Home

 

 

Cando – mccann – Pennell link – barry – crossroads – rove – watts/ridgeview/trn – rexroad/chrans – furmanmilburn/liuna/expressway – schuh – stannard – (milburn and pfs bowling and see mcd’s)

 

Note also kevin schott 183fd – w/ kevin Pennell –

Schott is seiu steward – see also camp Lincoln guards – securitas –

And note terry reed – comptroller – jbt – w/ gray special asst – ift – hade – cellini –

See also ifpe/ift – arson inv – security guards – cra bldgs. – nf – a&r – etc. –

183fd link to mccann – Carlinville fd – small town – city gov – and see fire science instructor

 

 

183fd – link this to cando –

 

Pennell drug frame – ob apt – monty Pennell and james baker – galv guy –

Sipe – hade – pieper/seiu/access/Austin – busmonitors – sent to sd – 96 rnc conv – bundlers – grover – “hard copy” salsa – campo – ipi – bct – saladino – xa prehoda foil stamps – zito vending – brahler – securitybank – dorcoffee – apt in sd – (only person I know in sd = delong – long time fam friend, I stay at delongs, find out later Pennell is the leaseholder, lives nearby, set up re drug frame bc my brother was selling drugs w/ Pennell) – careful on this Pennell is contractor for isp drugs – caci – 

 

 

Kevin Pennell on 183 fd – other pennell as pilot – 183fw fuel specialist timm/lopian

Pennell – sere in spk – talon frame – “jpen” – Pennell/caths – pilot/ - dunbar reverse – lgpd – ingrum – dunbar/heminghous both lgpd -

 

bonansinga on airport bd – xa 4 wheeler – cwlp – xa ingrum and airport – vala links – henkle – and see noonan at airport – xa scb – hart as scb atty – and cellini atty -

 

ilroa – Shannon Pennell as def – left town – xa ngaoi – celletti – kirk – vaq209 -

 

prola – heminghous/Pennell – both prez of us roa – and see afa133 -

 

roa used to harass me – terr frame – xa 2005 emails – complaint – xa homicidal frame – uis abnormal psych class w/ mcconnell – spreading rumors of homicidal – “serial” killer threats –

xa charlie Pennell – spd mcu – carpenter/graham – carpenter ftl – polistina – poe – Sherman fd – burge – llcc trucks – clatfelter/Sherman – ibt916 – poe/wavering at pubworks – contri - cobblestone

 

Pennell – prola – beaubien – securitybank – heminghous – Wackenhut – lgpd –

 

Securitybank – mangalavite – yannone – madonia - dorcoffee

 

Pennell – vondebur party – bean bags – madonia – cocaine – Pennell at agriculture – Jennings – isp – heads up – cocaine – Aiello/schackmann – xa troxell/Pruitt/punzak – siebert/eck etc – uis soccer –

 

And note Pennell at isfm – arson frame – dor – ingrum – noonan – cim at isfm – prairie farms – ibt916 – sternstein – fickes – usmc – moushon – ripper – wal mart – terry nelson – schweska – llcc yrs prez – xa terry nelson crosslink – mercury – emil jones –

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hostetler – coble –

Armstead – sfd – kc’s -

 

Illinois Volunteer Fire Service Summit

Organizing Committee

 

 

Office of the State Fire Marshal

Tom Armstead (217) 785-0969

Illinois State Fire Marshal

1035 Stevenson Dr.

Springfield, IL 62703

 

Sandy Hill (217) 782-4542

Director of Personnel Standards and Education

Office of the State Fire Marshal

1035 Stevenson Drive

Springfield, IL 62703

 

Juliann Heminghous (217) 785-1021

Public Information Officer

Office of the State Fire Marshal

1035 Stevenson Dr

Springfield, IL 62203

 

Dan Williams (217) 785-0969

Deputy Director

Office of the State Fire Marshal

1035 Stevenson Dr

Springfield, IL 62203

Fire Service Institute

 

Robert Bettenhausen

Chairman, Fire Service Institute Advisory Committee

17239 68th Court

Tinley Park, IL 60477

 

Dave Clark (217) 333-3800

Associate Director for Academic Affairs

11 Gerty Drive

Champaign, IL 62820

 

Richard L. Jaehne (217) 333-3800

Director

11 Gerty Drive

Champaign, IL 62820

Appendix A

University of Illinois Springfield

 

Julie Slack (217) 206-7464

Project Coordinator

Continuing Education UIS

Springfield, IL 62794-9243

 

Larry Dale (217) 206-6550

Director of Media Services

University of Illinos Springfield

Springfield, IL 62794-9243

Firefighters

 

Tim Clemens

Il Professional Firefighter’s Assn.

