor was Lori Mitchell, with Gina Graham as bridesmaid.

 

Serving as best man was

Jermey Maggiore, with Tim Kell serving as groomsman. Serving as ushers were

 John Saladino, Mike Hawkins and Jim File.

 

A reception was held at Panther Creek Country Club.

 

The bride is a graduate of Lanphier High School, Springfield College in Illinois and Illinois State University.

 

She is employed by the Illinois Collaboration on Youth .

 

The groom is a graduate of Griffin High School, SCI, the University of Illinois, Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville School of Dental Medicine. He is a practicing dentist with Dr.

 

Dennis

Hayes.

 

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TITLE: ANNIVERSARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, June 18, 1996

 

Mudra-60th Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Mudra of Springfield celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary with a family dinner.

Mudra and the former Violet Nerone were married June 6, 1936, at St.

Aloysius Church by the Rev. Ernest A. Burtle.

Mr. Mudra retired from Bruce-Terminix after 26 years of service. Mrs. Mudra retired from the secretary of state's office in 1978. They are the parents of three children, James, Joseph and David, all of Springfield. There are four grandchildren and a great-grandchild.

 

 

 

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, February 6, 1986

John J. Mudra John J. Mudra, 79, of 1963 E. Converse died at 5:45 a.m. Tuesday at Druid Hills Nursing Home in Clearwater, Fla.

He was born in Lakewood, Ohio, on Dec. 11, 1906, the son of Aloysius and Barbara Voytek Mudra, who preceded him in death. Prior to his retirement, he was a maintenance engineer at Capital Airport for 23 years. He was also preceded in death by his wife, Ann, in 1983. Surviving are three daughters, Vicky Krizmanich of Seminole, Fla., Johanna Woodrum of Springfield and Monica Mudra of St. Petersburg, Fla.; three brothers, Adolph Mudra of Springfield, Carl Muttra of Worthington, Ohio, and Joe Mudra of Parma, Ohio; two sisters, Mary Sabo of Springfield and Sister Barbara Ann Muttra of West Africa; 10 grandchildren; one great-grandchild; and several nieces and nephews.

Services will be at 10 a.m. Saturday at St. Aloysius Church, with the Rev.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, January 26, 2003

Henderson-Skrzekut

Cimone Lucyna Skrzekut and Brian Keith Henderson, both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. Oct. 19, 2002, at St. Aloysius Church by the Rev. John Titus.

The bride is the daughter of Ann Marie Skrzekut of Chicago and the late Casey Skrzekut. The groom is the son of John and Rose Henderson of Springfield.

Serving as matron of honor was Aimee Skrzekut-Torres. Bridesmaids were Danielle Trame, Crystal Lucas and Michelle Maggiore . Flower girl was Ashley Rose Weir.

Best man was Don Matulevich. Groomsmen were Steve Rose, Paul Mitalski and Ara Chinnusamy. Ring bearer was T.J. Weir. Ushers were Joshua and Eddie Torres.

A reception was held at the Knights of Columbus.

The bride is a graduate of Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville. She is employed by American Mobile Health as a travel registered nurse. The groom is a graduate of Bradley University. He is employed by Daimler Chrysler as an engineer.

The couple will live in St. Charles, Mo.

 

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, June 19, 1994

 

Saladino-Smith Stacy Earl Smith of Sherman and John Robert Saladino of Springfield were married at 2 p.m. May 21 at Christ the King Church by the Rev. Donald Meehling.

The bride is the daughter of Lloyd and Shirley Smith of Sherman.

The groom is the son of Carl Jr. and Nancy Saladino of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Lori Smith.

Bridesmaids were Sandy Smith, Michele DeBoer,

 

Tina Jannazzo and Leigh Thompson. Flower girls were Robyn, Elizabeth and

Samantha Saladino.

Best man was Phil Langen. Groomsmen were Tim Kell,

 

*David Saladino,

 

Jim File and Kyle Rominger.

Ushers were David Hood,

 

*Todd Maggiore , Cathy Sidles and Rod Vose.

Ringbearer was

 

Kurt Saladino.

A reception was held at the

 

Northfield Center.

The bride is a graduate of Lanphier High School and Illinois State University. She is employed at The Franklin. The groom is a graduate of Griffin High School and the University of Illinois. He is employed by the state

 

Department of Transportation.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spd - Daniel Patterson – jeff tavernor

 

Curt McCloughan – excessive force - pattern

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spd - Daniel Patterson – jeff tavernor

 

Curt McCloughan – excessive force - pattern

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, December 4, 1988

Patterson-Tavernor

 

Christina Ann Tavernor and

 

Daniel Scott Patterson, both of Springfield, were united in marriage at 6:30 p.m. Nov. 4. The Rev. Charles Mulcrone officiated the ceremony at Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception.

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Tavernor, 2221 Eleanor. The bridegroom's parents are Mrs. Mary Lynn Culler, 301 S. Park, and Harold Patterson of Mount Vernon.

Faith Tavernor served as matron of honor, and serving as bridesmaids were Lisa Duke, Dena Thorpe and Mindy Ruger. Flower girls were Miranda Ruger and Brittany Tavernor.

Best man was R.J. Finneran, and serving as groomsmen were Harold Patterson, Mike Patterson and Dolan Osbourne. Ushers were Kevin Dickey, Steve Ferrier, Jeff Tavernor and Jeff Dorr. Shane Viele and Jarrod Steele served as ringbearers.

A reception was held at the Knights of Columbus Hall in Riverton.

The bride is a graduate of Sacred Heart Academy. The bridegroom, a graduate of Griffin High School, is enlisted in the United States Army.

The couple will live in Germany.

 

 

 

 

City, former officer named in civil suit / Parking lot incident involving off-duty police back in court

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, May 29, 2002

Author/Byline: BRIAN WALLHEIMER STAFF WRITER
Section: CITY/STATE
Page: 6

Opening arguments began Tuesday in the latest round of the legal battle over what happened in the parking lot of The Office Sports Bar and Grill North on Jan. 15, 1999.

The new court case involves a civil suit brought by Curt McCloughan against former Springfield police officer Daniel Patterson and the city of Springfield.

McCloughan, of Spaulding, says Patterson kicked him in the head during an altercation with Patterson and other off-duty officers who were attending a party at The Office North. McCloughan also named the city as a defendant because he says Patterson was acting as a police officer during the incident.

Patterson and the other off-duty officers allegedly pulled McCloughan from his truck and battered him after he backed into a vehicle at the bar, which has since changed names and is under new ownership at 1120 E. Sangamon Ave.

McCloughan's face, knee and thumb were injured, the suit says.

Six officers were disciplined as a result of the incident, including Patterson, who was fired in March 1999.

Patterson was acquitted in a criminal trial of aggravated battery in October 1999, and an arbitrator decided in May 2001 that he should be reinstated to the Springfield police force with back pay. The city has appealed that ruling twice, but lost in both the trial court and the Fourth District Appellate Court.

Patterson has been working since April 2000 for the Grandview Police Department.

McCloughan pleaded guilty to driving under the influence in May 2001.

In opening arguments Tuesday, McCloughan's attorney, Richard Steagall, said McCloughan's blood was found on Patterson's boot. He also said that, while Patterson and fellow officer Jeff Tavernor were off duty, they still acted as officers during the incident.

"Tavernor and Patterson were acting within the scope of their jobs," Steagall said.

Defense attorneys said Tavernor and Patterson can retain their power as peace officers while off duty but do not have to. Peter Wise, Patterson's attorney, said none of the off-duty officers, including Patterson, identified themselves as police.

"Up to five o'clock, he was officer Dan Patterson," Wise said. "After five o'clock, he was just good old Dan Patterson."

Bill Workman, defense attorney for the city, agreed.

"The off-duty officers were not acting within the scope of their duty," Workman said during opening arguments.

Wise said witnesses will tell the court that the blood was airborne when it came into contact with Patterson's boot, not because Patterson kicked McCloughan.

A jury of five women and three men will decide if McCloughan should receive compensation. Steagall could not say how much McCloughan is seeking in damages, just that it was more than $15,000. Testimony will continue today.

Memo: ON WEB SITE

 

Arbitrator: Reinstate Patterson / Finds charges not proved in alleged beating by police

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, December 27, 2000

Author/Byline: SARAH ANTONACCI STAFF WRITER
Section: NEWS
Page: 1

A Springfield police officer fired in 1999 after being accused of beating a man in a tavern parking lot should be reinstated to his job with back pay, an arbitrator has ruled.

The fired officer, Dan Patterson, and his family learned of the ruling on Christmas Day.

"They're elated," Sgt. Don Kliment, president of Springfield Policemen's Benevolent & Protective Association Unit 5, said Tuesday of the family's reaction.

"I think he knew it was good news, because he knew I wouldn't call him on Christmas to give him bad news."

Patterson refused comment Tuesday, while the wife of the victim of the alleged beating called the decision one more stage of "a total nightmare."

"I guess everybody's right," said Melody McCloughan, wife of Curt McCloughan, who was injured in a scuffle that allegedly involved Patterson and others attending a party at a north-side tavern on Jan. 15 1999. "The cops really do have their own set of laws."

The arbitrator, Matthew Finkin of the University of Illinois Law School, heard the case during a two-day period in October.

Finkin found that the city did not prove that Patterson kicked McCloughan, among other charges, and therefore should hire him back. Finkin also ruled that more appropriate disciplinary action would have been a 90-day suspension without pay.

Patterson was fired March 20, 1999. As a result of Finkin's decision, Patterson could be eligible for 18 months' back pay.

Sgt. Kevin Keen, spokesman for the Springfield Police Department, said Tuesday the city had not yet seen the arbitrator's ruling and would review it before commenting.

"We learned . . . (Tuesday) morning from a Benevolent board member that the arbitrator ruled in favor of Mr. Patterson," he said. "The department will review the decision and its options and make a decision based on that."

The city could take the matter to circuit court, but Brian McFadden, chief of staff to Mayor Karen Hasara, did not think any decision on an appeal would be made before next week.

"When we look at the ruling itself and then talk about it internally, then a decision will be made on whether to appeal," he said.

A Sangamon County jury in October 1999 found Patterson not guilty of aggravated battery for the beating of McCloughan, of Spaulding, outside what was then the Office Sports Bar and Grill North, 1120 E. Sangamon Ave. (The tavern has since changed ownership and been renamed.)

Patterson, who was off duty, was attending a birthday party for his wife, along with other off-duty officers and others.

McCloughan was injured in a dispute that occurred after he drove his pickup into a vehicle owned by Patterson's brother-in-law, Jeff Tavernor , also a police officer, and his wife.

During Patterson's trial, McCloughan testified that he was stopped, pulled from his truck and attacked. He suffered abrasions, deep cuts around his left eye and a hyperextended thumb.

Several witnesses testified both at the trial and during the arbitration hearing that they saw Patterson kick McCloughan.

However, none of the witnesses' descriptions matched.

Some said they saw McCloughan face down on the ground, one said he was face up, and another said he was on his hands and knees. They also testified to seeing Patterson kick McCloughan in different parts of the body and differed in their testimony as to who else was around at the time.

Finkin's evaluation of the testimony was:

"In sum, what the record shows is that there was a general melee in an unlit parking lot on a winter's night involving an inebriated driver and a group of off-duty policemen celebrating a birthday during which a crowd, including the Grievant, gathered closely around the prostrate victim and that the Grievant's boot came in close proximity with the driver's head; but the testimony is far from being either clear or convincing that the Grievant struck the victim with a kick."

Melody McCloughan expressed disappointment in the arbitrator's ruling.

"What can I say? It's just such a heartbreak," she said. "We've been through such awful things - my family, myself and my husband. It's been a total nightmare. .. .

"It's sad they allow someone like that back on the police department."

The McCloughans are suing Patterson and the city in federal court. That trial is set for July.

Six members of the Springfield Police Department were disciplined as a result of the incident, but only Patterson was fired. He now is an officer with the Grandview Police Department.

The city charged that Patterson violated at least six departmental rules the night of the alleged beating. Among them: that he was drinking off duty and got into the middle of a traffic dispute, kicking the driver; that he participated in conduct unbecoming an officer; that he failed to properly report the incident; that he lied during an internal affairs investigation; and that he caused a loss of public trust.

The arbitrator said the city failed to prove those charges, including whether Patterson ever kicked McCloughan.

Finkin said a 90-day suspension would have been justified because of a conversation Patterson had with a fellow officer after the incident. In that conversation, Patterson allegedly told the officer to misrepresent what happened outside the tavern.

"It's kind of a strange ruling because we pointed out that (Finkin) should not even consider that, because that was not why (Patterson) was fired," said Ron Stone, the attorney for the officers' union.

The two most widely publicized allegations arising from the incident have been disproved, Stone added.

"The two biggest issues were that there was a cover-up and that Daniel Patterson caused this injury," he said, "and at this point it's been shown twice that those things are not attributable to him."

 

 

OFF-DUTY OFFICER DETAILS CONVERSATION WITH COP ACCUSED IN TAVERN BEATING

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, October 16, 1999

Author/Byline: CHRIS DETTRO STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 16

An off-duty Springfield police officer testified that Daniel Patterson asked him, "You're not going to let me hit him again?" while an alleged

beating victim stood in the parking lot of a north-end tavern early this year.

Officer Shawn Handlin was one of several off-duty police officers attending a 30th birthday party for Christina Patterson, wife of former officer Dan Patterson, at The Office Sports Bar and Grill-North the evening of Jan. 15. Dan Patterson, 29, is on trial charged with aggravated battery for allegedly kicking Curt McCloughan, 41, of Spaulding, in the head in the tavern parking lot following an accident in the lot. McCloughan backed his pickup truck into a Ford Bronco owned by police officer Jeff Tavernor and his wife and was subsequently dragged from the truck and onto the asphalt parking lot. McCloughan said he was trying to pull back into his parking space; other witnesses said he appeared to be attempting to leave the lot.

McCloughan was charged with driving under the influence that evening, and his case is still pending. Patterson was fired from the police force following the incident, and other officers were disciplined.

Handlin, under questioning by assistant state's attorney Robin DuRocher, said he went out to the parking lot after Faith Tavernor, Jeff Tavernor 's wife, came into the private party room and said there was a fight going on outside.

Handlin said he saw a man who appeared to be injured "coming up to his feet" between the two vehicles. He said he and Wendell Banks, another off-duty officer at the party, took the man off to the side and asked him questions to determine his level of coherence.

Handlin said Patterson then approached him and asked if he could talk to the man, later identified as McCloughan. "I told him no, to go back inside, like I had been telling everybody else," Handlin said. "He (Patterson) said, `You're not going to let me hit him again?' and I said, 'No, not unless you're going to go through us.' " Handlin said.

The officer said Patterson did not ask the question in a threatening manner, and under cross-examination by defense attorney Fred Schlosser, Handlin said Patterson made the remark "casually." Handlin further testified that Patterson then said, "He deserved this." "I told him, `No one deserves this, why don't you go back inside,' " Handlin said. He said Patterson then walked away.

Prosecutors DuRocher and state's attorney John Schmidt rested their case Friday afternoon, and defense attorneys Schlosser and Peter Wise presented four witnesses to the six-man, six-woman jury before court recessed for the weekend. Defense testimony will continue Monday before Circuit Judge Robert Eggers.

Banks testified he heard Patterson talking to Handlin and heard the defendant ask if he could talk to McCloughan. He said Handlin refused the request and stepped between Patterson and McCloughan. Banks said Patterson asked again, "You're not going to let me talk to him?" and Handlin again refused.

Another off-duty officer at the party, Robert Byrne, said when he went outside to see what had happened in the parking lot, a large crowd was starting to gather by the two vehicles. He described the atmosphere as intense, and said there was cursing and yelling coming from the crowd. He also saw a man, McCloughan, sitting by the wheel of a pickup truck.

Byrne said he was standing next to Dan Patterson, who seemed upset.

Byrne testified he told Patterson to relax and calm down. "I told him we were at a bar and in a public area and we all have to control ourselves," Byrne said. He said Patterson did become calmer, and Byrne went back in the bar.

Both sides stipulated that blood found on the left boot of a pair of boots seized from Patterson's home matched the DNA profile of McCloughan.

Springfield forensic pathologist Dr. Travis Hindman, testifying for the defense, said he had examined photographs of McCloughan's face taken after the incident, as well as medical records and the boots.

He said the injuries around McCloughan's left eye were abrasions and deep contusions caused by a broad surface impact.

He said the injuries were incompatible with being kicked by the boots or hit by fists, and it was "extremely unlikely" they were caused when McCloughan backed out and hit the Bronco.

He said they were compatible with contact with the parking lot surface.

McCloughan testified that when he was pulled from his truck, he landed on his knees, then slid to all fours and ended up prone on the asphalt.

Under cross-examination by Schmidt, Hindman said it would be possible to kick someone with the boots and not leave a mark.

On Thursday, three prosecution witnesses -- a police officer, firefighter and bank employee -- said they saw Patterson kick McCloughan. The witnesses disagreed on the location of the kick and one man said he saw two "short jabs" from Patterson's foot.

 

VICTIM TESTIFIES IN BEATING TRIAL / EX-OFFICER ACCUSED OF KICKING MAN IN PARKING LOT OF TAVERN

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, October 15, 1999

Author/Byline: CHRIS DETTRO STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 11

Curt McCloughan testified Thursday he was beaten about the face and head the evening of Jan. 15 in a north-end tavern parking lot after a

fender-bender accident. But McCloughan said he doesn't know who struck him, or with what.

Three other witnesses testified they saw former police officer Daniel S. Patterson, on trial in Sangamon County Circuit Court for aggravated battery, strike McCloughan with his booted foot. But the witnesses differed in describing the nature and exact location of the blow.

