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Very important – link from arson frame to fibro/ankle

 

 

 

Jim Cimarossa spd – david hurrelbrink spd/sfd

 

This is key – xa frank cimarossa prairie farms – peter cimarossa ISFM

 

Arson investigators are IFPE, see also relationship with sfd/spd - see terry reed at spi clc - ift - ing 183 fd -

 

See also hurrelbrink at ISP –

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, May 21, 1989

 

Brown-Nelson Jeannie Nelson and Alan Michael Brown, both of Springfield, were united in marriage at 11 a.m. April 29. The Rev. Jerry Nichols performed the ceremony at the First United Methodist Church.

Mr. and Mrs. William Saner of Bradenton, Fla., are the parents of the bride. The bridegroom is the son of Harold J. and Wilma Brown, 1925 S. Spring St.

Cathy Brown served as maid of honor, with Bobbie Gadberry, Missy Watts, Bonnie Clardy and Gail Costagliola serving as bridesmaids. Flower girl was Holly Ann Nelson.

Best man was Donnie Boblitt, and groomsmen were David Hurrelbrink , James Cimarossa, Howard Clardy and Kent Brunsman. Ushers were Michael Walton, John Palmer and Billy Bowser, with Marc Brown serving as ringbearer.

A reception was held at the Aqua Sports Club.

The bride is a graduate of Katy High School in Katy, Texas. The bridegroom, a graduate of Griffin High School, is employed by the Springfield Police Department.

The couple will reside in the Springfield area.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Hurrelbrink is kc’s – sfd batt chief – arson inv

 

 

And see armstead at isfm –

 

 

pete cimarossa isfm–

 

 

pennell/heminghous isfm

 

 

terry Johnson – spd/sfm – arson inv – ifpe 4408 – TRN

 

 

club – social network – irv smith

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Hurrelbrink – also before 9/11 – wtc attack – legal auth

 

 

 

Ankle – fibromyalgia – physical trauma, talked about sleep deprivation and constant exposure to pesticides/chem  As causing weakened immune system. Combined with physical trauma this causes fibromyalgia symptoms/pain. See also bacterial infections in nasal membranes and gut. Note esp. urinary tract infection in ftl.

 

Cause of pain and physical trauma. Hurrelbrink. Jan 2001 at hurrelbrink residence, was invited to new home/rental. Slipped on stairs, unusually slick. Found out later butter was actually placed on stairs. When I fell, I ended up limping back to hall’s and stayed at his house for a couple weeks. Intense pain for a minor sprained ankle. This persisted for appx 2 weeks. Never had a sprained ankle like that and the slip wasn’t that bad. After that, pain at same spot at ankle would reoccur at strange unrelated to ankle usage or stress.

 

*See also moore collision in spi - chin

*Guy that walked up behind me and hit me in the nose and then a car drove up, parked in the street and he got in and left – spk – hairline fracture

*Back injury – sd – guy hit me while parked on highway – later had to carpool with harris and he drove intentionally hitting the brakes a lot and accelerating quickly 

Also – chin sd -

 

Note crabtree – fibro guy at cia works w/ paul

 

Very important – link from arson frame to fibro/ankle

 

 

 

Jim Cimarossa spd – david hurrelbrink spd/sfd

 

This is key – xa frank cimarossa prairie farms – peter

cimarossa ISFM

 

Arson investigators are IFPE, see also relationship with

sfd/spd

 

See also hurrelbrink at ISP –

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, May 21, 1989

 

Brown-Nelson Jeannie Nelson and Alan Michael Brown, both of Springfield, were united in marriage at 11 a.m. April 29. The Rev. Jerry Nichols performed the ceremony at the First United Methodist Church.

Mr. and Mrs. William Saner of Bradenton, Fla., are the parents of the bride. The bridegroom is the son of Harold J. and Wilma Brown, 1925 S. Spring St.

Cathy Brown served as maid of honor, with Bobbie Gadberry, Missy Watts, Bonnie Clardy and Gail Costagliola serving as bridesmaids. Flower girl was Holly Ann Nelson.

Best man was Donnie Boblitt, and groomsmen were David Hurrelbrink , James Cimarossa, Howard Clardy and Kent Brunsman. Ushers were Michael Walton, John Palmer and Billy Bowser, with Marc Brown serving as ringbearer.

A reception was held at the Aqua Sports Club.

The bride is a graduate of Katy High School in Katy, Texas. The bridegroom, a graduate of Griffin High School, is employed by the Springfield Police Department.

The couple will reside in the Springfield area.

 

 

 

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateMon, Jul 7, 2008 at 1:31 PM

subjectHURRELBRINK - ANKLE - HALL - ISP - ARSON INVESTIGATOR - RYAN ADMIN - CMS - GRAY - FS JAX - REBBE

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details 7/7/08 Reply

 

 

 

HURRELBRINK,

 

 

*FS AT JACKSONVILLE

 

*AT ISP

 

*RYAN ADMIN CMS - GRAY, MCCLURE

 

*ARSON INVESTIGATOR

 

*AT AGING, UNDER NELSON

 

 

 

DAUGHTER BRIDGET W/ ALEX INGRAM; NOTE ANKLE INJURY AND HALL

 

INJURY TO ANKLE RESULTS FROM SLICK SURFACE ON STAIRS

 

AIRBORNE SUBSTANCE AT HALL'S HOUSE INTENSIFIES PAIN AND TISSUE DAMAGE AND PREVENTS TYPICAL REDUCTION IN SWELLING AND RECOVERY

 

INCIDENT WAS PLANNED BEFOREHAND AND HAD THE DESIRED OUTCOME; THAT BEING MY INJURY, INABILITY TO WALK ON THE ANKLE AND CONSEQUENTLY CONTINUED EXPOSURE TO SUBSTANCE

 

THIS PRACTICE SEEN BEFORE WITH OTHER BODY PARTS ON OTHER PLACES

 

 

 

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 18, 2002

Faulkner-Stout

Mary Elizabeth Stout and Nicholas James Faulkner, both of Springfield, were married at 6 p.m. July 19, 2002, at Blessed Sacrament Church by the Rev. David Hoefler.

The bride is the daughter of Lynn H. King of Springfield and the late Robert E. Stout. The groom is the son of Carolin Faulkner and James and Hannelore Faulkner, all of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Heather Weiss. Serving as matron of honor was Laura Coughlin. Bridesmaids were Trisha Perks, Tara Memminger, Sarah Hammond, Jennifer Dowling, Suzzan Rudibaugh and Tracey Fair. Flower girls were Madison Faulkner and Courtney Harris.

