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TITLE: WEDDINGS (mudra= pesticides – orkin, see also keen terminix)

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 31, 1997

Maggiore-Mudra Theresa Marie Mudra and Todd Alan Maggiore, DMD, both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. July 12 at Christ the King Church by the Rev. David Lantz.

The bride is the daughter of Joe and Donna Mudra of Springfield.

 

The groom is the son of Richard and Helen Maggiore of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Lori Mitchell, with Gina Graham as bridesmaid.

Serving as best man was Jermey Maggiore, with Tim Kell serving as groomsman. Serving as ushers were John Saladino , Mike Hawkins and Jim File.

A reception was held at Panther Creek Country Club.

The bride is a graduate of Lanphier High School, Springfield College in Illinois and Illinois State University. She is employed by the

 Illinois Collaboration on Youth.

 

The groom is a graduate of Griffin High School, SCI, the University of Illinois, Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville School of Dental Medicine. He is a practicing dentist with Dr.

Dennis Hayes.

 

 

note “vince” age co-hort with SHG baseball, not the awoi “vince”. (NSA “vince”) – sauer -

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, December 24, 1995

Saladino -Rohrig Michele Lee Rohrig and David Matthew Saladino , both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. Nov. 11 at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church by the Rev.

Patrick Gibbons.

The bride is the daughter of Richard and Sharon Rohrig of Springfield. The groom is the son of Carl and Nancy Saladino of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Ann Reynolds, with Kim Robinson, Maria Sakowicz, Karen Miller and Karen Saladino as bridesmaids. Flower girl was Kara Gallagher.

Serving as best man was John Saladino , with Pat Sullivan,

 

 Vince Madonia,

Jeff Sauer and Tim Kell as groomsmen. Ushers were Jeff Beccue, Jim File and Jim Tresouthick. Ringbearer was Greg Gallagher.

A reception was held at the Northfield Center.

The bride is a graduate of Southern Illinois University and the University of Illinois, where she earned a MS degree. She is employed as an advertising account executive with Professional Images. The groom is a graduate of SIU. He is employed as an environmental scientist with Andrews Environmental Engineering.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

“vince” at dr. paul’s daughter’s wedding

he’s there with sauer – shg baseball – dave saladino

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, June 18, 1995

 

Sauer-Paul Barbara Jean Paul and Jeffrey Edward Sauer, both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. May 20 at St. Agnes Church by the Rev. David Paul.

The bride is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Glennon Paul of Springfield.

The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Sauer of Springfield.

Serving as matron of honor was Sheryl Ungashick, with Sally Paul serving as maid of honor. Ginger and Mia Paul, Shelly Graupner, Angela Tobler, Gina McLaughlin and Gail Grant were bridesmaids.

Flower girl was Allie Siebert.

Serving as best men were Drew Sauer and Jeff Swaney. Andrew Paul, Rod Davis,

Vincent Madonia, Jeff Dodd, Brett Diamond and

Dave Saladino were groomsmen. Ushers were Charles and Marty Paul. Ringbearer was Bradley Sauer.

A reception was held at the Springfield Hilton.

The bride is a graduate of Sacred Heart Academy and St. Louis College of Pharmacy. She is a pharmacist. The groom is a graduate of Griffin High School and Southern Illinois University.

He is employed by the secretary of state.

The couple will live in Springfield.

 

saladino at sullivan’s wedding – IBT 916 -

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, October 29, 1995

Sullivan-Barr Melanie Lynn Barr and Patrick Jay Sullivan, both of Clayton, Mo., were married at 5 p.m. Oct. 14 at Laurel United Methodist Church by the Rev.

John Hamilton.

The bride is the daughter of Ralph and Karen Barr of Springfield. The groom is the son of
Gary G. and Janice Sullivan of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Jill Barr, with Lori McConnachie, Susan Barr and Seann Price as bridesmaids. Flower girls were Eryn and Rylie Sullivan.

Serving as best man was Rob Mitra, with
Rob Pieper,

Dave Saladino

and Eric Peterson as groomsmen. Ushers were Brian Oberlink, Tony Willms and Kevin Sullivan. Ringbearer was Connor Sullivan.

A reception was held at the American Center.

The bride is a graduate of Southeast High School, the University of Illinois and St. John's School of Medical Technology. She is employed by St. Mary's Health Center, Clayton, Mo. The groom is a graduate of Southeast High School and Sangamon State University. He is employed by Turnkey Technologies, St. Louis.

The couple will reside in Clayton, Mo.

 

 

 

saladino and dahlkamp are shg football coaches with leonard

 

Dominant 'D' / SHG defense shuts the door on opponents

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, September 9, 2000

Author/Byline: ROBERT BURNS STAFF WRITER
Section: SPORTS
Page: 25

Josh Norris had a recent awakening, much like the Sacred Heart-Griffin High School football team for which he plays.

"To me, there's no difference between fifth grade and 12th grade," he said. "But all of a sudden, I realized I'd grown up."

Norris' awareness came on the heels of the Cyclones' win last Friday over Chatham Glenwood that put SHG atop the Central State Eight Conference, albeit with three other teams after the first week of league play.

But Norris, Jim Freitag, John Cicci and the rest of the SHG defensive squad have, indeed, grown up.

The prowess of the latest SHG hit squad, which has played a significant role in the current 2-0 record, will again be tested in today's game against Southeast at Memorial Stadium (7 p.m.; WFMB 1450 AM).

"I see speed," said Cicci, a senior defensive back, about the Spartans. "I see quickness, good athletes. It's going to be a lot different than Glenwood. They run inside the tackles a lot more than Southeast will. We will have to work on containment."

Historically known for its tough, determined offense, the new millennium SHG defense has in two weeks been just short of brilliant.

It held a run-oriented O'Fallon squad to 123 yards rushing in Week One, then stopped Glenwood three times on fourth-and-short situations the following week. The two-time defending CS8 champions got inside the 20 three times and failed to score.

"I didn't think we would be this good this quick,"

 

Sacred Heart-Griffin coach Ken Leonard admitted. "I just feel that the coaches (Jim McMann, Sam Saladino and Steve Dahlkamp)

 

have prepared them well. They've done a really great job of preparing them."

Although the majority of the season remains, continued success by the current group will draw comparisons with the Matt Mitrione-led team that finished second in the state in 1995.

"I didn't know if we were going to be as good as we were last year, but I think we are now," Freitag, a defensive lineman said. "We've been in so many situations, third-and-short, fourth-and-short . . . we've had a lot of stands this year."

What Sacred Heart-Griffin will face today is a Southeast team struggling on offense, averaging slightly more than 11 points per game. But the Spartans have enough potential to evoke respect from both players and coach.

"They always worry me," Leonard said. "They've got a lot of speed. The coaching staff is a good staff, and they're always well prepared defensively and offensively. And they've got one of the fastest kids in the state (wide receiver Sean Dickerson)."

Norris said Southeast will present different problems than Glenwood, but he foresees problems nonetheless.

"Southeast is one of those teams that is different," he said. "I always have some kind of respect for them."

Freitag said what fans, friends and partisans are seeing and enjoying this season is just a continuation of last season, when the Cyclones rebounded from a 1-3 start to win their last four games. He theorized that it took the offense longer to jell last year than the defense. As evidence he cites last season's 7-3 loss to Glenwood, a game SHG very easily could have won with just a bit more juice from the offense.

"Over the last half of last season and now, I think our offense got going," he said. "I think for the most part that our defense was good last year. I don't think our defense ever played poorly. We only gave up six points to Glenwood, one drive. So I think we were close."

Leonard said that, interestingly, the offense this season, new, improved and effective, has helped the defense bolster its status.

"They've matured," he said. "They were good last year, and I think we give them a good look in practice with a good offense. They just play hard. They are a bunch of hard hitters, and they just go after it."

For Norris, who Leonard projects is going to be "something" during the next two seasons, this year will be one where maturity is going to be a week-to-week proposition.

"Many of the coaches said that I should be a leader because I started as a sophomore," he said. "They thought that it would be hard for me to be a second-year player and not take any kind of leadership action.

"My main concern from last year was how quickly we would be good this year. But it seems to be working. And it seems to be going on."

Caption: SHG defenders Steve Capranica, left, Josh Norris, Jim Freitag and Joe Workman held a run-oriented O'Fallon team to 123 yards in Week One, then stopped Glenwood three times on fourth-and-short situations en route to a shutout win last week.

Index Terms: LOCAL
Record Number: 0000473578
All content is (c) Copyright 2000 The State Journal-Register, a division of Copley Press, Inc. All rights reserved. No material may be reproduced electronically or in print without written permission.

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, March 14, 1997

 

Dominic Saladino Dominic "Pete" Saladino , 83, of Springfield died Thursday at Memorial Medical Center.

He was born Jan. 12, 1914, in Springfield, the son of Leonardo and Frances Giganti Saladino . He married Alberta Catherine Eck in 1934; she preceded him in death in 1986. Mr. Saladino , a lifelong resident of Springfield, was employed as a baker for 40 years, having retired from Amhrein's Bakery. He was a graduate of Springfield High School, a member of St. John's Lutheran Church and served as a business agent for American Bakers and Confectioners Union Local 147. Survivors: a daughter, Mrs. Dulany (Pat) Sriner of Springfield; three sons, Ronald B. Saladino of Lompoc, Calif., James L. Saladino of Angeles City, Philippines, and Jerry L. Saladino of Chatham; 15 grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; two sisters, Mary Osburn of Springfield and Mrs.

August (Josephine) Bartolomucci of Lilburn, Ga.; a brother, Joseph Saladino of Springfield; and several nieces, nephews and cousins.

 

LUCKY DOGS STARVING GOLDEN RETRIEVER GIVES BIRTH TO 16 PUPPIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, August 7, 1997

Author/Byline: MIKE MATULIS STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 15

Life was already hard for Allie. Barely a teenager, she found herself living on the street. Life had become merely existing. No one seemed to

care.

And as if things couldn't get any worse, suddenly she was faced not only with starvation, but also motherhood. In her case, motherhood times 16. Thanks to Christi Hipple and a slew of bottle-wielding volunteers, Allie and her plentiful puppies have beaten the odds.

Allie, a purebred and extremely skinny golden retriever, was wandering city streets until a couple of weeks ago, apparently dumped by her former owners.

A Springfield couple found her in an alley and took her in temporarily, but were unable to provide a long-term home. Last Wednesday, Allie -- named after where she was found -- was taken in by Hipple, who already had four other golden retrievers.

Hipple knew she was taking on a pregnant, nearly starving dog. She probably didn't fully comprehend that being a good Samaritan would end up costing her more than $1,000 in veterinary and other expenses.

And nothing prepared her for the emotional roller-coaster ride that began the day after Allie arrived.

On Thursday, Hipple took Allie and another of her dogs, 13-year-old Willy,

 

to her veterinarian -- Susan Saladino at Laketown Small Animal Clinic.

It was Willy's last trip to the clinic. Confirmation of a large tumor sealed the painful decision to have him euthanized.

Allie wasn't in much better shape. Besides suffering from an infection and malnutrition, she was clearly pregnant.

"You could count every rib without touching them," said Hipple.

Her emaciated frame was accentuated by her huge mid-section.

"She looked like a Guernsey cow. She was all belly," said Saladino .

Hipple had just lost one of her best friends, and now she was dealing with another dog teetering on the edge. But she'd soon find out just how full of life this sick dog was.

An X-ray by Saladino indicated a dozen puppies.

Hipple prepared herself for the impending onslaught. She drove home with Allie and popped a "how to help a dog give birth" videotape into the VCR. The tape wasn't halfway finished when the puppies started coming. So much for video theory -- Hipple would learn about puppies the old-fashioned way.

The first puppy came quickly. The next one didn't arrive for more than an hour. And then, to paraphrase the famous battery commercial, they just kept coming and coming and coming. The puppies started appearing at 2:14 p.m., and Allie didn't finish until after 1:30 a.m. on Friday.

The grand total -- 17 puppies. Even though one -- the 15th -- was stillborn, this emaciated mom had beaten the odds. Puppy mortality is often as high as 30 percent.

"It's a record for me,"

 

said Saladino , who's been a veterinarian for 17 years.

 

"Really, it's amazing, especially given her condition, that she carried them to full-term."

Getting through the delivery, however, was just the beginning of an uphill fight that will continue for the next few weeks.

Hipple, a schoolteacher, enlisted some friends, many of them teachers, who rushed over to help.

"It's a good thing it's summer," laughs Hipple.

The puppies were kept fat and relatively happy for the critical first 48 hours. Unfortunately, Allie was too undernourished and exhausted to help much.

So the next hurdle was to find people willing to take on the around-the-clock task of bottle feeding -- every two hours for the first few days. Word came from Benld's Adopt-A-Pet animal shelter that a wet-nurse dachshund was available, and three puppies were quickly sent her way. (Unfortunately, the foster mom didn't work out, and those pups are being bottle fed now, too) Soon, all but three puppies had left Hipple's small Southern View home to be bottle-fed.

In just a week, Allie's health has improved, and she's producing milk again. Currently, she's nursing five of her puppies in the towel- and newspaper-lined baby pool she calls a nursery. She'll probably take on two more later this week.

Hipple said that if the pups make it past five weeks, chances are they'll do fine. And, of course, they'll need homes. Hipple already has a few lined up, and some of those doing the bottle feeding say they might keep pups as well.

The selection will be varied. Allie most likely was bred by three different dogs. Hipple thinks she detects some Labrador mixes, some German shepherd mixes and maybe a few boxer mixes.

"I will have stringent standards," said Hipple of any puppy adopters.

And chances are no one needs to ask about adopting Allie.

"I'm quickly falling in love," said Hipple.

Laketown Small Animal Clinic is accepting donations to help offset the puppies' veterinary expenses.

Caption: Allie nurses five of her 16 puppies. Dog lover Christi Hipple took in the starving and pregnant Allie and has helped deliver and care for the puppies

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, January 31, 1999

 

Rosemary Rupp HANNIBAL, Mo. -- Rosemary Rupp, 57, of Hannibal, Mo., formerly of Springfield, died Thursday, Jan. 28, 1999, at her residence.

She was born Dec. 27, 1941, in Rock Island, the son of John and Grace Saladino Fulgenzi.

 

She married Thomas J. Rupp in 1992 in Hannibal, Mo.

Mrs. Rupp was employed by Springfield's IRS, served as director of volunteer services at Levering Hospital from 1979-1988, managed Deters Convenience Store from 1989-1993, was owner/operator of Rivercity Station Convenience Store and was a member of Holy Family Church, Hannibal, Mo.

Survivors: husband, Thomas J.; two sons, Bob Meiron of Hannibal, Mo., and Tom Meiron of Phoenix; a daughter, Lisa Meiron of Hannibal, Mo.; a stepson, Ted Rupp of Hannibal, Mo.; father, John Fulgenzi of Springfield; a brother, John Fulgenzi Jr. of Springfield; a sister, JoAnn Christie of Springfield; a niece; and four nephews.

Services: Mass of Christian Burial, 10 a.m. Monday, Holy Family Church, Hannibal, Mo. Burial: Holy Family Cemetery, Hannibal, Mo., the Rev. Mike Quinn officiating.

James O'Donnell Funeral Home in Hannibal, Mo., is in charge of arrangements.

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 5, 1998

 

Josephine M. Bartolomucci Josephine M. Bartolomucci, 82, of Lilburn, Ga., formerly of Springfield, died Thursday, July 2, 1998, at her residence.

She was born April 19, 1916, in Springfield, the daughter of Leonard and Frances Giganti Saladino .

 

She married August Bartolomucci on Oct. 3, 1936; he died in 1998.

 

Mrs. Bartolomucci lived in Lilburn, Ga., for the last four years, having lived in Springfield most of her life. She was a homemaker and a member of St. Joseph's Church.

Survivors: a daughter, Mrs. Vern (Nancy J.) Clark of Lilburn, Ga.; two sons, Ralph (wife, Nancy) Bartolomucci of Springfield and Leonard (wife, Annette) Bartolomucci of Winfield; 10 grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; a sister, Mary Osburn of Springfield; a brother, Joseph Saladino of Springfield; and several nieces, nephews and cousins.

 

PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, May 28, 2000

THE ILLINOIS ASSOCIATION of Park Districts announces three new appointments.

Cindy Deiters has been named executive assistant. She will provide support for the association's development and contract services and serve on the communications team. Prior to joining IAPD, Deiters worked as a legal assistant to the corporate secretary and associate general counsel for Trans World Airlines Inc. and as marketing assistant for WTI in St. Louis, Mo.

Angie Howard has been named communications director. Previously, Howard worked as a public information assistant for the City of Indianapolis, brokerage manager for Golden Rule Insurance Company and credit manager for Norwest Financial in Indianapolis, Ind.