A jury of six men and six women heard opening statements from attorneys and testimony from four prosecution witnesses Thursday.

Patterson, 29, is accused of striking McCloughan after McCloughan, 41, of Spaulding, backed his pickup into a Ford Bronco owned by police officer Jeff Tavernor and his wife. McCloughan was attempting to leave The Office Sports Bar and Grill-North, 1120 E. Sangamon Ave., about 9:05 p.m. on Jan. 15 when the accident occurred. McCloughan was said to have been dragged from his vehicle afterwards. Patterson was among several off-duty officers attending a birthday party at the tavern for Christina Patterson, his wife and Jeff Tavernor 's sister.

State's attorney John Schmidt, who has to prove a single charge -- that Patterson "knowingly made physical contact of an insulting and provoking nature" with McCloughan -- said Patterson "unprovoked, kicked Curt McCloughan when he was down." Peter Wise, one of Patterson's defense attorneys, said his client was charged "in a rush to find a bad guy; a rush based on contradiction and assumption." "Dan Patterson is glad this day is here," Wise said.

McCloughan, an apprentice pipe fitter with Central Illinois Light Co., said he was invited by a journeyman pipe fitter to have some drinks after work at The Office North. He said he arrived about 4:15 p.m. and drank eight to 10 beers until he got up to leave about 9 p.m.

He said he backed his truck out of its parking space and felt a thud. Instead of blocking the parking lot, he attempted to pull back into the parking space, he said.

But before he could do that, he testified, people were beating on his truck's hood and driver's side window. Before he could turn the truck off, he said, the door opened and he was dragged from under his seatbelt onto the ground.

While someone was standing on his right hand, he testified, he was struck with a flurry of blows. He said he was then pulled off the ground and put against the side of his truck. He said he couldn't see the people in front of him because of the blood and injuries to his face and outside tavern lights shining in his eyes . "I said, 'All I did was hit something, call the cops,' " McCloughan said. "The guy in front of me said 'We are the cops.' " "I said, 'No, real cops.' " McCloughan said the people pulling him out of the truck and striking him never identified themselves as policemen.

Under cross-examination from Wise, McCloughan said he wasn't trying to leave the scene, and that he didn't swear at the people trying to stop the truck.

He said when dragged from the truck, he was on his knees, then his hands and knees and slid until he was face-down on the asphalt.

Wise said he will present evidence to show that McCloughan's facial injuries were caused when he hit the parking lot surface face-first. He also said he will show that blood found on Patterson's boot got there through the air, not as the result of contact with McCloughan's face.

Springfield firefighter Mitchell Ruger said he was inside the private party room with other birthday guests when Faith Tavernor, Jeff Tavernor 's wife, opened the door and asked for help.

Ruger said she told those inside that her husband had someone in a headlock in the parking lot.

Ruger said he went through the beer garden into the parking lot and saw Jeff Tavernor holding a man in a headlock. Someone pulled Tavernor off the man, according to Ruger, and Ruger said he put a hand on the man's back, hoping to calm him.

Ruger said the man did not respond and appeared to be drunk.

He said he then saw a booted foot strike the man in the neck and shoulder area, and the foot belonged to Dan Patterson. "The kick didn't seem that hard to me," Ruger said.

Neither Ruger nor other witnesses who testified Thursday indicated that McCloughan said anything or otherwise reacted to the kick.

When McCloughan leaned back in a sitting position against the truck, Ruger, who had not been drinking alcohol, returned to the tavern. "I knew I wanted to be somewhere else," he said.

Under cross-examination, Ruger said Patterson kicked McCloughan twice and described the kicks as "a couple of short little jabs." Springfield police officer Rob Fleck said he was with his wife and Christina Patterson, who had become ill, when the Bronco was hit.

He said he heard someone call his name and ran through the beer garden into the lot and saw a red pickup starting to pull away. He said he saw Tavernor leaning in the truck trying to stop it, and he ran to the passenger side only to find the door locked.

When he got to the other side of the truck, now stopped, Tavernor was outside and Patterson was leaning inside, he said. Patterson was pulled from the truck, and Tavernor opened the door and pulled McCloughan out. Fleck said McCloughan slid to his knees, then to all fours and eventually onto his face.

Fleck said he was trying to calm the driver when he saw a foot -- Dan Patterson's foot -- make contact with McCloughan's forehead just at the hairline.

He said he then went to his car and called the police dispatcher on his cell phone.

Fleck, under questioning by Schmidt, said the blow by Patterson was a kick. "I don't know how else to describe it," he said.

But under cross-examination, he said he had characterized the blow as "a stub" in an earlier interview. "It wasn't a 30-yard field goal," Fleck said.

Schmidt then asked Fleck if his statement to police investigators on Feb. 6 was correct. In the statement, Fleck said he saw Patterson step around someone and kick McCloughan one time in the head. "Is what you put in this statement what you saw?" Schmidt asked. "Yes," Fleck replied.

Brian Brewer, characterized by Wise in opening statements as a "police officer wannabe," said he knew Christina Patterson through his work at a bank and knew both Dan Patterson and Jeff Tavernor from playing softball with them.

He said he had been on "ride-alongs" with several police officers, including Tavernor, but never with Patterson.

He said he was outside talking to Faith Tavernor, who was in the Bronco, when the truck struck the vehicle. "He did not appear to be stopping," Brewer said of the driver of the truck.

Brewer said he saw Jeff Tavernor pull the driver from the truck after it had stopped, and saw Fleck "trying to get everybody back, to restore order." He said he saw Patterson walk up to McCloughan, who was face-up on the ground, and kick him. "I can't say for sure where, but it was in or around the head or neck area," Brewer said. "It wasn't a rear back and kick a field goal kind of thing," said Brewer when asked to describe the kick by assistant state's attorney Robin DuRocher. "He didn't rear back and try to win the Super Bowl." Brewer, whose cross-examination will continue today, said he didn't tell investigators about the kick during an initial interview, but did tell them on Feb. 26. "I wasn't asked specifically, and I didn't volunteer," he said of his first omission.

Patterson was subsequently fired from the police force following the tavern incident, and McCloughan has DUI charges pending from the same night.

McCloughan also has filed a civil lawsuit seeking damages against Patterson, Tavernor, police Chief John Harris and the city.

 

TAVERN BEATING HEARING LEADS TO WITNESS PROCESSION

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, May 14, 1999

Author/Byline: CHRIS DETTRO STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: NEWS
Page: 1

A normally routine pretrial hearing in the drunken-driving case against Curt McCloughan of Spaulding turned into an all-day parade of witnesses

Thursday.

Most recounted the events of Jan. 15, the evening McCloughan allegedly was kicked in the head by an off-duty Springfield police officer in the parking lot of The Office Sports Bar and Grill-North, 1120 E. Sangamon Ave.

The hearing before Associate Circuit Judge Theodis Lewis was to argue a defense motion to suppress results of a blood test given McCloughan that night.

McCloughan's attorney, Charles "Chick" Delano III, contended the results should be suppressed because his client's constitutional rights were violated by the alleged beating. Assistant state's attorney John Maurer argued that McCloughan didn't have to agree to the test if officers had probable cause to seek it.

Lewis won't decide on the test admissibility before June 1, when the hearing is scheduled to resume.

Thursday's testimony, however, was a prelude to what can be expected in two other cases, should they come to trial -- the aggravated battery case against Daniel S. Patterson, the police officer accused of kicking McCloughan; and McCloughan's civil case against Patterson, fellow officer Jeff Tavernor , Police Chief John Harris and the city of Springfield.

McCloughan was leaving the bar about 9:10 p.m. Jan. 15 when he allegedly backed his pickup into a Ford Bronco owned by Tavernor and his wife, Faith.

Several off-duty police officers who were at the tavern attending a birthday party for Christina Patterson, Daniel Patterson's wife and Jeff Tavernor 's sister, reportedly saw the fender-bender and approached McCloughan, who was beaten and suffered injuries to his face and hand.

Delano subpoenaed both Patterson and Tavernor, but they were not called to the witness stand after their attorneys said they would invoke their Fifth Amendment rights against self-incrimination.

Two guests at the party, both of whom said they were there as friends of the Pattersons, said they saw Dan Patterson kick McCloughan in the head area while he was prone, face-down on the parking lot.

Mitchell Ruger, a Springfield firefighter, said he saw a man on the ground being held by Tavernor in a headlock. Several people, some of them off-duty officers, were clustered around the two men. "Jeff was holding him with his right arm and motioning for everybody to get away," said Ruger, adding that McCloughan had blood on his face.

Ruger said he approached the two, put his hand on McCloughan's back, and said, "It's OK. Let's find out what's going on here." At that point, Ruger said, "I saw a boot come into the situation. Someone was kicking him about the head, in the neck area." Ruger, who said he wasn't drinking that evening, said he "looked up and it was Dan Patterson" kicking McCloughan.

Ruger said that McCloughan seemed incoherent and offered no resistance while he was present.

Springfield police officer Rob Fleck, who said he drank two beers after arriving at the party about 7 or 7:30 p.m., testified that Jeff Tavernor appeared angry at Patterson for not taking his wife, Christina, home from the party.

Fleck said Christina Patterson was intoxicated and became ill about 9 p.m., and he and his wife were holding onto her arms outside the tavern. He said Jeff Tavernor came outside and told his wife to pull the Bronco around to take Christina home.

Faith Tavernor did so. Her husband was putting children in the Bronco, and Faith was getting in the driver's side, still with the door open, when Fleck "heard a bang and saw the truck rock," he said.

Fleck said he then saw a small truck pulling away from the Bronco with Jeff Tavernor next to the driver's side door. "He was leaning toward the truck, saying 'You just hit my truck,' "Fleck testified. McCloughan replied, "I didn't f---hit anything" and started to pull away, Fleck said.

Tavernor and then Patterson leaned into the truck, Fleck said. He tried to pull Patterson out of the truck by his waistband, but lost his grip, Fleck said.

Tavernor then opened the truck door and pulled McCloughan out, then "put him on his knees," according to Fleck. He said McCloughan fell face first to the asphalt with his hands extended outward. "I got on my hands and knees and said, "Stay where you are,'` Fleck said. "Then a foot came out and hit him in the head." "`Did Dan Patterson kick him in the head?" Delano asked. "Yes," Fleck replied.

Officer Noll Handlin, who also was at the party while off-duty, said he escorted an "obviously injured" McCloughan out of the crowd. "He appeared stumbling, dazed, whatever," Handlin testified. "He was bleeding from the facial area." As he was standing by McCloughan, Patterson came up to him and asked to talk to McCloughan, Handlin said. "I said no, and told him to go back inside where we'd been telling everybody to go," Handlin said. "He said something about wanting to hit him again." Handlin said he told Patterson no one was going to talk with McCloughan, "that they were going to have to go through us." "He (Patterson) said he deserved it, or something like that," Handlin said. "I said, `No one deserves it.'` Delano asked Handlin if Patterson had talked to him another day. "He told you he thought Officer Fleck did it, didn't he?" Delano asked. "Yes, he did," Handlin replied.

The manager of Skateland North roller rink, Rodney Howard, testified he overheard a conversation among four unidentified, out-of-uniform police officers at the roller rink on a day after the Jan. 15 incident. He said they were there during a skating party booked by Faith Tavernor.

Howard said the officers talked about what had happened outside the tavern and "what they were going to say if anybody questioned them." He said one officer "said he wasn't the only one doing it." "The conversation was about covering their a-," Howard said.

He told Delano he had been "intimidated by a couple of police officers" about his testimony. "I don't know their names," he added.

Maurer, in his cross-examinations, concentrated on whether the officers at the party were off-duty, and all witnesses said they were. No witness testified that they heard anyone identify themselves to McCloughan as a police officer during the incident.

 

STATE POLICE: NO BEATING COVERUP / REPORT FINDS FAULT WITH INVESTIGATION BY CITY OFFICERS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, June 26, 1999

Author/Byline: SARAH ANTONACCI STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: NEWS
Page: 1

Springfield police did not attempt a coverup in the January beating of a local man by an off-duty officer but there was a "significant" breakdown in

communications and other investigation problems, an Illinois State Police audit has concluded.

The department in "no way, shape or form" showed a "hint at any type of coverup," Michael Lane, chief inspector for the Illinois State Police's inspection and audits department, said Friday.

Mayor Karen Hasara asked state police in March to determine whether department policies and procedures were followed during an investigation of the incident at a local tavern on the night of Jan. 15. Lane said there were "omissions" and "untimely follow-up investigations." He added that there was a "breakdown in the checks and balances" but no evidence of a coverup. "There was clearly a breakdown and no one will try to defend that," he said. "Job descriptions lay certain responsibilities on certain officers. In the future, you lay right out there who's to do what and when to make sure this never happens again." The audit concluded that there was a "significant" breakdown of communication between officers and upper command personnel. The report said the preliminary investigation was inadequate, e-mail was improperly handled and upper command failed to follow-up, including no timely follow-up by the Internal Affairs Division.

The state police made several suggestions on ways to prevent similar problems in the future and to "make sure someone's held accountable," Lane said.

Springfield Police Chief John Harris said the department is already implementing some of the suggestions, including revamping command notification guidelines and developing an e-mail policy. State police made two other recommendations -- including faster follow-up by internal affairs when serious allegations are made against officers and development of written rules for command-staff review of reports.

Harris said the department is considering the final two recommendations. "We have an outstanding department," he said. "We have problems and we always will have problems. When we make a mistake, though, we will change to make it better. That's why we open ourselves up to independent reviews." On Jan. 15, Curt McCloughan, 41, of Spaulding, was leaving The Office Sports Bar and Grill-North, 1120 E. Sangamon Ave. when he backed his Nissan pick-up into a Ford Bronco owned by Springfield police officer Jeffrey Tavernor and his wife, Faith.

The off-duty officers were attending a birthday party for Tavernor's sister.

Police at the scene said McCloughan tried to flee, so they told him they were police and ordered him to stop. When he didn't, the report stated, Tavernor reached inside McCloughan's truck to turn off the ignition. He said McCloughan tried to swing at him.

McCloughan said he was actually trying to park his truck when off-duty officers pulled him out of the truck and attacked him. McCloughan's suffered injuries to his face, arm and knee. McCloughan was arrested at the scene for driving under the influence and an assault charge that was never formally filed. His DUI trial is set for later this summer.

Only one officer has been charged in the case. Daniel S. Patterson, 29, is facing aggravated battery charges in Sangamon County Circuit Court for allegedly kicking McCloughan once in the face. Patterson has since been fired.

State police were asked to look into the handling of the incident, including notification of command staff, the chief and internal affairs, and how the investigation was conducted.

It was one of four investigations into the beating. An internal affairs investigation began about a week after the incident. Results of the investigation were not made public, other than the fact that six officers were disciplined internally.

A criminal investigation was launched the day after a story appeared in The State Journal-Register.

In addition, the FBI is investigating whether McCloughan's civil rights were violated.

Kevin Corr, supervisory special agent and chief counsel for the FBI's Springfield office, said Friday "our file is still considered a pending file." Also, as a result of the incident, McCloughan and his attorney Charles "Chick" Delano III, have filed a civil lawsuit against the city, Patterson, Tavernor and the police department.

Delano said Friday that he thinks the Illinois State Police "are excellent highway patrolmen" but would not comment on their investigation into the incident.

Hasara said the city and the police department were opened to close scrutiny by asking state police to conduct the probe. "We can't redo what happened. We can only make sure it doesn't happen again. We're working with the chief to do that," she said. "This was a huge risk on our part to ask the state police to come in. It would have been a lot easier to say -- what with the court proceedings, trial and lawsuit -- let's wait. But if we didn't do this, we wouldn't have been doing our jobs."

Memo: ON WEB SITE / FACT BOX HEAD: Main points of state police report. FACT BOX ON PAGE 4

Beating victim tells his story / Testimony comes in continuation of DUI hearing

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, June 2, 1999

Author/Byline: CHRIS DETTRO STAFF WRITER
Section: LOCAL
Page: 9

The man allegedly beaten by an off-duty Springfield police officer in a

tavern parking lot earlier this year recounted his version of what happened

that night during a pretrial hearing on his own DUI charge Tuesday.

Curt McCloughan's testimony came during a hearing on a motion to suppress

the results of his blood test taken the evening of Jan. 15 at St. John's

Hospital. McCloughan's attorney, Charles "Chick" Delano III, is arguing the

results should be suppressed because his client's constitutional rights

were violated by the alleged beating. Assistant state's attorney John

Maurer argued that McCloughan didn't have to agree to the test if officers

had probable cause to seek it.

Associate Circuit Judge Theodis Lewis said he will take the matter under

advisement and rule within a few days. Tuesday's hearing was a continuation

of a proceeding that began last month.

McCloughan, 41, of Spaulding, testified he volunteered to give a blood

sample at the hospital only because he knew doing so would "get me out of

there and get me medical treatment."

However, Springfield police officer Tim Ealey, who investigated

McCloughan's alleged beating at the scene, said McCloughan refused medical

treatment when he was asked.

McCloughan said he arrived at The Office Sports Bar and Grill-North on

Sangamon Avenue about 4:15 p.m. Jan. 15 and left through the front door at

9:05 p.m.

He said when he started to back his truck out of its parking space, he felt

"a thud" and started to pull back into the space to get out and check for

damage. McCloughan allegedly struck a Ford Bronco belonging to off-duty

police officer Jeffrey Tavernor and his wife, Faith.

Before he could do so, McCloughan said, one person began beating on the

hood of his red pickup truck and another on the driver's side window. He

said that before he could turn off the ignition, someone opened the door

and hit him in the side of the head and pulled him out, while a second

person reached in and got the keys.