Best man was Jacob Faulkner. Groomsmen were Buddy Howell, David Faulkner, Paul Dexheimer, Scott Hurrelbrink, Peter Graham, Miles Anderson and Joe Malek. Ring bearers were Brandon Harris and Jacob Nethling. Ushers were Tom Dilello, Chad Welch , Jeff Romanotto and Peter Lynch.

A reception was held at the Renaissance Springfield Hotel.

The bride is a graduate of Springfield High School and Drake University and received her master's degree from Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville. She is employed by the Pawnee School District. The groom is a graduate of Springfield High School and attended Lincoln Land Community College. He is employed by PSO.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

Nick Faulkner has worked at several local restaurants and has been in executive sales the last 10 years.



 

 

 

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 Reply |Dennis Delaney

show details 7/8/08 Reply

 

 

 

also rebbe at fs and rebbe as jett fam

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateWed, Apr 4, 2007 at 4:23 PM

subjectlincoln land FS - board - rebbe and hurrelbrink

mailed-bygmail.com

 

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President:John Wilcox (Sangamon County)

Vice President:Mark Bicknell (Scott County)

Secretary:Joe Pickrell (Sangamon County)

Treasurer:Gary Ginder (Morgan County)

Interlocking FB:Earl Dugger (Sangamon and Menard FB)

Interlocking FB:Jeff Hurrelbrink, (Scott and Morgan FB)

Director:Kevin Forden (Sangamon County)

Director:Dean Hess (Morgan County)

Director:Jeff Rebbe (Menard County)

Director:Dale VanEtten (Petersburg, IL)

Director:David Watt (Scott County)

Director:Don Wilson (Morgan County)

 

 

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateThu, Jul 31, 2008 at 11:08 AM

subjectanimal drugs and pesticides

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details 7/31/08 Reply

 

 

 

ifca - gray and dunbar

 

poe at FS, farm bureau

 

jax FS - hurrelbrink, rebbe

 

rossof at taylorville - jurkanin

 

dunbar at ILDA, under weiries and with saputo

 

apl - sharmin smith, rebbe, leroy jett

 

long at new holland FS

 

Minder at chatham DVM

 

Brewer animal hosp in clocktower, next to ILFOP

 

 

 

 

Chad Welch – scott hurrelbrink –

 

tom dilello/handley/office/dot/blago

 

hurrelbrink – spd – fogleman – 2006 retirees,

 

 

 

 

 

ANNIVERSARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, May 31, 2005

Welch-35th

Mr. and Mrs. C.E. Welch Jr. of Springfield celebrated their 35th wedding anniversary Monday.

Welch and the former Joleen Fox were married May 30, 1970, at Central Baptist Church by Adam Baum.

Mr. and Mrs. Welch are both retired teachers from District 186.

They are parents of two children, Chad Welch of Springfield and Katheryn (husband, Frank) Springhart of San Antonio.

 

TITLE: POLICE BEAT

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, January 24, 1992

A man who refused to pay for $7 worth of food around 12:45 a.m. Thursday at Mr. Ted's Grill, 926 W. Jefferson St., was arrested on charges of theft and possession of marijuana.

Police are seeking the charges against Chad Welch , 21, address not available, who also was wanted on a warrant. Police found the marijuana while searching Welch.

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 19, 1998

Springhart-Welch Katheryn Joy Welch and Richard Franklin Springhart, both of Herrin, were married at 1 p.m. June 20 at Central Baptist Church by the Rev. Alan Brown.

The bride is the daughter of C.E. and Joleen Welch of Springfield. The groom is the son of Richard and Gladys Springhart of Marion.

Serving as maid of honor was Nicole Manning, with Alisa Fritz, Ashley Enter, Bess Zelle and Alyssa Crosby as bridesmaids. Flower girl was Jelisa Gaston.

Serving as best man was James Williams, with Sam Cooper, James Faulkner, Anthony Gaston and Brian Schardein as groomsmen. Ushers were Chad Welch , Tony Marsaglia and Mark Dalbey. Ringbearer was Darrian Gaston.

A reception was held at the Holiday Inn East.

The bride is a graduate of Southern Illinois University. The groom is a graduate of and employed by John A. Logan College.

The couple will reside in Herrin.

 

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 18, 2002

Faulkner-Stout

Mary Elizabeth Stout and Nicholas James Faulkner, both of Springfield, were married at 6 p.m. July 19, 2002, at Blessed Sacrament Church by the Rev. David Hoefler.

The bride is the daughter of Lynn H. King of Springfield and the late Robert E. Stout. The groom is the son of Carolin Faulkner and James and Hannelore Faulkner, all of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Heather Weiss. Serving as matron of honor was Laura Coughlin. Bridesmaids were Trisha Perks, Tara Memminger, Sarah Hammond, Jennifer Dowling, Suzzan Rudibaugh and Tracey Fair. Flower girls were Madison Faulkner and Courtney Harris.

Best man was Jacob Faulkner. Groomsmen were Buddy Howell, David Faulkner, Paul Dexheimer, Scott Hurrelbrink, Peter Graham, Miles Anderson and Joe Malek. Ring bearers were Brandon Harris and Jacob Nethling. Ushers were Tom Dilello, Chad Welch , Jeff Romanotto and Peter Lynch.

A reception was held at the Renaissance Springfield Hotel.

The bride is a graduate of Springfield High School and Drake University and received her master's degree from Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville. She is employed by the Pawnee School District. The groom is a graduate of Springfield High School and attended Lincoln Land Community College. He is employed by PSO.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

Nick Faulkner has worked at several local restaurants and has been in executive sales the last 10 years.



A la carte: Great Harvest Bread Co. to open in Montvale Plaza

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, June 21, 2009

"We've done minor renovations to the store, remodeling to improve the flow," he said. "It's the same wonderful ice cream, and we're serving it with a new attitude." There are ice cream cakes, reduced-calorie choices and soft-serve in addition to the traditional ice cream cones, sundaes and shakes.

Summer hours are 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Phone: 787-3031.

The Faulkners are hoping to open another west-side location by spring of 2010, Nick said.

 

Democrat aldermanic candidates get boost from unions

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL)

March 6, 2003

…TOM DiLELLO, 41, moved from a $60,000 job as office services manager at the Environmental Protection Agency.

 

The fact that his usual party affiliation is different from that of the governor, DiLello said, "shows the Blagojevich administration is willing to look at the best candidate is." He noted he's been in management positions at the secretary of state's office as well as the EPA.