Michele
Saladino has been named marketing director.

She will be responsible for developing and implementing a strategic marketing plan for the association, as well as marketing special programs such as the Eagle Eye Neighborhood Park Watch Program.

 

Previously, Saladino worked as a senior media planner at Ralston Purina's headquarters (see stoldt in spk)

 

and media supervisor at D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles in St. Louis, Mo. and account manager for OGR/Professional Images in Springfield.

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, April 19, 2000

John Fulgenzi

SHERMAN - John Fulgenzi, 83, of Sherman died Tuesday, April 18, 2000, at St. John's Hospital.

He was born April 3, 1917, in Springfield, the son of Nicholas and Rose Ippolito Fulgenzi. He married Grace
Saladino in 1938; she preceded him in death in 1970. He later married Clara Darovec in 1976; she preceded him in death in 1995. A son, Nicholas, and a daughter, Rosemary Rupp, also preceded him in death.

Mr. Fulgenzi retired from Sangamo Electric, where he had worked as a foreman for 29 years. He had also been employed by Hummer Manufacturing and the state of Illinois.

He was a member of St. Cabrini Church and the Eagles Aerie 437. He served in the U.S. Army in the Pacific Theater during World War II.

Survivors: a daughter, JoAnn (husband, John) Christie of Springfield; a son, John (wife, Sandra) Fulgenzi of Springfield; eight grandchildren; four sisters, Rosetta (husband, Guy) Matarelli and Norma Cardinal, both of Peoria, Anna Mae (husband, Richard) Roscetti of Springfield and Gloria Antonacci of Riverton; two aunts; and several nieces, nephews and cousins.

Services: 10 a.m. Friday, Staab Funeral Home, the Rev. Peter Mascari officiating. Burial: Camp Butler National Cemetery.

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, May 28, 2001

 Joseph L. Saladino

SPRINGFIELD - Joseph Leonard Saladino , 91, of Springfield died Friday, May 25, 2001, at Villa Health Care East in Sherman.

He was born July 12, 1909, in Montevago, Sicily, Italy, the son of Leonardo and Francesca Giganti Saladino . He married Dorothy Louise Nolting in 1936; she preceded him in death in 1999.

Mr. Saladino worked for the U.S. Postal Service for 34 years. He was a member of St. Aloysius Church, Aqua Club, Garden Club, U.S. Postal Employee Retirees and American Postal Workers Union. He was very active in Sacred Heart Credit Union and Springfield Post Office Credit Union.

Survivors: four daughters, Dottie (husband, Jim) Perkins of Chatham, and Fran Eckhoff, Mary Lou (husband, Joe) Schroeder and Kathy L. (husband, Sam) Wheeler, all of Springfield; a son, Joseph L. (wife, Toni) Saladino Jr. of Arlington Heights; 13 grandchildren; 15 great-grandchildren; a great-great-grandchild; a sister, Mary Osburn of Springfield; and several nieces, nephews and cousins.

Funeral Mass: 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, St. Aloysius Church, the Rev. John Titus officiating. Burial: Calvary Cemetery.

Staab Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

 

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, December 22, 2000

 Alberta M. Saladino

SPRINGFIELD - Alberta M. Saladino , 90, of Springfield died Thursday, Dec. 21, 2000, at St. John's Hospital.

She was born April 7, 1910, in Springfield, the daughter of William and Lucy Harrison Oswald. She married Carl J. Saladino Sr. in 1933; he preceded her in death in 1989.

Mrs. Saladino was a partner with Dental Service Laboratory and was a member of Christ the King Church.

Survivors: a son, Carl J. (wife, Nancy) Saladino Jr. of Springfield; nine grandchildren; 18 great-grandchildren; two brothers, George and William Oswald, both of Springfield; two sisters, Eleanor Mendenhall and Maxine (husband, Willard) Kennedy, both of Springfield; and several nieces, nephews and cousins.

Funeral Mass: 10 a.m. Saturday, Christ the King Church, the Rev. David S. Lantz officiating. Burial: Calvary Cemetery.

Staab Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

 

 

Household waste can be hazardous

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, June 13, 2009

Author/Byline: CAROL SPONAGLE, THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER
Section: at_home

When it comes to safety in the environment, hazardous waste isn't only the responsibility of the government and the industries that produce it - it's something that rests in the hands of consumers.

And many everyday products, including health care items,

For more information:

* City of Springfield waste and recycling: www.springfield.il.us or 789-2327

* U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Household Products Database: www.householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov

* Illinois Environmental Protection Agency: www.epa.state.il.us

* U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: www.epa.gov cleaning solutions, chemical lawn products and electronic equipment, are deemed household hazardous waste, or HHW, by the Environmental Protection Agency.

When used and stored safely, many of these items pose minimal threat. But with overuse, improper storage or reckless disposal, they can become dangerous to people, pets and the environment.

These products also pose a threat to the environment. The EPA warns that pouring toxic HHW down the drain may contaminate septic tanks, wastewater treatment systems, and cause physical injury to sanitation workers.

Types of dangers

Household waste is typically put into one of five categories, according to the EPA:

* Ignitable: Items such as lighter fluids, paint and turpentine that can be ignited by heat, spark or flame.

* Corrosive: Acids or bases that may corrode metal containers, such as battery acid.

* Toxic: Items such as antifreeze, weed killers, rat poison, mercury or lead that can be toxic when swallowed, absorbed or inhaled. They can cause injury or even death.

* Reactive: Fertilizers and lithium-sulfer batteries are examples of reactive HHW that can explode or create toxic fumes and gasses under heat and pressure or when mixed with water.

Warning signs

If you need help recognizing HHW, look for information on labels.

* Look for words such as "danger," "warning," "poison" and "caution" to indicate harmful products.

* Raise the red flag if labels warn about the product getting in the eyes or say, "do not swallow," "avoid inhalation of vapors" or "use in a well-ventilated area."

* Be aware that products labeled "nontoxic" may be safe for humans but could cause damage to the environment if thrown in a landfill or poured down the drain.

Someone else's turn

Since 1989, the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency has coordinated free, one-day HHW collections with the city of Springfield and the Sangamon County Department of Public Health. However, there is no event currently scheduled for the Springfield area.

Wynne Coplea, manager of Springfield's Division of Waste & Recycling, says the IEPA has funded an event in the Springfield area for the past few years. But with funding in short supply, IEPA is targeting areas that have not recently had HHW collections. She said there's a chance Springfield might get a collection day in the fall.

Dave Saladino , IEPA environmental protection specialist, said funds that drive HHW disposal events are appropriated by the Illinois General Assembly. He urged Springfield residents to contact members of the Illinois House and Senate, and the governor's office, to "let them know how popular it is so we can continue to fund it."

What you can do

There are a number of things homeowners can do to deal with household waste. The EPA is focused on a public-awareness initiative to reduce, reuse and recycle:

* Reduce the amount of HHW products used in the home by coming up with alternative products and methods for household tasks.

* Recycle HHW to the appropriate agencies to conserve resources and energy that would be expended in the production of more products.

* Reuse of HHW products, by appropriate agencies and industries to save money and the need for the creation of more HHW products.

But getting rid of HHW can be difficult, especially if you aren't sure how or where to dispose of it. Here are some helpful tips:

* Read product labels and follow instructions on use, storage, and disposal.

* Never mix chemicals together - contamination may deem them unrecyclable. Even worse, they may react, ignite, or explode.

* Only store HHW in original containers - do not pour other substances in empty containers.

* Look for area HHW disposal events or businesses that collect certain products for recycling. Some local businesses accept used motor oil, tires, and batteries for recycling. (See accompanying information.)

* Never allow children to handle or help with the disposal of HHW.

* If you think someone has been poisoned by a HHW product, call the Poison Center at (800) 222-1222.

* According to the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency Web site, paint is the most common material delivered to hazardous household waste collection sites. Latex (or water-based) paints are not accepted at IEPA disposal events due to the low levels of toxicity associated with latex paints and the expense of disposal. So the IEPA recommends using leftover paint, passing it on to a neighbor or local agency in need of paint or mixing it with an absorbent such as cat litter, shredded paper or sawdust before disposing of it.

To minimize HHW, Saladino recommends that people:

* Reduce the amount of chemical products they purchase.

* Try to use all chemical products you buy - and use only for intended purposes.

* See if a friend or neighbor can use products you no longer need.

* Store items safely until there is a HHW collection event.

* Contact your local municipality or solid waste agency. Many of these agencies host recycling events of their own and the IEPA doesn't always know about them.

Specialized HHW recycling:

* The Sangamon County Department of Public Health is organizing a permanent medical household waste disposal site. Look for more information at www.scdph.org or by contacting Angela Harris, recycling coordinator, 535-3100.

* Recycle tires at Johnson & Johnson Auto Service Center ($2), 1325 Stevenson Drive and Midtown Tire and Auto Service, 2110 Clear Lake Ave. ($5).

* Johnson & Johnson and Auto Zone in Springfield recycle motor oil in certain quantities for a fee.

* The Rechargeable Battery Recycling Corporation (RBRC) is associated with a network of retailers who accept nickel cadmium batteries for recycling. Go to www.rbrc.org/start.php or call (678) 419-9990 for information on retailers in central Illinois.

Types of household waste

In the garage:

* Paints (enamel, oil-based or latex)

* Paint thinner and varnishes

* Antifreeze, motor oil

* Automotive fluids (brake, transmission, power steering)

* Automotive batteries

* Car wax, degreaser and cleaners

* Gasoline, kerosene

* Fertilizers, fungicides and herbicides; insect killers

* Pool chemicals

* Hobby products such as photographic chemicals, model paints, chemistry sets, and certain types of glues.

In the house:

* Chemical cleaners, hobby chemicals, aerosol paints

* Products containing mercury (such as thermometers or blood pressure devices)

* Fluorescent lamp bulbs

* Asbestos

* Old/outdated medicines and pharmaceuticals, inhalers or medicated shampoos and lotions

* Household batteries

* Appliances, cell phones, TV sets and other electronic equipmen

 

 

 

News Briefcase: Rochester business is finalist in competition

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, January 7, 2009

...

Kincaid Power Station donates to foodbank

The Dominion Foundation, owner/operator of Kincaid Power Station, recently donated $10,000 to the Central Illinois Foodbank. C.J. Saladino , station director at Kincaid, made the donation Dec. 30.

Central Illinois Foodbank was established in 1982 by a coalition of churches and nonprofit organizations concerned about hunger and poverty.

The Central Illinois Foodbank distributes more than 4.5 million pounds of food annually to nearly160 food pantries, soup kitchens, residential programs and after-school programs in a 21-county region.

 

Here's who wants to be on a board

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, May 4, 2008

Section: LOCAL
Page: 4

Applicants for appointment to Sangamon County boards and commissions, as listed by the Sangamon County Board office. All are Springfield residents unless otherwise noted. Asterisk (*) indicates incumbent. List does not include fire district applicants.

Airport Authority

Bobbie Baker, Charles Boutcher, William Cowles, Eric Hansen, Keith Johnson (Chatham), David Miller (Buffalo), Scott Pillsbury, Peter Rotskoff, Sam Saladino , Stuart Shiffman, Kenneth Springs, Bill Taft, Ronny Wicherhauser, William Womack (Sherman)

Building Code Board of Appeals

Bobbie Baker, Richard Benanti, Harish Bhatt, Jon Edwards, Kevin Forden*, Earl Henderson, Richard Herndon, Mike Keafer* (Rochester), Jeremy Kirk, Keith Moore*, Tim Reiser, Anthony Salvatore, Cathy Scaife (New Berlin), Kenneth Springs

Citizens Advisory Committee

Bobbie Baker, Matthew Bilinskey, Palmer Blevins, Frank Coble*, Louis DeLaby, Sandra Douglas, Donald Eastep*, S.Craig Feger, Christine Groves*, Eric Hansen, John Hawkins* (Buffalo), Kevin Hyatt* (Rochester), Kyle Kirts (Chatham), John Kolaz, Judith Large, Larry Marxman (Dawson), Aaron McEvoy, Marvin Miller, Sam Montalbano, Gwen Montgomery, Sarah Musgrave* (Rochester), Caroline Petefish*, Scott Pillsbury, Douglas Purnell, Max Rowe, Sam Saladino , Thomas Shafer, Sam Snell* (Auburn), Bill Taft, Thomas Thornburg*, Jerry White*

Community Services Block Grant

Rosemarie Long*, Anthony Mares, Barbara McDonald (Chatham)

Deputy Merit Commission

Bobbie Baker, Matthew Bilinsky, Joseph Galassi, Joe Gooden, Eric Hansen, Anthony Mares, Michael McFadden, Robert Moore, Douglas Purnell, William Rouse, Dennis Sloman (Pleasant Plains), Bill Taft

Extension Board

David Mendenhall* (Buffalo), Scott Pillsbury

Board of Health

Bobbie Baker, Jeffrey Bierman* (Sherman), Andy Goleman* (Divernon), Richard Herndon, Annamarie Israel*, William Moredock, Ross Silverman, Gail Simpson*, Whitney Steele, Kris Theilen*

Historic Preservation

Richard Benanti, Roger German, Grant Hammer, Richard Herndon, Jerry Jacobson, Kyle Kirts (Chatham), Gwen Montgomery, Chuck Pell*, Scott Pillsbury, Douglas Purnell, Aakash Raut (no address listed), Jason Rudis, J. Randle Schick*, Robert Sherman, Amy Williams

Land Use Advisory

Bobbie Baker, Richard Borus, Frank Bowman (Pleasant Plains), Joshua Brainerd, Jon Edwards, Joe Gooden, John Greene, Eric Hansen, Kyle Kirts (Chatham), Anthony Mares, Aaron McEvoy, John Raynolds, Mark Reichert (Auburn), Robert Spencer (Pleasant Plains), Kenneth Springs, William Yoggerst*

Mass Transit

Bobbie Baker, David Boyd, Clarence Davis, Jerry Doss*, Eric Hansen, Jim McDonough, T. Ray McJunkins*, Sam Saladino , Kenneth Springs, Bill Taft

911 Board

David Mendenhall (Buffalo), Joe Powell* (Auburn), Al Swettman* (Pleasant Plains)

Q5 Advisory Board

John Raynolds

Regional Planning

Richard Borus, Frank Bowman (Pleasant Plains), Jon Edwards, John Greene, Steven O'Dell, Kenneth Springs

Board of Review

Bobbie Baker, Gene Bergschneider (New Berlin), Harish Bhatt, Matthew Bilinsky, Nancy Couter Dollison, Todd Eddington, Richard Herndon, Jeremy Kirk, Tony Leone, Katie Madonia (Rochester), Chris McClure (no address listed), Dirk McCormick, Bob Partridge (Rochester), Connie Sebok, Kenneth Springs

Sanitary District

Andy Alvey, Warren Atherton, Bobbie Baker, Richard Berning, Harish Bhatt, Matthew Bilinsky, Palmer Blevins, Kenneth Bollin, Richard Borus, Philip Chiles, R. Dean Collins, Louise Constant, Eric Dailey, Stephen Davis (Rochester), Scott DeStasio, Joseph Dorman, Paul Duiker, Danny Faulkner, Joe Feagans, James Flemming*, Stephanie Fuller (Rochester), Stan Givens (Sherman), John Greene, Scott Hanauer, Eric Hansen, Jim Harrington, Darryl Harris*, Richard Herndon, Jerald Jacobs, Tim Kell (Rochester), Jeremy Kirk, Kyle Kirts (Chatham), John Kolaz, R. Dale Laningham (Rochester), Dan Long, Bradley Loscher, Lee Malany, Brian Manci, Liam McDonnell, Mario Moore, Robert Moore, Jan Nelle, Kenneth Page, John Pasko, Michael Plog, Casey Pratt, Douglas Purnell, Kitty Ramirez, James Reinhart, Bruce Rimbey, Bill Schulenburg, Thomas Shafer, Irv Smith, Kenneth Springs, Bruce Strom, Richard Turner, Louis Van Hoos, Chris Walcher, Daniel Wavering, Robert Wire, William Womack (Sherman), Elvin Wooden

Springfield Medical District Board

Kenneth Springs, Elvin Zook*

Zoning Board

Bobbie Baker, Richard Boruse, Charles Chimento*, Joe Gooden, John Greene, Richard Herndon, John Lucchesi, Anthony Mares, Robert Spencer (Pleasant Plains), Bill Taft, Donald Wulf (alternate incumbent)

Undecided applicant

Norman Koefoed (Cantrall)

Memo: FACT BOX / STORY: PG 1

 

 

 

Waiting for a green light / Prairie Crossing extension will open this month

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, October 16, 2007

Author/Byline: TIM LANDIS BUSINESS EDITOR
Section: BUSINESS
Page: 8

State transportation officials estimate 21,000 vehicles a day use Veterans Parkway on the west side of the Prairie Crossing shopping development, and about 8,500 use Chatham Road on the east side.