McCloughan said he fell out of the truck facedown on the asphalt, and

someone stood on his right hand, while others struck him in the knee, back

and all around the head. He said he was turning his head from side to side

on the ground to try to avoid the blows.

"I have no idea," he replied when asked how many people took part in the

beating.

One off-duty officer, Daniel Patterson, has been charged with aggravated

battery for allegedly kicking McCloughan in the head. Patterson, who like

the other off-duty officers was at the tavern that night attending a

birthday party for Patterson's wife, has since been fired from the police

force.

McCloughan said the beating "seemed like forever" but couldn't say how long

it actually lasted. He said after he was brought to his feet and pinned

against the side of his truck, he told the people around him, "All I did

was back into someone. Call the cops."

"They said, 'We are the cops,'` McCloughan testified. "I said, 'Not real

cops.'`

Because of his injuries, he said he refused a field sobriety test once

uniformed officers arrived.

He said at the hospital it was determined he had a broken right thumb, and

he had X-rays taken of his knee and back. Eye doctors have told him he has

a piece of metal lodged in his left eye near the optic nerve that has

caused him to lose peripheral vision in that eye and two holes in the

retina of his right eye. He is still seeing a retinal specialist, he said.

When asked by Maurer how much he had to drink that night, McCloughan

replied, "I couldn't tell you." But when asked specifically if he had one

drink, McCloughan replied in the affirmative. When asked if he had two

drinks, he invoked his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination.

McCloughan also has filed a civil suit seeking damages from the city,

Police Chief John Harris, Patterson and Jeffrey Tavernor .

CITY SEEKS CHANGE OF VENUE FOR TRIAL

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, May 14, 1999

Edition: M1,M2
Section: NEWS
Page: 4

The city of Springfield is asking that a lawsuit filed by the man allegedly beaten by an off-duty police officer outside a local tavern be moved from

county to federal court.

Ted Schullian, the attorney representing the Springfield Police Department, filed the motion Thursday in Sangamon County Circuit Court. He made the motion because the lawsuit alleges Curt McCloughan's civil rights were violated, among other things. "There's an allegation of a federal civil rights claim in the complaint, and whenever there's a federal claim in a case filed in local court, we ask that it be moved to federal court," he said.

A judge will decide if that happens.

McCloughan, of Spaulding, has filed suit against the city, Police Chief John Harris, former Springfield police officer Daniel Patterson, who's been criminally charged in the case, and officer Jeffrey Tavernor .

McCloughan alleges that the officers violated his civil rights when they beat him outside the tavern. The suit also contends the police department ignored a pattern of "misconduct" and "brutality" among its officers.

Damages of at least $250,000 are being sought.

UNION TO FIGHT DISCIPLINARY ACTION FROM TAVERN BEATING

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, May 5, 1999

Author/Byline: SARAH ANTONACCI STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 9

To virtually no one's surprise, the Springfield Police Department's union is fighting disciplinary actions taken against five of its members after

the Jan. 15 beating of a Spaulding man at a local tavern.

The Policemen's Benevolent and Protective Association No. 5 sent two letters last month to the city requesting to see evidence the department used in coming to its disciplinary decisions regarding four officers and a sergeant. A lieutenant also was disciplined, but is not a union member.

It took nearly three weeks before reports of the beating surfaced in The State Journal-Register, with the disciplinary action occurring only after significant publicity was generated. The delay in reporting the incident also prompted Mayor Karen Hasara to ask for a state police investigation. "We want to ensure the discipline handed out is supported by the facts," said Sgt. Don Kliment, president of the union. "Some of the officers felt the discipline was excessive and not corrective but meant merely to punish them. And we can't make a decision on how strong (the department's) case is until we see the files." The handling of the incident at The Office Tavern-North, 1120 E. Sangamon Ave., has become one of many bones of contention between the union and Police Chief John Harris.

The union will begin Thursday a no-confidence vote that will conclude Saturday. Low morale and internal dissension are other reasons, the union has said.

Harris said Tuesday he would like to see the gap bridged between his office and union members, but that can be difficult. "I don't believe anything would come between officers and serving the community, and people in this community can trust they'll do their job despite internal squabbles," he said.

According to the union contract, disciplinary measures are meant to improve behavior, not punish officers, and also are supposed to be progressive in nature.

Ron Stone, the union's attorney, said the organization suspects some of the disciplinary action was too swift and may have violated that tenet of the contract. "You don't start out firing someone for a first offense," he said. "They have a progressive scheme of discipline from oral, to written, to a one-day suspension, a two-day suspension ..." Harris announced on March 12 that six members of the department would be disciplined for their roles in the beating -- and their roles in reporting the beating -- of 41-year-old Curt McCloughan.

Officer Daniel Patterson, 29, a three-year veteran of the force, was fired after he was charged with aggravated battery for allegedly kicking McCloughan in the head while off-duty and attending a party at the tavern.

Another officer who also was off-duty at the time, Jeffrey Tavernor , 31, was temporarily taken off street duty, but has since returned.

Sgt. David Dodson, 43, and Lt. Michael Geiger, 40, were disciplined as a result of their response to the alleged attack. Dodson was the supervising officer on the scene until Geiger was called in. Geiger supervised the entire shift.

Two other officers also were disciplined, although their identities have never been revealed. Other than Patterson, who was taken off the city's payroll, the exact punishments for the other officers haven't been disclosed, in keeping with established departmental policy. "We want to see whether the evidence they used meets the standards for discipline," Kliment said.

The issue likely will be heard by an arbitrator. The city will hand over its files on the incident once the arbitration hearing is scheduled. Then the officers will sit down with union officials and review their files, making sure they are accurate and complete.

At the hearing, Stone said, the city will have to prove by preponderance of the evidence that its actions were in keeping with the contract.

 

POLICE TESTIMONY LINKS PATTERSON TO TAVERN BEATING / OFFICER PLEADS INNOCENT TO CHARGES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, April 2, 1999

Author/Byline: SARAH ANTONACCI STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: NEWS
Page: 1

Several Springfield police officers agree they saw one of their co-workers kick a Spaulding man in the head outside a north-end tavern Jan. 15, a

police department investigator testified Thursday.

The alleged details of the beating of Curt McCloughan, 41, by off-duty officer Daniel S. Patterson while at a party at The Office Sports Bar and Grill-North, 1120 E. Sangamon Ave., were publicly disclosed for the first time, during a hearing in Sangamon County Circuit Court.

Sgt. Clay Dowis, of the Springfield Police Department's Major Case Unit, testified at Thursday's hearing to statements officers and other witnesses gave during the criminal investigation that led to Patterson's arrest.

Patterson, 29, will be tried June 1 on charges he kicked McCloughan in the head after McCloughan backed his pickup into another off-duty officer's Ford Bronco. On Thursday, Patterson pleaded innocent to two charges of aggravated battery.

A 3 1/2-year veteran of the force, Patterson was fired March 20. Dowis was one of the police officers, along with Detectives Timothy Young and Patrick Ross, who interviewed both police and civilian witnesses.

Dowis said when Springfield police officers who were on duty arrived at the tavern, they discovered there had been an accident between a pickup and a Bronco and "an individual who had been battered as a result." Though McCloughan was the alleged victim, he was the only person arrested that night for possible battery and assault. Neither of those charges was actually filed, but he does face a drunken driving charge stemming from the incident.

Witnesses told Dowis McCloughan backed his Nissan pickup into the Bronco, owned by police officer Jeffrey Tavernor , 31. Dowis said McCloughan then pulled forward and tried to stop, at which point two people "came up to the driver's door, pulled him out and battered him further." McCloughan couldn't identify his assailants, Dowis said.

When the on-duty officers recorded their reports, Dowis said, McCloughan told them he'd been struck about 15 times by numerous people, but he never used the word "kicked," only "struck" or "hit." Dowis said the off-duty officers were at The Office to celebrate the birthday of Patterson's wife, Christina. Several of them were outside when Tavernor's Bronco was struck.

Dowis also referred to the account given by police officer Robert Fleck, 35, a witness who reported that he believed McCloughan was trying to flee.

Fleck told Dowis he went to the passenger side of McCloughan's truck while Tavernor went to the driver's side. According to Dowis, Fleck said Tavernor leaned in through the open driver's window and turned off the ignition. Fleck said he then went around to the driver's side, and by the time he got there, Tavernor had been pushed aside and Patterson was leaning inside the window.

Fleck said someone then pulled Patterson out of the way, and Tavernor reached back inside the truck and pulled McCloughan out, laying him face down on the ground.

According to Dowis, Fleck said McCloughan, who had been fighting officers while inside the truck, now was submitting and repeating, "OK, OK." It was then that Fleck allegedly saw Patterson kick McCloughan in the head.

McCloughan's attorney, Charles "Chick" Delano III, who has been critical of the decision to charge just one officer, said Thursday he had no comment on the police testimony. "I want Mr. Patterson to get the fairest trial possible," Delano said. "We'll be having our litigation in the not too distant future, and I will defer until that time." The FBI is investigating whether McCloughan's civil rights were violated, and a civil suit against the department is expected.

Other accounts of the incident varied slightly from Fleck's but were consistent in that Patterson kicked McCloughan once in the head, according to Dowis' testimony.

Patterson's attorney, Peter Wise, noted after the hearing that none of the off-duty officers told on-duty police Jan. 15 that they had witnessed Patterson kick McCloughan in the head.

Dowis said another witness, Springfield firefighter Mitch Ruger, told him he saw McCloughan's head struck by a brown boot and then realized the boot was on Patterson's foot.

Police searched Patterson's house for a pair of brown boots and found a pair of black boots with brown tongues, Wise said.

Officer Noll S. Handlin, 28, told Dowis he was inside the tavern at the time and went outside only after Tavernor's wife, Faith, came in and told party attendees what was happening.

According to Dowis, Handlin said he went outside and saw a crowd around McCloughan. Handlin said he pulled McCloughan away and noticed he appeared to be "intoxicated and had injuries to his face." McCloughan suffered facial injuries, as well as a broken thumb, as a result of the attack.

Handlin said Patterson approached and asked to speak to McCloughan.

Dowis related the conversation: "What, you're not going to let me hit him again?" Patterson reportedly asked. Handlin's rely: "You're going to have to go through me to hit him again." Dowis also told of conversations Patterson allegedly had with another Springfield officer, Richard T. Whitlock Jr., who told investigators that Patterson approached him three times after Jan. 15, asking him what he saw that night. Whitlock said he told Patterson he saw nothing.

Then, Whitlock said, about two weeks after The Office incident, he was at a convenience store when Patterson allegedly walked in acting "agitated" and "pointed a finger at my chest." Patterson reportedly told Whitlock that "your buddy Mitch went to I.A.," an apparent reference to Ruger's visit with internal affairs.

According to Whitlock, Patterson acknowledged hitting someone but said it wasn't McCloughan and that if anyone asked Whitlock what happened, he was supposed to say "someone hit (Tavernor's) truck." As a result of the internal affairs investigation, Patterson was fired and Tavernor was put on desk duty. Two supervisors, Lt. Michael E. Geiger, 40, and Sgt. David E. Dodson, 43, both were disciplined, as were two other officers.

Patterson appeared in court with his wife and his father-in-law, 27-year Springfield police veteran Bill Tavernor. Jeffrey Tavernor is Patterson's brother-in-law.

 

Officers honored for bravery, service / Springfield Police Department holds annual awards luncheon

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, May 11, 2007

Author/Byline: JAYETTE BOLINSKI STAFF WRITER
Section: CITY/STATE
Page: 9

A large-scale cocaine conspiracy investigation that had Springfield-area residents talking last year yielded big results: eight indictments and the seizure of 3.2 kilograms of cocaine, seven vehicles, six guns, five houses and $77,000 cash.

Springfield police officer Jeramie Mayes, who worked the investigation as part of a regional drug unit, never guessed where the probe would lead.

"There were a lot of surprises. There were a lot of avenues we went down that I didn't think we would go down. There were a lot of individuals involved that I didn't think were involved," he said Thursday. "It went places I did not think it was going to go."

For his diligent work on the case, which spanned years and at one point was interrupted by a one-year tour of duty in Iraq, Mayes was awarded the Springfield Police Department's prestigious William Herndon award for plainclothes officers.

Numerous other city officers and civilians were recognized Thursday for outstanding service, bravery and police work during the department's annual awards luncheon.

Also receiving awards were:

* Detective Scott Kincaid, who received the Law Enforcement Commendation Medal for solving the May 2001 murder of 24-year-old Lontreal Martin. Kincaid was assigned the case in February 2006 and began re-interviewing everyone mentioned in the original reports. He talked to more than 30 people that detectives had not yet spoken to and developed new information.

Kincaid spent more than 330 hours on the cold case, and his investigation led to the arrest of Randy Hughes in September.

* Beat 300 neighborhood police officer Jason Sloman received the Abraham Lincoln award for community service. Beat 300 spans east from Ninth Street between Carpenter Street and South Grand Avenue.

Sloman attends neighborhood meetings, participates in a food drive, gets abandoned buildings boarded up and demolished, works closely with county health department inspectors and steps up efforts to dispose of garbage and weeds.



"Officer Sloman through his hard work has gained the respect of those living in his beat," his nomination read. "They know that he is available to them 24 hours a day, seven days a week."



* Officers Michael Mack and Leroy Jett were given the Silver Suarez award for uniformed officers for stopping a vehicle that matched the description of one involved in the armed robbery of a Pizza Hut a few days earlier. A passenger became nervous during the stop, which piqued the officers' interest.

A search of the car and its occupants turned up a .32-caliber Derringer hidden in the man's shoe. He eventually confessed to three armed robberies of local businesses.

* The department gave two Porter Williams awards for distinguished acts of bravery.

One went to officers Don Mumaw and Brian Graves for rescuing several children Sept. 30 from a burning car that crashed into a tree at 12th and Phillips streets. The car was severely damaged, and the passenger compartment was engulfed in flames. Six people were in the vehicle, including Della Gilmer, who died as a result of the crash, and five children.

The other was given to officers Robert Byrne, Brock Butcher and Gerry Castles, who fatally shot an armed murder suspect who was hiding out in a home in the 600 block of West Capitol Avenue on Jan. 10, 2006.

Certificates of appreciation were issued to officers Zeid Langan, Kevin Groesch, Steve Pellegrini, Scott Allin, Dan Patterson , Jason Oldham, Jamie Kollins, Ricky Burns, Mark Marinelli, Edward Higginson and Sgt. Dave Dyer.

The Chief's Unit Citation went to the traffic services section.

Civilian certificates of appreciation were given to:

* Don Pickel, for helping officers pull the children out of the burning car at 12th and Phillips;

* Helen Merrifield, for reporting a residential burglary and then telling police where the burglars went after they escaped through a window;

* Fredy Beltran, for rescuing and administering CPR to a person who had been submerged in water;

* Jacob Wardlow, Thomas Grant and Paul Davis, for confronting and chasing a car burglar, who eventually was captured by police;

* Levon Carraway, Nicole Rottinghaus and Noelle Crocker, for rescuing and administering CPR to an 8-year-old boy found at the bottom of a health club pool; and

* Jeremy Hampton for calling police and then following two suspicious men who had burglarized a house.

Caption: 1. Kincaid / 2. Sloman / 3. Mack / 4. Jett / 5. Mumaw / 6. Graves / 7. Byrne / 8. Butcher / 9. Castles

 

 

 

GRIFFIN ARMS ITSELF FOR TITLE DEFENSE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, June 9, 1988

Author/Byline: Dave Kane
Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: SPORTS
Page: 27

En route to the Class AA state baseball championship last year, Griffin High School relied on the one-two pitching punch of seniors Jeff Borski

and Tim Hull. As they prepare for a repeat appearance at Lanphier Park, the Cyclones don't have such a Big Two, but Coach Ron Wojcicki isn't fretting.

"Last year, it was pretty much a case of us going as far as Jeff and Timmy could take us," said Wojcicki. "We don't have anybody of their caliber this year, but I think we have more people who can throw. We've been going with whoever's hot."

Griffin certainly has gotten hot at the right time. The Cyclones entered last year's tourney at 33-4. Today, they'll take a 20-19 mark into an 11:30 a.m. quarterfinal against Chicago Marist (31-8). Griffin ended its regular season with six straight losses -- four coming to Joliet Catholic. In fact, Griffin enters with the second-most losses by a quarterfinalist. In 1982, Edwardsville finished 23-24. In 1981, Chicago Brother Rice was 32-17 in finishing second.

But the Cyclones have allowed just 10 runs in their five post-season games. That's Wojcicki's main reason for optimism.

"Our pitching has been outstanding," said Wojcicki, in his third year as head coach. "If you can hold your opponent to two runs, you know you're going to be in the game. That's all we look for."

Wojcicki will look for more of the same today from junior right-hander Chris Stapleton (2-5). Marist Coach Don Kuehner said his likely starter will be senior left-hander Frank Vlk (9-2). Vlk is one of three lefties in Marist's rotation.

Stapleton, a hard thrower, was winless in the regular season with a couple of tough-luck losses along the way. But he has won two tournament contests and has a 3.72 earned-run average over 53 innings, with 73 strikeouts 48 walks.

If Stapleton would falter, it would be sophomore J.J. Borski out of the bullpen. In the Cyclones' five tourney games, Borski has saved three and won one. For the year, he carries a 1.81 ERA with 30 strikeouts and 15 walks in 39 innings.

Senior right-hander Dave Saladino (5-4) got the complete-game victory Monday against Lincoln in the Springfield Sectional.