 

DiLello also is 60 percent owner of The Office Sports Bar & Grill in Montvale Junction. Oh, and one of the other owners of The Office happens to be JOE HANDLEY, Gov. ROD BLAGOJEVICH's new deputy chief of staff for legislative affairs.

 

Asked if that affected his hiring, DiLello said, "Heck, no. I interviewed for it."

 

Once again, governor's ' new way ' looks like old way

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, June 17, 2004

Gov. ROD BLAGOJEVICH's " new way of doing business" strikes again, this time with the brother of a top aide getting a $94,000-a-year job through a grant from the Illinois Department of Transportation.

 

That's the same department where 60 or so people - many of them Republicans - recently got notices that their jobs are being eliminated by the end of June. Blagojevich, of course, is a Democrat.

 

MICHAEL HANDLEY , 42, brother of the governor's deputy chief of staff for legislative affairs, JOE HANDLEY , this spring went to work for the University of Illinois at Springfield on a contract to the university from IDOT.

 

Joe Handley , 43, of Decatur is not only the governor's top legislative liaison but was also downstate coordinator of the Blagojevich campaign in 2002.

 

Michael Handley has computer expertise, which fit the bill for his new job, which is to help the state roll out a new program of installing mobile crash reporting data systems in police cars. Instead of filing paper reports on accidents, the new system will allow officers to fill out reports at the scene, and that data will be transferred to IDOT computers almost immediately - saving time and steps in making the data usable.

 

The program will receive a runner-up award at the Association of Transportation Safety Information Professionals traffic records forum in Nashville, Tenn., in July, IDOT spokesman MATT VANOVER said.

 

Michael Handley was hired to help administer the project, and he has experience as a network administrator in the private sector, said ERNIE COWLES, director of the Institute for Legal and Policy Studies at the University of Illinois at Springfield.

 

Of about $770,000 in federal transportation grants the university received through IDOT in the current year, about $337,000 is to help install and study the mobile reporting system.

 

"He was recommended to us by somebody from the Illinois Department of Transportation," Cowles said of Handley . "There's a pretty good-sized project team that we work with over at IDOT. ... We were saying, 'We'll need somebody to do this.' They said, 'We have a resume. We'll send it over.' "

 

Cowles didn't know who specifically made the recommendation, and Vanover said he didn't know either.

 

Michael Handley 's job wasn't posted, but he was hired on an "academic hourly" basis, Cowles said. Someone was needed "fairly quickly without having to go through a full job search," Cowles said.

 

Michael Handley said he had worked for a Bettendorf, Iowa, construction company for a dozen years - the last seven as network administrator, with duties that included linking company headquarters to offices in Des Moines and on job sites. But his job was outsourced, and he was out of work as of mid-January.

 

Handley said his brother knew he was looking for a job, but "he wasn't involved in getting me hired." Michael Handley said he had more than one job offer, but he decided on the Springfield job. He's been staying in Decatur and is working to relocate his family to Springfield.

 

"I got lucky that they needed people for this project that is an important project for the state of Illinois," Michael Handley said.

 

This isn't the first time that Joe Handley's relationships and traffic safety programs have crossed paths. More than a year ago, TOM DiLELLO was named director of traffic safety at IDOT. At the time, DiLello was 60 percent owner of the Office Sports Bar & Grill in Montvale Junction in Springfield. Joe Handley was one of the other owners.

 

Vanover said this week that Joe Handley is now "not affiliated with the Office sports bar." REBECCA RAUSCH, spokeswoman for the governor, also said she was told Handley 's ownership in the bar ended about a year ago.

 

That turns out to be very misleading, though I don't blame the spokespeople for the nature of the information they passed along.

 

As it turns out, DiLello said he transferred his 60 percent interest in the bar to his wife, DEBBIE DiLELLO. Handley apparently did something similar, because DiLello said LIZ HANDLEY of Decatur, Joe's wife, is among the other eight owners.

 

Tom DiLello said he had nothing to do with Michael Handley getting hired at UIS.

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 4, 1991

 Hurd-Hurrelbrink Diane J. Hurrelbrink and Robert J. Hurd, both of Springfield, were married at 3 p.m. July 20 at the bride's parents home.

The bride is the daughter of Al and Nan Hurrelbrink, 28 Bonneville Drive. The groom is the son of the late Homer and Roberta Hurd.

Serving as matron of honor was Ceci Fitzsimmons, with Tracy Hurd serving as bridesmaid. Flower girl and ringbearer was Barbara Hurrelbrink.

Best man was Danny Broy. Groomsman was Scott Hurrelbrink . Ushers were Bill Hurrelbrink and Dave Hurrelbrink.

A reception was held on the lawn of the bride's parents home.

The bride is employed as personnel executive at Secretary of State George Ryan's office. The groom is employed as a general dentist.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 13, 1997

 Moffat-Galassi Amy Janine Galassi and James Joseph Moffat IV, both of Chicago, were married at 2 p.m. May 24 at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church by the Rev.

Chris Comerford.

The bride is the daughter of Joseph and Sharon Galassi of Springfield. The groom is the son of J.J. and Karen Moffat III of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Ann Galassi, with Marianne Moffat, Jodi Ushman and Alexis Galassi as bridesmaids. Flower girl was Corrie Vesely.

Best man was Patrick Krolak, with Christopher Quinn, Scott Hurrelbrink and Jeffrey Romanotto as groomsmen. Ushers were Todd Andrews, Steven Bosse and Shaun Reardon. Ringbearer was Matthew Foster.

A reception was held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel.

The bride is a graduate of Sacred-Heart Griffin High School, Eastern Illinois University and Rush University. She is employed by Schwab Rehabilitation Hospital and will be employed by Sundance Corp. in July. The groom is a graduate of Sacred Heart-Griffin High School and Illinois College. He is employed by the state.

The couple will live in Springfield.

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, October 29, 2000

Section: LOCAL
Page: 23

Roland-Briggs

Julie Leigh Briggs and Matthew Louis Roland, both of Chicago, were married at 5:30 p.m. Sept. 8 at Blessed Sacrament Church by the Rev. David Lantz.

The bride is the daughter of Bob and Jean Briggs of Ashland. The groom is the son of Ray and Mary Beth Roland of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Kim Fielding. Bridesmaids were Steffanie Owczarzak, Shea Briggs, Rachel Roland and Sali Shores. Flower girl was Emily Briggs.