188 Industrial Dr.

Suite 18A

Elmhurst, IL 60126-1609

 

Terry Ford

President, Illinois Firefighters Association

Godfrey Fire Department

P.O. Box F

Godfrey, IL 62035

 

Kevin Schott e-mail: kschott@ilspi.ang.af.mil

President 3M Firefighters

210 West 1st South St

Carlinville, IL 62626

Fire Service Leadership

 

Chief John Buckman

Director, Volunteer Section

International Association of Fire Chiefs

8400 Street Wendell Road

Evansville, IN 47720-1718

 

 

Chief Douglas Chappell

National Volunteer Fire Council representative

Fire Chief, Hazel Crest Fire Department

2903 West 175th Street

Hazel Crest, IL 60429-0000

 

Brett P. Kunkel

Fire Protection Districts Assn Representative

PO Box 219

Sorento 62086

 

Chief Jay Reardon

Illinois Fire Chiefs Assn representative

Northbrook Fire Department

740 Dundee Road

Northbrook, IL 60062

 

Heather Schaffer

National Volunteer Fire Council

1050 17th Street, NW

Washington, DC 20036

 

Joe Umbach

President, Illinois Association of Fire Protection Districts

Rt. 1, Box 259

Easton, IL 62633

 

Larry Walsh

President, Illinois Fire Chiefs Assn

Troy Fire Protection District 107 West Jefferson Street

Shorewood, IL 60431

 

Bill Watts

Chief Havana Rural FPD

311 N. Broadway

Havana, IL 62644

Government

 

Gary Koch

Illinois Municipal League

500 East Capitol Ave.

P.O. Box 3387

Springfield, IL 62708

 

Mr. Rex Coble

Illinois Emergency Management Agency (IEMA)

110 East Adams

Springfield, IL 62706

Educators

 

Dr. Charlie Evans

Director of Statewide Programming, Assistant Vice President Academic Affairs

Office of Statewide Programming

1400 University Inn, MC-431

 

Chief J.D. Knox

Springfield Fire Department

201 N. 7th Street

Springfield, IL 62701-000

 

Carol Lanning

Director for Policy and Planning

Illinois Community College Board

401 East Capitol

Springfield, IL 62701

 

Forest Reeder

Illinois Society of Fire Service Instructors

Pleasantview FPD

12212 South 72nd Court

Palos Heights, IL 60463

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pfs bowling – milburn – animal drugs – liuna – street sweepers -

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyfurmanmilburn

 

 

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneygalveston

 

 

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneytexas

 

jab – galv -

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneybaker

 

96 rnc – video – bundlers – campo – yrs - rove

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneysalsa

 

brahler -

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyjacksonville

 

 

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyheminghous

 

yannone – illini bank -

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneysecuritybank

 

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneydorcoffee

 

arson frame - ingrum

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyenglish

 

locations – terr frame – airport -

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneywalnut

 

airport board – vala – bangert – bodewes - homeier

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyairport

 

spi fbo - garrett – landmark – capitol aviation – bunn – sangamo elec

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneycapitolaviation

 

ngaoi – celletti – kirk – vaq209 – trame - ilfop

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyilfopngaoi

 

timm and lopian – dav – wes vala – tammy jett - clatfelter

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyfuelspecialist

 

 

 

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaney

 

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaney

 

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaney

 

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaney

 

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaney

 

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaney

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

todwdelaney@gmail.com

dateFri, Jul 15, 2011 at 4:34 PM

subjectnotes

mailed-bygmail.com

Important mainly because of the words in the message.