Near the end of this month, a connection should open in between.

"We're finishing up the traffic signals. They are just getting energized and the wiring completed," said Phil Martin of Martin Engineering Co. in Springfield.

The firm designed the new intersection at Chatham Road and Recreation Drive - including three sets of traffic lights - as part of a project that includes construction of a Menards megastore in 2008.

One set of lights is at the intersection, while two are inside the Woodside Place development, which will be anchored by Menards.

A traffic study released just before the start of work nearly a year ago estimated the 8,500 vehicles a day that travel Chatham Road daily south of Interstate 72 will increase by more than 17,000 within two decades.

The study suggested that an east-west connection between Chatham Road and Veterans Parkway would spread out traffic flow into the south side of Springfield from Chatham and other steadily growing communities south of the city.

"We've seen people cutting through there already, and some have been pulled over," said an employee of Tractor Supply Co. The farm-and-home supply store, which opened in 2006, is just off the new intersection.

Prairie Crossing is anchored by a Meijer superstore and several auto dealerships.

Springfield Police Department spokesman Sgt. Pat Ross said he was not aware of unusual problems at Chatham Road and Recreation Drive, though it is not uncommon for drivers to cut through before roads are completed.

State and city highway planners had to approve the project, though Woodside Place developer Bob Barker is paying the estimated $4 million cost of the changes, including the one-third mile extension of Prairie Crossing Drive to Chatham Road.

"They just needed a permit from us. It's a state route (old Illinois 4), but they're the one responsible for building it," said John Saladino , construction engineer with District 6 of the Illinois Department of Transportation in Springfield.

Recreation Drive also will tie into the new intersection of the MacArthur Boulevard extension and I-72 farther east.

Construction of the Menards store, scheduled to begin in the spring, is expected to take nine months. The store, which is about double the size of a traditional store, will replace the Menards at the north end of the Parkway Pointe shopping center.

Barker said he is working with other potential tenants for Woodside Place, including a hotel, but the focus now is on opening the intersection. "They've pretty much assured us we should be able to get it open by the end of the month," Barker said.

Caption: A newly constructed intersection at Chatham Road and Recreation Drive creates an east-west connection between Chatham Road and Veterans Parkway.

 

 

James L. Saladino

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, June 3, 2007

Section: LOCAL
Page: 13

James L. Saladino

ANGELES CITY, Pampanga, Philippines – James L. Saladino , formerly of Springfield, died at age 68 on Thursday, May 24, 2007, at 7:45 a.m. in Angeles City (May 23 at 6:45 p.m. local time). Jim was born June 26, 1938, to Dominic "Pete" and Alberta Eck Saladino of Springfield. He was preceded in death by his parents and his brother, Jerry.

He is survived by his loving wife, Maribeth of Angeles City; six children, including Tony, Brett, Shane Turner, and Kristi; six grandchildren; one great-grandchild; a brother, Ronald; a sister, Patti Sriner; his aunt, Mary Osburn; and many nieces, nephews and cousins.

Jim attended Springfield High School and Springfield Junior College and graduated from Carthage College in 1958. He was an engineer/computer analyst in Springfield much of his early life, and also belonged to the Springfield stagehands union (IATSE). He was instrumental in rebuilding and supporting the Springfield Muni Opera at Lake Springfield. In 1982, he moved to Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. He lived there until retiring to the Philippines, where he was a guest lecturer at Holy Angel University in Angeles City until his health declined.

Jim will be remembered by his family and many friends for his easy laugh, his friendly and generous nature, his optimistic outlook on life and his work ethic.

Jim's remains were cremated on May 27, 2007, and will stay with his family in the Philippines. Condolences, gifts or donations may be sent to Maribeth Saladino , 5-14 Carlos Panlilio St., Villa Dolores, Angeles City, 2009, Pampagna, Philippines.

Caption: James L. Saladino

 

 

 

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 27, 2006

Leonard-Metz

Rebecca Marie Metz and Bradley Pierce Leonard, both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. June 17, 2006, at Blessed Sacrament Church by the Rev. David Hoefler.

The bride is the daughter of Pat and Janet Metz of Springfield. The groom is the son of Ken and Liz Leonard of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Betsy Metz. Bridesmaids were Emily Brown, Lindsey Leonard, Lori Metz, Katy Nickols, Tiffany Pickford and Noreen Walton. Junior bridesmaids were Hanna Noonan and Savannah Williams. Flower girl was Abby Elston.

Best man was Derek Leonard. Groomsmen were Josh Allotey, Christian Gripper, Chris Metz, Joe Metz, Mike Metz, Justin Miller, Kyle Brown, John Cicci and Ryan Davlin. Ring bearers were Ridgely Noonan and Davis Noonan. Ushers were Kevin Morphew and Jake Saladino .

A reception was held at Crowne Plaza.

The bride is a 2002 graduate of Sacred Heart-Griffin High School and a 2006 graduate of Illinois State University in Normal with a degree in family and consumer science teacher education. She is employed by Lincoln Community High School as a family and consumer science teacher. The groom is a 2001 graduate of Sacred Heart-Griffin High School and a 2005 graduate of Illinois State University with a degree in business administration. He is employed as a manager in training at Bank of Springfield.

The couple resides in Springfield.

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, March 19, 2006

Robert L. Townsend

SPRINGFIELD - Robert L. Townsend, 90, of Springfield died Saturday, March 18, 2006, at his home.

He was born April 29, 1915, in Springfield, the son of Elmer and Alice McGuire Townsend Sr. He married Eileen M. Huber in 1938.

Mr. Townsend was chief accountant for the Chicago and Illinois Midland Railroad for 42 years. He was a member of Sacred Heart Church and Holy Name Society and an officer in the Brotherhood of Railway Clerks. He served in the Civilian Conservation Corps during the depression.

Survivors: wife, Eileen; seven daughters, Nancy (husband, Carl) Saladino , Jean Townsend, Pat (husband, Bill) Anderson, Carol Townsend, Marilyn (husband, Joe) Mueller and Janet (husband, Chuck) Reynolds, all of Springfield, and Mary Teresa (husband, Don) Ballentine of Chatham; four sons, Michael (wife, Carol) and David (wife, Michelle) Townsend, both of Chatham, Danny (wife, Karen) Townsend of Mount Pleasant, Iowa, and Thomas Townsend of Springfield; 25 grandchildren; 31 great-grandchildren; two sisters, Margaret Woodside of Loami and Barb Dorr of Springfield; two brothers, Elmer (wife, Laura) Townsend Jr. of Auburn and Don (wife, Becky) Townsend of Houston; and several nieces, nephews and cousins.

Funeral Mass: 10 a.m. Wednesday, Sacred Heart Church, the Rev. John Nolan officiating.

Staab Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 24, 2005

Section: LOCAL
Page: 12


Saladino -Ryan

Kellie Marie Ryan and David Matthew Saladino , both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. June 4, 2005, at Christ the King Catholic Church by Monsignor David Lantz.

The bride is the daughter of Bill and Pat Ryan of Creve Coeur. The groom is the son of Carl and Nancy Saladino of Springfield.

Serving as matron of honor was Julie Montgomery. Flower girl was Sophie Montgomery.

Best man was C.J. Saladino . Ring bearer was Coltin Saladino . Ushers were John Saladino and Ron Rice.

A reception was held at Panther Creek Country Club.

The bride is a graduate of Eastern Illinois University. She is employed by Glaxo SmithKline Pharmaceuticals. The groom is a graduate of Southern Illinois. He is employed by the state Environmental Protection Agency.

The couple resides in Springfield.

 

 

 

BOWLER SPOTLIGHT

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, June 11, 2005

Section: SPORTS
Page: 51

* NAME: Jake Saladino

* AGE: 21

* EDUCATION: Graduated from Sacred Heart-Griffin in 2001. Will graduate from the University of Illinois at Springfield with a degree in business administration following the summer semester.

* OCCUPATION: Works at United Community Bank in Springfield.

* FAMILY INFORMATION: He has two sisters, Robyn, 19, and Sam, 16.

* HOBBIES: Enjoys golf, bowling and intramural softball and basketball.

* BOWLING HISTORY: Started bowling in junior leagues at age 14. In the 2001-02 season, he joined his first adult league, the Columbian League, at AMF Strike 'N Spare Lanes. He continues to bowl in that league.

* 2004-05 AVERAGE: 199

* HIGH AVERAGE: 207 (junior leagues)

* HIGH GAME: 300

* HIGH SERIES: 781

* BALL: AMF Slam

* BOWLING GOAL: To bowl an 800 series.

* SPOTLIGHT ACCOMLISHMENT: On March 25, Saladino bowled the first 300 game of his career in the Columbian League at Strike 'N Spare Lanes. His teammates on Northwestern Mutual were Mark Hayward, Pat Schweska, Pat Connelly and Lester Peden.

* QUOTE: "I felt very excited. It was kind of hard to believe. It wasn't until people started congratulating me that I realized what happened."

 

 

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, January 22, 2005

 

Dominic A. Campo

PLEASANT PLAINS - Dominic A. Campo, 82, of Pleasant Plains died Thursday, Jan. 20, 2005, at Memorial Medical Center.

He was born Jan. 17, 1923, in Springfield, the son of Carlo C. and Myrtle Beck Evans Campo.

Mr. Campo was a U.S. Army veteran of World War II and a retired cement contractor. He was a member of Veterans of Foreign Wars, Elks Club and Knights of Columbus.

Survivors: two sons, Carl (wife, Cynthia) Campo of Branson, Mo.,

and Terry Campo of Arlington, Va.;

three sisters, Rose Saladino and

Carrie Dinora,

both of Springfield, and Mary Merritt of Kokomo, Ind.; brother, Frank Campo of Scottsdale, Ariz.; and several nieces, nephews and cousins.

Services: 1 p.m. Monday, Staab Funeral Home, the Rev. Richard Chiola officiating. Burial: Calvary Cemetery.

 

Neal Taylor joins SHG coaching staff

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, January 10, 2005

Author/Byline: ROBERT BURNS STAFF WRITER
Section: SPORTS
Page: 30

Former Southeast High School head football coach Neal Taylor, who was the focal point of a national story two seasons ago,

 

has been hired to coach the secondary and special teams at Sacred Heart-Griffin.

"We asked him," Sacred Heart-Griffin coach Ken Leonard said, when asked how Taylor came on board. "He's a good coach and he's knowledgable."

Taylor, 40, is part of a switching around on the Cyclones' staff, which has been known for its stability over the years.
He will replace Sam Saladino , who resigned. Leonard said Jim McMann will remain as defensive coordinator. Taylor teaches physical education at Jefferson Middle School.

Taylor served this season as an volunteer assistant coach at New Berlin in the midst of the Pretzels' best season in their history, advancing to the semifinal round of the Class 2A playoffs with an 11-1 mark.

Rumors had swirled through the Central State Eight Conference for a couple of weeks that Taylor was going to join the staff of the five-time CS8 champions, but Leonard said confirmation from the SHG administration did not come until Friday.

Sacred Heart-Griffin went 10-1 last season, losing to Jacksonville 21-14 in the second round of the Class 5A playoffs after being rated No. 2 in The Associated Press ratings all season.

After serving as an assistant for 10 years under Bob Bagby and Brent Ashbaugh, Taylor was head coach for two years at Southeast. In his tenure, the Spartans went 12-8 overall, reaching the Class 6A playoffs in 2002. That included a best-in-school-history 8-3 mark and their first postseason win, beating Mount Vernon 26-21.

That was the prelude to a 2003 campaign that ended when Taylor resigned at the conclusion of the season under a storm of controversy because he had arranged with Cahokia coach Antwyne Golliday for Spartans quarterback Nate Haasis to get the CS8 career passing record.

With Southeast trailing 36-20 in the closing seconds of its season finale, Taylor and Golliday agreed to let Cahokia score an uncontested touchdown in exchange for letting Haasis complete a pass to set the record.

Haasis later wrote a letter to the CS8 saying he didn't want the record, and the pass was stricken from the record books.

 

 

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, August 12, 2003

 Jeri A. Daily

SPRINGFIELD - Jeri Ann Daily, 52, of Springfield died Sunday, Aug. 10, 2003, at Memorial Medical Center.

She was born June 29, 1951, in Springfield, the daughter of Robert W. and Zelda Woodall Coady.

She graduated from Athens High School in 1969 and worked for the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency.

Survivors: a son, Shane (wife, Shelly) Turner of Riverton; a daughter, Kristi Saladino of Springfield; a granddaughter; companion, Scott Goldsby of Andrew; mother, Zelda Coady of Sherman; a brother, Rod (wife, Judi) Coady of Springfield; a sister, Lori (husband, Brian) Bell of Athens; and several aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews.

Graveside services: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Fancy Creek Cemetery near Sherman, the Rev. Robert Ervin officiating.

Mott and Henning Funeral Home in Athens is in charge of arrangements.

 

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 20, 2003

 Langheim-Burnett

Jennifer Lynn Burnett and Todd Matthew Langheim, both of Springfield, were married at 7 p.m. May 30, 2003, at the Knights of Columbus Hall by Judge Robert Hall.

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gene Burnett of Springfield. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Langheim of Chatham.

Serving as maid of honor was Sarah Conlon. Bridesmaids were Amy Jones, Tara Langheim and Vail Blunk.

Best men were Marc Niemczyk and Dave Hannah. Groomsmen were Gary Saladino and Brad Burnett. Ushers were Bryan Henson, Marcia Abner, Mike Blunk, Kelly Hannah and Jim and Doreen Boehme.

A reception was held at the Knights of Columbus Hall.

The bride is a graduate of Springfield High School. She is employed in administration by engineering consultants Crawford, Murphy and Tilly. The groom is a graduate of Chatham Glenwood High School. He is employed by the Illinois Air National Guard.

The couple lives in Springfield.

 

PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, March 12, 2000

 

THREE BUNN-O-MATIC quality work groups received special recognition during 1999 by meeting annual goals. They are:

R&D Group: Dave Wurtzler, Sam Giordano, Burt Hart, Brent Friedrich, Jack Knepler and Bill Shaw.

Su Nombre: Mick McKibben, Jerry Bauman, Tammy Blauvelt, Rick Frey, Trina Nees, Kathy Rees and Debbie Spoon.

Shawshank Redemption: Steve Shaw, Jacquie Estes, John Hupp, Diana Hurt, Michelle Mogg, Dan Shields, Sam Saladino and Angie Langiano.

 

 

 

LOCAL

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, December 25, 1999

 

 

Dorothy L. Saladino

SPRINGFIELD - Dorothy Louise Saladino , 85, of Springfield died Thursday, Dec. 23, 1999, at Memorial Medical Center.

She was born Feb. 15, 1914, in Springfield, the daughter of Jesse and Mary Isabell Appley Nolting. She married Joseph Leonard Saladino in 1936.

Mrs. Saladino was a lifelong resident of Springfield. She was employed by the Illinois Department of Revenue and the Internal Revenue Service. She was a member of St. Aloysius Church and the Postal Clerks Auxiliary.

Survivors: husband, Joseph; four daughters, Frances Eckhoff, Mary Lou (husband, Joe) Schroeder and Kathy L. (husband, Sam) Wheeler, all of Springfield and Dottie (husband, Jim) Perkins of Chatham; a son, Joseph L. (wife, Toni) Saladino of Arlington Heights; 13 grandchildren; several great-grandchildren; a sister, Debbie (husband, Joe) Terrill of Springfield; and several nieces, nephews and cousins.

 

 

 

BELIEFS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, December 5, 1999

Reilly- Saladino

Jennifer Samantha Saladino and Kevin Michael Reilly, both of Denver, were married at 3 p.m. Sept. 18 at St. Francis De Sales Church in Denver by Monsignor Frank Morefield.

The bride is the daughter of Judith Dalsin of Springfield and the late Jerry Saladino . The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Reilly of Springfield.

Serving as matron of honor was Jennifer Frazier. Bridesmaids were Marci Irvine, Amy Snyder and Gretchen Cly. Flower girl was Adrianna Bergmann.

Best man was Michael Reilly. Groomsmen were Daniel Reilly, Robert Chamberlain and

Brian Reardon. Ushers were Philip Leiss and Travis Saladino .

A reception was held at the Metropolitan Club in Greenwood Village.

The bride is a graduate of Springfield High School and Northern Illinois University. She is a corporate meeting planner at StorageTek. The groom is a graduate of Springfield High School and St. Michaels College. He is a retirement plan specialist at Janus.