Best man was Chris Leming. Groomsmen were Pete Graham, Scott Hurrelbrink , Scott Coggins and Aaron Klauber. Ushers were Rick, Jim and Phil Briggs. Ringbearer was Ethan Briggs.

A reception was held at Island Bay Yacht Club.

The bride is a graduate of Bradley University. She is a self-employed free-lance graphic designer. The groom is a graduate of Illinois State University. He is employed as rental manager of the Chicago division of Roland Machinery.

The couple will reside in Chicago.

 

 

FOR THE RECORD

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, March 29, 2002

 

 Wendy and Scott Hurrelbrink , Springfield, a daughter, Ella Grace Hurrelbrink, Tuesday, March 19, 2002. Grandparents are Ray and Jan Ogden, Tom Andersen and Diane Hurrelbrink, all of Springfield. Great-grandparents are Al and Nan Hurrelbrink, Elizabeth Tumulty, Loretta MacArthur and Gwen Ogden, all of Springfield.

 

 

(David hurrelbrink and pat fogleman worked together)

Possible poison described to Fayemi jury

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, September 15, 2005

Author/Byline: CHRIS DETTRO STAFF WRITER
Section: CITY/STATE
Page: 19

Jurors in the Adetokundo "Philip" Fayemi attempted-murder trial heard evidence Wednesday about a "white, foamy substance" and a liquid that appeared to be mercury being found in the car of an ex-girlfriend of Fayemi in 1996.

Fayemi, 56, is on trial for allegedly poisoning his fiancee, Alice Minter, 44, and seven other people with the heavy metal thallium in the fall of 2002. Minter is in a wheelchair and still suffers other ill effects from exposure to thallium. Among the seven other victims are Minter's three sons.

Former Springfield police officer David Hurrelbrink , now-deputy chief Pat Fogleman and officer Cleo Moore all were called to the parking lot of the Fairfield Inn, 3446 Freedom Drive, about 9 a.m. on March 3, 1996.

A woman had called police saying she thought she saw the car of her ex-boyfriend, Fayemi, in the parking lot. She had an order of protection against Fayemi at the time.

Hurrelbrink , under questioning by special prosecutor Ed Parkinson of the state's attorneys appellate prosecutor's office, said Fayemi was in his car and told him he was waiting in the lot for the Target store across the street to open.

All three officers recalled inspecting the woman's car, which was parked one space away from Fayemi, and finding the passenger-side dashboard vent broken and a "white, foamy substance" inside the opening.

Fogleman said the substance "sizzled" and that it "had a smell I didn't want to get close to."

Hurrelbrink , under questioning from St. Louis defense attorney John Rogers, said he was aware that Fayemi was not prosecuted in connection with his arrest that day.

Fogleman said a key found on the key ring in Fayemi's ignition opened the door of the ex-girlfriend's car.

Springfield police officer Ron Gillette testified he was at the front desk on May 23, 1996, when a woman came into the police station saying she had left work and found an unknown substance inside her car.

Gillette said there were no signs of forced entry, and he found a beaded, silver liquid substance on the dashboard, on the center console, front seat and on the driver's side floor.

"It looked somewhat like mercury to me," Gillette testified.

The substance was sent to a laboratory for testing, and witnesses are expected today to discuss the results.

Circuit Judge Leo Zappa told the six-man, six-woman jury that evidence about prior acts by Fayemi were being admitted into the trial as "modus operandi evidence" to show a pattern in Fayemi's alleged behavior.

Earlier Wednesday, Alan Weizman, president of Florida-based Advanced Scientific and Chemical, testified he talked to Fayemi on the phone in 2002 when Fayemi ordered a 50-gram bottle of thallium sulfate for $95.

He said he talked with Fayemi long enough to decide Fayemi had first-hand knowledge of how to use and dispose of the product, which Fayemi told him was for "a research-type use," Weizman said.

Fayemi says he ordered the thallium at Minter's request to take care of a rodent problem. He says he gave half the thallium to Minter and doesn't know what happened to it after that.

Fayemi ordered the highly toxic thallium on July 31, 2002, and picked it up at the United Parcel Service facility in Springfield on Aug. 24 after two unsuccessful delivery attempts.

Forensic toxicologist Dan Brown testified about thallium and some of the other substances found in Fayemi's home in the 1900 block of Fairfield Drive by police on Oct. 17, 2002.

Brown said thallium sulfate is easily dissolved in liquids and is relatively odorless and tasteless. It is used in the electronics industry and was used in rat poison until it was banned as a pesticide in the early 1970s.

He told special prosecutor Charles Colburn of the state's attorneys appellate prosecutors office that about one gram, or a quarter-thimble-full, would be enough to kill a person in a single dose.

Brown testified that his analysis of laboratory tests done on Alice Minter on Oct. 8 showed she had 3,000 nanograms of thallium per milliliter in her system, where normal levels would be fewer than 100 nanograms.

Brown said the most likely source of that amount of thallium would be if someone ingested it.

The other seven people who Fayemi is accused of poisoning showed lesser amounts of thallium exposure but greater than normal levels and greater than the levels expected in workers who handled thallium.

Tests done on samples taken from Fayemi on Oct. 17 showed normal levels of thallium in his system - 2.7 nanograms per milliliter.

Brown said smaller doses of thallium ingested over a period of time would produce symptoms that mimic other diseases, including influenza and carpal tunnel syndrome. He said tests are rarely requested for the presence of thallium.

 

Family emphasized as three retire from, two join police force

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, August 29, 2002

 

(Ankle happens january 2001)

 

Author/Byline: SARAH ANTONACCI STAFF WRITER
Section: CITY/STATE
Page: 8

Every time Springfield Police Chief John Harris swears in new officers, he tells them they should put their families first.

On Wednesday, the reason became apparent.

The Springfield Police Department said goodbye to three officers who retired with 70 years of combined experience. At the same time, two new officers joined the force.

One of the retirees, Sgt. Rick Hinds, actually left the department in April after 20 years on the force. At his retirement ceremony Wednesday, Hinds thanked Judy, his wife of 32 years. Wednesday was their wedding anniversary.

"I want to thank her for supporting me," Hinds said. "That lady there is the one who made me what I am."

After the ceremony, Hinds said he didn't become a police officer until he was 33 years old, and that he and his wife already had their son at the time. Prior to that, he'd been a heavy-equipment operator.

Judy took the change in stride, Hinds said.

"There's a lot of times you can't discuss the things you see or who's involved - in part to protect them," he said. "You don't want to tell them what people do to other people. You come home and try not to bring it home, but you do. It helps when your spouse understands that you've just had a bad day."