"You knew whoever threw Monday wouldn't throw Thursday," Wojcicki said. "Saladino gave us a big lift Monday, and I think it helped his confidence."

While Stapleton, Saladino and Borski have formed Griffin's post-season staff, Wojcicki sees several others with a chance for tournament work. Among them is junior right-hander Craig Jones, who worked three innings of relief in last year's quarterfinal win over Chicago Vocational.

"We haven't used Jones in post-season, but we're confident enough in him from last year," Wojcicki said. "We'd have no problem pitching him. We haven't thrown (senior right-hander) Dan Patterson in a while, or (senior left-hander) Jeff Sauer."

Offensively, Griffin has had various post-season heroes. Leadoff man Terry Williams drove in the game winner in the regional opener against Chatham Glenwood and belted a two-run homer in the sectional win over Normal.

And against Lincoln, No. 6 man Brad Rotherham went 3-for-3 while No. 7 man Greg Bernet delivered a key bases-loaded triple. In defeating the Railers, the Cyclones' top three batters went hitless. The bottom six combined for nine hits.

"If you'd told me that was going to happen, I would've said our chances would've been pretty slim," Wojcicki said. "But the bottom of our lineup came through. We don't rely on that one person."

Only a few Cyclones saw substantial action on last year's state championship team: Williams, second baseman Dennis Kracik and catcher Jeff Swaney. That, combined with an up-and-down regular season, casts the Cylcones as a heavy underdogs -- just as theywere in the regional and sectional.

"Oh, sure, we're the underdog," Wojcicki said. "You look at our record and everything else. But we don't feel any pressure at all. You hear people say, `It's great just to be here,' and it is great. But we're playing our best ball now.

"Our record reflects we didn't always play our best. But the kids are confident now."

 

 

(fleck possibly set-up for testifying against Patterson)

 

City police fire two officers / Accused of stealing cocaine

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, February 6, 2002

Author/Byline: SARAH ANTONACCI STAFF WRITER
Section: NEWS
Page: 1

Two Springfield police officers have been fired after an investigation into allegations that they took cocaine and cash from a suspected drug dealer at the Hilton Springfield on Sept. 29.

Rob Fleck, who had been with the department since June 1996, and Mark Terlecki, a member of the force since April 1998, were removed from the payroll Thursday, according to Gina Larkin, city director of human resources.

Both were patrol officers before the September incident. Fleck made $45,804 annually and Terlecki $44,905. The two had been reassigned while Illinois State Police investigated reports they stole the drugs and money.

In November, State's Attorney John Schmidt said he would not file charges against Fleck and Terlecki because proving criminal allegations contained in the 206-page state police report "depended on the truthfulness of the alleged victim." The report, he said, did not bear out the man's veracity.

For instance, Schmidt said at the time, the crime suspect insisted Fleck and Terlecki had taken $400 from him, but the state police investigation determined that the man had never had $400 with him in the first place.

However, the Springfield Police Department's internal affairs unit continued its investigation, and that apparently led to the firings.

According to police, Fleck and Terlecki were called to the Hilton, 700 E. Adams St., about 2:15 a.m. Sept. 29 to investigate reports that at least two people were using cocaine in a hotel bathroom.

The alleged drug use was witnessed by several northern Illinois police officers who had graduated from the Illinois State Police Academy the night before and were celebrating their graduation at the hotel. Those officers apparently contacted local authorities.

Dispatch records showed Springfield police were asked by Hilton security officers to help them with a problem.

Fleck and Terlecki terminated the call at 3:08 a.m. with a "Code 36." That means people at the scene provided information, but there was no need for a report to be written.

People familiar with the case said the two officers were suspected of taking the alleged drug users elsewhere to test the substance, but that they threw the test kit away, kept the cocaine and released the suspects.

However, at least one of the two men who was accused of having the cocaine later allegedly told his mother he thought it was strange that the officers had confiscated the drugs but did not arrest him. The mother, who thought her son's story was suspicious, reportedly called the police department to find out what really happened. That is said to have prompted the investigation.

Ron Stone, a lawyer who represents Police Benevolent and Protective Association No. 5, the union local for Springfield police, could not be reached Tuesday for comment on the incident or on whether the union plans to fight the officers' terminations.

Fleck also was involved in the so-called Office Tavern incident, in which a patron of a Sangamon Avenue bar was beaten in January 1999, allegedly at the hands of an off-duty police officer. The officer, Daniel Patterson , was later acquitted of charges in that case.

Fleck, who testified against Patterson at his trial, was one of six officers disciplined in the case.

He also was given a certificate of appreciation at the 1999 police awards luncheon for, along with two other officers, capturing a rapist.

 

 

Retireed officer honored for braver / Others awarded at banquet for notable work

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, May 16, 2003

Author/Byline: SARAH ANTONACCI STAFF WRITER
Section: CITY/STATE
Page: 11

A retired lieutenant Thursday received the Springfield Police Department's award for bravery for saving a woman with multiple sclerosis from a fire at her home. But Frank Natale may actually have felt even more honored by the two standing ovations he got from his former co-workers.

Natale, who retired March 14, was given the Porter Williams Award for rescuing the woman from her burning house at 435 W. Reynolds St. on Sept. 22.

He was on his way to a dinner break when he overheard the fire call and was advised that one or two people were inside the home and that one had multiple sclerosis and couldn't get out. Natale arrived to find the woman's daughter on the front porch. She had just punched her fist through two panes of glass to try to get inside.

Natale kicked in the window, got inside and convinced the woman to let him pass her through a window to waiting rescuers.

"You get caught up in it, and the adrenaline flows," he said. "I got her up and I was talking to her, and then I realized, 'It's hot in here.' You don't even notice."

Natale was a well-liked shift lieutenant who some in the department believe was forced into retirement. He became teary-eyed when fellow officers rose to applaud him as he went to receive the award, and again as he went back to his seat.

"It's just a humbling experience to be recognized by your fellow police officers," he said. "We're there for a purpose, and it's a privilege having been able to do this for a number of years. I appreciate them for all their years of support, and I have a special relationship with many of them. They serve the public every day."

Natale was one of several officers and civilians honored at the 2003 awards banquet. The others included:

* Officer Robert Davidsmeyer, given the William Herndon Award for the year's most distinguished act of police work.

He helped arrest Luke McDaniel, 42, an alleged gang member and major supplier to the Springfield-area drug market. During the arrest, police seized 3.2 pounds of high-grade powder cocaine, 2.85 ounces of crack cocaine, an ounce of heroin, $900 in cash and two guns, one of which was linked to nine armed robberies. The drugs had a total street value of $310,000, the largest seizure ever for the Springfield Police Department's street-level narcotics unit.

"It feels great," Davidsmeyer said of winning the award.

McDaniel pleaded guilty last month in federal court and faces a minimum of 10 years in prison.

* Sgt. Steve Swetland, given the Abraham Lincoln Award for community service for overseeing a variety of departmental functions, including speeding, DUI and parking enforcement, and for participating in the county's DUI task force and a variety of local events and safety programs.

* Officer Thomas Baughman, given the Silver Suarez Award for distinguished police work because he helped track down the motorist who hit and killed a pedestrian near 19th and Cummins streets on Oct. 10.

In addition, certificates of appreciation were awarded to: officer Tad Stalets, who linked footprints at a crime scene to a suspect; officer Jason Sloman and detective Rick Dhabalt, who helped connect a local man to a McDonough County murder; officer Scott Kincaid, who determined that three youths found with BB guns had been involved in a burglary; officer Mark Pointer, who helped rescue a woman trapped beneath a car; and detectives Rick Cory, Kelly Urbas, Chris Mueller, J.T. Wooldridge, Ryan Sims and Dane Cookson, who tracked the people responsible for seven armed robberies late last year to a bus headed to Champaign, eventually resulting in their arrests.

Also receiving certificates of appreciation were: detectives Jim Graham and Paul Carpenter, for their work in the Jericko Clark murder case last summer;

 

evidence technician Jeff Tavernor ,

 

who collected a soda fountain cup at the Clark gas station last year that eventually led to the apprehension of two murder suspects; and officers Matt Fricke and Chris Russell, who during undercover surveillance on a vehicle found cash, crack, cocaine and other items worth more than $13,000.

Others receiving the certificates were: officer Jeramie Mayes, who was off duty but helped locate a man police were looking for who had fled from a vehicle; officer Joseph Schweska, who talked to a local store manager about a stolen Elvis doll and ended up helping capture burglary suspects; Sgt. Ed Bell and officer Tony Fritcher, who captured a man with a hatchet who was threatening truckstop patrons; and officers Kerry Miller and Heather Shuler, who helped stop a woman from trying to kill herself on railroad tracks.

Unit citations were given to both the Traffic Services Section and the department's Explorer's Post 326.

Traffic safety certificates were given to officers Kevin Donaldson, Ed Kloppenburg, Carl Crawford, David Dyer and Terrence Davis.

Civilian certificates of appreciation went to: Orville and Aileen Bottrel, 87 and 82, who confronted an intruder in their home, scared him away and helped reduce the number of elderly harassment cases in their neighborhood; Tammy Couts, who gave officers information about a bank robber; Craig Hohl, who led police to an area where an armed robber had fled; and Rita Moughan, who recovered $11,000 in an intersection and returned it to the person who lost it.

Civilian certificates also were awarded to Brent Moral and Mindy Corey. Brent is the 6-year-old who called 911 last year when his mother became trapped beneath the family's minivan, and Corey is the dispatcher who took the call.

The Sons of the American Revolution awarded a Law Enforcement Commendation Medal to Matt Fricke for his work as a neighborhood police officer.

And the Illinois Police Association recognized officer Brian Graves, who earlier this year helped rescue a family from their burning home on North Douglas Street.

Caption: Natale / Davidsmeyer / Baughman / Swetland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matt madonia is a detective at SPD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matt madonia is a detective at SPD

 

Police officers, civilians honored for work

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, May 16, 2002

Author/Byline: SARAH ANTONACCI STAFF WRITER
Section: LOCAL
Page: 11

A Springfield police officer was recognized Wednesday for turning a two-ounce undercover cocaine buy into a bust that netted 103 pounds of cocaine and links to a multistate drug cartel.

Detective Ron Vose, a 24-year veteran of the local department, was assigned to the Illinois State Police Criminal Conspiracy Team when he made an initial purchase of cocaine from an informant that led to the arrest of the seller and continued through the supply network to Mexico.

"Despite periodic skepticism by the federal Drug Enforcement Agents in the Chicago office, Vose continued to be the lead case agent, developing new information," said Tim Schweitzer, master of ceremonies for the Springfield Police Department 's awards luncheon at the Hilton Springfield.

"His perseverance resulted in a successful buy-bust operation in June 2001, when two Mexican nationals delivered (103 pounds) of cocaine to him on Chicago's west side. Also seized in the operation were cash and a vehicle. These nationals are now cooperating with authorities and providing information on a drug cartel with ties to California, Oregon and the Midwest."

Vose, who received the William Herndon Award for performing the year's most distinguished act of police work, was one of several police officers and civilians honored.

The others included:

* Detective Stephen Pellegrini, given the Porter Williams Medal for performing a distinguished act of bravery when he confronted an armed suspect at the scene of a shooting.

* Officer Mike Brown, given the Silver Suarez Award for distinguished police work because he helped track down a pair of armed robbers through an abandoned bicycle left behind at the victimized business.

* Officer Gary Wells, given the Abraham Lincoln Medal for community service after he helped transform local high school hockey clubs into the Lincoln Land High School Hockey League, of which he is president.

Police Chief John Harris said the annual awards banquet is a chance for the public to see that the work officers do is both dangerous and important.

"Everybody looks at the things that go wrong in a department because that's what gets the press," he said. "It causes people not to understand what police do each and every day."

Others awards were:



*
Certificates of appreciation to Sgt. Todd Taylor and detectives Al Brown and

 

Matt Madonia .



* Chief's Unit Citations to mounted patrol officers Lora Nevins and Kerry Miller; the hostage negotiation team of Lt. Frank Natale, Lt. Pat Fogleman, Sgt. Jeff Bivens, Sgt. Steve Swetland, Sgt. Greg Lokaitis, detectives Don Kolar, Rick Wiese, John Bolinger, Chris Bolinger and Amy Strawn and officers Jeff Barr and Dave Wesselman; and to those who helped with the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, including assistant chief Ralph Caldwell, Sgt. Al Pinter, detectives Marty Towsley and Tim Young and Michael Grim.

* Traffic Safety Certificates to officers Dave Dyer, Robert L. Williamson, Darren Galloway, Kevin Donaldson and Dan Jones.

* Civilian awards to Kenneth Manning, Scott Miner, Jamey Green, Kenneth Giordano, Mike Alwood, Matt Daniels, Joe McCarthy, Mike Semon, John Blasko and 18 local high school students who assisted police in an anti-smoking campaign.

* A Law Enforcement Commendation Medal was awarded by the Sons of the American Revolution to officer J.R. Hauversburk, who works with the canine teams.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMPORTANT*********

 

 

 

Goulet – matt at spd – joe/spd – cac – essenburg/scsa

 

 

 

Spd – matt goulet= problem at SPD

 

See also sccac – joe goulet - spd

 

 

Local sex abuse investigations 'child sensitive'

Child advocacy center's staff takes issue with AP report


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Justin L. Fowler/The State Journal-Register

Joe Goulet, director of the Sangamon County Child Advocacy Center, sits in the center's interview room, which has a two-way mirror so officials can monitor the interview of abuse victims.

By CHRIS DETTRO

THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER

Posted Aug 26, 2009 @ 11:30 PM

Last update Aug 27, 2009 @ 06:17 AM


Officials with the Sangamon County Child Advocacy Center insist child sexual abuse investigations have come a long way since the 1980s, when aggressive questioning of suspected child victims sometimes led to bizarre allegations and discredited prosecutions.

“We just don’t do things like that any more,” Joe Goulet, executive director of the Sangamon CAC, said this week.

Goulet took issue with a recent Associated Press report that centered on interviewing techniques used in what is known as the McMartin case, which took place in California in the 1980s. Members of the McMartin family, who operated a daycare center in Manhattan Beach, Cal., were accused of sexual abuse and satanic activities. Under intensive questioning, some children who had been at the daycare center claimed they had seen witches fly, traveled in a hot-air balloon, and were taken through underground tunnels that didn’t exist.

No one was ever convicted, and prosecutors dropped any remaining charges in 1990.

The AP article suggested that investigators still use discredited interviewing techniques that encourage children to create crimes that didn’t happen.

Interviews child-sensitive

“Someone might get the idea that form of questioning is used in Sangamon County,” Goulet said. “But forensic interviewing was developed at least partially as a result of those methods.

“There has been at least child-sensitive interviewing here ever since the center opened 20 years ago,” he said.

“They used to interrogate, not interview,” Goulet said. “Kids will tell you anything they think you want to hear. It’s not forensic interviewing when you try to push a little harder.”

The article cited child sexual abuse cases in which courts have ruled that interviews conducted with the alleged victims were coercive and suggestive.

“The frustrating thing about the article was the suggestion that nothing has changed since those cases, and nothing could be further from the truth,” said Sheryl Essenburg, chief of the family violence division of the Sangamon County state’s attorney’s office and the prosecuting attorney for Child Advocacy center cases.

“There are national organizations whose reason for being is to improve interviews in child sexual abuse cases,” she said.

In Sangamon County, all interviews are recorded if the child is under 13 and they allege abuse. Essenburg said state law includes a hearsay exception that allows for admission in court of a taped interview of someone under 13 if the judge deems it sufficiently reliable. Victims who are mentally retarded also may apply for the exception.

“It can be admitted only to back up a child’s testimony, not to replace it,” Essenburg said. “That’s because you can’t cross-examine a videotape.”

No leading questions

Goulet said forensic interviewing is child-friendly, age-appropriate and court-friendly.

“We’re not asking leading questions,” he said.

Before those rules were adopted, interviewers didn’t necessarily work together and a child might be interviewed four or five times, Essenburg said.

“It wasn’t fair to the child and it wasn’t good for the interview,” she said. “The child got lost in all this, and it makes for a lousy investigation.”

Tracy Pearson is the forensic interviewer at the CAC. Each day of the month, a child advocate and a member of either the Springfield Police Department, Sangamon County Sheriff’s Department or Illinois State Police is assigned to the center.

When a child is questioned, all except the interviewer and the child are assigned to an observation room and can watch the interview behind one-way glass.

A representative of the state Department of Children and Family Services will be in the observation room if it is a DCFS case.

If a parent is suspected of the abuse, the offending parent isn’t part of the interview, Goulet said.

“We do have standards for forensic interviewing that we must meet for accreditation by the National Children’s Alliance, of which we are a member,” Goulet said. “If a child discloses (abuse) in the interview, we offer counseling to the child and the family. An advocate is available.”

He said the CAC participates in a review program once a month to re-examine interviewing techniques.

“It is a continual training process,” he said.

“Everyone understands that you want to elicit in the interview as much information as you can with as little suggestion as you can,” Essenburg said. “Trying to get clear information from a very young child is really very tricky.”

Chris Dettro can be reached at 788-1510.

Child advocacy

Illinois’ child advocacy centers developed as a result of a state law that required every county to develop a protocol for handling child sex abuse cases, according to Joe Goulet, executive director of the Sangamon County Child Advocacy center.

The Sangamon County CAC is a county agency, although most aren’t government-based, he said. At least half are not-for-profit agencies.

The Sangamon CAC provides all services for Sangamon and Christian counties and does courtesy interviews for Menard, Logan, Macoupin and Montgomery counties.

“We process about 250 cases a year, but that could mean 300 to 350 interviews” when interviews with siblings, for example, are included, he said.