The couple will reside in Denver.

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, November 23, 1999

Section: LOCAL
Page: 40



Jerry Lynn Saladino

CHATHAM - Jerry Lynn Saladino , 54, of Chatham died Sunday, Nov. 21, 1999, at Memorial Medical Center.

He was born Jan. 28, 1945, in Springfield, the son of Dominic "Pete" and Roberta Eck Saladino . He married Julie Spengler in 1997 in Springfield. A son, Trevor, preceded him in death.

Mr. Saladino was a retired airline pilot with the state of Illinois.

 

He was a member of the Stage Hands Union and was presently

 

 driving a school bus for the Ball-Chatham School District.

Survivors: wife, Julie; a daughter, Jenifer (husband, Kevin) Reilly of Denver; three stepdaughters, Jessie, Sarah and Rachel Lewis, all at home; two sons, Trooper (wife, Julie) Saladino of Warrenville and Travis Saladino of Scottsdale, Ariz.; and a granddaughter.

Memorial services: 10 a.m. Friday, Sugar Creek United Methodist Church in Chatham, the Rev. Bruce Jacobs officiating.

Wilson Park Funeral Home in Rochester is in charge of arrangements.

 

 

TITLE: ANNIVERSARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, June 8, 1999

 

 

Saladino -40th Mr. and Mrs. Carl J. Saladino Jr. of Springfield will celebrate their 40th wedding anniversary with a family golf outing and dinner at Piper Glen Golf Course on Saturday.

Saladino and the former Nancy L. Townsend were married June 13, 1959, at Sacred Heart Catholic Church.

Mr. Saladino was employed for 28 years by CWLP, retiring in 1994 as director of engineering at the power plant.

Mrs. Saladino retired in 1995 from the Catholic Diocese and Christ the King School.

They are the parents of nine children, CJ, Mark and Karen, all of Springfield, Gary of Champaign, Paul of LaGrange, Diane Boyle of Madison, Wis., John of Sherman, David of Webster Groves, Mo., and Jeanie Beccue of Mount Pulaski. There are 15 grandchildren.

(see beccue/madonia)

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, February 8, 1998

 

Kell-Whalen Suzanne Kay Whalen and Timothy Patrick Kell, both of Springfield, were married at 3:30 p.m. Jan. 3 at South Side Christian Church by the Rev. Jeff Chitwood.

The bride is the daughter of Michael and Sandie Whalen of Springfield. The groom is the son of James Kell of Springfield and the late Margaret Kell.

Serving as maid of honor was Wendy Whalen. Bridesmaids were Jil Nelson and Krista Ewerks.

Best man was Rodney Vose. Groomsmen were John Saladino and Todd Maggiore. Ushers were Jim File, Phil Langen, Tim Whalen and Kyle Rominger.

A reception was held at the Knights of Columbus Hall Post 364. The bride is a graduate of Eastern Illinois University. She is employed as a first-grade teacher at Chatham Elementary School. The groom is a graduate of the University of Illinois. He is employed as an engineer at the state Department of Transportation.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, January 10, 1998

August Bartolomucci

August Bartolomucci, 84, of Lilburn, Ga., formerly of Springfield, died Wednesday at his home.

He was born Dec. 5, 1913, in Springfield, the son of Ralph and Nunzia Antonacci Bartolomucci. He married Josephine M. Saladino in 1936. Mr. Bartolomucci, a resident of Lilburn, Ga., for four years, was an operating engineer for local construction. He was a former member of St.

Joseph's Church and was a Navy veteran of World War II. Survivors: wife, Josephine M.; a daughter, Nancy J. Clark of Lilburn, Ga.; two sons, Ralph Bartolomucci of Springfield and Leonard Bartolomucci of Winfield; 10 grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; a sister, Ada Viele of Springfield; and several nieces, nephews and cousins.

 

TITLE: ANNIVERSARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, January 6, 1998

 

Schroeder-25th Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Schroeder of Springfield recently celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary.

Schroeder and the former Mary Lou Saladino were married Dec. 22, 1972, at St. Clementine Presbyterian Church by the Rev. M.C. Maietta.

Mr. Schroeder has been employed as an ironworker with Local 46 for 30 years. Mrs. Schroeder has been employed by Ameritech for 27 years.

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS – (chief judge eggers)

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, September 21, 1997

 

Frazier-Eggers Jennifer Lyda Eggers and Rick Frazier, both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. Aug. 16 at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church by the Rev. Chris Comerford.

The bride is the daughter of Robert and Donata Eggers of Springfield. The groom is the son of Connie and Les Allen and Richard and Nancy Frazier, all of Pittsfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Kimberly Drury. Jeni Saladino , Gabrielle Marshall and Mary Kay Webel were bridesmaids. Flower girl was Addy O'Brien.

Best man was Randy Klatt. Jon Eggers, Dan Davis and Pat McCulloch were groomsmen. Ushers were David Graham, John Tenfelder, Todd Laurence and Fred Schlosser.

A reception was held at Panther Creek Country Club.

 

 

 

TITLE: BRIEFCASE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, June 28, 1996

GENERAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES, an authorized Ameritech cellular and paging dealer, has opened a retail store on the upper level of White Oaks Mall.

The store sells the full line of Ameritech cellular and paging services and a wide variety of cellular phones, pagers and accessories.

It is General Communications' fourth Springfield location.

Gary Saladino , manager of the White Oaks store, said General Communications had a temporary store at the mall

 at Christmas time that was very successful.

"So we thought a permanent location would allow customers to consistently find us," he said. "This store has a unique look to it that goes along with Ameritech's new retail concepts."

Among the new products the store carries are Pick Up and Go Cellular and Ameritech series phones by Motorola. It also has Motorola Star-TAC, a wearable cellular phone.

The store is open during regular mall hours, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 6 p.m. Sunday.

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, October 21, 1995

 

Nancy Catalano Nancy Crifasi Catalano, 88, of Springfield died Tuesday at Heritage Manor.

She was born Dec. 4, 1906, in Sicily, Italy, the daughter of Nicholas and Audenzia Saladino Crifasi. She married Vito Catalano in 1939; he died in 1972. Mrs. Catalano was a resident of Springfield most of her life. She was a homemaker and a member of Ss. Peter and Paul Church.

Survivors: several nieces and nephews, including John Catalano of Springfield.

 

BEHIND THE SCENES WITH THE `FLY'N ILLINI'

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, September 22, 1995

Author/Byline: Dean Weaver
Edition: M1,M2
Section: MAGAZINE
Page: 4A

Illinois Air National Guard Senior Master Sgt. Jeff Baer of Beardstown is late getting home from work some evenings because he's been busy sifting

through garbage dumpsters. It's certainly not as glamorous as flying a jet, but it's part of Baer's job.

His concern is not the loss of a stray socket, nut or bolt, but knowing that such an object sucked through an Air Guard jet's intake tract could destroy the $2 million, turbo-fan General Electric engine.

"Every tool must be accounted for at the end of each day so we know nothing was left on or inside a plane," says Baer, who helps maintain the 19 F-16C Fighting Falcon jet aircraft at Springfield's Capital Airport.

Baer and the other phase inspectors practice preventive maintenance, right down to X-raying portions of the plane to look for metal fatigue.

"There is a difference between an inspector and a good mechanic," Baer says. "We sometimes go inside the planes with a bright light and mirror looking for hours for that elusive chafed wire."

The inspectors remove more than 100 panels and often the engines themselves from the jets after every 200 hours of flight time. They look at every part, trying to determine what could break, taping pieces of string to parts that will need further inspection by a specialist.

Maintaining the electronically controlled "fly-by-wire" fighter jets is challenging, Baer says. "This aircraft is so complex, I learn something new every day."

Baer is among the Illinois Air National Guard's 1,045 members -- 297 full-time -- who comprise the 183rd Tactical Fighter Group team.

The guard's mission is to provide 15 combat-ready aircraft, along with the pilots and support personnel, giving them the capability to spring into action, entirely on their own, anywhere in the world.

The Air Guard can be activated by the governor or the president.

This miniature air base with 40 buildings on the north side of Capital Airport features machinists, munitions experts, crew chiefs, doctors, nurses, military police, painters, fueling specialists, avionics technicians and civil engineers.

Recruiters say the 183rd is one of Illinois' best-kept secrets. Most of the members learned about the unit from family and friends in the Springfield area who once were members.

To some people, multi-million dollar fighter aircraft capable of traveling at twice the speed of sound may seem like an unnecessary extravagance in Springfield. But the Air Guard is more than macho weekend pilots flying mock air battles over corn fields.

Air Guard members helped sandbag during the flood of 1993; augmented the U.S. Air Force during Operation Desert Storm; and participate in Lincoln's Challenge, a military-style educational program in Rantoul that helps 16- to 18-year-olds with a history of delinquency a chance to earn their GEDs.

During its 46-year history, the group has been deployed to Thailand, Denmark, Germany and Puerto Rico to train foreign pilots and uphold U.S. treaty agreements.

Cutbacks in defense spending have taken their toll on the 183rd, says Col.

Barry Beard, air commander.

In 1993, the 183rd was assigned 24 primary fighter aircraft. The U.S. Department of Defense cut the base to 18 planes in October 1993 and to 15 planes in 1994. Now, Beard says, the unit is in jeopardy of being reduced to 12 planes by the end of this year. The reduction could mean cutting traditional guardsmen and full-time employees.

The number of planes might fluctuate, but to the pilots who alternate daily flight missions to stay ready for combat, it remains business as usual.

An average of 16 missions, or "sorties," are performed every day as groups of four or six pilots depart for mock air battles or bombing runs, says Senior Master Sgt. Bob Emerson, a 32-year member and air operations supervisor.

Concrete-filled bombs are loaded under the wings of the planes and dropped at military ranges in central Missouri, southeastern Indiana and central Wisconsin.

Pilots are in the air a little more than an hour before returning to base from a typical sortie.

"Dogfighting" maneuvers are done in a triangular air space between Petersburg, Quincy and Macomb.

In addition to these routine exercises, there are usually five long-range deployments each year that last several days, Emerson says.

The allure of fighter aircraft, the opportunity to travel, unique professions and good benefits work to make the 183rd a family affair.

Capt. Mitch Rebman of Rochester says his father, a radio controller for the 183rd, brought him to Capital Airport as a child.

"I saw the planes and thought it was better than sliced bread," says Rebman, a part-time fighter pilot and full-time supervisor at ABF Freight System in Springfield.

"I get to fly eight to 10 times each month and spend every night with my wife and three kids," says Rebman, a former pilot for Pan American Airlines.

Rebman is deployed eight to 12 weeks each year on training missions. He says the guard is better than the commercial airlines that gave him only about a week each month to spend at home.

Most of the 183rd's pilots, though not Rebman, work or wish to work as commercial airline pilots.

The appeal of the military is the chance to accumulate flight hours and become prospects for better-paying civilian jobs as pilots or flight-test engineers.

Eleven years after Maj. Don McGregor joined the Air Force and fulfilled his dream of flying fighter jets, he left active duty for a full-time career flying 727s for United Airlines. He joined the guard after leaving the Air Force.

"I didn't want to let go of a job I loved; this still gives me the opportunity to fly," says McGregor, who spent two years flying F-16As in the Peoria Air National Guard before coming to the 183rd last year.

The 183rd has 36 pilots, nine of whom are full-time. The part-time pilots are experienced as well.

"The vast majority of part-timers are airline pilots who have extensive fighter pilot experience," McGregor says.

For him, that experience includes four years of flying the F-4 Phantom jet and more than eight years of experience with the F-16. McGregor, an F-16 flight instructor, is qualified to do periodic functional check flights in which the plane is taken above 40,000 feet and flown faster than 1,500 mph.

The military demands that all pilots, part-time or not, be in excellent physical condition. There is a prescribed workout routine including weights and aerobics.

Pilots, along with other guard members, must finish a 1 1/2 -mile annual run within a specific time.

To withstand the 29,000 pounds of engine thrust, pilots must wear a G-suit for the legs and chest in addition to a helmet, oxygen mask and survival vest.

Flying F-16s, even part time, takes a big commitment, so many pilots are coming to Springfield from Chicago and St. Louis. Beard left McDonnell Douglas in St. Louis in 1992 to take command of the 183rd.

For 1st Lt. Trooper "Cliffie" Saladino of Springfield, joining the guard 13 years ago helped pay for college and fulfill his a dream of flying fighter jets.

His first job was loading bombs onto the wings of planes.

After graduating from the University of Illinois in Champaign, Saladino earned his private pilot's license and coached the school's flying team.

An average of one pilot is selected each year. Saladino made the cut in 1990, spending the next 2 1/2 years training to be a mission-capable fighter pilot.

After returning to the 183rd, Saladino continues as a part-time pilot, waiting for the chance to fill in for an absent pilot. These substitute pilots are known as "guard bums."

Saladino has accumulated more than 680 flight hours in the F-16s. He enjoys spending February and March training in Arizona, engaging 47 other aircraft in mock air battles and bragging about his job until he accumulates enough hours to be hired as a commercial airline pilot.

"I feel blessed because only a handful of people can fill my shoes," he says.

A total of 420 men and women work to maintain the guard's planes, says Lt.

Col. Wayne Rosenthal, maintenance commander.

Jeff Baer's job of inspecting the planes is just one aspect of maintenance that includes specialties like loading bombs and missiles, pumping nearly 7,000 pounds of fuel into the plane, testing hundreds of circuit cards and maintaining the explosive charges in the seat.

The main hangar houses up to 10 F-16s and specialty shops that can do everything from replacing and painting bent titanium panels to fixing a flat tire.

The main work bay resembles a hospital operating room. The hangar's concrete floor, painted a gloss-cream color, is devoid of any grease, oil, tools and dust. Mechanics are stripped of any jewelry that could fall inside the plane and none have stained their fatigues.

The second floor of the building is filled with offices where commanders have a bird's-eye view of the work bay.

While phase inspectors look at the aircraft with mirrors, flashlights and X-ray machines, a crew chief is assigned to each aircraft to take care of daily maintenance.

For Tech. Sgt. Don Schnapp of Pawnee, a crew chief for 14 years, each day begins at 7:35 a.m. with the foreign object debris walk.

He and 75 other members span the concrete pad outside the hangar, walking the area for 15 minutes looking for pebbles or other debris that could be sucked up by the intake vortex of the F-16 engines.

A truck with a magnetized metal bar sweeps the runways before takeoff.

By 8 a.m., Schnapp begins the preflight inspection that is done an hour before the first group of four planes takes to the air.

The pilot joins Schnapp 30 minutes prior to takeoff and looks over the plane before climbing the ladder into the cockpit and allowing Schnapp to adjust and fasten his harness.

The pilot checks the switches and instruments while communicating with the crew chief through his headset. If everything checks out, the wheel chalks are pulled and Schnapp waves the pilot toward the runway.

After each flight, Schnapp pops the videotape out of the plane's nose, hands it to the pilot and begins the hour-long, post-flight inspection.

The tape has information recorded from a cockpit camera that films everything the pilot sees, including the heads-up instrument display.

At the end of each day, the technicians download information stored in one of the F-16's onboard computers to determine engine performance and take oil samples.

The F-16s' computers are tested periodically by avionics technicians using diagnostic computer stations. Malfunctioning multi-layer electronic cards are replaced. The cards are a vast improvement over the glass tubes used by the old F-4 Phantoms.

There have been many advances in technology, but the science of loading bombs and missiles under the wings of the aircraft has changed little, says Chief Master Sgt. Bruce Melton, weapons supervisor.

Melton, who began his career 35 years ago in the Air Force, says the 2,000-pound iron bombs used today are very similar to the ones he loaded on B-47s when he began his career.

Fuses and explosives are the same, but the changes in what guides them are dramatic, says Melton, a 29-year member of the 183rd.

"The path of a bomb used to be dictated by the speed and altitude of the plane," says Melton. "But today, smart bombs and missiles are assisted by lasers, infrared sensors and television cameras to home in on their targets."

The F-16 has a 20 millimeter gun beside the cockpit and a Sidewinder missile on each wingtip. By attaching pylons under the wings, the plane can carry additional missiles, bombs or external fuel tanks, depending on the mission. The plane is powerful enough to carry its own weight in fuel and munitions.

Bringing an aircraft that can weigh up to 17 tons to a stop is the job of Master Sgt. Mark Kessler of Auburn, a 15-year member of the guard.

Kessler maintains the aircraft arresting system -- an emergency braking system that brings runaway aircraft to a quick stop.

Planes that have lost their wheel brakes can drop a hook and snag a steel cable that spans the runway.