And, he said, the hours are unbelievable. "Crime is not an 8-to-4:30 venue."

Hinds spent the bulk of his career on the midnight shift, which allowed him to participate in his son's activities and to spend time with his family. The Hindses' son, Jason, 29, is now working in a finance-related job in Chicago.

Harris always emphasizes family when welcoming new recruits.

"It's imperative to keep your family and the things that are important to you first. If not, you will go downhill and you'll burn out," the chief said during the swearing-in ceremony.

The other two retired officers are: Lt. John Workman, who joined the department in 1980 and worked as a patrol officer, sergeant and lieutenant in the field operations division until he retired July 1; and David Hurrelbrink , who started working as a police officer in 1974 and retired June 30.

The two new officers are: Jeremy C. Frailey, 23, of Hillsboro, who last worked for the Macomb Police Department; and Joseph S. Arnold, 27, of Terre Haute, Ind., who worked as an officer in Terre Haute and in Bement

Hurrelbrink echoed Harris' sentiments on the importance of family.

"To the new guys, I was where you are 28 years ago, and this is a hard job," he said. "I hate to say it, but you have to put your family first and your job second."

Caption: Sgt. Rick Harris celebrated both his retirement from the Springfield Police Department and his 32nd wedding anniversary Wednesday. His wife, Judy, is at left.

 

 

FIRE, POLICE JOIN FORCES TO FIGHT ARSON / TWO OFFICERS ALSO SWORN IN

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, September 10, 1999

Author/Byline: LESLEY ROGERS STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 13

No one would have believed it five years ago.

But on Thursday, for the first time in Springfield's history, the police

and fire departments -- two separate entities that often compete for city funding and prestige -- jointly swore in four arson investigators as police officers.

Mayor Karen Hasara likened the event to the feeling parents have when their children get along. "For the first time, we are swearing in firefighters who will act in a very professional capacity to assist in arson investigation," Hasara said. "It delights me that this did not come from me, but from the fire department, with cooperation of the police department. In some cities, the police department would not be receptive and cooperative with such a project." Four longtime firefighters who serve as arson investigators trained for 340 hours to add police officer duties to their job titles. Now, the firefighters can oversee the investigation of a suspicious fire from beginning to end, including making the arrest. Before, firefighters started the investigation, and police officers took over after the source of the fire was determined.

Police officers will still continue to assist in the investigations.

Also on Thursday, Hasara helped Police Chief John Harris swear in Springfield's two newest police officers, Tanessa Ferguson and Jeff Royer. And the rookie officers, who start Sunday at midnight, were given personal gun safes to use when locking their city-issued weapons at home.

Last month, the Springfield City Council approved spending almost $50,000 to buy 285 portable firearms safes to comply with a new state requirement that guns be stored safely away from children. The police department isn't required to buy the safes, but Sgt. Bill Pittman said they take liability away from the city if a weapon is stolen, or if a police officer's gun gets into the hands of a child.

Pittman noted that several officers' guns have been stolen, with one turning up in the possession of a Springfield gang member.

The safes, which are accessed with a password, will be distributed to all 268 city officers. The remaining safes will be used in select police vehicles.

Ferguson, a 24-year-old Shelbyville native, has been working at the Sherman Police Department for 13 months. Royer, 30, a Springfield native who attended Southeast High School, was an officer in the Quincy Police Department for four years.

Both the new officers and the firefighters taking the police officer oath -- Peter Janssen, Terry Johnson, Dale Simpson and Bill Hurrelbrink -- were told by Harris to remember to balance work with family duties, and to be prepared to see "the very worst that society has to offer." Hurrelbrink , who has been with the fire department for 20 years, said investigating the source of a blaze is something a person with a long history of fighting fires can tackle best. "Trying to find what we call the origin of the fire and the cause of the fire, it is somewhat of an art," Hurrelbrink said. "I can't give you all my secrets, but people think they destroy evidence, but actually they create it." The idea of the police and fire departments conducting such extensive cross-training, and the swearing-in of firefighters as police officers would have made people laugh years ago, both Harris and Fire Chief J.D. Knox said after Thursday's ceremony. "This sort of cooperation in the city is light years away from what it was in the past," Harris said.

While the firefighters took police training and took oaths as police officers, they won't patrol or actually be considered police officers. But they will have the ability to make arrests, Knox said. "This gives them the police powers to take the case from A to Z," he said. "They can make arrests, investigate, carry guns, everything."

Caption: Springfield Police Chief John Harris congratulates Tanessa Ferguson and Jeff Royer, newly sworn-in police officers Thursday in the city council chamber. Harris also swore in four arson investigators as police officers. / The Springfield Police Department has purchased combination safes for all of its officers with the help of a federal grant.

 

 

BLAST DESTROYS HOUSE / 2 NEIGHBORS INJURED, WINDOWS SHATTERED, BUILDINGS ROCKED

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, April 4, 1998

Author/Byline: JOE MAHR STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: NEWS
Page: 1

A television set flew by Anna Ananias before she was showered with glass. Bobbie Rice was walking to the kitchen when he was thrown into his front

door.

And people across Springfield felt buildings shake Friday after a natural gas explosion at a vacant house at 925 N. 14th St.

The 10:43 a.m. blast shattered windows for blocks and forced authorities to evacuate residents from about two dozen nearby homes. They were allowed to return 2 1/2 hours later, with gas service restored that afternoon.

Ananias and Rice -- who each lived on opposite sides of the house -- were the only ones injured. Both were treated at St. John's Hospital and released.

A couple was set to move Friday night into the rental home, according to owner Gary Grider. He had been renovating it for 10 months and was making one last repair: changing a gas-line coupling to the stove.

"I was putting on a new line, because . . . the appliance people and these firemen tell me that these are outlawed now," Grider said, holding the old coupling in his hand.

He had already bought a new coupling but discovered that it didn't fit, he said. So he left with the old coupling to match it with the correct part.

He told investigators that he turned off the gas valve behind the stove before leaving about noon Thursday. But the valve apparently stayed open just a crack -- enough to let gas slowly seep into the home.

"He turned the gas valve off, but he didn't cap it, and you're supposed to cap them," said Springfield Fire Department Capt. Bill Hurrelbrink , the lead investigator.

It's unclear what caused the explosion, although it could have been anything from a thermostat spark to a water heater's pilot light, Hurrelbrink said.