 

hide details Jul 15 (3 days ago)

 

7 attachments — Download all attachments  

empty wheel - On Two Torture Investigations.docx

Mccan campaign - crossroads - brahler - barry patrick ilsen repubs aprop 2015 noble.docx

MCCANN - bruner - ucm - cellini - sjr.docx

mccann - campaign - fortune media -.docx

mccann - staffer - Patrick Barry - repub aprop staff.docx

Mccann - crossroads - media buys - 2010.docx

Notes - 7-15.docx

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, March 16, 2000



V.E. Heminghous

SPRINGFIELD - V.E. "Bud" Heminghous , 64, of Springfield died Wednesday, March 15, 2000, at St. John's Hospice.

He was born Sept. 5, 1935, in Greenup, the son of Victor and Iverna Hubbard Heminghous . He married Sandra Campbell in 1959.

Mr. Heminghous worked as an Operations Supervisor for AT&T for 30 years. He served as a patrol officer part time for the Village of Jerome for 19 years and full time for the village of Leland Grove for seven years. Mr. Heminghous also graduated from LLCC Police Training Institute.

He was a member of the Christ the King Church, Chapter of Ducks Unlimited, NRA, Telephone Pioneers of American, the FOP Lodge 55 and was a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps, serving from 1953-1956.

Survivors: wife, Sandra; three sons, Mike (wife, Kathy) Heminghous of Springfield, Mark (wife, Jeri) Heminghous of Nederland, Colo., and Charles (wife, Juli) Heminghous of Chatham; three grandsons; mother, Iverna Johnson of Greenup; a brother, William (wife, Brenda) Heminghous of Saginaw, Mich.; and a sister, Mary Lou (husband, Gus) Hanson of Anchorage, Alaska.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateWed, Aug 30, 2006 at 4:21 PM

subjectpennell recently gone

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details 8/30/06

 

recently spoke at event with spfld people, prob in il esgr capacity.

website recently says gone- replaced,  and summons returned.

 

[new esgr dir.doc]

 

3/16/05

Best Practices in Military Leave & Benefits

Col.John Ady (retired) &

Lt. Shannon Pennell

This program provided tips and guidelines to employers to operate a proactive program that ensures understanding and appreciation of the role of the National Guard and Reserve in the context of the DoD Total Force Policy. 

.75 hours

 

 

CIC-SHRM

Educational Session’s Program Information & Descriptions

 

(Note:  Due to a communication error, the CIC-SHRM educational sessions in 2005 and January 2006 were not pre-certified by HRCI.  Therefore, CIC-SHRM members who are applying for re-certification credits from HRCI may use the brief descriptions listed below.)

 

 

 

pennel is illinois  esgr dir in 2005

 

 

 

 

 

2006 director is

 

 

Tim Franklin
Executive Director
Bus: (217) 761-3642
Fax: (217) 761-3568
tim.franklin@us.army.mil

 

 Reply Forward

 

 

 Reply |Dennis Delaney

show details 8/31/06

 

adds il roa site w/ pennell as dir

 

online within last month, but updated Jan 2006

 

 

[ROA - Department of Illinois.txt]

ROA - Department of IllinoisRESERVE OFFICERS ASSOCIATION

                  DEPARTMENT OF ILLINOIS

 

                  Representing all Officers of the seven U.S. Uniformed

Services.

                  ARMY / NAVY / AIR FORCE / MARINES / COAST GUARD / NOAA / USPHS

 

 

                  Revised 01/31/06

 

 

 

                  2001 Recipient of the Sword & Screen Website Design Award

 

 

 

                  

                        Reserve Officers Association has recently received the

                        Golden Web Award for excellence in originality and

                        content, presented by The International Association of

                        Web Masters and Designers.