"I like the unique work, and few people in the world can say they do what I do," says Kessler, who met his wife, Kim, a 17-year 183rd member, at the base.

Like most of the full-timers, Kessler has two jobs. For one weekend a month and two weeks each year, he is a civil engineer.

Kessler's two-week mission this summer was to build a medical clinic in a remote area of Argentina.

"It was a humanitarian effort done to show the country's good faith," he says.

Senior Sgt. Lauri Oseland, 24, of Pleasant Plains, fills orders for clothing and office supplies at the base during the week, while one weekend a month she locates and supplies parts for the plane.

Her father and brother are members of the group, and Oseland says she found working as a guardsman more intriguing than taking college courses.

The unit, already full of relatives, is placing greater emphasis on families, says Oseland, who is married.

"There are support groups for the spouses of guard members, and a trip to Walt Disney World is planned for November," he says.

For Airman 1st Class Doug Gray, 24, of Springfield, the Air Guard is paying the cost of tuition at the University of Illinois at Springfield and providing a little extra cash each month to perform a job he enjoys.

"I get to try out new computer software for my job," says Gray, who works to find the most cost-efficient telecommunication equipment for the base.

A mathematics and economics major, Gray says he attends conferences on the latest communication developments.

"It's tougher than a typical job because you don't do it every day, but that's what makes it challenging."

Caption: The Illinois Air National Guard is based just north of Springfield's Capital Airport. Right: An F-16C Fighting Falcon jet screams by shortly after takeoff from Capital Airport. Below: 1st Lt. Trooper "Cliffy" Saladino gets out of his jet after returning from an air-to-air combat drill. A 13-year member of the Air Guard, Saladino says it's always been his dream to be a fighter pilot. After 200 hours of flight time, each of the 19 F-16C jets based in Springfield is inspected to identify any metal fatigue or wiring problems. A lunch-hour step aerobics class is offered three days a week to help guardsmen maintain strict weight and body-fat requirements. Aircraft mechanic Jerome Cole waits on the flight line on a standard-issue banana seat bicycle, which is commonly used to get around the air guard base. The Illinois Air National Guard is a family affair for the Skeeters. Ron Skeeter, left, cousin Jim, center, and sister Laurie have followed a family tradition by serving in the guard. Two guardsmen discuss the maintenance schedule of a jet while walking through the hangar. The preventive maintenance of the $2 million jet aircraft is a main priority in the hangar.
Memo: COVER HEAD / Behind the scenes with the `FLY'N ILLINI'

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, June 18, 1995

Sauer-Paul Barbara Jean Paul and Jeffrey Edward Sauer, both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. May 20 at St. Agnes Church by the Rev. David Paul.

The bride is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Glennon Paul of Springfield. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Sauer of Springfield.

Serving as matron of honor was Sheryl Ungashick, with Sally Paul serving as maid of honor. Ginger and Mia Paul, Shelly Graupner, Angela Tobler, Gina McLaughlin and Gail Grant were bridesmaids. Flower girl was Allie Siebert.

Serving as best men were Drew Sauer and Jeff Swaney. Andrew Paul, Rod Davis, Vincent Madonia, Jeff Dodd, Brett Diamond and Dave Saladino were groomsmen. Ushers were Charles and Marty Paul. Ringbearer was Bradley Sauer.

A reception was held at the Springfield Hilton.

The bride is a graduate of Sacred Heart Academy and St. Louis College of Pharmacy. She is a pharmacist. The groom is a graduate of Griffin High School and Southern Illinois University. He is employed by the secretary of state.

The couple will live in Springfield.

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 21, 1994

Rominger-Gist Jennifer L. Gist of Owensboro, Ky., and Marcus Kyle Rominger of Springfield were united in marriage at 6:30 p.m. July 16 at Settle Memorial United Methodist Church in Owensboro, Ky.

The bride is the daughter of Raymond and Georgia Gist of Owensboro, Ky. The groom is the son of Dr. Roger and Phyllis Rominger of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Mary Powell. Bridesmaids were Caroline Shively, Pam Chinn and Kristi Rominger Hart.

Best man was Derek Griffin. Groomsmen were Tom Russell, Evan Hart and Chris Gist. Ushers were John Saladino , Timothy Kell, Jim File and Rodney Vose.

The bride is a graduate of Southern Illinois University and is employed by the Jefferson County property value administration office. The groom is a first-year law student at the University of Louisville.

They will live in Louisville, Ky.

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 31, 1994

Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 23

Beccue- Saladino Jean Louise Saladino of Springfield and Jeffrey Allen

Beccue of Mount Pulaski were married at 2 p.m. July 9 at Christ the King Church by the Rev. David Lantz.

The bride is the daughter of Nancy and Carl Saladino Jr. of Springfield. The groom is the son of Ralph and Phyllis Beccue of Mount Pulaski.

Serving as maid of honor was Jennifer Rybak. Bridesmaids were Margaret Madonia, Stacy Saladino , Connie Ruholl and Karen Saladino . Flower girls were Samantha and Elizabeth Saladino .

Best man was Charles Kodatt. Groomsmen were David Saladino , Randy Bailey, Scott Cooper and Shannon Leesman. Ushers were Stan Anderson, John Saladino and Gary Saladino . Ringbearers were Nathan and Zach Boyle.

A reception was held in the American Center.

The bride is a graduate of Sacred Heart-Griffin High School, Lincoln Land Community College and the University of Illinois. The groom is a graduate of Mount Pulaski High School, Lincoln Land Community College and the University of Illinois. He is employed by Beccue Trucking and Downing Farms.

The couple will reside in Mount Pulaski.

 

 

SIGN COMPANY BUYS B&B PROPERTY

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 10, 1994

MIDWEST CELLULAR, an authorized Cellular One sales and service center, has moved to a new location next to Kohl's department store in White Oaks Plaza.

The store, at 2857 S. Veteran's Parkway, was design with a retail orientation with a larger showroom and a variety of phones and accessories on display.

MidWest Cellular has expanded its product line to include several portable hand-held cellular phones as well as several transportable, or "bag" phones. Manufacturers represented include Motorola, NEC, Oki, AT&T, DiamondTel, Uniden and General Electric.

Store manager Gary Saladino said the idea was to give customers a chance to walk in and see and touch the different phones.

"While most people have used, or at least seen a cellular phone, there are some who have never even seen one up close," he said. "This store gives them the chance."

A grand opening celebration is planned Thursday through Saturday. Representatives of cellular phone manufacturers will be on hand to answer questions, and people purchasing phones on those days will receive additional products at no cost.

Hours are 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Sunday. Phone is 787-1200.

 

 

 

TITLE: ANNIVERSARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, June 21, 1994


Saladino -35th Mr. and Mrs. Carl Saladino of Springfield recently celebrated their 35th wedding anniversary with a brunch at the Renaissance Hotel.

Saladino and the former Nancy Townsend were married June 13, 1959, at Sacred Heart Church.

Mr. Saladino had been employed by City Water, Light and Power for 28 years, retiring this year. Mrs. Saladino is employed by Christ the King School.

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, June 19, 1994

Saladino -Smith Stacy Earl Smith of Sherman and John Robert Saladino of Springfield were married at 2 p.m. May 21 at Christ the King Church by the Rev. Donald Meehling.

The bride is the daughter of Lloyd and Shirley Smith of Sherman. The groom is the son of Carl Jr. and Nancy Saladino of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Lori Smith.

Bridesmaids were Sandy Smith, Michele DeBoer, Tina Jannazzo and Leigh Thompson. Flower girls were Robyn, Elizabeth and Samantha Saladino .

Best man was Phil Langen. Groomsmen were Tim Kell, David Saladino , Jim File and Kyle Rominger.

Ushers were David Hood, Todd Maggiore, Cathy Sidles and Rod Vose.

Ringbearer was Kurt Saladino .

A reception was held at the Northfield Center.

The bride is a graduate of Lanphier High School and Illinois State University. She is employed at The Franklin. The groom is a graduate of Griffin High School and the University of Illinois. He is employed by the state Department of Transportation.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

WELCOME TO THE NEIGHBORHOOD

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, March 22, 1994

Author/Byline: ELIZABETH BETTENDORF STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: NEIGHBORS
Page: 9

Amidst the cobblestone streets and trim 1920s-era homes in this otherwise sedate residential neighborhood on Springfield's southwest side, a couple

of holsteins are staging a sit-in -- Julius Caesar style -- in the Saladino family front yard.

These black-and-white spotted bovines, who gleefully change costume according to the calendar, are in togas and sport sprigs of ivy around their large, leaf-shaped ears.

"The first outfits they ever wore were reindeer antlers," says Jerry Saladino , a state pilot who carves large heifers out of plywood in his spare time.

"It started as a seasonal thing. Then it turned into `What can I do to change them month to month?' For the Super Bowl, they wore Buffalo Bills and Dallas Cowboys helmets."

Since November 1992, when the plywood and fiberglass herd made its debut at 1833 S. State St., the holsteins have posed as Lepri-cows, Easter cows, "bovine Valentines," and Moo-flowers (as in the kind wrought by April showers). One cow traveled to Ireland in Jerry's bicycle case, but more about that later.

On this occasion, the cows are adorned as Roman senators in celebration of the ides of March -- that generally undistinguished day that falls in the damp doldrums of early spring.

A large, homemade placard warns: "Please do not feed the cows/Romans."

One cow, identified on his wooden medallion as "Caesar," is accompanied by the sign "Et Moo Brute?" (for Julius' famous parting words "and you, Brutus?"). Reclining on a bus bench, hoof outstretched, he looks smugly satisfied, as if chewing on a perpetual cud.

"When people say, `Where do you live?' all I have to tell them is `where the cows are,' and they know exactly where to go," says Jerry's 22-year-old son Travis.

The Saladinos, known around the neighborhood as "Neighbors of the Decade," bought the wrought-iron-and-wood bench when they noticed an elderly woman waiting for the bus (a city bus stops next door every 30 minutes). At Christmas, the couple dressed up as Santa and Mrs. Claus and delivered gifts from door to door. In the summer, Jerry, also a carpenter, built a lemonade stand for neighborhood kids and barbecued hundreds of country ribs for the annual block party.

He has been known to deliver pans of lasagna to late-working neighbors.

"You can't even believe it," exclaims neighbor Cathy Lloyd. "When it snows, he shovels every driveway and sidewalk in the entire middle of the block. Susan makes late-night calls for sick gerbils and takes in stray rabbits, birds and possums and heals them. At Halloween they both dress up, give out big candy bars and have the parents come over for cider.

"At Easter, there are baskets from the `Easter Cows.' Jerry helped the guy across the street pour his driveway. And just this morning, I saw him helping an elderly lady carry out her recycling stuff.

"They're very thoughtful people who go beyond being friendly neighbors. They're givers. And there aren't many people like that around any more."

All of this praise makes Jerry and Susan blush.

"We're no different from anybody else," Jerry demurs. "We're the ones who have great neighbors, they put up with our cows!" At last count, five bovines dot the yard of the Saladinos' bungalow . All are made from plywood except for "Bo" who loiters on the bus bench in front of the house. Bo was made from fiberglass at a friend's auto body shop.

"Once we got the bench, no one would sit in it, so I put a cow in it," says Jerry, 49, who says his cows are influenced by Far Side cartoonist Gary Larson.

The Saladinos' yard in spring is a perennial favorite for prom-night picture taking. Jerry and his wife,

 

 Susan, a veterinarian at Laketown Animal Clinic,

 

are used to the attentions of strangers: Cars and buses slow to a crawl while drivers and passengers crane for a better view. Jokester neighbors have slipped rubberized cow patties into strategic locations on the lawn.

A Chicago travel agent driving by requested a cow for her summer home in Ireland. (the Saladinos, on their way to the British Isles for a vacation, carted the critter in Jerry's bicycle case.) At dusk one early March evening, Bo, the fiberglass cow, basked in the first glow of the pink, aqua and white spotlights rigged to a timer and sensor.

"I really don't know what possessed him to start the cow thing," says Susan with a mock sigh.

"I came home from work one day and he said, `I'm going to put cows in the front yard.' " Of course, not all of the attention has been welcome.

One morning they were horrified to discover that Bo had been dismembered by vandals. While recovering at the auto body shop, Bo received get-well cards and letters from neighborhood children.

"We got letters from people we didn't know," says Jerry. "We got one signed `Your Friends in Sherwood Forest.' "When Bo got better, he sent the kids in one family a letter inviting them over for lemonade. This Christmas, Bo got a good 15 or 20 cards addressed just to him. And someone even sent him a Valentine."

Jerry, who is fond of cow suspenders and Mickey Mouse ties, is an accomplished cook, painter and bicyclist.

The son of a baker, he started out pumping gas at Capitol Aviation for $90 a week. He spent $60 of that on flying lessons.

The couple's museum-like living room is crowded with Susan's extensive teddy bear collection, antique animal folk paintings and old photographs of children with their pets.

In the middle of what should be the dining room, an easel displays Jerry's architectural renderings of the Dana-Thomas House.

OK, so the house is a little cramped. But the Saladinos aren't going anywhere. They like the neighborhood too much.

"But," quips Jerry, "if we ever did leave, we'd have to put out a sign that says: `Sorry, we're moo-ving.' "

Caption: Jerry Saladino and his wife, Susan, describe life as something not to be taken too seriously. And so three years ago when they were considering Christmas lawn decorations, they picked cows as a permanent addition to their front yard.

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 11, 1991

Victor-Buckley Debra Ann Buckley of Indianola, Iowa, and Daniel Lee Victor of Des Moines, Iowa, were married at 2 p.m. July 20 at St. Agnes Catholic Church. The Rev.

Virgil Mank performed the ceremony.

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Donald E. Buckley, 1931 W. Cardinal Drive.

The groom is the son of Mrs. Howard Victor of Indianola, Ind., and the late Howard Victor.

Serving as maid of honor was Jennifer Harrison.

Bridesmaids were Catherine Ambrose, Maja Radevich and Ann Saladino .

Flower girl was Maggie Rupnik.

Best man was Matthew Boyd. Groomsmen were David Long, Sean Shannon and Tom Kirvin.

Ushers were David Boyd, Douglas Buckley and Tony Mauro.

Ringbearer was Lee Rupnik.

A reception was held at the Springfield Hilton.

The bride is a graduate of Sacred Heart Academy, Drake University and Loyola University.

She is employed as a teacher at McCombs Middle School in Des Moines, Iowa.

The groom is a graduate of Indianola High School and is employed by Victor's Conoco Service Station in Des Moines, Iowa.

The couple will reside in Des Moines, Iowa.

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 28, 1991

Saladino -Forsyth Catherine Ann Forsyth and Paul William Saladino , both of Chicago, were married at 2 p.m. June 29 at Church of the Blessed Sacrament Church. The Rev. Hugh P. Cassidy officiated.

Mr. and Mrs. William Donald Forsyth Jr., 1713 Bates Ave., are parents of the bride. Mr. and Mrs. Carl Joseph Saladino Jr., 2700 Clifton Drive, are parents of the groom.

Serving as matron of honor was Kelly Forsyth Welindt. Serving as maid of honor was Elizabeth Forsyth. Bridesmaids were Debra Buckley, Janice Butler, Sarah Cooke, Margaret Miller and Brooke Remick.

Best man was Gary Saladino . Groomsmen were John Becker, Michael Keating, Joseph Metzmaker, Steve Pigmataro and Jeff Tatarek. Ushers were David Saladino and John Saladino .

A reception was held at Illini Country Club.

The bride is a graduate of University of Illinois and Northwestern University. The groom is a graduate of Illinois State University and is employed by Greenwich Capital Markets Inc.

The couple will reside in Chicago.

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, June 30, 1990

Sam Giganti Sam Giganti, 96, of Springfield died at 3:40 a.m. Friday at Dirksen House Nursing Home.

He was born Aug. 23, 1893, in Montevago, Sicily, Italy, the son of Calogero and Josephine Campo Giganti. Preceding him in death were three brothers, James, Joe and Dominic Giganti; and four sisters, Josephine LaRocca, Clara Giordano, Frances Saladino and Mary Giganti.

A resident of Springfield for many years, Mr. Giganti was a coal miner for Panther Creek for many years, retiring in 1955. Surviving are several nieces, nephews and cousins.

 

 

TITLE: POLICE BEAT

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, March 8, 1990

A short circuit in attic wiring sparked a fire in a Springfield residence Wednesday that caused $2,000 damage, reports said.

No one was injured in the 9:15 p.m. fire in a one-story wood frame residence occupied by Delbert Jackson at 220 E. Carpenter St.

The home is owned by Carl Saladino , reports said.

 

LOCAL CHAPTER OF DAR NAMES GOOD CITIZENS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, February 18, 1990

Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 27

Fifteen area high school students have been named Good Citizens by the Springfield chapter of the National Society of the Daughters of the

American Revolution.