Grider, who owns about a dozen rental properties, said he was about to leave his own home Friday to buy another coupling when he heard the news.

"I could have been blown right out through the door," he said.

Rice, next door, almost was.

The explosion left the 47-year-old dazed in his doorway before workers from a nearby Department of Corrections complex pulled him into his yard. Neighbors then covered him with blankets.

The blast left Rice's home so damaged that his family had to seek shelter at the Red Cross office on South Sixth Street.

On the other side of the demolished home was Ananias, 85, who was watching TV in her front room.

"Suddenly her television flew past her, and the next thing she felt was a shower of glass," said Sgt. Bill Pittman, referring to her statement to police .

At the time, Ananias was watching her great-grandson, Kyle Dennison, 2, of Riverton, who was not injured.

Other nearby residents, such as Susan Taylor, 69, got a good scare. Taylor was lying on her couch when the window beside her shattered, and she heard the enormous blast.

"I didn't know what to think," said Taylor, shaking her head minutes after the explosion.

Another neighbor, 79, said she was making coffee in her kitchen when two of her windows shattered. The glass light fixture in her bathroom fell to the floor.

"I thought my world exploded," said the woman, who asked only to be identified by her first name, Millie.

The explosion threw another neighbor, Dianne Ekiss, into her coffee table.

"It lifted me right off the couch. I couldn't believe it," said Ekiss, 68, who lives three doors down.

Police spent the next few hours assessing the damage.

"We noticed practically every house on the block . . . had some kind of damage, whether it was a result of debris that hit the house, or shock movement with windows breaking," Pittman said.

Authorities estimated the damage at roughly $150,000 to the neighborhood, including the destroyed house. But an official estimate was too difficult because of the widespread damage.

Central Illinois Light Co. workers checked the gas lines running down the street and to the home, said CILCO spokesman Bill Branham. They found no leaks.

But the explosion itself stirred memories of December 1992's gas-induced fires at 39 homes in a six-block area around 12th and Jackson streets.

CILCO's aging, leaking and poorly maintained gas lines were blamed for the fires. The company later settled a civil complaint with the Illinois Commerce Commission for $1 million and agreed to replace 130 miles of gas lines.

Some of the first lines replaced were in the neighborhood of Friday's explosion, said ICC spokeswoman Beth Bosch.

A lingering civil lawsuit from those days brought attorney Mark Vincent to the scene Friday.

Vincent had just been hired a day earlier to help represent a family suing CILCO and a contractor for a 1991 fire and explosion in their Grandview residence that killed three children.

The lawsuit, filed in 1993, claims the contractor had been working on the gas line to the home and let gas seep inside. The gas exploded after a 4-year-old set fire to a couch with a cigarette lighter.

Vincent said he was surveying the scene on North 14th for any similarities to the 1991 incident. He expects the case to go to trial early next year.

Other residents braved Friday's steady downpour to peer across police lines at the result of the percussion heard well over a mile away.

"I've never seen anything like this before," said Ladonna McClanahan, who awoke to her house shaking and pictures falling off her wall. "I can't believe no one's really hurt."

Caption: Springfield firefighters prepare to search the rubble left from an east-side house destroyed by a natural gas explosion Friday morning. No one was in the house. Gary Grider, owner of the destroyed home, talks with CILCO gas service supervisor Mark Martin. Grider, holding gas-line couplings, was going to replace a part Friday morning. Ambulance personnel prepare Anna Ananias, 85, for transport to be checked out at St. John's Hospital after a house next to hers was destroyed by a natural gas explosion. Her great-grandson, Kyle Dennison, 2, escaped injury, although he was transported with her to St. John's.
Memo: MAP HEAD / Explosion site

 

 

ARSON INVESTIGATORS SAY TIME FINALLY IS ON THEIR SIDE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, September 22, 1997

Author/Byline: JOE MAHR STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: NEWS
Page: 1

When reported arsons in Springfield jumped from 14 in mid-1996 to 36 for the first six months of 1997, an apparently alarmed FBI official picked up

the phone.

What's going on, the FBI wanted to know. Some terrible trend? Nah, says a local arson detective, investigators are just finally getting the time needed to check out suspicious fires.

"They just weren't being investigated before," said police Detective Amos Mitchell.

Because arson cases involve both police and firefighters, the agencies jointly investigate suspicious fires. Fire Capt. Bill Hurrelbrink is stationed at the police detective bureau, in addition to Mitchell, to work the cases.

A fire battalion chief will call the arson detective and captain to any fire scene where a cause can't be readily determined. (Sometimes a fire code inspector fills in for the captain.) At least that was the way it worked before early 1995. Then, under the administration of former Police Chief Harvey Davis, Mitchell, who has investigated arson cases since 1985, had his overtime cut. He no longer was being called out to suspicious fires, other than the ones that happened during normal business hours, he said.

Additionally, battalion chiefs were pressured to stop calling in arson investigators, Mitchell said.

Fire Marshal Cliff Garst maintains that battalion chiefs were never deterred from calling in arson investigators.

"That order hasn't ever changed. We have never stipulated that somebody shouldn't be called out because they shouldn't be paid overtime," Garst said.

However, some veteran firefighters back Mitchell's contention.

Fire administrators told them at their regularly scheduled morning meetings that arson investigators were being called out too much on overtime, said a battalion chief who asked to remain anonymous, citing a fear of retribution.

"They were getting mad at the bat' chiefs for calling these guys in," he said. "If it was Monday to Friday, 8:30 to 4:30, then it was no problem."

He said the atmosphere has since changed, with administrators not complaining as much about the overtime.

In early 1996, if a fire department investigator were called out on overtime to a possible arson scene, Mitchell usually hadn't been called out by the police . That made it difficult to establish if a crime had occurred, Mitchell said.

And if nobody was summoned, that meant a potential crime scene sat overnight before Mitchell and the captain could examine it.

"The witnesses aren't going to wait around for 12 hours -- and many times the suspect is among that group," Mitchell said. "If you take samples and find gasoline, you never know: `Was the gas there before? Or was it placed there after the fire?' " Also, at the time, Mitchell was investigating other violent crimes, too. So he was left with little time to do extra digging on probes of suspicious fires, he said.

In April 1996, Mitchell complained to the then-new police chief, John Harris. His overtime was restored, with new orders written that he would be called out anytime a battalion chief called out a fire department investigator.

With both able to immediately investigate more suspicious fires, they were able to confirm additional arsons, Mitchell said. Hence the jump in the 1997 numbers.