 

                         SERVING YOU WHILE YOU SERVE YOUR COUNTRY

 

                         

                         Chairman:

                          John E. Scully, Sr. VP - Human Resources, LaSalle Bank

                          Corporation

                          135 S. LaSalle St, Suite 3300, Chicago, IL  60603

                          B (312) 904-8183, Fax (312) 904-2497

                          E-Mail: john.scully@abnamro.com

                           

                          Executive Director

                          lLT Shannon L. Pennell, Camp Lincoln

                          Springfield, IL

                          PH (217) 761-3642, FAX (217) 761-2072

                          Public Affairs Chair:

                          Mr. Michael Peck

                          55 So. Greeley St., Apt. 109, Palatine, IL 60067

                          PH (847) 991-4700 Fax (847) 991-5742

                          Send email to: colpeck@yahoo.com

                          Ombudsmen:

                          Renato Bacci

                          PH (312)904-7114

                          E-Mail: renato.bacci@abnamro.com

 

 

 

                        Upcoming Events          Dismissed Scientist Waiting on

                        Ag Lab

                        

                        ESGR Future Events

                        14 Feb-10 am Executive Committee (EXCOM) Teleconference

                        13-16 Mar- Waterworks Assoc Trade Show, Springfield

                        24 Mar- 10 am EXCOM meeting in Bloomington

                        18 Apr- 10 am EXCOM Teleconference

                        10/11 May- Guard and Reserve Day at Scott AFB

                        19 May- 10 am Quarterly EXCOM meeting in Springfield

                        June- No teleconference, chosen month for bosslift

                        21 July- 10 am EXCOM Teleconference

                        4 Aug- 10 am Quarterly EXCOM meeting in Springfield

                        5 Sep- 10 am EXCOM Teleconference

                        10 Sep- ESGR Freedom Awards Banquet

                        3 Oct- 10 am EXCOM teleconference

                        3 Nov- 10 am Quarterly EXCOM meeting in Peoria

                        5 December- 10 am EXCOM teleconference

                        19-21 Jan 2007- IL ESGR Annual Awards and Training

                        Conference.

 

 

 

                        Dismissed scientist waiting on ag lab

                        BY MATT BUEDEL

                        OF THE JOURNAL STAR

                        PEORIA - A former ag lab scientist whose claim of

                        military prejudice at the research center sparked public

                        protest and government probes has been cleared to return

                        to work.

                        A federal arbitrator last month awarded Bruno Mannarelli

                        more than a year of back pay plus interest and full

                        restoration to his post as a microbiologist. Though the

                        decision favored Mannarelli, it also vindicated the lab

                        of his most serious allegations.

                        The Dec. 2 judgment rejected Mannarelli's claims that

                        theNational Center for Agricultural Utilization Research

                        retaliated against him for repeated military deployments

                        and leading successful union grievances as its

president.

                        The arbitrator instead ordered Mannarelli back to work

                        based on a technicality of his termination.

                        Nearly two months have passed since then, but Mannarelli

                        has yet to cash a check or step foot in labs where he

                        once experimented. The delay has disconcerted him enough

                        to contact the office of U.S. Rep. Ray LaHood, R-Peoria,

                        in an effort to speed his return.

                        "I expected to start fresh and begin anew, but it just

                        hasn't happened," Mannarelli said recently. "I guess I

                        shouldn't be surprised."

                        Lab director Peter Johnsen, however, said the doors will

                        be open to Mannarelli once a union contract issue

                        complicated by his reinstatement is clarified.

                        "We are planning on reinstating him, and we will honor

                        the direction of the arbitrator," Johnsen said this

                        week. "It's a very confusing ruling, and we're in the

                        process of figuring out what to do."

                        LaHood spoke directly to Johnsen after being contacted

                        by Mannarelli but has decided to "wait and see what

                        happens" before taking any action, Mannarelli said.

                        Other investigations of Mannarelli's claims, meanwhile,

                        continue slowly or have fallen by the wayside.

                        After filing union grievances, Mannarelli also lodged a

                        complaint about the lab's alleged discrimination against

                        military service with the U.S. Department of Labor's

                        Division of Veterans Employment and Training Services.

                        That inquiry is still pending.

                        News accounts of Mannarelli's situation in late 2004

                        additionally prompted Lt. Gov. Pat Quinn's office to

                        launch its own investigation into whether the ag lab

                        violated the Illinois Citizen Soldier Initiative.

                        That measure, signed into law in August 2004, extended

                        protection under the Illinois Human Rights Act from only

                        active military personnel to include reservists.

                        "We were told by the federal investigators that they had

                        things covered," said Eric Schuller, a senior policy

                        adviser for Quinn. "Fortunate or unfortunate, we had to

                        let things run their course."