They are: Krista Sheppard, Ashland High School; Jennifer Tate, Auburn High School; Bradley Winn, Glenwood High School; Christine Wise, Divernon High School; Nancy Chapman, Illiopolis High School; Heather Williams, Lanphier High School; Maggie Kossman, New Berlin High School; Amy Schober, Pawnee High School; Laura Draughan, Pleasant Plains High School; Kristie Glintborg, Riverton High School; Jennifer Roth, Rochester High School; Ron Mitra, Southeast High School; Christopher White, Springfield High School; Christopher Reed, Tri-City High School; and Abby Barker, Williamsvile High School.

In addition, four seniors in Springfield high schools have received Elizabeth Morf U.S. Savings Bond Awards through the Springfield chapter DAR. Those winners are: Christopher Cougle, Calvary Academy; Katie Hanlon, Ursuline Academy; Ron Mitra, Southeast High School; and Jennie Saladino , Sacred Heart Academy.

Janelle Bundy of Concordia Lutheran received a certificate for winning the Division V history essay contest. Robert Oakley of Concordia Lutheran and Andrea Young of Lincoln School received chapter certificates in that competition.

Caption: Sheppard / Tate / Winn / Wise / Chapman / Williams / Kossman / Schober / Draughan / Glintborg / Roth / Mitra / White / Reed / Barker

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, September 12, 1989

Carl J. Saladino Sr.

Carl J. Saladino Sr. of Springfield died at 6:55 a.m. Monday at St. John's Hospital.

A lifelong resident of Springfield, Mr. Saladino was the son of Leonard and Frances Giganti Saladino . He married Alberta Oswald in 1933. A sister, Grace Fulgenzi, preceded him in death.

Retiring in 1978, Mr. Saladino owned and operated the Dental Service Laboratory for 50 years.

He was a member of Christ the King Church, Elks Lodge 158, K of C Council 364 and

 

past president of the Downstate Dental Laboratory Association.

Surviving are his wife, Alberta; a son, Carl J. Saladino Jr. of Springfield; nine grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; two sisters, Mrs. Mary Osburn and Mrs. Josephine Bartolomucci, both of Springfield; two brothers, Joseph Saladino and Dominic "Pete" Saladino , both of Springfield; one uncle; several nieces, nephews and cousins.

Services will be at 10 a.m. Thursday at Christ the King Church, with the Rev. Donald Meehling officiating. Burial in Calvary Cemetery.

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 16, 1989

Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 20

Walters-Mahan Christie Mahan of Flossmoor and Lt. Hugh Walters of Fulda, West Germany,

were married June 10 at St. Paul's Community Church in Homewood. Dr. Larry McClellan officiated.

The bride is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. James Mahan of Flossmoor. The groom is the son of Dr. and Mrs. Donald Walters of Chatham, Mass., formerly of Springfield.

Maid of honor was Jean Montgomery. Bridesmaids were Nancy Knight, Traci Richardson, Missy Gedzun and Margaret Walters.

Kevin Walters was best man. Groomsmen were Lt. Zeyad Suqi, Rick Franzen,

Mark Saladino and Kurt Mahan.

The bride, a graduate of Homewood Flossmoor High School, is completing her degree in English education at the University of Illinois, Champaign. The groom, a ceramic engineering graduate of the University of Illinois, is currently an officer with the U.S. Army and is stationed in Germany.

The couple is residing in Fulda, West Germany.

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, June 18, 1989

Tatarek-Stehn Stacy Jo Stehn and Jeffrey Joseph Tatarek, both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. May 20 at Blessed Sacrament Church. The Rev. John R. Ossola officiated.

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jack B. Stehn, 1049 Williams Blvd. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Tatarek, 2201 B Lexington Drive.

Susan Vono

was maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Libbie and Jackie Stehn, Julie Dewey, Sue Sronce and Kim Eck. Flower girl was Janelle Sronce.

Gregory Tatarek was best man. Groomsmen were Mike Stehn, Dave Stanger, Mike Eck, Paul Saladino and Tom Cargie. Usher was Tom Stehn. Joanthan Eck was ringbearer.

A reception was held at the Holiday Inn East.

The bride, a graduate of Sacred Heart Academy and Illinois State University, is employed by Town & Country Bank. The groom, a graduate of Springfield College in Illinois and the University of Illinois, is employed by Collins & Rice Inc.

The couple will live in Springfield.

 

 

SPRINGFIELD COLLEGE ANNOUNCES SPRING GRADUATES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, July 9, 1988

Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 12

Springfield College in Illinois has announced graduating students for spring 1988.

Receiving associate in arts degrees are: Annette Ament, Julia Armbruster, Alice Armour, Phyllis Ball-Danmole, John Baranzelli, Greg Barnett, Connie Bartman, Keith Beauchamp, Michelle Becker; Donna Birkman, Daniel Blankenburger, Joseph Blasko Jr., Randall Bounds, Debra Brown, Michelle Brown, Kim Buchele, David Burkum; Todd Buscher, Wendi Campbell, Vicky Carson,
Craig Cellini, Gina Cianferri, Penny Cooper, Victoria Copp, Jean Crain, Linda Cycholl; Elencia Davis, Daniel DeSalle, Angela Dodd, Deboray Dorsey, Betsy Dye, Patrick Elchlepp, Jeffrey Enlow, Lisa Ewing, Judith Farris-Marcy, Jodi Felter, Dana Field, Kary Fleck, Debra Flener Jillane Flynn; Matthew Gairani, Cheryl Gallant, Sheri Garland, Cynthia Garvin, Bradford Gleeson, Amy Graham, Patricia Green, Jean Greenwald, Todd Hammond, Staci Hampton, Catherine Harris, Tracey Herron, Michael Hott; Heather Hughes, Donna Humphries, Joseph Jiardina, Laura Jordan, Timothy Kell, Mark Kerhlikar, Jill Kesler, Patrick Ketchum, Deborah Kilver, Michelle Kirby, Denise Kirsch, Debra Krick, Jean Langfelder; Susan Lanterman, Julie Madonia, Gina Manola, James Marrin, Suzanne Martin, Kristina McCarthy, John Medley, Wendy Miller, Julia Minder, Rose Mogle, Pamela Morgan, Teresa Mueller, Gina Muncy, Cheryl Myers; Tammara Niebrugge, Constance Nika, Linda Owens, Margaret Oyler, Sylvia Perkins, Anne Peters, Jay Pierceall, Michelle Pietrzak, Peggi Porter, Carol Probst, M. Adil Rahman, George Rakin, Lara Reed; Jill Ruholl, John Saladino , July Satterlee,

Lisa Schleyhahn, Debra Schuckenbrock, Marilyn Schuette, Katherine Seck, Samuel Simmons Jr., Donna Smith, Amy Staten, Lisa Streight; Joni Summers, Ginger Taylor, Dianne Thies, Gregory Turner, James Valentine, Angela Vicari, Dianna Van Allen, Yvonne Walenga, Michael Wall, Robert Ward, Elizabeth Welch, Kathie White, Mary Wiest (Wendt), Joseph Williamson III, Ramona Wilson and Jennifer Wrigley.

 

 

TITLE: ANNIVERSARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, June 5, 1988



Townsend -- 50th Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Townsend of 1304 E. Pine St. celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary with a family gathering at the home of their daughter, Nancy Saladino .

Townsend and the former Eileen M. Huber were united in marriage June 4, 1938, by the Rev. William Quatman at Sacred Heart Church.

Mr. Townsend, now retired, was employed for 42 years by Central & Illinois Midland Railroad Co. Mrs. Townsend is a homemaker.

They are the parents of 11 children, Nancy Saladino , Patty, Carol, Marilyn and Janet Reynolds, all of Springfield; Michael and Mary Teresa Ballentine, both of Chatham; Jean of Marion; Danny of Mount Pleasant, Iowa; David of Berwyn; and Tommy of Lincoln. They have 19 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, March 18, 1988

Trevor Saladino Trevor Saladino , 21, of Springfield, died at 7:43 p.m. Wednesday at 1833 S. State St.

He was born in Springfield on Oct. 2, 1966, the son of Jerry and Judy Bergmann Saladino .

Mr. Saladino was a 1984 graduate of Springfield High School,

 

and served in the U.S. Air Force as a firefighter.


Surviving are his father, Jerry of Springfield; his mother, Judy of Springfield; two brothers, Trooper of Champaign and Travis of Springfield; one sister, Jeni of Springfield; his grandparents, Dr. Harry W. Bergmann, Roberta Johantgen and Pete Saladino , all of Springfield.

Remains were cremated.

 

 

VICTIM IDENTIFIED AFTER APPARENT SUICIDE IN CITY

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, March 18, 1988

Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 6

Trevor Saladino , 21, was the victim of an apparent suicide Wednesday night at his father's home in the 1800 block of South State Street, Sangamon

County Coroner Norm Richter said Thursday.

Saladino was found about 7:30 p.m. His body was suspended from a door knob with a belt around his neck, Richter said.

However, the cause of death has not been determined, because there was also evidence of drug use in the house, Richter said.

"There was drug paraphernalia that indicates he might have been abusing drugs," Richter said.

Saladino forced his way into the residence while his father was out of town, Richter said. Saladino had lived at the residence up until about three weeks ago, Richter said.

Initial reports said police were called to the house when a family member reported smelling gas, but there was no indication of gas in the house, Richter said.

"He talked to his sister 10 minutes before and said he was going to do it," Richter said.

 

GRIFFIN, GLENWOOD IN SOCCER SEMIFINALS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, September 26, 1987

Edition: M2
Section: SPORTS
Page: 17

Griffin, Chatham Glenwood and Pleasant Plains all posted wins in third-day action at the Sangamon State University Classic high school soccer

tournament at Kiwanis Field.

Griffin advanced to within one victory of the championship match as they downed Rochester 1-0. Mike Glisson scored an unassisted goal at 15:43 of the second quarter for the lone score of the match. Goalie Dave Saladino posted the shutout for Griffin, which improved to 7-0-1. Pat McCormick broke a 1-1 tie in the final quarter as Chatham Glenwood bested Southeast 3-1 in the winners bracket. Both goals came from kicks in front of the net off of corner kicks by Josh Goodner. Goodner scored the other Glenwood goal in the second quarter which tied the contest 1-1. Southeast's Jimmy Keung opened the scoring on a goal earlier in the second quarter with an assist going to Matt Cary.

Griffin will meet Jacksonville today at 10 a.m. with the winner advancing to this evening's title match at 8 p.m. Chatham will meet Normal at noon today in the other semifinal.

In consolation bracket play Pleasant Plains downed Springfield Lutheran 1-0 in an overtime shootout to advance the consolation title game. Bryan Kreuger, Aron Tewari and Greg Trello all converted their kicks in the shootout to take the match, though the score is recorded as 1-0 in the shootout format irregardless of the number of shootout goals made.

Plains will meet Ursuline Academy for the consolation title at 6 p.m.

 

 

GRIFFIN, SHS POST SOCCER WINS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, September 15, 1987

Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: SPORTS
Page: 19

Mike Glisson scored two goals as Griffin High School remained unbeaten in soccer, blanking Calvary Academy 6-0 Monday night.

Griffin's goalie was
Dave Saladino . The Cyclones improved to 4-0.

Tim Hay, Nathan Schultz, Damon Dunning and Scott Tureskis added goals for the Cyclones. Pete Cavanagh was credited with two assists and Dunning, Greg Dillon and Steve Madonia also contributed assists.

Calvary fell to 0-3. SPRINGFIELD 2, SOUTHEAST 1: David Bass scored both Springfield goals in the second period.

His first goal was unassisted and, after Southeast's Mark Lanzotti tied the game, scored the winner on an assist from Dan Weiss.

Springfield's goalies were Shawn O'Neill in the first half and Rick Groeninger in the second half.

Springfield upped its record to 2-1-1 while Southeast dropped to 0-2.

 

LOCAL TEAM ADVANCES TO MINNEAPOLIS LINCOLN CAB WINS MICKEY MANTLE STATE TOURNEY

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 26, 1987

Edition: M2
Section: SPORTS
Page: 59

Springfield Lincoln Cab advancedto the Mickey Mantle regional tourament by beating Sterling 23-2 Saturday at Chamberlain Park for the state

championship.

Lincoln Cab will play the host team in Minneapolis, Minn., Thursday.

Lincoln Cab used two pitchers to limit Sterling to just three hits. Starter Dale Dunavan pitched five innings to earn the win, shutting Sterling out and giving up just one hit and one walk while striking out 10.
Dave Saladino pitched the final two innings, giving up two runs on two hits.

Sterling unsuccessfully used four pitchers to try to slow Lincoln Cab's offense. Lincoln Cab rapped out 20 hits and had an 11-run fifth inning.

Leading Lincoln Cab's offense was Lance Marshall, who had three RBIs in the third inning with the game's only home run. Dunavan, Todd Blakeman, Brad Owens, Brett Western and Ed O'Conner had two RBIs apiece.

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 19, 1987

Saladino -Ruppel Michelle Ann Ruppel of Lawrenceville and Trooper Morgan Saladino of Springfield were united in marriage at 3 p.m. June 20. The Rev. Robert Bultman officiated the ceremony at the Old Cathedral in Vincennes, Ind.

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Ruppel of Lawrenceville. Parents of the bridegroom are Jerry L. Saladino , 107 S. Douglas Ave., and Judy A. Saladino , 853 S. MacArthur Blvd.

Maid of honor was Alison Kavanaugh, with Jennifer B. Saladino , Rebecca Pea and Jennifer Noble serving as bridesmaids. Flower girl was Leah Emmons.

Best man was Trevor L. Saladino , and Richard E. Ruppel, Travis D. Saladino and Jeffery Ruppel served as groomsmen. Ushers were Steve Dos land, Chris Ruppel, Burt Powers and Scott Gauss. Ringbearer was William Guy Henry.

A reception was held at the Eagles Lodge in Vincennes.

The bride, a graduate of the University of Illinois, is in graduate school at the U of I and is a mathematics teaching assistant there. The bridegroom, a graduate of Springfield College in Illinois and the University of Illinois,

is in the Illinois Air National Guard and is attending the U of I's Institute of Aviation.

The couple will reside in Champaign.

 

 

JANIE KLEIN HEADS LLCC STUDENT SENATE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, October 10, 1986

Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 18

Janie Klein, daughter of John Klein, Springfield, recently was elected president of the Student Senate at Lincoln Land Community College.

Klein is in her second year at LLCC, majoring in business.

Other officers elected were: vice president, Sabrina Jordan, daughter of Delores Jordan, Springfield; secretary, Derek Andrew Reynolds, son of Jack and Carolyn Reynolds, Springfield; and treasurer, Gwendolyn Tremail, daughter of Jarl Tremail, Springfield, and Karen Heusted, Tucson, Ariz.

Senators were Roland Allen, David Burns, Mary Byrd, Elizabeth Coburn, Amy Head, Tim McNeill and Jeni Saladino , all of Springfield; Janis Williams, Athens; Jerry Oxley, Franklin; Michelle Whitlock, Girard; Tracy Schroyer, Hillsboro; Tony Bounds, Petersburg; Dave Allison, Riverton; and Brad Adams and Ralph Metcalf, Rochester.

Program board members elected were Della Hasty, Phillip Langen, William Lauters, Robert Romanotto, Anthony Smith and Douglas Trester, all of Springfield; Louis Kirk, Kincaid; and Christopher Heather, Raymond.

The 25-member Student Senate is the official voice for the student body. It budgets student activity fees and oversees student organizations.

The 13-member Program Board plans, promotes and produces programs on and off campus.

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, August 27, 1986

Lucille Hess Mrs. Lucille Oswald Hess, 69, of Springfield died at 11:44 p.m. Monday at St. John's Hospital North.

A resident of Springfield and Florida for many years, Mrs. Hess was born in Springfield on Feb. 6, 1917, the daughter of the late William A. and Lucy E. Harrison Oswald.

Surviving are a daughter, Mrs. Terrance (Sharon) Muldoon of Enterprise, Ala.; a son, Gordon A. Hess Jr. of Bay Village, Ohio; six grandchildren; three sisters,

Mrs. Carl (Alberta) Saladino Sr. of Springfield, Mrs.

Eleanor Mendenhall of Margate, Fla.,
and Mrs. Willard (Maxine) Kennedy Jr. of Springfield; two brothers, George Oswald of Old Forge, N.Y., and William Oswald Jr. of Springfield; and several nieces and nephews.

Services will be at 10 a.m. Friday at Blessed Sacrament Church, with the Rev. Hugh Cassidy officiating. Burial will be in Calvary Cemetery.