For the first six months of this year, 71 fires were investigated, with about half determined to be arsons. That includes high-profile cases such as the Southern View Motel fire in May. (The investigation of that case remains open.) The jump -- although expected by Mitchell -- surprised the number-crunchers at the FBI. "They called about three weeks ago and asked us what was going on," Mitchell said.

Besides arsons, most other crimes in Springfield were down for the first half of 1997. The chief exception: Murders doubled to six.

Total crime dropped 6 percent, to 4,488 reports filed from January through June 1997.

Caption: Police Detective Amos Mitchell points to fire damage in the basement of a house at 2003 E. Kansas Street.

 

 

On 4/30/07, Dennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com> wrote:

5 NEW DEPUTIES JOIN SANGAMON COUNTY SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL)

December 11, 1998

 

Estimated printed pages: 1

Five people have recently joined the Sangamon County sheriff's office as deputies, bringing the total number on the force to 75. Those hired took

the place of others who had either retired or left for other jobs.

The new deputies are: o Mike Bishop, 39, of Springfield, who began on Aug. 3, was formerly employed by the Leland Grove Police Department and attended Lincoln Land Community College. o Mark Garst, 26, of Springfield was formerly employed by the state of Illinois, graduated from Illinois State University with a bachelor's degree in history and attended Drake University School of Law. He began with the department on Oct. 1. o Eric Knowski, 36, of Springfield also began with the force on Oct. 1. He worked for The Club Fitness Center before becoming a deputy and is a graduate of Illinois College with a bachelor's in accounting and business administration. o Mike Long, 30, of Lincoln used to be a Jerome police officer and began with the sheriff's department on Dec. 7. He is a graduate of Lincoln College. o Shad Shymansky, 28, of Springfield started his job on Oct. 5. He was formerly employed by Garrett Aviation and attended Illinois Benedictine College and Lincoln Land Community College.

  Caption:

Bishop / Garst / Knowski / Long / Shymansky

 

 

BANKS SEEK CITY FUNDS FOR LOAN PROGRAM

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, December 28, 1994

 Confirmed Mayor Ossie Langfelder's nomination of Alfred Hurrelbrink to the Springfield Housing Authority board, effective Jan. 3, to succeed outgoing member Grady Holley. Hurrelbrink now awaits confirmation by the full city council. If he is confirmed, as expected, he will serve for five years.

 

 

ACTING FIRE CHIEF DOUSES FIRE-BREATHING TACTICS NOW SAYS HE'S CHANGED HIS MIND ABOUT TOP STAFF POSITIONS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 21, 1991

Author/Byline: BERNARD SCHOENBURG STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 1

Springfield's acting fire chief, David Newbrough, admits he might have spoken too soon on the day of his appointment, when he told top department

brass many of them would not be part of his team.

He now says he's changed his mind about top staff positions, and he wants time to determine who will stay where they are.

"I probably wasn't sure at that time what I was going to do, so I shouldn't have said anything," Newbrough said last week. "I'm not going to jump and try to make any changes now until I've been confirmed, until I learn the job and know more of what they (top staff members) are doing."

Some of the top officers say they were given a weekend to put their choices in writing -- resign, retire, or go back to their civil service ranks.

Newbrough said he just wanted to let the eight administrators know of changes that would be coming over a few months. But seven of the group were told they couldn't keep their current jobs, and the eighth was told he might have problems keeping his job when he turns 60 in August. The eight officers average 25 years on the department. Newbrough will mark 18 years of service in September.

"I don't change my life around in three days for nobody," said Division Chief Elmer Renfro that afternoon.

Langfelder appointed Newbrough -- a fire captain and also a Democratic precinct committeeman who worked in the mayor's election campaign -- just three days after Chief Tom Oseland announced retirement plans. The mayor said he did no interviews because he knew who he wanted, and gave Newbrough, 44, immediate power as acting chief.

In addition to walking a precinct for Langfelder, Newbrough said, he helped coordinate the mayor's Ward 10 efforts, in part making sure Langfelder people were at each polling place. He also helped find yard sign locations.

Newbrough denies any politicalmotives behind the abortive staff reshuffling, and there is evidence to back him up. While a top staff member who would have been affected is a Republican precinct committeeman (he took no active role in the April campaign), another had displayed a Langfelder yard sign at his home.

Nonetheless, Newbrough moved too quickly for his own good, clouding his chances of confirmation by the city council.

"It's definitely an uphill battle," said Ward 4 Ald. Chuck Redpath, chairman of the council's Public Affairs and Safety Committee, which scrutinizes police and fire departments.

Newbrough said his perspective has changed since he became acting chief.

"I'm going to reconsider everything. It might turn out in the end that I still feel what my first impulse (was). But at this point, I'm seeing what they (staff members) are doing and how they're doing it and the good job some of them are doing."

However, Newbrough said fire department tradition is that a new executive brings in his own staff. Four officers retired when former Public Safety Director Pat Ward first won election in 1975, he said.

"Those guys didn't cry," Newbrough said. "They didn't run to the media.

"I like all these guys," he added. "I just thought I'd be more comfortable with my own staff. But right now, I don't know how many months that's going to take."

Newbrough said he doesn't think aldermen have anything against him personally and predicts he'll be confirmed.

"They understand that the mayor's the mayor and that's his role, to appoint his department heads.

"I think what's rough about this city council is, well, they have full-time jobs on the side, and sometimes they expect the mayor, who's full-time, to tell them everything he's doing before he does it. Maybe they're not being realistic a little bit there."

Newbrough made his mark on the department through his work with Local 37 of the International Association of Fire Fighters -- the Springfield local. He was secretary and vice president before being elected to two two-year terms as president starting in 1985. City officials who faced him at the bargaining table say he was a tough negotiator.

Still an active member, Newbrough also is a vice president of the statewide Associated Fire Fighters of Illinois, and has done lobbying and convened a recent statewide seminar on issues such as collective bargaining and grievance procedures.

"Almost my whole career at this fire department is helping everyone else," Newbrough said.

Driver-engineer Bill Hurrelbrink ,

 

a 20-year friend of Newbrough and 17-year companion on the department, thinks the acting chief will excel.

"He's a very caring, compassionate person," Hurrelbrink said. "Anything he gets involved in, he puts his heart, mind and soul to it. He got us some of the biggest raises we ever had."

Hurrelbrink thinks the department's recent leadership has played favorites.

"Dave is not like that. He's real fair and treats everybody equally."