The agency handles cases involving victims from infancy through 17 years of age.

“We have interviewed some children as young as two, if the child is verbal,” he said.

The CAC also coordinates services to families.

Cases are referred from law enforcement and the state Department of Children and Family Services.

Legislation last year added serious physical abuse and child fatality cases to the CAC caseload.

There are about 700 child advocacy centers in the United States, including 38 in Illinois. Illinois ranks second behind Texas in number of CACs.

 

 

 

TITLE: PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, September 21, 1986

 

AIRMAN MATTHEW GOULET , son of Bernard and Barbara Goulet of Springfield, …, have graduated from Air Force basic training at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas.

 

 

ENDORSEMENT CAUSES ELECTION FLAP IN WARD 6 STATEMENT FOR AIELLO ON CHILD ADVOCACY CENTER'S LETTERHEAD

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, March 29, 1991

Author/Byline: BERNARD SCHOENBURG STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 18

The executive director of the Child Advocacy Center, a Sangamon County agency that gets its funding from the state, said Thursday she made a

mistake by writing a letter -- on the center's letterhead -- in support of an aldermanic candidate.

"It was a mistake for me to take a political stand," said Betsy Pope Goulet , who runs the agency.

In a letter dated Tuesday and beginning "Dear Ward 6 Voter," Goulet urges votes for Joe Aiello, who is challenging incumbent Jack Andrew in the central-city ward.

"In our area, we are fortunate to have good people to choose from running for the office of Ward 6 alderman," she wrote. "There is, however, one candidate who would make extraordinary efforts on behalf of all of us in the ward -- Joe Aiello."

Goulet said she wrote the letter "without thinking" after being asked for the endorsement by Aiello, whom she has known since she was a student at the former Sacred Heart High School, and he was at what then was Griffin High.

She said she realized later she should not have used the center's letterhead, especially because she did not consult the center's board.

The center, which coordinates investigations into cases of sexual abuse of children and now is funded by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services, is the subject of a proposition on Tuesday's ballot that would establish countywide tax support. If the proposition passes, it is estimated that about $60,000 would be raised annually from a tax that amounts to 80 cents on a $60,000 home. Goulet said she was particularly concerned that publicity about the letter could hurt the proposition's chances.

"This is really, really a mess," she said.

Springfield Election Commission records show that the center, at 1001 E. Monroe St., is in Ward 2, and Goulet lives in Ward 7. Goulet said Aiello's campaign paid the costs of copying and mailing the letter. It was accompanied by a copy of a State Journal-Register article saying Aiello would donate $2,000 of his $8,000 aldermanic salary to charities in his ward.

"I can only emphasize to you how much this kind of leadership means to us and to all of the charitable groups in the area," Goulet wrote.

The Ward 6 race is one of the most-watched of the 10 aldermanic contests in the city because Andrew, who received significant GOP support in his 1987 run, had a political falling-out with GOP County Chairman Irv Smith, who is also Ward 8 alderman, and there's a Republican push for Aiello. Andrew voted against Smith and on the winning side of a council committee reorganization vote two years ago.

In the Feb. 26 non-partisan primary, Andrew outpolled Aiello by only 53 votes, 739-686. Goulet said she is "not a political person" and didn't realize the Ward 6 race was considered pivotal.

"I didn't realize that Joe was Republican and Jack was a Democrat," she said. City races are officially non-partisan.

Aiello said later that he was not aware of any legal problems with sending out the letter. If he had known, he said, "I wouldn't have asked her to put herself in this position."

He added that he thought Goulet was just trying to do her job because she called him asking if her agency could get some of the money he would donate. He said she "made a decision from her heart to endorse Joe Aiello. . . . The mistake was putting it on the letterhead."

Aiello also said he supports the proposition for the center.

Andrew could not be reached for comment.

The Child Advocacy Center board is chaired by State's Attorney Donald Cadagin, a Republican, and its membership includes state Rep. Mike Curran, a Springfield Democrat.

Daniel White, director of the Chicago office of the State Board of Elections, said state law prohibits the use of public funds for political purposes.

Meanwhile, Andrew has picked up the endorsement of Ann Laurence, who opposed him in the 1987 election.

"I have been pleasantly surprised by Jack Andrew during the last 3 1/2 years," she wrote in a letter sent out in the ward. "The biggest surprise of all is that Jack isn't in anyone's hip pocket. In fact, the bosses who worked so hard to beat me in 1987 are now working just as hard to beat Jack on April 2." Aiello said he was surprised by the endorsement because he thought Laurence didn't like Andrew after a hard-fought campaign in 1987. In other election news, questions are being raised about the use of absentee ballots.

Ward 1 Ald. Bill Clutter, a Democrat who is in a tough contest to keep his seat after being outpolled 1,744 to 1,163 in the primary by Republican Tom Madonia, said he has heard that Madonia partisans are improperly carrying out absentee balloting.

He said he's been told that some Madonia backers are saying they must be present when absentee ballots are filled out, or are filling out the ballots for voters. He also said he's been told of at least one case where Madonia has promised to help somebody get a job.

"That is ludicrous, absolutely ridiculous," Madonia responded later to both accusations.

"I don't have any jobs to promise people," he added. "The only promise I make is to be their alderman."

Clutter pointed to Precinct 81, which is in Ward 1. Election Commission records show that as of noon Thursday, 47 absentee ballots had been applied for from the precinct. That represents more than 14 percent of the 325 registered voters in the precinct.

Clutter complained about the situation to a member of the commission, and Mary Beth Awerkamp, commission executive director, said she will include a memo to all election judges making clear that if somebody has voted absentee but appears to vote on Election Day, Tuesday's vote should be counted and the absentee ballot should not be counted.

Madonia said he thought that was "pretty much standard operating procedure," and he had no problem with it.

Meanwhile, two Ward 2 officials objected to continued news reports pointing out absentee-ballot problems in that east side ward.

"I'm tired of them pointing a finger at us," said Carolyn Toney, the Democratic committeeman in Precinct 23 in Ward 2. Ward 2 Ald. Frank McNeil also said that while he sought an FBI probe of absentee ballot irregularities in Precinct 76 after the 1990 primary, that was an aberration and some wards across the city have high absentee-ballot rates.

A check of commission records, as of noon Thursday, highlighted the point.

Some examples: in Precinct 108, in Ward 3, 84 absentee ballots had been applied for, or more than 10 percent of the 800 registered voters; in Precinct 83, in Ward 1, there were 63 applications, or more than 10 percent of the 623 voters; and in Precinct 19, in Ward 6, there were 52 applications, or nearly 8 percent of the 658 voters.

In Precinct 76 -- reported to be the target of the FBI probe -- there were 12 absentee applications or about 2.3 percent of the 532 voters.

Awerkamp said 10 percent absentee applications in a precinct "would be considered a point at which to start watching what's going on."

In the Ward 8 race, candidate Diana DeWeese criticized incumbent Smith because she said he was "asleep at the switch" in a city council vote to allow a study of the location of a fire station on the city's west side.

The action taken by the council on March 19 instructs city officials to investigate possible locations, and the possible replacing of the existing station at Monroe and Chatham -- in Ward 8 -- with one further west.

Smith told the council his constituents did not want the existing station moved, but he did so just after the vote, when the council was considering another vote on an in-house study to determine where a police substation might go.

DeWeese said mayoral candidate Todd Renfrow is using the issue, with a mailing telling Ward 8 residents he would oppose closing the fire station.

"All this was possible because Irv was asleep at the switch," she said.

Smith said later that the study involved no appropriation and would not be binding, and he was satisfied to let other council members know his position.

"They can study it, but they aren't going to do it," he said of closing the station.

Meanwhile, a story in Wednesday editions of the State Journal-Register had some incorrect information about absentee voting. Awerkamp said Thursday that absentee ballots in Tuesday's election can be cast in person at the commission office in city hall through 5 p.m. Monday. Thursday was the last day that applications for such ballots could be accepted by mail because it was also the last day they could be mailed out. The commission does count absentee ballots it receives by mail through Tuesday.

The newspaper regrets the error.

 

Officer Matt Goulet=spd/ usaf

 

HURRY UP AND WAIT / PROBLEMATIC PARKING PROVES PAINFUL FOR LAST-MINUTE SHOPPERS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, December 20, 1998

Author/Byline: JEREMY MOORE STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 13

With Christmas less than a week away, shoppers headed to White Oaks Mall Saturday -- and found out everyone else had the same idea.

"It's horrible. I've been shopping for four weeks, and I haven't seen it this bad with all the cars. They've got police officers out there directing traffic," said Lisa Musick.

Even with the extra Springfield police directing traffic at all entrances, shoppers could expect to wait as long as 20 minutes to get in and out of the parking lot.

"It was pretty much gridlock around the entire mall earlier in the day, but by the evening it had started to flow a little more freely," said Officer Matt Goulet .

Passing the gridlock at the entrance was only half the battle. Once inside, shoppers had to find a parking space anyway they could. Being quick, creative and just plain lucky helped.

"As I was driving down a lane, I saw a spot open up behind me," said Musick who had been hunting for a space for ten minutes. "When I saw it open, I backed down a whole lane of parking spaces to get there."

Other shoppers used the time-tested strategy of following people to their cars.

"We were lucky this afternoon because we saw several people go to their cars, and we raced after them to get the spot," said Betty Thompson, who had arrived at the mall at 1 p.m., and left to put packages in her car three hours later.

"We've been here too long to look for a parking space. We have one now, and we're not leaving," said Thompson.

Mall employees weren't given special parking instructions Saturday, even though White Oaks Mall security was anticipating the heaviest parking lot traffic of the year.

"We have special parking. It's called the White Oaks Mall parking lot, and you park wherever you are lucky enough to find a space," said Waldenbooks' employee Dave Miller.

Some shoppers saw parking as a matter of timing.

"We got here around dinnertime because we figured everyone else would go home to eat, and maybe we could get in while everyone was leaving," said Jesse Guzman.

Guzman's plan saved him about ten minutes, compared to what other shoppers were reporting.

Most shoppers agreed parking created an extra headache for the holiday season, and one that could be easily solved.

"It's crazy out there right now. People are cutting each other off, and not letting anyone in," said Tom Lindsey.

"If people would show each other just a little bit of consideration, the traffic would flow a lot smoother."

Caption: Traffic in the parking lot of White Oaks Mall Saturday afternoon was going nowhere fast. The crush of last-minute shoppers created heavy congestion getting into and out of the mall.

 

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, May 22, 1994

 

Tolley-Heckler Dawn M. Heckler and Robert W. Tolley, both of Riverton, were married at 3 p.m. April 30 at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Riverton. The Rev. Michael Koschmann officiated.

Parents of the bride are Jerry and Betty Heckler of Riverton. Parents of the groom are John and Janet Tolley of Riverton and Billie and Larry Strickland of Springfield.

Serving as matron of honor was Donna Handlin. Bridesmaids were Tammy Vaughn, Patsy Cuffle and Sally Davis. Flower girl was Chelsea Alexander.

Best man was Michael Carrino. Groomsmen were Matthew Morris,

 

Matthew Goulet ,

 

Sean Ramsey and Gerald Williams. Ushers were Joseph Ramsey and Chet Sabo. Ringbearer was William Handlin Jr.

A reception was held at the Blue Ridge Club.

The bride is a graduate of Riverton High School and attended Lincoln Land Community College and Robert Morris. She is employed by St. John's Hospital. The groom is a graduate of Lanphier High School and is employed by Limey's Variety Bar.

The couple will reside in Riverton.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPD Chief John Harris – 2003

Background – spd - pattern

 

 

 

 

 

 

JUNE 12, 2003
Justice delayed
If SPD Chief John Harris resigned, why is he still calling the shots?

BY DUSTY RHODES

Mail Article
Print Article


During the recent municipal elections, five men ran for the job of mayor. Four of them promised repeatedly that if elected they would immediately remove John Harris from his position as Springfield's Chief of Police.

Harris has been chief nearly eight years--much longer than any chief in recent history. He has survived his share of scandals, protests, and lawsuits, as well as a 90 percent no-confidence vote from his rank-and-file.

Then last fall, Harris was implicated in a controversy that some said was the last straw. The "Renatta Frazier case," as it's now known, involved a black female rookie officer subjected to countless media reports suggesting that she had failed to prevent the rape of another officer's daughter. These reports turned out to be totally false.

"We called for his resignation when the story first broke," says Alderman Frank Kunz. "I made no bones about it. Everybody knows where I stand. And it's not just an Eastside thing either. I work all over this city, and everywhere I go, everybody asks me: Why is Harris still here?"

Harris submitted his resignation with 30-days notice almost two months ago, just as Mayor Karen Hasara was leaving office and the new mayor, Tim Davlin, was coming in. Davlin has appointed an executive search committee to conduct a nationwide search to find a new police chief.

Meanwhile, though, he has asked Harris to remain on the job, and Harris appears content to do so. Sources inside the police department say Harris has not even started to pack his office or delegate responsibility. He continues to hold meetings, make plans, and call the shots. He is a lame duck with no sign of a limp.

Davlin was the one candidate who did not campaign on an explicit promise to fire Chief Harris. Instead, whenever he was asked about his plans for the SPD, he would answer with a curious aphorism that implied he had no use for Harris:

"A fish," Davlin would say, "rots from the head back."

* * *

There's a cliché pronounced whenever a new guy steps into a job vacated by someone with a sterling record: "Well, he's got big shoes to fill."

Nobody uttered that phrase when John Harris became Springfield's police chief back in 1995. Harris followed five years of scandal-plagued administrators: Harvey Davis, who became police chief in 1993 and was blamed for the disappearance of money, drugs and guns from SPD's evidence room; Kirk Robinson, chief for the preceding six months until he was accused of sexually harassing two female subordinates (who both eventually accepted out-of-court settlements); and Mike Walton, chief from 1987 to 1990, demoted back to sergeant after participating in a sex-and-blackmail scheme.

So there were no "big shoes" for Harris to fill. More like a pair of skanky flip-flops. To be counted as a success, all Harris really had to do was keep the squad cars running and his trousers zipped.

But just doing the bare minimum has never been Harris's style. He's been out of town recently and declined to be interviewed upon his return. By all accounts, though, he is a man of boundless energy and ambition who doesn't do anything halfway.

Only 44 years old when he applied to be Springfield's top cop, Harris had already accumulated enough professional, educational, and civic achievements to fill a seven-page resume. The one he's currently shopping around to prospective employers is undoubtedly twice as long and even more impressive.

Under Harris's leadership, Springfield Police Department won national recognition for its community policing policies as well as certification from the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA). Harris dazzled community leaders with the introduction of the Citizen Police Academy, the establishment of an Office of Community Relations at White Oaks Mall, the expansion of the popular Neighborhood Police Officer program, and the resumption of horseback patrols downtown.

He overhauled the entire department, "flattening" (that was his term) the top-heavy, highly-politicized structure through elimination of more than half of the appointed positions. He increased the frequency of SPD entrance and promotional exams, and revamped the internal affairs division, moving it blocks away from the main police station and staffing it with officers ranked lieutenant or above.

Harris avoided the particular pitfalls that tripped up his predecessors, but his tenure has not been without its scandals. Two years into his contract, he was faced with untangling what was, essentially, a bar fight involving several off-duty SPD officers and one unlucky civilian. Known as "the Office Tavern incident," the scuffle led to several trials, plus various degrees of punishment for the officers, and provided countless hours of fodder for talk radio.

A few years later, Andy Sallenger, a young unarmed mentally ill man, died after being subdued and hog-tied by three SPD officers; his family's lawsuit against SPD is currently pending in federal court. And finally, there was the Renatta Frazier debacle.

Besides these scandals, Harris was plagued with behind-the-scenes grumbling from his troops almost from the get-go, which is standard procedure at SPD.

"You've got two strikes against you when you walk in the front door--the union and the political atmosphere," says Sangamon County Sheriff Neil Williamson, who spent 21 years working at SPD. "Plus, he was an outsider, so he was automatically considered suspicious. He had an uphill battle."

While Harris spent his first few months formulating his reorganization plan, the police union fretted that he would fail to replace the most scandal-tarnished brass (and, indeed, Harris demoted only two members of upper-management). Labor relations went from bad to worse: The rank-and-file worked 18 months without a contract and in 1998 won $800,000 in back pay. But that contract has since expired; they've now been working without a contract for more than two years. When union members complained about "manning" (the number of patrol officers on the street), claiming some beats were left uncovered, Harris responded by re-drawing the beat map, making each beat bigger.

Morale ebbed so low that the confidence vote called by the Policemen's Benevolent and Protective Association No. 5 in 1998 showed nine out of 10 officers had no confidence in Harris.

* * *

It was another no-confidence vote that set Harris on the path that eventually brought him to Springfield.

Harris began his law enforcement career in 1974 as a patrolman with the Tucson Police Department--an agency with close to 800 officers supported by approximately 300 civilian employees and another 300 or so volunteers. According to his resume, he was assigned to the Special Weapons and Tactics team from 1978 through 1988, achieving the rank of lieutenant before moving to the hostage negotiations unit. Over the next five years, Harris was promoted through the ranks to captain. His wife, Barbara, who was also a TPD officer, achieved the rank of sergeant.

In 1992, TPD's long-time chief Peter Ronstadt (Linda's brother) announced his retirement, and the city chose to hire from within. Harris was one of six finalists, but the job ultimately went to Elaine Hedtke. She soon promoted Harris to assistant chief.

But the rank-and-file were immediately disgruntled with Hedtke, says Joe Burchell, a veteran city hall reporter at the Arizona Daily Star. "They thought she was anatomically challenged," he recalls.