Staab Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 24, 1986

Boyle- Saladino Diane Marie Saladino and James Edward Boyle, both of Springfield, were united in marriage at 2 p.m. Aug. 2. The Rev. John Bretz officiated the ceremony at Christ the King Church.

Parents of the bride are Carl and Nancy Saladino Jr. of 2700 Clifton Drive. The bridegroom is the son of Robert and Rosie Boyle of Thayer.

Serving as matron of honor was Laura Saladino . Maid of honor was Dianne Crowley. Bridesmaids were Karen and Jean Saladino , Bobbie Jo Boyle and
Ann Bodewes.

Best man was Ray Ross, with Gary and Paul Saladino , and Vincent Pitchford serving as groomsmen. Ushers were John and
David Saladino , and Tim O'Brien.

A reception was held at the Knights of Columbus Hall.

The bride, a graduate of Sacred Heart Academy, is employed as a secretary by the federal government. The bridegroom, a graduate of Lincoln Land Community College, attends Sangamon State University and is employed as a programmer by the state Comptroller.

They will reside in Springfield.

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 17, 1986

 

Hillebrenner-Harrop Janice L. Harrop of Greenview and Jeffrey D. Hillebrenner of Springfield were united in marriage at 1 p.m. July 12. The Rev. James Hartke officiated the ceremony at St. Francis Solanus Church in Quincy.

The bride's parents are Earl and JoAnn Harrop of Whitewater, Wis. The bridegroom is the son of Donald and Mildred Hillebrenner of Quincy.

Serving as maid of honor was Jill Carlson. Bridesmaids were Patty Peterson, Sue Harrop, Jenny Lloyd and Gloria Ludwig. Flower girl was Melissa Hillebrenner.

Best man was Dennis Hillebrenner, with Ed Harrop, Gary and Greg Hillebrenner, and C.J. Saladino serving as groomsmen. Ushers were Jeff Bozarth, Tom Cox and Paul Dinkheller. Michael Hillebrenner served as ringbearer.

A reception was held at the Quincy Motor Inn.

The bride, a graduate of Illinois State University, is employed as a physical education teacher in Athens. The bridegroom, a graduate of the University of Illinois, is employed as a mechanical engineer by City Water, Light and Power Co.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, August 14, 1986

Nunzio Saladino Nunzio Saladino , 92, of Springfield died at 9:20 a.m. Wednesday at Haven Convalescent Center.

Mr. Saladino was born on April 8, 1894, in Palermo, Italy, the son of Guiseppe and Mary Giambalvo Saladino . He had been a resident of Springfield since 1921.

 

He married Eufrasia "Frances" Catalano in 1921, and she preceded him in death in 1983. Also preceding him in death were his parents and two sons, Andrew Saladino in 1974, and Joseph Saladino in 1986. He was a member of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception and was a veteran of World War I.

For many years he was employed by the Springfield Street Department.

 

He had been retired for several years.

Surviving are one daughter, Mrs. Mary Baliva of St. Louis, Mo.; three grandchildren; several great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, July 31, 1986

Joseph Saladino Joseph R. Saladino , 63, of Springfield died at 7:20 p.m. Tuesday at St.

John's Hospital.

He was born Sept. 29, 1922, in Kincaid, the son of Nunzio and Eufrasia "Frances" Catalano Saladino . He was a resident of Springfield most of his life.

He married Rose Campo in 1946.

He was preceded in death by his mother in 1983; and one brother, Andrew Saladino , in 1974. Mr. Saladino was a member of Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception Church, Roman Cultural Society and was a veteran of World War II. He was employed for many years by the Springfield Streets Department.

Surviving are his wife, Rose; one daughter, Mrs. Edward (Francee) Brown of Springfield; one son, Sam Saladino of Chatham; two grandchildren; father, Nunzio Saladino of Springfield; one sister, Mrs. Mary Baliva of St. Louis, Mo.; several nieces and nephews.

Services will be at 9 a.m. Friday at Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception Church. Burial will be in Calvary Cemetery.

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, May 25, 1986

Lex-Rennier Sandy K. Rennier of Springfield and John W. Lex of Chatham were united in marriage at 2 p.m. May 3. Monsignor Henry Knoedler officiated the ceremony at St. Joseph Church in Springfield.

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bernie Rennier, 1621 N. 19th St.

The bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John E. Lex, 3253 S. Sixth St.

Serving as maid of honor was Michele Phillips. Carol and Janet Lex and Stephanie Saladino served as bridesmaids. Flower girls were Catie Hatcher, Colleen Hatcher and Jennifer Lex.

Best man was Ed Lex, with Tom and Jim Lex and Jeff Heck serving as groomsmen. Ushers were Tony and Dave Rennier, with Wes Hatcher serving as ringbearer.

A reception was held at the Nelson Center.

The bride, a graduate of Lanphier High School, is attending Lincoln Land Community College. She is employed by the Illinois Department of Transportation. The bridegroom, a graduate of Sangamon State University, is also employed by the Illinois Department of Transportation.

The couple will reside in Chatham.

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, February 27, 1986

Edition: M1,M2,E1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 31

Alberta C. Saladino Mrs. Alberta Catherine Eck Saladino , 74, of 208 W. Reynolds died at 3:15

a.m. Wednesday at her residence.

She was born on Aug. 11, 1911, in Springfield, the daughter of Henry and Lottie Sweet Eck. She married Dominic Saladino in 1934. She was a member of St. John's Lutheran Church and Mother's Club.

Mrs. Saladino was a former Democratic precinct committeewoman for Precinct 91. She was preceded in death by one brother, Frank E. Eck, in 1947, and one sister, Lorene Eck, in 1913. Surviving are her husband, Dominic; three sons, Ronald B. of Lompoc, Calif., James L. of Saudia Arabia and Jerry L. of Springfield; one daughter, Mrs. Dulany (Pat) Sriner of Springfield; one brother, John H. Eck of Springfield; 15 grandchildren; sever al nieces and nephews; and one aunt.

 

 

CITY PAID TWICE THE APPRAISALS OF PROPERTY FOR PARK

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, October 17, 1985

Author/Byline: Doug Finke
Edition: M1,M2,E1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 1

The city of Springfield paid at least twice as much as the appraised value to buy two properties on the site of the planned downtown "urban park,"

according to documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act.

The other two parcels the city has bought so far went for at least 69 percent and 28 percent more than their appraised value.

The two most expensive properties obtained by the city so far were owned by Harry Kaiserman of Springfield. One parcel -- at 210-212-214 N. Fifth St. -- had a low appraised value of $100,000 and a high of $105,000. The city paid $195,000 for the land and buildings. The buildings house D.T.'s Tavern, the now-closed Whirl-a-Way Tavern and several apartments.

The other Kaiserman parcel is located at 204-206 N. Fifth St. It was given appraisals of $44,000 and $65,000, but the city paid $130,000 for it. The buildings include two vacant stores at the 204 address, along with apartments, and the burned-out remains of Donna's Adult Bookstore at 206 N. Fifth.

Mayor Mike Houston defended paying much more than the appraised value for the Kaiserman properties.

"While it is over and above the amount indicated in the appraisals, given other information in regards to that purchase it is a reasonable amount to pay," Houston said.

Houston's negotiator for the properties, city Planning and Zoning Director Keith Haynes, agreed.

"I realize on the surface what this looks like," Haynes said. "But I'm not sure it's fair to use this as a measuring stick for what we will pay on the remaining properties."

In addition to the Kaiserman properties, the city bought the old House of Antiques building at 202 N. Fifth St. for $45,000. Both appraisers listed the value of that parcel at $35,000. That building was owned by Carl Saladino Jr., a City Water, Light and Power employee.

The only other parcel bought so far is a 2,100-square foot vacant lot at 213-215 N. Sixth St. The lot was the site of Springfield Auction until the building was gutted by fire in August 1984. The previous owner was Barbara Sebastian.

The burned-out hulk was demolished before the city bought the land. It was appraised at $17,000 by one service and about $14,500 by another. The city paid $28,800 for it, including $16,800 for the property itself and $12,000 to cover Sebastian's demolition costs.

All five members of the city council voted unanimously to approve the sales Sept. 24. Haynes said all council members were briefed on the sales -- including the appraisals -- before a vote was taken.

Altogether, the city has paid at least 80 percent more than the appraised value of the first four properties purchased so far for the urban park.

"The percentages, I don't think, make any difference whatsoever," Houston said. "It's what we're dealing with in terms of dollars and what the circumstances of a particular property are. Each piece of property will be negoti-ated on an individual basis."

Houston said appraisals were only one factor the city considered when deciding what to pay for the property. However, both he and Haynes declined to talk about the other factors.

"There is additional information which at this particular time may play into future negotiations," Houston said. "Given the fact that we did pay an amount over and above the appraised value, we still believe that was a very good and fair price." "We decided it was reasonable," Haynes said. "It came about from many factors during negotiations. There are things that have to remain private at this point. " Houston has repeatedly said the city is prepared to go to court to condemn property should negotiations prove unsuccessful. He denied that the city's willingness to pay premium prices for the properties indicates the city is backing away from that position.

"I believe with the remaining parcels, particularly those parcels we feel will be much more expensive, we would not hesitate to go into condemnation," Houston said. Both Haynes and Houston said they don't believe that paying more than the appraised value for some of the properties will send a message to other property owners that the city is willing to pay big money to settle quickly.

"It's not fair to say this opened the barn door," Haynes said. "That's not fair or accurate. You can't look at what happened with one or two parcels and say that will set the tone for what will go on. Whether that will send a message to other property owners, they're mistaken if they come to that conclusion."

Haynes also noted that while the city paid nearly 100 percent more than the appraised value for the Kaiserman land, the Saladino property was bought for "only" 28 percent more than it was appraised.

There are still seven parcels to be purchased for the park, including the Pete's Cafe building and the Argonne Tavern building on Fifth Street; the Henry Washer Co. building, an office building and two vacant lots on Sixth Street; and the Goodyear Auto Service Center on Jefferson Street. The Goodyear parcel is expected to be the mostly costly of the 11 to purchase.

The park will be located south of the old Union train station on the block bounded by Fifth, Sixth, Madison and Jefferson streets.

The city's Community Development Department staff originally estimated that land acquisition for the park would run about $1.6 million. Both Haynes and Houston have said land costs are running higher than expected. However, they said, the final total should not be substantially higher, despite what was paid for the first four properties.

"We anticipate we will spend more than we had originally anticipated," Houston said. "We do not anticipate that that difference will be significant. I think we are probably talking of $2 million (for land acquisition) or less."

Houston called the budget for the park "tight." He said substantial increases in land acquisition costs could force money-saving changes in the park itself. However, Houston said it is too early to speculate on what those changes might be.

The city is using a $300,000 federal grant channeled through the state Department of Conservation to help fund the park. The city is applying for another $200,000 grant from the same source and expects to receive word on it near the end of the year.

Roughly $1.2 million in tax increment funds also are earmarked for the park, Haynes said, plus another $800,000 in federal community development block grant funds from the city's Community Development Department. Tax increment funds are tax dollars raised from new downtown developments that are set aside for public works projects aimed at attracting additional downtown development. Traditional city revenues -- such as property taxes or sales taxes -- are not being used to fund the park.

Each of the 11 parcels in the urban park site was given two appraisals -- one by Kienzler, Briggs and Co. and the other by Randy Johnson. Haynes said each was paid about $500 for each appraisal.

Louis Kienzler said his appraisals were based on "data from the marketplace. I think I was reading the market."

As for the city paying twice, and in one case nearly three times what he said a property was worth, Kienzler said, "I felt the city officials were doing what they felt they had to."

Because of the DOC grant, Haynes said, the conservation department sets the opening offer for the city.

"The appraisals were reviewed by the city and then by DOC," Haynes said. "Basically, DOC picked the figure for the initial offer."

In each case, Haynes said, that initial offer was one of the two appraisal figures.

But after that, the negotiations were up to city officials and the property owners. Haynes said negotiations have gone smoothly.

"Negotiations with Mr. Kaiserman and the others were very cordial," he said. "In fact, they were friendly negotiations, not hostile."

Houston said he didn't know if the city's willingness to spend helped the negotiations go smoothly.

Haynes said he hopes land negotiations will be completed early next year. If they are, construction could be completed in a year from now, he said.

The appraisals were obtained after the State Journal-Register filed a Freedom of Information request with the city. However, Houston and Haynes both said that neighboring property owners could obtain rough estimates of property values from property tax records.

Memo: head M1 edition reads City paid twice the value of property for park; head E1 edition reads City of Springfield paid twice the appraisals of two properties for park

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, October 1, 1985

Edition: M1,M2,E1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 14

Elizabeth J. Sandidge Mrs. Elizabeth Jeanne Sandidge, 59, of 80 Foresters Lane died at 11:30

a.m. Monday at St. John's Hospital North.

Mrs. Sandidge was born Feb. 18, 1926, in Springfield, the daughter of Albert M. and Nora M. Krouse Young. She married L.E. "Jim" Sandidge in 1953. A lifetime resident of Springfield, Mrs. Sandidge had been employed by the Horace Mann Insurance Co. for 11 years.

Preceding her in death were her father; one brother, Albert M. Young Jr.,

and one sister, Mrs. Marjorie Burge.

Mrs. Sandidge was a member of Christ the King Church, Altar and Rosary Society and Springfield Association of Insurance Women.

Surviving are her husband, L.E. "Jim"; two daughters, Mrs. James R. (Janet) Curtis Jr. and Mrs. C.J. (Laura) Saladino , both of Springfield; one son, Stanley M. Sandidge of Springfield; four grandchildren; mother, Mrs. Nora M. Young of Springfield; one brother, John Young of North Hollywood, Calif.; several nieces and nephews.

Services will be at 10 a.m. Thursday at Christ the King Church, with Monsignor John Bretz officiating. Burial will be in Roselawn Memorial Park.

Staab Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements

 

HAY HOMES RESIDENTS DON'T SWAY MAYOR

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, September 18, 1985

Author/Byline: Doug Finke
Edition: M1,M2,E1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 9

Despite more pleas by John Hay Homes residents Tuesday at a Springfield City Council meeting, Mayor Mike Houston said he will not ask the city

council to formally oppose the Madison Street extension.

Houston said state transportation officials have already promised to work with residents to make the street compatible with their neighborhood.

"My understanding is that (state transportation) Secretary (Greg) Baise has indicated a willingess to work with residents to modify what they are doing to make it as acceptable as possible," Houston said. "I will call IDOT to see what effects a resolution might have, but personally I am not in favor of making any changes in the plans in terms of actually stopping the street from going through."

The Hay Homes residents Tuesday said the Madison extension "creates the atmosphere of living on a reservation for blacks" and poses "a serious health and safety hazard for us and our 850 children." About 1,550 people live in the housing project.

The residents took their case to the state last week and got assurances that state planners would meet with representatives from the project to map out final Madison Street plans. The residents were also told that if the city council formally opposed the road project, the state might be prompted to reevaluate the project.

Although some of the extension, such as the Clear Lake Avenue railroad overpass, is already under construction, the final portion, from 11th Street to 16th Street, is still in the planning stages. Final plans are supposed to be completed in January.

Jackie Readus, one of the Hay Homes residents, told council members Tuesday that they wanted to get a council resolution first before meeting with state planners. After Tuesday's meeting, she said the group will try to arrange a meeting with state officials.

Houston said late Tuesday afternoon that he had spoken with transportation officials and nothing was said that would prompt him to bring a resolution opposing the extension.

Hay Homes residents have said the Madison extension will surround the housing project with heavily traveled streets, in effect isolating the residents there. Preliminary plans for a pedestrian overpass on Madison were opposed by residents who said it is unsafe. How to deal with pedestrian crossings is one issue the state and the residents will try to work out.

Also Tuesday the council approved issuing $2.7 million in industrial revenue bonds to aid in renovation of the old Union Train Station.

The train station, once flirting with a wrecking ball, is undergoing a $4 million overhaul and is scheduled to open in late October. When completed it will house a series of small shops and restaurants.

While owners Michael and Nanchen Scully initially wanted to complete the project without city assistance, skyrocketing costs forced them to seek help from the city, Mayor Mike Houston has said. Portions of the bond proceeds will enable the Scullys to rebuild the four-sided, 97-foot clock tower on the building front.

Emergency passage was given to the bonds Tuesday to enable them to be sold today.

The council also filed for one week ordinances buying the first four parcels of land needed for construction of the urban park.

The park will be south of the Union Station in the block bounded by Fifth, Sixth, Madison and Jefferson streets.

The city will buy two parcels from Harry Kaiserman for $225,000. The parcels are at 210-212-214 N. Fifth St. and at 204-206 N. Fifth St.