Capt. Bernie Coady -- secretary-treasurer of Local 37 and someone Newbrough plans to consider for one of the staff jobs -- said he was a firefighter on a truck company when Newbrough was the driver. It is part of the driver's job to cut off electricity to burning buildings when firefighters enter.

"I had 100 percent confidence in him, and he always got the job done for me," Coady said. "He's more than competent."

The Springfield & Central Illinois Trades and Labor Council, to which Newbrough is a delegate, also has endorsed him. Newbrough's personnel moves didn't deserve criticism, said Michael Hade, council president. "It is quite refreshing to have someone who is willing to act in an honest and upfront manner," Hade said.

Newbrough's qualifications also are being questioned. He has never been the command officer at a major fire, and his level of experience and specialized training is far below that of some of the officers he wanted to move out.

Had top staff been moved out before last week's natural gas leak and fire on Lawrence Avenue, said one department member, there would have been "utter chaos."

Division Chiefs Cliff Garst and J.D. Knox, along with Oseland,

 

are the only department members who have gone through a hazardous materials technician course run by the Association of American Railroads.

 

They said they ran department operations at the gas leak. People with lesser training, Garst said, are not supposed to try aggressive procedures, like trying to stop a hazardous material leak.

Garst and Knox were among officers Newbrough originally indicated he would remove.

Newbrough, who was also at the scene, said he wasn't sure what role Garst and Knox played, but Central Illinois Light Co. crews were working to stop the leak and he thinks battalion chiefs -- below the top staff level -- "had everything set up."

Garst said he and Knox "had the responsibility to manage the incident overall." "CILCO consulted with us," he said.

"Cliff Garst and J.D. Knox, I think, have been to a different school than the rest of us, but . . . we all have training," Newbrough said.

Garst said later that Newbrough may not know all requirements of responding to certain hazardous materials incidents, and he'd be glad to brief the acting chief.

Newbrough said he will concentrate more on local fire courses and bringing teachers in, instead of sending firefighters to outside schools. Many department members think trips have been reserved for a chosen few.

"That helps them build resumes, maybe, but I've never seen whether they came back and passed any of that along."

Garst said only in recent years has the union contract allowed time for rank-and-file personnel to attend out-of-town schools, and Knox said information gained is passed on to other department members.

Knox, fire science coordinator at Lincoln Land Community College, said the local school can't offer some specialized training. All top staff members and about five other department members have been to at least one two-week course at the National Fire Academy in Emmitsburg, Md., which he calls the FBI academy for firefighters. Knox himself has been there five times. Newbrough has not been there.

Newbrough says he has taken a succession of firefighting courses since joining the department. He has 61 hours of credit in liberal arts and fire science at Lincoln Land.

He said he failed one course that he thinks was taught by the state concerning hazardous materials, but said it involved a lot of memorization that he doesn't think anyone could retain for long. The coursework duplicated material in a book firefighters would have at a scene, he added.

"You don't have that many" hazardous materials incidents, he said, "but you still have to be prepared for them."

Newbrough failed a test to become battalion chief, the next civil service step up from captain. He said he took the test only because tests often generate union complaints, and as union president he needed to know about the procedures. "I didn't study at all," he said.

As a captain, Newbrough said, he has been the first on many incident scenes and handled them. However, all structure fires are overseen by battalion chiefs. While Newbrough said he's filled in as battalion chief for two or three 24-hour shifts, he does not recall having a structure fire on any of those days.

Newbrough does not think staff changes will hurt Springfield's Class 1 fire insurance rating -- a rank held by only seven departments nationwide.

"There's no chance of losing the Class 1 here in the next few years," he said.

Terry Young, manager of operations at Commercial Risk Services Inc., which ranks departments for property and casualty insurance companies, said Springfield's 1988 rating should last for 10 years.

"Normally, a change in management does not affect it," he said.

Newbrough, a native of Mexico, Mo., joined the U.S. Marines at age 17, in 1964, and finished high school while in the military. He was a combat infantryman in South Vietnam and a military police officer in San Diego.

He got a Purple Heart for his Vietnam service, but he didn't ask for it and is a touch embarrassed by it. During an enemy ambush, he backed up into a pointed stick left as a booby trap; it broke the skin on his buttocks, but didn't hurt him badly. He didn't know he would receive the medal until he was back in the states.

"I didn't want to get a Purple Heart," he said. "In the Marines, that kind of meant like you made a mistake."

Newbrough and his wife, Barbara, have a 15-year-old son and a 13-year-old daughter.

NEWBROUGH FILE o Age: 44 o Hometown: Mexico, Mo. o In Springfield: Since 1970. Began as firefighter in 1973. o Military: Three years in the U.S. Marine Corps., including Vietnam combat, duty in Okinawa and as a military policeman in San Diego. Received the Purple Heart. o Labor: President of Springfield Local 37 of International Association of Fire Fighters, 1985-88. Also served as vice president and secretary. Vice president and service representative, Associated Fire Fighters of Illinois. Treasurer for Springfield department's Foreign Fire Insurance Board. o Education: 61 credit hours in liberal arts and fire science, Lincoln Land Community College. Some labor courses at Sangamon State University. Several other labor and fire-related courses. o Community service: United Way volunteer of the year 1987. Volunteer for Senior Olympics, Special Olympics, Muscular Dystrophy Association, Salvation Army, Big Brother/Big Sister, YWCA and Crisis Nursery. o Family: He and his wife, Barbara, have a son, Jeff, 15, and a daughter, Devon, 13.

Caption: David Newbrough

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, May 21, 1989

 

Brown-Nelson Jeannie Nelson and Alan Michael Brown, both of Springfield, were united in marriage at 11 a.m. April 29. The Rev. Jerry Nichols performed the ceremony at the First United Methodist Church.

Mr. and Mrs. William Saner of Bradenton, Fla., are the parents of the bride. The bridegroom is the son of Harold J. and Wilma Brown, 1925 S. Spring St.

Cathy Brown served as maid of honor, with Bobbie Gadberry, Missy Watts, Bonnie Clardy and Gail Costagliola serving as bridesmaids. Flower girl was Holly Ann Nelson.

Best man was Donnie Boblitt, and groomsmen were David Hurrelbrink , James Cimarossa, Howard Clardy and Kent Brunsman. Ushers were Michael Walton, John Palmer and Billy Bowser, with Marc Brown serving as ringbearer.

A reception was held at the Aqua Sports Club.

The bride is a graduate of Katy High School in Katy, Texas. The bridegroom, a graduate of Griffin High School, is employed by the Springfield Police Department.

The couple will reside in the Springfie