When Hedtke suspended without pay a pair of cops accused of roughing up a teenager, the officers saw their chance to oust her. The Fraternal Order of Police (of which Harris had been a member) held two rallies against Hedtke. Tucson's city council, meanwhile, held a press conference to express support of Hedtke. Some council members encouraged the chief to take whatever steps necessary to regain control of her department.

"They said they believed some of her command staff was trying to undermine her, at least partially because she was a woman and because some of them want[ed] her job," according to a 1992 article in the Arizona Daily Star.

Apparently, some council members told the press that Captain John Harris was fomenting the unrest.

"City Council sources last week named Harris as one of three top commanders who was undermining Hedtke's control of the department and provoking the outburst by officers in the department," the Daily Star reported. "Those assertions were disputed repeatedly by Hedtke and her commander."

Hedtke demoted Harris back to his rank of captain. The newspaper reported that Harris was demoted for "blatant insubordination" after failing to reprimand another captain, Linda Burkett, who publicly asked for the chief to resign.

But Hedtke now says there was a bit more to it than that. "It was a captain accusing me publicly of being a liar," she says. "In discussion, I had determined that John had been aware of what Captain Burkett felt and intended to say, and he took no steps to advise me or deal with it in a way that was less difficult, less disruptive to the organization. I felt that that constituted a lack of leadership on his part as an assistant chief. And therefore I demoted him back to captain."

The following week, the FOP released a letter listing 14 complaints against Hedtke, including the fact that she had "demoted and publicly humiliated" John Harris.

Eventually, both Harris and Hedtke left the TPD--Hedtke for another job with the city, and Harris to "retire" to a small town in Missouri, apparently to work as director of Trans-Soviet Outfitters, leading bear hunts in Siberia. When the local police department started looking for a chief, Harris took the job.

Kirk Powell, editor and publisher of the Pleasant Hill Times, has fond memories of Harris's two-year tenure as chief over a force of eight officers in a town of 4,000. "He just had a great approach to it. He seemed to be able to get the job done while rustling the fewest feathers as possible," Powell says.

"For example, we had a place in town that was a pool hall and bar selling beer to minors pretty regularly. Instead of making a big deal out of it, Harris would just pop in two or three times a week and have a Pepsi. He told me, 'They never really know when I'm coming in!' And that fixed the problem.

"He was probably one of the best small-town law people I've ever seen," Powell says. "He had far superior management skills. We were just lucky to have him as long as we did. I think we're still enjoying the benefits of that. He set a tone and a pattern for the police department here that still continues."

* * *

Harris was one of 58 applicants for the job of chief over the Springfield Police Department. When he was selected, the media described him as an assistant chief from Tucson, not mentioning that he had held that post less than a year. Alderman Kunz doubts the investigation into Harris's background was very thorough.

"He fed us a line of horse s---and we all fell for it," Kunz says.

Harris was unanimously approved by the City Council on October 17, 1995, and began work on October 23 with a 6:30 a.m. meeting with his command staff. On January 5, 1996, he signed a four-year contract with the city. His salary was $69,000 per year.

Harris seemed to want to get the community involved in the resurrection of the police department. He had officers and citizens meet with him and Mayor Hasara to come up with a "mission statement" for the SPD--that the police will "work in partnership with the community to promote open communication, education, cooperation, and fair and equal treatment to improve the quality of life, promote unity, encourage respect and make Springfield a safe community." He fostered a personal connection between the community and his agency when he got an auto parts store, an American Legion post, and a church to sponsor bullet-proof vests for SPD officers.

Sheriff Williamson recognized that Harris had talent as a politician. "He always said he wasn't a politician, but he's a bigger politician than I am, and I'm an elected official," Williamson says.

But some of the innovations that won Harris praise from the public had the opposite effect inside the agency. For example, the popular Neighborhood Police Officer program that assigned officers to certain neighborhoods and schools was a sore spot with the union, which complained that too many officers were assigned to special units.

Other problems he simply created for himself. One of his first official moves was the hiring of Mark Faull as his assistant at a salary of $54,500 per year. Faull had been a police officer in Tucson, but left the force to earn his law degree. He had followed Harris to Missouri, where he worked as county attorney. In Springfield, Faull signed on as a civilian employee, yet within a few months Harris arranged for Faull to be sworn in as a police officer with the right to carry a gun.

The union pointed to Faull in the summer of '97 to force Harris to withdraw his proposal for "lateral entry"--hiring officers from other agencies. Harris had pitched the idea as a way to add minority officers to the ranks, but the union saw lateral entry as a blank check for Harris to bring in his buddies, like Faull, from Arizona to leap-frog over local officers trying to work their way up the ladder.

As a compromise, Harris joined union leaders in a proposal to increase the frequency of the police department's hiring test from once every three years to once annually, with promotion exams given every two years. But the controversy had focused attention on Faull's gun-carrying privileges, and an alderman requested a legal opinion. Then-corporation counsel Bob Rogers ruled that Faull never got proper approval to carry a gun in Springfield.

Harris's battles with the union continued. In September 1997, union trustee Bob Vose testified before the City Council's public affairs and safety committee that SPD left two or more beats unmanned more than 10 percent of the time, especially during the first shift of the day (7 a.m. to 3 p.m.). There were occasions when as few as 10 officers were on the streets, according to schedules produced by Vose. This led Harris to re-draw the beat map a few months later. Instead of 14 small beats, the city was now divided into eight bigger beats. Vose called the chief's tactic "smoke and mirrors."

The following year, Harris again angered his officers just as they were preparing for the first promotion exam in several years. When the list of books to study for the exam was announced, at least two officers admitted they had an unfair advantage because they had already been reading these books--thanks to Harris's suggestion. The test had to be postponed.

As Harris's first contract renewal date approached, the union took a formal confidence vote. Ninety percent of PBPA members voted; 89 percent of those said they had no confidence in Harris's ability to lead the department.

By a 9-1 vote (Alderman Cecilia Tumulty voted "present,") the council renewed his contract anyway.

* * *

Of course, the toughest tests faced by any police chief are the pop quizzes--the "incidents" that crop up in the middle of the night, typically, when officers find themselves having to make judgment calls in the dark. The public will focus first on the patrol officers for their actions, but scrutiny soon shifts to the chief and his handling of these events.

Harris's first big test was the Office Tavern incident--more than three years into his tenure here. Although unanswered questions may linger (mainly because everybody involved had been drinking), this incident has been probed, investigated, and litigated multiple times.

Three trials resulted in no finding of fault against the SPD. At the request of Mayor Hasara, the Illinois State Police reviewed the department's response to the incident and found "a significant breakdown of communication between line officers and upper command personnel." Among the recommendations listed by the state police was one that would factor into a later scandal-- "Police Report Command Review." The state police recommended that: "Written policy should be implemented to define how and when police command [high ranking officers] are to review written police reports. Reviews should be required to ensure that upper command review the written reports of specified incidents. . . . "

In other words, the brass ought to read the reports on any high-profile incident.

Had this recommendation been followed, the Renatta Frazier case should have never happened.

Frazier was a rookie cop, dispatched to investigate a call from a female who said men were banging on her apartment door. When Frazier arrived at the apartment, she saw no one. When she had dispatch phone the complainant, the call was answered by voice mail. Frazier cleared the call and left. The next morning, the girl reported that she had been raped.

This case was made more newsworthy by the fact that the rape victim was the daughter of a police officer. Within weeks, word that Frazier was being investigated "for failure to prevent the rape of a fellow officer's daughter" was leaked to the daily newspaper and rebroadcast repeatedly by the electronic media.

This scenario was false, as anyone who read the incident report knew. The rape had occurred before the girl ever called police, and before Frazier ever arrived at the scene. But the false reports continued for almost a year, until a story in this paper revealed the truth.

Harris has never answered the question of when he knew the truth. But the inevitable conclusion that he either knew and did nothing to correct the situation or was oblivious to what was going on in his own agency was so troubling that several aldermen and civic groups started calling for his resignation.

It came, supposedly, on the day Mayor Hasara left office. Now a matter of debate, this letter has not been released even to City Council members. There is speculation that the letter mentions retirement as well as resignation, and that Harris bought enough military time to be eligible to receive a pension.

Harris has made no secret of his desire to remain in Springfield, and he has several reasons to want to do so. He has a high-school aged daughter who would love to graduate with her friends. And his wife, Barbara Harris, has a contract with the Illinois State Police as a public service administrator working full-time at a pay rate of $45 an hour, according to State Police spokesman Master Sergeant Rick Hector. Her contract expires in July, and "is under review at this time," Hector says.

For a while, the rumor mill cranked out suggestions that Harris might stay on with the city in some other capacity (director of hometown security, for example), but people close to the mayor say that simply won't happen.

"I haven't seen any application or resume from him applying for any other position," says Letitia Dewith-Anderson, Davlin's chief of staff.

Alderman Chuck Redpath, who was a major contributor to Davlin's campaign, says he hopes the mayor doesn't consider Harris for any position.

"I think Harris is a lightning rod and things that happened in the police department will overshadow any position he could have," Redpath says. "I just don't think he'd fit."

Alderman Kunz is characteristically blunt: "I will not be happy if Harris stays on in any capacity," he says. "If he does, I would imagine that Tim would lose a lot of support. John Harris is going to cost us a bunch of money. The Renatta Frazier case is his fault and nobody else's."


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dyer fam –

 

liuna/spi clc/hade –

ibt shop steward –

SPD

*And see mcgraw/hotels/mcd’s security

 

 

 

 

Jack dyer – liuna – spi clc – united way

Dyer= ibt 916 shop steward - concrete

Spd – dyer – il. Police assoc

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jack dyer – liuna – spi clc – united way

 

 

Trimmer named head of labor group

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, April 13, 2008

Section: LOCAL
Page: 14

Toby Trimmer has been elected president of the Springfield & Central Illinois Trades and Labor Council for the 2008-10 term.

Trimmer is a legislative director for the 90,000-member Illinois Federation of Teachers and a member of the Communications Workers of America.

Other officers are Allan Lauher, vice president; Terry Reed, recording secretary; Cindy Johnson, treasurer; and Caryl Farrell, sergeant-at-arms.

Executive board members are Steve Antonacci, Steve Clement, Jack Dyer , John Haines and Rosetta Shinn.

Council trustees are Shannon Garrett, Theresa Pedersen and Ray Philips.

The Springfield & Central Illinois Trades and Labor Council represents more than 26,000 members of organized labor living in Christian, Macoupin, Menard, Montgomery, Morgan, Pike and Sangamon counties.

 

 

 

 

Union criticizes United Way's cut of labor liaison

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, September 30, 2006

Author/Byline: JOHN REYNOLDS STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1
Section: CITY/STATE
Page: 8

A union official is criticizing the recent decision by the United Way of Central Illinois to cut its labor community service liaison.

The position was created through an agreement between organized labor and the United Way that goes back some 50 years. The United Way paid the salary of the liaison, whose job was to raise funds for the charity from union members.

The liaison also helped union members obtain United Way benefits when necessary.

"The Springfield and Central Illinois Trades and Labor Council is very disappointed with this decision by the United Way board," Steve Antonacci, president of the council, said in a press release Friday. "We are discussing our options, talking about how we're going to respond to United Way."

John Kelker, president of the United Way of Central Illinois, said in a prepared statement that the union position was eliminated because of a realignment of the organization's monetary and staffing resources.

"Our responsibilities at the United Way of Central Illinois continue to broaden beyond fundraising and distributing money to the United Way-certified agencies, which provide human services throughout our community," Kelker said. "This step we are taking will allow the United Way of Central Illinois to more fully engage in the identification, prioritizing and planning required to fill critical, unmet needs in our community."

Nevertheless, the United Way had nothing but positive things to say about the people who have held the position, saying they've "provided invaluable support for our mission."

Antonacci said that after the March 12 tornadoes, for instance, the United Way's labor liaison helped several union and non-union workers whose homes and businesses sustained damage.

He noted that the United Way receives contributions from thousands of union employees in numerous types of jobs.

"I don't understand why their board would choose to antagonize the working families who support United Way and benefit from their services," Antonacci said.

The current liaison, Jack Dyer , will remain at his position for another 90 days, based on notification requirements in the contract language.

According to the labor council's press release, Dyer has served in the position for the past 17 years and is a former United Way board member.

 

 

 

 

HADE RE-ELECTED TO LABOR GROUP

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, February 2, 1994

Edition: M1,M2
Section: BUSINESS
Page: 24

 

 

Mike Hade

 

has been elected to a fourth term as president of the Springfield and Central Illinois Trades and Labor Council.

The AFL-CIO affiliated council, which represents unions with more than 80,000 members, elected a slate of officers without opposition for terms extending through 1996. Those elected are: Mike Hade, Newspaper Guild, president; Steve Antonacci, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, first vice president; Mike Stout, Teamsters, second vice president;

 

Jack Dyer , Laborers,

 

treasurer; and Mettie Funk, International Association of Machinists, secretary.

Eleanor O'Neill of the Communications Workers of America, Erin Gorman of the United Mine Workers, Mary Ann Gatten of the Illinois Federation of Teachers, Terry Fairclough of the Carpenters union, Harold Maples of the Plumbers, Marie Watts of AFSCME Local 2000, Pat Schoeneberg of AFSCME, Jeff Burnett of the Carpenters, Diane Hendricks of the Teamsters and Marilyn Fiddler of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers were named to the executive board.

John Hudson of the Operating Engineers, Pat Giordano of AFSCME and Carol Farrell of the United Food & Commercial Workers were elected trustees. Pete Maggio of the Printers union was named sergeant-at-arms.

 

LABOR COUNCIL TO ELECT NEW HEAD

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, January 29, 1986

Edition: M1,M2,E1
Section: BUSINESS
Page: 15

 

 

The Springfield Trades & Labor Council,

 

the umbrella organization for local AFL-CIO affiliates, will elect a new president in late February to

replace

 

Ron Holstein,

 

who has resigned.

The body elects new officers every two years. February is the next regularly scheduled election.

James Kellus of Laborers Local 477, first vice president of the central body, is acting as interim president until the Feb. 25 election.

Holstein, who had been president since early 1984, also was an employee of the council, handling some of the job retraining efforts of the organization. He also has resigned that position.

Jack Dyer , who coordinates the Trades & Labor Council's Job Club, said the retraining programs were not interrupted. Decisions on who will replace Holstein in his retraining capacity will be made soon, Dyer said.

Between 75 and 100 delegates from affiliated unions vote for the officers. Votes are weighted according to each local's membership.

Bond rating Duff & Phelps Inc., the Chicago-based financial analysis and consulting firm, has assigned a D&P-7, or low single-A, rating to Illinois Power Co.'s $100 million shelf registration for first mortgage bonds.

Duff & Phelps also assigned a D&P-8 (high triple-B) rating to IP's newly filed issue of one million shares of preferred stock at $50 a share.

The rating reflects "Illinois Power's commitment to maintain a strong capital structure while completing the Clinton nuclear unit," Duff & Phelps said. Around town MidVid Electronics, a firm that sells used VCRs and related equipment, such as video cameras, has been started by Frank Ryan at 1016 E. Adams St.

A Family Home Movie Club formerly operated out of the building, and it's no accident that Ryan's business is the new tenant.

He previously rented space to do VCR repairs at Midstates Appliance & Supply Co. Midstates' Charles Hoogland also operates the Family Home Movie Club outlets, including four in Springfield.

When Ryan's business expanded, the former video club became a natural location.

Ryan also sells new accessories and repairs almost all makes of VCRs. . . A flower and gift shop, Plants & Things, has opened at 1205 Stevenson Drive across from Bunn-Capitol Co.

Guy Bouvet, owner of the FTD-affiliated shop, said merchandise includes plants, flower arrangements, helium balloons and silk flower arrangements. Delivery and 24-hour phone service also are offered. . . . A new word processing business is being operated by Sandy Hayden from her home in rural Springfield.

Hayden, with 10 years of experience in word processing, offers processing of legal documents, resumes, scripts, speeches, direct-mail, envelopes, manuscripts, mailing lists and most other business, scholarly and legal documents.

All jobs will include proofing and additional copies as required. The firm's rates are by the hour.

Mailing address of the business, Automated Business Concepts, is R.R. 1, Box 54. She can be reached at 544-0538. Hayden, a senior word processing correspondent with the state, offers pick-up and delivery. The business currently operates only evenings and weekends, but it will have an answering service in a few weeks, she said. In the area Eastern Iowa Management of Iowa City has purchased the Wendy's Old Fashioned Hamburger franchise in Litchfield.

The Litchfield Wendy's, which opened in 1984, is EIM's 24th Wendy's restaurant in Iowa, Illinois and Kansas. The Iowa group purchased the Springfield Wendy's in 1980. The Wendy's chain has 3,300 restaurants worldwide. . . . Richard and Cindy Vincent of Hillsboro have opened a video store in Nokomis. The store will rent and sell video recorders and tapes.

The Vincents own another video store, the Music Mart, in Hillsboro. . . . Three firms owned by Johnny Joyce in Litchfield will be moving to the Litchfield Plaza shopping center at the northwest city limits.

Johnny's Sporting Goods, a Radio Shack franchise and RJ Telecommunications, which Joyce owns with his son, Rick, have been at 608 N. State St.

The firms will move to the former location of the Brass Rack in the shopping plaza. The firms are also extending their hours to seven days a week, including evenings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dyer= ibt 916 shop steward - concrete

 

 

Ready Mix

Atlas Concrete - John D. Ruggless

Contractors Ready Mix - Jimmie Barr and Mark Hill

Capitol Ready Mix - Ed Tribble

Henry Nelch & Son - Ben Dyer and Denny Brown

 

 

Spd – dyer

 

 

 

Police association announces officers

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, November 26, 2003

Section: LOCAL
Page: 21

Carl Sprinkel has been elected chairman of the Midstate Division of the Illinois Police Association.