The other parcels are at 202 N. Fifth St. and 213-215 N. Sixth St. The North Fifth property -- owned by Carl Saladino -- will cost $45,000. The North Sixth property -- owned by Barbara Sebastian -- will cost $28,800. Final approval is expected next week.

Final approval is also expected next week on a rental rehabilitation loan for county Republican party chief Irv Smith.

Smith will get $40,000 in loans to rehabilitate an eight-unit apartment at 419 E. Lawrence Ave. The total cost of the remodeling job is about $80,000, Houston said.

If Smith rents the apartments to low- and moderate-income families for 10 years, he will not have to repay the loan.

 

SANCHEZ'S HOMER CAPS WILD FIREFIGHTERS' TITLE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, July 8, 1985

Author/Byline: Bob Reed
Edition: M1,M2,E1
Section: SPORTS
Page: 10

RIVERTON -- Rich Sanchez pulled a Rick Camp on Sunday to win the wild championship game of the Riverton Athletic Club's Fourth of July baseball

tournament for Springfield Firefighters.

Sanchez, a pitcher who wasn't supposed to bat, cracked a leadoff homer in the top of the seventh to give his club an 11-10 win over the Chicago Orioles.

The Orioles forced a one-game showdown for the title with a 12-0 win over Riverton Athletic Club/American Legion Post 32 and a 10-5 victory over Firefighters, who made five errors in the first inning.

The championship game featured bench jockeying that almost got out of hand, purpose pitches and Firefighter coach Bruce Richards, who gave plate umpire Scott Nance a tobacco shower after Nance ejected Richards for arguing a check-swing call in the seventh.

That wasn't the only mistake Richards made on Sunday. In the sixth inning he removed starting pitcher Drew Hummel and replaced him with Sanchez. Hummel moved to first base, and first baseman Dan Buck came out of the game.

Firefighters, who used Mike Wheeler as a designated hitter for Hummel, lost use of the DH because Hummel stayed in the game and took Buck's spot in the lineup. Richards forgot the rule and sent Wheeler up to lead off the seventh.

Oriole coach Dave Ciarrachi pointed out the mistake and the proper batter, Sanchez, was sent to the plate. After taking one feeble swing, he crushed a 1-2 fastball from Mike Sedarski over the left-center field fence to win the game.

"That's the first home run I've hit since Sandy Koufax," Sanchez said. "That was about seven years ago."

Sanchez added that he's really a pretty good hitter. "I was really unprepared, but I've hit a lot this season. I DH'd one game this tournament and I've got about 40 at-bats. I'm hitting over .300." Ciarrachi, who also made a managerial blunder, had a different opinion of Sanchez's hitting. "He (Sanchez) was the guy we wanted to face, and he lines one over the fence," he said. "Thirty-nine times out of 40 we get him out."

But Ciarrachi could have waited until after Wheeler had batted, pointed out the mistake to the umpires if he reached base and had him called out for batting out of turn.

"The umpires weren't sure," Ciarrachi said. "If the mistake wasn't pointed out before he batted, they probably weren't going to call it."

The umpires seemed right on top of the situation. Base umpire Brad Stearns checked the lineup and, after a brief discussion, sent Sanchez to the plate.

"I know the rule as well as anyone," Richards said. "I made a mistake."

Richards' second run-in with the umpires was more serious. Also in the seventh, Richards headed toward the plate from the third-base coach's box and jawed with Nance after a check-swing strike was called on Bob Dowson. Nance threw Richards out of the game, and Richards spat his tobacco squarely into Nance's face.

After the game, Richards claimed it was an accident. "I was spitting it out and it just blew out," he said. "It was not intentional. He (Nance) is a good friend of mine -- I apologized."

Nance -- who played at Lincoln Land, where Richards is an assistant coach -- refused to comment on the incident.

Controversy aside, Firefighters won an exciting game. They grabbed a 5-0 lead in the second on a two-run homer by Wheeler and a three-run, opposite field shot by Adam Giganti.

Giganti, who doesn't look like your typical power hitter, went three for four with four runs batted in.

"I'm about 5 feet 10 and I rarely am above 160 pounds. I'm a right field hitter, and I went that way on that one. It was a fat 3-1 pitch, and I hit it just the way Bruce taught me."

He said that he and his teammates took incentive from taunts by Oriole players throughout both games. "The game before we were pretty pathetic," Giganti said. "They got on us badly. They were a good team, but there was no call for that."

Giganti added that Firefighters also took offense when Oriole starter Doug Blake hit Buck in the back with a pitch after Wheeler's home run.

"We play hard and we do bench jockey -- it's part of the game," said Ciarrachi. "If they don't like it they shouldn't be out there. This isn't high school baseball or legion ball. With the kind of time and money we spend on the game, we play to win, not for a six-pack after the game."

The Orioles, who fell behind 9-3 in the fifth, almost won. They scored four in the fifth on a grand slam by Dave Heintzel to make it 9-7. Firefighters added a run in the sixth before the Orioles tied the game in their half of the inning.

After the Orioles scored two runs charged to Drew Hummel, Jeff Rutter singled off Sanchez to tie the game at 10. Third baseman Tony Ruzic ended the threat with a diving catch of a line drive by Mike Hansen that saved a run.

After Sanchez's hit his homer, he walked the first two batters in the seventh and was relieved by Kevin Williams. Williams got Holling to line into a double play before Jeff LeRiger flied out to end the game.

Center fielder Mark Alstott of Firefighters, who had four hits and three RBIs in the last two games, was named the tournament's most valuable player.

SECOND GAME FIREFIGHTERS (5) CHICAGO ORIOLES (10) Collier 2b 4 0 1 0 Alstott cf 4 2 2 1 Ruzic 3b 4 1 1 3 Dowling c 4 1 1 0 Hummel 1b 3 0 1 0 Sanchez 1b 0 0 0 0 Buck rf 3 0 1 0 Dhabalt p 0 0 0 0 Giganti dh,rf 2 0 0 1 Dowson lf 2 1 0 0 Thompson ss 3 0 0 0 Holling cf 3 1 1 0 LeRiger ss 4 2 3 3 Ross 2b 4 2 3 2 Kleinhuber dh 3 0 2 1 Rutter rf 1 1 0 1 Bailes rf 2 0 1 1 Heintzel 1b 4 0 0 0 Kirk lf 4 1 0 0 Lutz 3b 3 1 1 0 Hansen c 3 2 2 1 26 5 6 5 31 10 13 7 Firefighters 100 100 3 -- 5 Chicago Orioles 510 004 x -- 10 E -- Ruzic 3, Dowling 2, Heintzel. DP -- Firefighters 1. LOB -- Firefighters 5, Orioles 6. 2B -- Collier, Kleinhuber 2, Hansen. HR -- Alstott, Ruzic. SB -- Ross, Rutter, Hansen, Holling, Le Riger, Lutz.

Wheeler L 5 9 8 4 2 0 Dhabalt 1 4 2 2 0 0 Saladino W 7 6 5 4 2 11 U -- Moomey, McAvoy, Nance. T -- 2:00. THIRD GAME FIREFIGHTERS (11) CHICAGO ORIOLES (10) Collier 2b 3 1 0 0 Giganti lf 4 2 3 3 Alstott cf 4 2 2 2 Dowling c 3 0 1 1 Dhabalt pr 0 1 0 0 Ruzic 3b 3 1 1 0 Wheeler dh 3 1 2 2 Sanchez p 1 1 1 1 Buck 1b 2 1 0 0 Hummel p,1b 1 0 0 0 Dowson rf 3 1 1 1 Thompson ss 3 0 0 0 Holling cf 4 1 1 0 LeRiger ss 4 0 0 1 Ross 2b,lf 3 2 3 0 Kleinhuber lf 3 2 1 0 Lutz 2b 1 1 1 2 Rutter rf 3 1 2 1 Heintzel dh 3 2 2 4 Hansen c 4 0 2 0 Bailes 3b 3 0 0 0 Ortega 1b 3 1 2 2 Kirk pr 0 0 0 0 30 11 11 10 31 10 14 10 Firefighters 050 041 1 -- 11 Chicago Orioles 001 243 0 -- 10 E -- Le Riger 3, Alstott. DP -- Firefighters 1. LOB -- Firefighters 4, Orioles 6. 2B -- Ross, Heintzel, Hansen, Ortega, Alstott, Dowling. HR -- Sanchez, Wheeler, Giganti, Heintzel. SB -- Collier, Giganti, Bailes. Sac -- Thompson. SF -- Le Riger, Dowson.
 

LOCAL TEAM ADVANCES TO MINNEAPOLIS LINCOLN CAB WINS MICKEY MANTLE STATE TOURNEY

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 26, 1987

Edition: M2
Section: SPORTS
Page: 59

Springfield Lincoln Cab advancedto the Mickey Mantle regional tourament by beating Sterling 23-2 Saturday at Chamberlain Park for the state

championship.

Lincoln Cab will play the host team in Minneapolis, Minn., Thursday.

Lincoln Cab used two pitchers to limit Sterling to just three hits. Starter Dale Dunavan pitched five innings to earn the win, shutting Sterling out and giving up just one hit and one walk while striking out 10. Dave Saladino pitched the final two innings, giving up two runs on two hits.

Sterling unsuccessfully used four pitchers to try to slow Lincoln Cab 's offense. Lincoln Cab rapped out 20 hits and had an 11-run fifth inning.

Leading Lincoln Cab 's offense was Lance Marshall, who had three RBIs in the third inning with the game's only home run. Dunavan, Todd Blakeman, Brad Owens, Brett Western and Ed O'Conner had two RBIs apiece.

Colt League AT MOUNT VERNON, Doug Angeli struck out six and led the offense as the Central Illinois All-Stars beat Mount Vernon 11-6 in the Colt League section tournament.

CIL will play Mount Zion at noon today for the chamapionship.

Angeli and Pat Burwitz had three RBIs each, with Jerry Held adding two hits.

Today's winner will advance to the regional tournament in Omaha, Neb., next week.

Sandy Koufax The Nydegger Orioles and the Antonacci-Oldani Cardinals advanced to the championship game of the Sandy Koufax state tournament at Fairview.

The Orioles go into today's 12 o'clock game with a 4-0 record in the double-elimination tournament, and the Cardinals are 3-1. If the Cardinals win the first game, there will be a second to determine the champion.

Marine Bank and Noonan's Hardware fell out of the title race with losses.

The Orioles beat the Cardinals 8-4 and defeated Rockford 5-3 to remain unbeaten. The Cardinals advanced by giving Noonan's its second loss in a 7-4 game.

In the other game involving local teams, Noonan's gave Marine Bank its second loss 10-8. Pee Wee Reese Springfield Community Bank and the Springfield Southwest Yankees advanced to the championship game with victories in the double-elimination tournament at Fairview Park in Springfield.

Community Bank had to win twice on Saturday to clinch a spot in today's final game. In the first game they eliminated St. Rita of Rockford 8-4 behind starter Jeff Mitchell. Brian Vose homered for Community Bank.

Community Bank came back later in the day defeat Springfield Dairy Queen 11-10 in a game featuring five homers. Leo Thompson picked up the win in relief for Community Bank while Mike Wright was the loser for Dairy Queen. Dairy Queen ended the tournament with a 3-2 mark in the event.

The Southwest Yankees had earlier earned their way into the championship game with a 14-1 drubbing of Dairy Queen. Kyle Zellers was the winner for the Yankees.

Community Bank (4-1) will meet the Yankees (3-1) today at 1 p.m. for the title at Fairview Park.

Khoury League BANTAM CLASS A -- East St. Louis defeated Springfield's Black's Sporting Goods 8-4 in 10 innings for the state championship.

For Black's, Cory Formea drove in a run in the first inning, as did Joe Klickman, to put Black's in front 2-0. With East St. Louis leading 4-3 in the bottom of the ninth, Klickman picked up another RBI to send the game to extra innings.

BANTAM CLASS D -- Rodney Whitlow and Ryan Hale combined for a no-hitter as Police Benevolent downed Godfrey 13-2 at Hobbs Park for the state title.

Whitlow pitched the first four innings before turning the game over to Hale for the final two frames. The two combined for 10 strikeouts.

Police Benevolent will advance to the national tournament next weekend in Decatur.

ATOM CLASS A -- Charlie Sattler Olds/Cadillac of Springfield took the state title with a 12-2 five inning victory over Fairview Heights at Hobbs Park.

Eric Easley was the winner for Sattler as with some relief help Fairview Heights was held to four hits. Sattler is now 18-0 and advances to the national tournament.

ATOM CLASS C -- Collinsville Zeptetella captured the state title by eliminating R. W. Troxell of Springfield 13-3 at Hobbs Park.

Winning pitcher T.J. Thomas of Collinsville allowed just three hits. David Oakes took the loss for R.W. Troxell which completed the season with a 13-6 record.

MIDGET CLASS A -- The visiting Belleville Flames took the state championship as they downed Springfield Southwest Tire 21-15 in a slugfest at Hobbs Park.

Belleville pounded out 20 hits and took advantage of 10 errors by Southwest Tire.

 

 

SPRINGFIELD LEGION CAPTURES TITLE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, August 1, 1988

Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: SPORTS
Page: 12

BLOOMINGTON -- Springfield's American Legion Post 809 captured the Fourth Division title in American Legion state tournament action by defeating

Lincoln 8-7. Post 809 will advance to the state tournament in Alton were it will meet the winner of the Cook County division at noon on Thursday.

Jeff Borski was the winner in relief for 809, relieving starter David Freeman in the fifth inning. Kevin Van Houten was three-for-five and Robbie Fix and Clint Squires each added two hits for Springfield.

Lincoln 's attack was led by Jeff Nelson with three hits. Rob Walters took the loss for Lincoln in relief.

Connie Mack Joliet swept a double-header from Meyer's Paving 7-2, 2-1 Sunday to capture the Connie Mack State Tournament championship at Chamberlain Park.

A three-run homer by the Mohawks in the first inning propelled Joliet to the victory in the first game, forcing the second and deciding game. Eddie O'Connor took the loss for Meyer's Paving.

In the second game, Joliet scored the winning run with two outs in the top of the ninth inning.Dave Saladino suffered the loss as he gave up 10 hits.

Todd Blakeman doubled and tripled for half of Meyer's hits as it finished the season at 18-7. Khoury League boys Lincoln Cab captured the Khoury Senior Division Class A State Tournament with a 12-3 victory over Godfrey at Hobbs Park. This marks the first time a Springfield team has ever captured the Class A title.

Lincoln Cab ,27-18, was paced by the complete game pitching performance of Brien O'Brien who struck out four while walking only one.

Pat Antonacci had five RBIs for Lincoln Cab with three hits including a home run. Chris Bax had two home runs among his three hits and Dave Manfredo added two hits with a home run.

Lincoln Cab will face the Missouri state champion in a double-header next Saturday in Belleville for the national title. The finals are a two-of-three format.

BANTAM: Bunn-O-Matic won both of its games Sunday to capture the Khoury League, Bantam Class A State Tournament championship.

Bunn-O-Matic beat Collinsville 17-12 in the first game with Jason Werth taking the victory. Lantz Sakris and Werth each had five hits.

In the second game, Bunn-O-Matic beat Alton 16-14 as Shawn Bandy got the victory. Eric Easley, Chris Henry, Sakris and Bandy had two hits apiece.

Bunn-O-Matic, 28-4, will play at 8 a.m. Saturday in the national tournament at Belleville.

Little League Dale Teubner lost to Elgin 6-1 in the first round of the Junior League State Tournament at Crestwood.

Mike Davis took the loss, giving up nine hits, while Brian Graham had two of Dale Teubner's four hits. The team plays at 5:30 p.m. today in the loser's bracket.

AT BRIDGEPORT Paris scored six runs in the first inning and breezed to a 16-2 victory over Springfield Cy Young in the Bridgeport Sectional. The loss eliminated Cy Young in the tournament.

Jimmy Long had two hits including a home run for Cy Young.

Khoury League girls The Plains Redbirds beat Waterloo 15-1 to win the Class D Debutante State Championship at Hobbs Park.

Shashi Tewari took the victory as she limited Waterloo to three hits. The Redbirds' Jenny Brookhart and Julie Clemens had two hits apiece while Tanya Schafer collected three RBIs on a bases-loaded triple in the third inning.

Pleasant Plains advanced to the national tournament Saturday at Arnold, Mo.

PIXIE: Marine Bank of Springfield lost the title game of the Pixie Class C state tournament to Goreville 15-14 in Metropolis. Tami Valdez and Beth Rossi both had three hits for Marine Bank with Valdez totalling five RBIs and McHenry four. Cressie McHenry had a fourth inning grand slam for Marine.