Other officers are David Dyer , vice chairman; Francis Sprinkel, second vice chairman; Craig Sim, secretary/treasurer; and Ernest Dodson, Craig Law, Charles Palazzolo, Joseph Pisarek and Amy Strawn, sergeants-at-arms. Immediate past chairman is Craig Kennedy.

The association's lifesaving award was presented to Sangamon County sheriff's deputy John Diefenbach for his actions at a fiery car crash, saving the driver's life.

The next meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. Dec. 4 at the FOP Lodge No. 55 on West Lake Shore Drive. The event will feature a special dinner, and spouses or significant others are invited. The cost is $7 per person or $10 per couple.

For reservations, contact Carl Sprinkel or Harold Bryant by Monday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateThu, Jun 7, 2007 at 9:09 AM

subject3637th maintenance - sendoff - 6/7

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details 6/7/07 Reply

 

 

 

bumped into royer at event, he seemed to pause as he passed me and turned the corner. I was standing on the southwest corner of the old state capitol. About 20 minutes before event some kid, about 20, with a crew cut, walked by me and looked like he was gritting his teeth.

 

 

 

TITLE: PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, November 22, 1987

 

 

PVT. JEFF ROYER , son of James and Janice Royer of Springfield, has completed basic training at Fort Jackson, S.C. He is a 1987 graduate of Southeast High School.

DENNIS SLOMAN, son of Melvin and Ida Sloman of Pawnee, has received a commission as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Air National Guard in the state of Illinois.

 

 

Royer – Cellini – renaissance hotel

 

 

TITLE: ANNIVERSARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, May 21, 1989

 

Royer -- 25th Mr. and Mrs. Jim Royer, 432 South Grand Ave. W., will celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary today with a party held for family and friends at the Springfield Motor Boat Club. The couple also observed their anniversary earlier this year with a trip to Hawaii.

Royer and the former Janice
Britz were married on Feb. 29, 1964.

 

Mr. Royer is employed in the engineering department at the Ramada Renaissance Hotel.

 

Mrs. Royer is self-employed.

They are the parents of three children, Jill Standefer, Jeff Royer and Jason Royer, all of Springfield. They have one grandchild.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buscher –

 

 

Spd - third watch supervisor til 5/06

 

Taney county – witness intimidation

 

Buscher/Reid – liuna

 

Terry young – schleyhahn -

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateWed, Jul 9, 2008 at 5:57 PM

subjectcliff buscher - DAR - taney county mo. -

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details 7/9/08

 

 

DAR PRESENTS CITIZENS AWARDS TO STUDENTS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - March 12, 1987

Edition: M1,M2,S1

Section: LOCAL

Page: 20

DAR Good Citizens Awards were presented by the Springfield Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, to students in the senior classes of

 

area high schools who possess to an outstanding degree the qualities of dependability, service, leadership and patriotism.

 

Award winners include:

 

Sherri Buscher, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Buscher , Sr., a student at Lanphier High School.

 

Caption: Dannon Hill Harris Emerson Kloppe Stevens Johnson Mitchell Buscher Haynes Holmes Marshall

 

 

 

TITLE: FOR THE RECORD

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - November 22, 1985

 

 

Debra and Cliff Buscher , Springfield, a daughter Thursday.

 

 

 

 

SEWER `MISTAKE' FORCES FAMILY TO FLEE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - September 22, 1987

Author/Byline: Jacqueline Price

Edition: M1,M2,S1

Section: LOCAL

Page: 9

A family was forced from its home on St. Cabrini Court Monday when raw sewage backed up into the basement.

 

What's more, sanitation workers were cleaning the wrong sewer system, an official said.

 

"I'm not going to sue them to try to get rich off of this. I just want the mess cleaned up," said Cliff Buscher , who owns the house.

 

His wife, Debbie Buscher, said she was doing laundry in the basement about 10:30 a.m. when she saw dark waste bubbling up through the drain.

 

Debbie Buscher said she went out to the street where a Springfield Metro Sanitary District crew was working and told them to stop because they were making a mess in her basement.

 

When the crew refused to quit, Buscher and her three children fled to neighbors' houses because the smell was unbearable.

 

"When they finished doing it, they left," Debbie Buscher said. "And after they left the water went down and all this stuff was left."

 

Gerald Peters, sanitary district executive director, said the workers were trying to remove a sewer line blockage.

 

"We clean them every two years to prevent problems like this," Peters said.

 

But Peters also said the problem was that the sanitary crew was not supposed to be cleaning the sewers on St. Cabrini Court.

 

"It was not our jurisdiction," he said.

 

"I'm not sure when, but sometime ago (the area) was annexed by the city," Peters said.

 

St. Cabrini Court is located on the east side of the city, south of Grandview and north of Bergen Park.

 

City sewer maintenance is under the jurisdiction of the city streets department, although sewage does go to the sanitation district facilities. The metro crews service sewers which are in areas outside the city, or inside the city area but not annexed to the city, which are part of the district.

 

Peters said that a sanitation crew member on the truck misread the map.

 

Shirley Buscher, Cliff Buscher 's mother, said she called the sanitation district to complain and invite Peters to see the damage. He refused, she said.

 

"I thought the sanitation department should have shown some concern and sent someone out to look at the damage," Shirley Buscher said.

 

Peters said he gave Shirley Buscher the number of the district's insurance company,

R.W. Troxell & Co.

and "instructed them to send the insurance company the receipts."

 

Shirley Buscher said the insurance company refused to send a claims adjuster out, saying they would process the claim forms.

 

"What the lady said was, `If I were you, I would be down (in the basement) cleaning it up,' " Shirley Buscher said.

 

The carpet in all three rooms of the basement, plus mattresses, blankets and some of the children's toys were ruined by the waste, Debbie Buscher said. She's not sure how much furniture, such as tables and chairs, was damaged.

 

"I couldn't hold my breath long enough to go down and check it out," she said.

 

Peters said no other houses on the block were affected by the accident. But Debbie Buscher said some waste backed up at both 25 and 22 St. Cabrini Court.

 

The residents of those houses were not available for comment.

 

A Springfield Health Department official visited the house, Buscher said, and suggested they remove the children and not enter the house until the mess was cleaned up.

 

Shirley Buscher said the city health department contacted a local cleaning company, which began cleaning up the mess Monday afternoon.

 

Cliff Buscher said the company did not estimate the cost of the work, but added the house would have to be fumigated.

 

The Buschers did not know if they would be able to return to the house before this morning.

 

Debbie and Cliff Buscher said they have lived in the house for three years without sewer problems.

 

Peters said the problem is a very rare occurence and has happened only twice before.

 

"When something like this happens, your first priority is to clean it up," he said.

Caption: Ron Frazier of Servicemaster of Springfield vacuums raw sewage from the carpet in the basement of the Cliff and Debbie Buscher home.

 

 

 

 

TITLE: FOR THE RECORD

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - July 5, 1990

 

 

 

Angie and Cliff Buscher , Springfield, a son Wednesday.

 

 

TITLE: FOR THE RECORD

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - August 27, 1992

Edition: M1,M2

Section: LOCAL

Page: 22

HAPPENING TODAY Events

 

 

 

Angie and Cliff Buscher , Springfield, a son Tuesday.

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - October 11, 1992

 

 

Brown-Refine Julie Diane Refine and Neil Mulholand Brown, both of Springfield, were married at 1:30 p.m. Sept. 12 at St. Frances Cabrini Church by the Rev.

 

David V. Schauer.

 

The bride is the daughter of Kathryn L. Refine of Springfield and the late Harry E. Refine. The groom is the son of Dr. Lowell J. Brown and Veronica M. Brown, both of Springfield.

 

Serving as matron of honor was Jane Young.

 

Bridesmaids were Mary Young, Celeste Foster, Kathryn Refine, Emily Reid and Elizabeth Reid. Flower girls were Jourdan Horton and Hannah Young.

 

Best man was Walter Metzger. Groomsmen were Brendan Brown, Jeff Schmid, Greg Puckel and

 

Cliff Buscher .

 

Ushers were Jack Reid

and Terry Young. Ringbearer was Jack Reid.

 

A reception was held at the Artisans Building, state fairgrounds.

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - August 29, 1993

Edition: M1,M2

Section: LOCAL

Page: 21

Schertz-Buscher Donna M. Buscher and Steven P. Schertz, both of

 

Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. July 17 at St. Aloysius Church by the Rev. Robert Jallas.

 

The bride is the daughter of Clifford R. Buscher Sr. and Shirley A. Buscher, both of Springfield. The groom is the son of Harold and Claudene Schertz of Metamora.

 

Serving as maid of honor was Sherri Buscher. Bridesmaids were Kim Buscher, Vicki Costello, Ann Holmes and Karey Wanless. Flower girl was Jessica Schertz.

 

Best man was Phil Schertz. Groomsmen were Dave Schertz, Cliff BuscherJr., Mike Buscher and Pat Buscher. Ushers were Gary Hoyland and Chris Butler. Ringbearer was Anthony Buscher.

 

A reception was held at Knights of Columbus Hall on Lawrence Avenue.

 

The bride is a graduate of Illinois State University. The groom is a graduate of Bluffton College.

 

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

Angie and Cliff Buscher , Springfield, a son Sunday.

Index Terms: NOTICE

Record Number: 0000334685

Copyright (c) 1996 The State Journal-Register (Springfield, IL)

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - June 7, 1998

 

 

Butler-Buscher Sherri Lynn Buscher and Christopher Scott Butler, both of Springfield, exchanged wedding vows at 2 p.m. May 9 at St. Aloysius Catholic Church. The Rev. Robert Jallas performed the ceremony.

 

The bride is the daughter of Clifford R. Buscher Sr. and Shirley A. Buscher, both of Springfield. The groom is the son of James and Beverly Dickerson of Louisville, Ky., and the late Ronald Butler Sr.

 

Serving as matron of honor was Donna Schertz. Sue Ivy, Kim and Melissa Buscher, Jaime and Stacy Butler and Amanda Leezer were bridesmaids. Flower girls were Courtney Buscher and Tiffany Sexton.

 

Serving as best man was George Butler. Doug Sexton, Larry Ball Sr., Larry Ball Jr., Cliff BuscherJr. and Mike and Pat Buscher were groomsmen. Ushers were Anthony Buscher, Steve Schertz and Rick Green. Ringbearer was Clifford Buscher III. A reception was held at St. John Vianney Activity Center.

 

The bride is a graduate of Lanphier High School and Illinois State University. She is employed as president of technology and development at Service Medical Consulting Inc. The groom is a graduate of DeSales High School and attended ISU. He is self-employed with Butler Pressure Washing.

 

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

Sherri and Christopher Butler, Springfield, a son Alexander Christopher Butler, Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2000. Grandparents are Cliff BuscherSr. and Shirley Buscher, both of Springfield, and Jim and Beverly Dickerson of Louisville, Ky. Great-grandparents are Wilhelmenia Langston and Henry Duncan, both of Springfield.

 

 

Five city police officers promoted

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL)

 

March 4, 2006

 

 

Author/Byline: JAYETTE BOLINSKI STAFF WRITER

 

 

Five Springfield police officers were promoted Friday afternoon to supervisory positions.

 

Lt. Ed Flesch was promoted to deputy chief over the Administrative Services Division, Sgt. Cliff Buscher was promoted to lieutenant, and officers Bruce Alderson, Thomas Cockayne and Chris Steil were promoted to sergeant.

 

The promotions were the result of recent retirements within the department, said Police Chief Don Kliment. Officials calculated that the department has lost nearly 200 combined years of law enforcement experience to recent retirements.

 

"It's a time of change for the agency. We lost some very experienced officers, which creates opportunities for other officers who are on the promotional lists," he said.

 

Flesch replaces Pat Fogleman, who retired Friday after 27 years with the department. As head of the Administrative Services Division, Flesch will oversee personnel, records, crime analysis, planning and research, the department's fleet, evidence, supplies, computers, grants and accreditation.

 

Flesch, who joined the department in July 1985, was promoted to sergeant in 1999 and was a supervisor in both field operations and criminal investigations. He was promoted to lieutenant in January 2005. His most recent assignment was as a third-watch lieutenant supervising officers on the street.

 

Kliment declined to discuss why he selected Flesch for the job, citing a pending discrimination lawsuit that claims Kliment appointed William Rouse to oversee the department's criminal investigations division instead of Lt. Rickey Davis despite Davis' qualifications for the job.

 

Buscher fills the vacancy created by Flesch's promotion. A 17-year officer, Buscher was promoted to sergeant in April 2001 and has been a third-watch supervisor. He was assigned to begin training with first-watch field operations following his promotions.

 

Alderson has been with the department since June 1980. He most recently was a first-watch patrol officer. He will be assigned to third watch for training.

 

Cockayne has been on the force since February 1984. He spent the majority of his career as a third-watch patrol officer, but his most recent assignment was as a property officer in the Administrative Services Division. He will be assigned to first watch for training.

 

Steil joined the department in March 1995. He has been a patrol officer and a neighborhood police officer. He will be assigned to second watch for training.

 

 

'Not as much going on' after special patrol targets Bluebird Court

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - December 17, 2006

Author/Byline: AMANDA REAVY STAFF WRITER

Section: NEWS

Page: 5

The Springfield Police Department conducted a special detail that focused heavily on patrolling the Bluebird Court area from May 28 to Sept. 16.

 

The detail was sponsored through a grant from Weed and Seed, a branch of the U.S. Department of Justice, that is intended to revitalize high-crime areas,

 

said Lt. Cliff Buscher , who oversaw the patrols.

 

The team of officers was led by

 

Sgts. Chris Russell

 

and Carl Crawford, who replaced

 

Sgt. Matt Fricke midway through the summer.

 

The operation not only targeted the Bluebird Court area, but also the rest of Beat 400 as well as Beats 100 and 300, northeast Springfield and the area directly east of downtown, respectively.

 

"They spent most of their time (in Bluebird) initially. Now, there is not as much going on at night there. So they spread out," Buscher said near the detail's conclusion. "They did a great job out there."

 

The unit was assigned to address violent crimes and gang activity within the city. It also aimed to reduce the number of calls in the area for regular patrol officers and allowed assigned officers to use their own initiatives to reduce crime in the area instead of simply responding to complaints, Russell said.

 

Though not all of their arrests were made in the Bluebird apartment complexes, officers did encounter many of the most active criminals in the area, Buscher said.

 

During the detail, officers arrested Dante L. Jones, 22, of the 300 block of South Durkin Drive. Jones, who allegedly used two names and had addresses in Springfield and in South Carolina, is awaiting extradition on charges that he participated in a double murder in South Carolina in 2005.

 

Detail officers also stopped a vehicle Aug. 17 driven by Gregory L. Hullum, 38, of the 2900 block of Dunwich Street, who was charged with committing three armed robberies at local restaurants in the summer. Hullum was released on bail, and in November, he was accused of another string of robberies.

 

Officers on the detail also gathered evidence that led to the arrest of Clarence L. Watson III, 40, in connection with a robbery at the Jiffi-Stop convenience store, 2770 W. Washington St.

 

And the detail's officers participated in two prostitution stings that nabbed 16 people.

 

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - June 14, 2007

 

 

THE FOLLOWING STUDENTS were selected as students of the month for April/May 2007 in the following programs at the Capital Area Career Center.

 

Agriculture and Industrial Mechanics: John Blocks of Glenwood High School, son of Marcia and Gary Knight.

 

Building Trades: Clifford Buscher, Rochester High School, son of Angela and Cliff Buscher .

 

 

Several in city police get new assignments

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - August 30, 2007

Section: LOCAL

Page: 8

The Springfield Police Department announced new assignments Wednesday for several key staff members.

 

Some of the officers will be doing similar jobs, but are being moved to another shift. The new assignments are effective today.

 

At the police department, first watch runs from 6:30 a.m. until 3 p.m., second watch is 2:30 p.m. to 11 p.m., and third watch runs from 10:30 p.m. to 7 a.m.

 

The new assignments are:

 

* Cmdr. Mark Bridges has been transferred from the city's office of homeland security to the professional standards division/academy.

 

* Lt. Dennis Arnold has been transferred from professional standards/academy to the criminal investigations/special investigations division.

 

* Lt. Greg Williamson has been transferred from criminal investigations/special investigations division to the field operations division, first watch.

 

* Lt. Cliff Buscher has been transferred from third-watch field operations to first watch.

 

* Lt. Bill Neale has been transferred from third-watch field operations to second watch.

 

* Lt. Steve Peters has been transferred from second-watch field operations to third watch.

 

* Lt. Kurt Banks has been transferred from second-watch field operations to third watch.

 

 

Lieutenant will replace Wilson

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - September 5, 2007

Section: LOCAL

Page: 13

Springfield police Lt. Cliff Buscher on Tuesday was promoted to commander of the field operations division.

 

Buscher succeeds Randy Wilson, who recently was promoted to the position but last week announced he is retiring to accept a job with the state of Illinois.

 

Buscher will assist Deputy Chief Doug Williamson, who oversees field operations. That division includes all patrol officers, traffic officers, neighborhood police officers, school resource officers and the canine units.

 

Buscher joined the department in January 1989. He was promoted to sergeant in April 2001 and to lieutenant in March 2006.

 

He most recently was a shift lieutenant supervising the midnight watch.

 

Police Chief Ralph Caldwell said Buscher is a hard worker, has proven leadership skills and is respected by his fellow officers.

 

Caldwell said some other changes are still in the works, including appointing a civilian to be the police department's public information officer, formation of a street crimes unit and the shuffling of additional officers to street duty, at the request of some aldermen.

 

 

 

 

Missouri sheriff, city police mum on details of commander's arrest

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - March 25, 2008

Author/Byline: AMANDA REAVY STAFF WRITER / amanda.reavy@sj-r.com

Section: CITY/STATE

Page: 15

A Springfield police commander was placed on paid administrative leave Monday after he was arrested for unlawful use of a weapon in southwest Missouri during the weekend.

 

Cliff Buscher, 48, was taken into custody by the Taney County, Mo., sheriff's office, according to a news release from the Springfield Police Department. He was released on his own recognizance.

 

Taney County Sheriff Jimmy Russell confirmed the arrest but would provide no details.

 

"We had an arrest. I'm not saying it was (Buscher) or anything, but there's not been any charges filed at this time," he said Monday evening. "I do not release names or who they are affiliated with until such time that charges are filed."

 

Russell said a copy of the police report from his office was given to Springfield police and that they can decide what information, if any, to release.

 

Springfield police would not elaborate on the news release.

 

Buscher, who couldn't be reached for comment, apparently traveled to Taney County for a fishing trip.

 

He will remain on leave pending the outcome of the Taney County Sheriff Office's criminal investigation and an internal affairs review by the Springfield police, the news release says.

 

Buscher, a 19-year veteran of the department, in September was named commander of the field operations division, which includes all patrol officers, traffic officers, neighborhood police officers, school resource officers and the canine units.

 

Buscher taken in for unlawful use of weapon

 

Under Missouri law, unlawful use of weapon could include:

 

* Carrying a knife, firearm, blackjack or any other weapon readily capable of lethal use.

 

* Discharging or shooting a firearm into a residence, a railroad train, boat, aircraft, motor vehicle or any structure where people assemble.

 

* Exhibiting in front of one or more people any weapon readily capable of lethal use in an angry or threatening manner.

 

* Possessing or discharging a firearm or projectile weapon while intoxicated.

 

* Discharging a firearm within 100 yards of any occupied schoolhouse, courthouse or church building.

 

* Shooting a firearm at a mark, at any object or at random, on, along or across a public highway, or shooting a firearm into any outbuilding

 

* Carrying a firearm or other weapon into any church or place where people have assembled for worship, or into any election precinct on any election day, or into any building owned or occupied by any governmental agency

 

* Shooting a firearm at or from a motor vehicle, at any person or at any other motor vehicle, or at any building or habitable structure, unless the person was lawfully acting in self-defense

 

* Carrying a firearm, whether loaded or unloaded, or any other weapon into any school, onto any school bus, or onto the premises of any function or activity sponsored or sanctioned by school officials or the district school board.

 

 

Prosecutor: Police commander may not have broken any laws

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - March 26, 2008

Author/Byline: JAYETTE BOLINSKI STAFF WRITER jayette.bolinski@sj-r.com

Section: CITY/STATE

Page: 15

A Missouri prosecutor said Tuesday the Springfield police commander accused of misusing a firearm while on a fishing trip last weekend might not have committed a crime.

 

The case remains under review, he said.

 

Taney County, Mo., prosecuting attorney Jeff Merrell said he sent the police report about the incident, which led to the arrest of Cmdr. Cliff Buscher from the Springfield Police Department, back to the arresting deputy for further investigation.

 

Neither Taney County authorities nor Springfield police have provided any details about the circumstances of the arrest. Buscher, a 19-year veteran of the police force, reportedly was in southwest Missouri on a family fishing trip. He was arrested early Sunday for alleged unlawful use of a weapon and released on his own recognizance.

 

Merrell said unlawful use of a weapon in Missouri is a broad statute that covers different activities involving a weapon. It includes such things as improperly transporting a firearm, possession of a weapon while intoxicated, discharging a gun within 100 yards of certain types of buildings, or shooting across a highway or into a building.

 

"Part of my problem is I wasn't sure that I at this time have enough information to determine what, if anything, might have been done that violated the weapons statute. I'm not sure at this point if a crime was committed," Merrell said.

 

He said he is unsure when a charging decision will be made, noting it could be days or weeks, depending on how the investigation progresses.

 

Merrell said he would not provide information about the arrest until charges have been filed.

 

"If we file charges, we will make available the probable-cause statement along with our charge that we filed," he said.

 

"But if it's still a pending investigation, I really don't feel it's appropriate to do that because I can't say it's clear exactly what happened."

 

Springfield police have a copy of the incident report but have refused to provide any details, even though they issued a news release saying the arrest took place.

 

Meanwhile, Buscher, who has been unavailable for comment, is on paid leave pending the outcome of the Taney County investigation and an internal affairs review by the city police department.

 

In September, Buscher was named commander of the field operations division, which includes all patrol officers, traffic officers, neighborhood police officers, school resource officers and the canine units.

 

 

 

 

 

Questions re forsyth shooting

 

1. Why would you go on a fishing trip vacation, and drink while you are fishing, and bring your gun with you?

 

2. Why would carry your gun if your'e drinking, and out of state?

 

3. If you are on vacation, and fishing, don't you have a good idea of whether or not you might be drinking that day, and could leave the gun at the hotel?

 

4. Why would you shoot your official sidearm in public, when you know that doing so would jeopardize your livelihood?

 

5. Is this simply a judgment issue or related to something or someone in the Forsyth area?

 

6. If he was just a drunk cop shooting a gun in the air, he wouldn't have been charged with a felony; why was buscher in Forsyth?

 

 

Charges filed against police commander

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - April 22, 2008

Author/Byline: JAYETTE BOLINSKI STAFF WRITER jayette.bolinski@sj-r.com

Section: CITY/STATE

Page: 15

A criminal charge was filed Monday in Missouri against a Springfield police commander accused of firing a gun while intoxicated.

 

The incident happened March 28 while Cmdr. Cliff Buscher was on a fishing trip at the Edgewater Beach Resort near Forsyth, Mo.

 

Jeff Merrill, the prosecuting attorney in Taney County, Mo., where the alleged offense took place, filed a charge of unlawful use of a weapon. He declined Monday to go into detail about the allegations against Buscher, saying it is a pending case and Buscher is presumed innocent until it goes to trial.

 

Merrill said he has asked that a summons, not a warrant, be issued, and that no bond be required, allowing Buscher to remain free while the case is pending.

 

Court officials will pick a date, probably 30 to 45 days from now, for Buscher's first appearance.

 

The charge is a Class D felony - Missouri's lowest felony charge - and is punishable by one day to one year in jail, one to four years in prison and a fine of not more than $5,000.

 

Buscher, a 19-year veteran of the police force, has been unavailable for comment. He remains on paid administrative leave pending the outcome of the criminal case and a review by the Springfield Police Department's internal affairs division.

 

Police officials declined to comment, saying it is a personnel matter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateTue, Dec 2, 2008 at 10:54 AM

subjectRe: cliff buscher - DAR - taney county mo. -

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details 12/2/08

 

 

mike and cliff buscher, note egizii starts aspen R.E.

 

xa buscher - reid (CMDR and LIUNA)

 

EEI, aquisitions, const/zoning

 

E & F = AB - STL - bomaritto/caths - IBT/new contract for AB

 

Fleetwatch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateThu, Apr 2, 2009 at 12:30 PM

subjectRe: cliff buscher - DAR - taney county mo. -

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details Apr 2

 

 

***************************************buscher - reid/liuna - taney county - shots fired - witness intimidation, thats a federal offense

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateSun, Jun 8, 2008 at 1:21 PM

subjectbuscher - reid - spd - CMDR cliff buscher - LIUNA jack reid - note smith and cavanagh gone

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details 6/8/08

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - October 11, 1992

Edition: M1,M2

Section: LOCAL

Page: 47

 

 

Brown-Refine Julie Diane Refine and Neil Mulholand Brown, both of Springfield, were married at 1:30 p.m. Sept. 12 at St. Frances Cabrini Church by the Rev.

 

David V. Schauer.

 

The bride is the daughter of Kathryn L. Refine of Springfield and the late Harry E. Refine. The groom is the son of Dr. Lowell J. Brown and Veronica M. Brown, both of Springfield.

 

Serving as matron of honor was Jane Young.

 

Bridesmaids were Mary Young, Celeste Foster, Kathryn Refine, Emily Reid and Elizabeth Reid . Flower girls were Jourdan Horton and Hannah Young.

 

Best man was Walter Metzger. Groomsmen were Brendan Brown, Jeff Schmid, Greg Puckel and Cliff Buscher . Ushers were Jack Reid and Terry Young. Ringbearer was Jack Reid .

 

A reception was held at the Artisans Building, state fairgrounds.

 

The bride is a graduate of Ursuline Academy and Eastern Illinois University.

 

She is attending Sangamon State University and is employed by Dr. Lowell J. Brown.

 

The groom is a graduate of Griffin High School and Marquette University.

 

He is employed by the city of Springfield.

 

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 Reply Forward

 

 Reply |Dennis Delaney

show details Mar 9

 

 

jack reid of liuna midwest and cmdr buscher of spd; simple enough

 

note longstanding link b/t irv smith bro, spd cmdr john and frank zito

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateMon, Mar 9, 2009 at 4:09 PM

subjectSPD - some names

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details Mar 9

 

 

cliff buscher,

 

randy wilson

 

buscher, taney county, delong

 

buscher was shift lt. dupervising midnight shift, 3/06-9/07; (court timeline)

 

bridges was homeland sec guy

 

neale, off third watch 9/07, note radio, garage, parks/judd

 

flesch

 

steil

 

caldwell

 

fogleman

 

 

 

Lieutenant will replace Wilson

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, September 5, 2007

Section: LOCAL

Page: 13

 

Springfield police Lt. Cliff Buscher on Tuesday was promoted to commander of the field operations division.

 

Buscher succeeds Randy Wilson , who recently was promoted to the position but last week announced he is retiring to accept a job with the state of Illinois.

 

Buscher will assist Deputy Chief Doug Williamson, who oversees field operations. That division includes all patrol officers, traffic officers, neighborhood police officers, school resource officers and the canine units.

 

Buscher joined the department in January 1989. He was promoted to sergeant in April 2001 and to lieutenant in March 2006. He most recently was a shift lieutenant supervising the midnight watch.

 

Police Chief Ralph Caldwell said Buscher is a hard worker, has proven leadership skills and is respected by his fellow officers.

 

Caldwell said some other changes are still in the works, including appointing a civilian to be the police department's public information officer, formation of a street crimes unit and the shuffling of additional officers to street duty, at the request of some aldermen.

Several in city police get new assignments

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, August 30, 2007

Section: LOCAL

Page: 8

 

The Springfield Police Department announced new assignments Wednesday for several key staff members.

 

Some of the officers will be doing similar jobs, but are being moved to another shift. The new assignments are effective today.

 

At the police department, first watch runs from 6:30 a.m. until 3 p.m., second watch is 2:30 p.m. to 11 p.m., and third watch runs from 10:30 p.m. to 7 a.m.

 

The new assignments are:

 

* Cmdr. Mark Bridges has been transferred from the city's office of homeland security to the professional standards division/academy.

 

* Lt. Dennis Arnold has been transferred from professional standards/academy to the criminal investigations/special investigations division.

 

* Lt. Greg Williamson has been transferred from criminal investigations/special investigations division to the field operations division, first watch.

 

* Lt. Cliff Buscher has been transferred from third-watch field operations to first watch.

 

* Lt. Bill Neale has been transferred from third-watch field operations to second watch.

 

* Lt. Steve Peters has been transferred from second-watch field operations to third watch.

 

* Lt. Kurt Banks has been transferred from second-watch field operations to third watch.

 

Five city police officers promoted

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, March 4, 2006

Author/Byline: JAYETTE BOLINSKI STAFF WRITER

Section: LOCAL

Page: 7

 

Five Springfield police officers were promoted Friday afternoon to supervisory positions.

 

Lt. Ed Flesch was promoted to deputy chief over the Administrative Services Division, Sgt. Cliff Buscher was promoted to lieutenant, and officers Bruce Alderson, Thomas Cockayne and Chris Steil were promoted to sergeant.

 

The promotions were the result of recent retirements within the department, said Police Chief Don Kliment. Officials calculated that the department has lost nearly 200 combined years of law enforcement experience to recent retirements.

 

"It's a time of change for the agency. We lost some very experienced officers, which creates opportunities for other officers who are on the promotional lists," he said.

 

Flesch replaces Pat Fogleman, who retired Friday after 27 years with the department. As head of the Administrative Services Division, Flesch will oversee personnel, records, crime analysis, planning and research, the department's fleet, evidence, supplies, computers, grants and accreditation.

 

Flesch , who joined the department in July 1985, was promoted to sergeant in 1999 and was a supervisor in both field operations and criminal investigations. He was promoted to lieutenant in January 2005. His most recent assignment was as a third-watch lieutenant supervising officers on the street.

 

Kliment declined to discuss why he selected Flesch for the job, citing a pending discrimination lawsuit that claims Kliment appointed William Rouse to oversee the department's criminal investigations division instead of Lt. Rickey Davis despite Davis' qualifications for the job.

 

Buscher fills the vacancy created by Flesch 's promotion. A 17-year officer, Buscher was promoted to sergeant in April 2001 and has been a third-watch supervisor. He was assigned to begin training with first-watch field operations following his promotions.

 

Alderson has been with the department since June 1980. He most recently was a first-watch patrol officer. He will be assigned to third watch for training.

 

Cockayne has been on the force since February 1984. He spent the majority of his career as a third-watch patrol officer, but his most recent assignment was as a property officer in the Administrative Services Division. He will be assigned to first watch for training.

 

Steil joined the department in March 1995. He has been a patrol officer and a neighborhood police officer. He will be assigned to second watch for training.

 

 

 

 

 

Terry young

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brown-Refine Julie Diane Refine and Neil Mulholand Brown, both of Springfield, were married at 1:30 p.m. Sept. 12 at St. Frances Cabrini Church by the Rev.

 

David V. Schauer.

 

The bride is the daughter of Kathryn L. Refine of Springfield and the late Harry E. Refine. The groom is the son of Dr. Lowell J. Brown and Veronica M. Brown, both of Springfield.

 

Serving as matron of honor was Jane Young.

 

Bridesmaids were Mary Young, Celeste Foster, Kathryn Refine, Emily Reid and Elizabeth Reid. Flower girls were Jourdan Horton and Hannah Young.

 

Best man was Walter Metzger. Groomsmen were Brendan Brown, Jeff Schmid, Greg Puckel and

 

Cliff Buscher .

 

Ushers were Jack Reid

and

Terry Young. Ringbearer was Jack Reid.

 

A reception was held at the Artisans Building, state fairgrounds.

 

 

 

 

 TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, June 18, 1989

 Young-Lauterbach Marilyn Kay Lauterbach and

 

James Daniel Young,

both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. May 20 at First Presbyterian Church, by the Rev. Howard Milkman.

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lauterbach

of Springfield are the parents of the bride. Parents of the groom are James R. and Cindy L. Young of 1328 E. Ash St.

Maid of honor was Roxanne Greene, with Loretta Hankins and Marla Neuf as bridesmaids.

Best man was Terry Young ,

with Noel Dalbey and Mark Baehr as groomsmen. Ushers were Don Kolar and Donn Schroeder.

A reception was held at Aqua Sports Club at Lake Springfield.

The bride, a graduate of Rochester High School, works for the Credit Control Bureau. The bridegroom, a graduate of Southeast High School and Lincoln Land Community College,
works for

 

 the Springfield Police Department.



The couple will live in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, June 11, 1989

Horne-Bunten Tammy L. Bunten and Brian A. Horne, both of Springfield, were married at 6 p.m. May 6 at the First Congregational Church. The Rev. Donald McPeek officiated.

Parents of the bride are Mr. and Mrs. James C. Sisco of Champaign. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Horne, 3233 S. Fifth St.

Tracie Rowden was matron of honor, with Suzanne Austin, Kathy Austin and Jan Kennedy as bridesmaids. Stephanie Oliver was flower girl.

Tim Rumble was best man.

Rob Leach,

Dave Canaday and

Terry Young were groomsmen. Dewey Rowden and

Wymond Schleyhahn were ushers, and Tanner Renfro was ringbearer.

A reception was held at the Sky Harbor Inn.

The bride, a graduate of Springfield High School,

 

works for Railroad Maintenance Health and Welfare Fund. The groom, a graduate of Southeast High School, is self-employed.

The couple will live in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, October 30, 1988

 

 Hughes-Macchio Susan G. Macchio and Larry L. Hughes, both of Springfield, were united in marriage at 4 p.m. Sept. 24. The Rev. Daniel S. Powell officiated the ceremony at Grace Lutheran Church.

The bride is the daughter of Georgiann Macchio of San Diego, Calif., and Matthew Macchio of Sherman. The bridegroom is the son of Barbara E. Walton and Donald R. Hughes, both of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Carole Downey, with Denise Day, Diane Harms, Beth Martin, Jeannie Johnson and Connie Weller serving as bridesmaids. Flower girl was Alishia Fehrholz.

Terry Young served as best man, with Jim VanMeter, Rick Hesse, Bob Waddell, Tom Macchio and Mike McKinney serving as groomsmen. Ushers were Rich Higden, Bob Deckard, Ron Johnson and Duane Martin. Andrew Hughes served as ringbearer.

A reception was held at The Banquet Hall.

The bride, a graduate of Auburn High School, is employed by the state Department of Transportation. The bridegroom, a graduate of Griffin High School, is employed by Huber Pontiac-Subaru.

The couple will reside in Springfield.