                        Military motives?

                        Mannarelli's civilian career unraveled in October 2004,

                        when research leader Cletus Kurtzman deemed his

                        performance "unacceptable" and proposed his removal.

                        Johnsen finalized the termination a month later.

                        The timing of the events and statements from Kurtzman

                        made Mannarelli, a colonel in military intelligence with

                        the U.S. Army Reserves, question whether the

                        institutional inconvenience of his deployments factored

                        into his discharge.

                        A reservist for more than 25 years - a few years longer

                        than he's worked at the lab - Mannarelli was called up

                        for the first Gulf War and activated again at the onset

                        of the American invasion ofIraq in 2003.

                        He had been deployed three times in the 20 months before

                        the lab gave him its own set of marching orders. The

                        termination was final Nov. 12, 2004, a few days before

                        Mannarelli shipped out again - this time

                        toWashington,D.C., for several months to develop a

                        collaborative pilot program aimed at identifying

                        bioterrorist activity.

                        One charge in his grievance claimed the lab violated the

                        Uniformed Service Employment and Re-employment Rights

                        Act, or USERRA, when it let him go. The act prohibits

                        employers from discriminating against employees because

                        of their military service.

                        On Mannarelli's first day back at the lab after a 10-day

                        deployment, Oct. 1, 2004, Kurtzman quizzed him on gene

                        sequencing and methanol yeast experiments, neither of

                        which was complete.

                        Both projects had been assigned July 9 of that year, but

                        Mannarelli had been activated twice, for a total of 23

                        days, since that date. The deployments were to prepare

                        for the bioterrorism program he had been pegged to help

                        create.

                        A log Kurtzman kept during those months hinted at his

                        disapproval of the deployments' interference with

                        research schedules, detailing his belief that Mannarelli

                        could defer his activations but "enjoyed doing military

                        duties more than his research duties."

                        A memo Kurtzman sent to Mannarelli even demanded contact

                        information for "individuals that have direct knowledge

                        and influence on your military duty orders and times of

                        service."

                        In an interview with the Journal Star in December 2004,

                        Kurtzman said Mannarelli's "military duties have nothing

                        to do with this. We've been always extending deadlines

                        for him to accommodate the military."

                        The arbitrator, while calling Kurtzman's requests

                        "excessive," ultimately agreed and denied that part of

                        Mannarelli's grievance.

                        Union action

                        Mannarelli also alleged that his dismissal was fueled by

                        resentment of several successful union challenges to lab

                        management that he orchestrated as president of Local

                        3247 of the American Federation of Government Employees.

                        The arbitrator rejected that claim, as well. But

                        extensive comments in the ruling paint a grim portrait

                        of union relations with center director Johnsen.

                        Mannarelli said he began to encounter problems at the

                        lab after he assisted in and testified at a fellow

                        scientist's discrimination hearing in 2000. The black

                        scientist had been denied promotion to a supervisory

                        position.

                        The minority plaintiff won, slapping Johnsen with a

                        finding of discrimination and a letter of reprimand in

                        his personnel file, according to the arbitrator's

                        judgment. The terms of the settlement are sealed, and

                        the black scientist is bound by a confidentiality

                        agreement not to discuss the case.

                        Johnsen characterized that Equal Employment Opportunity

                        complaint and subsequent settlements of union labor

                        disputes in 2000, 2001 and 2002 with "comments such as,

                        'Those (union) guys are at it again,' i.e.,

                        light-hearted, non-malicious references to

                        disagreements," the arbitrator's report noted.

                        The ruling, however, concluded otherwise: "Clearly, the

                        labor-management relationship has gone beyond friendly

                        disagreement."

                        Mannarelli's grievance connected the union cases to

                        adverse evaluations of his performance beginning in

                        2001, when he was placed on an agency-dictated

                        "performance improvement plan," or PIP - a period in

                        which an employee has a prescribed amount of time to

                        achieve clearly defined goals and rectify unsatisfactory

                        ratings.

                        Mannarelli received a revised rating of "fully

                        successful" after the 2001 PIP. When he returned from

                        Operation Iraqi Freedom duties in May 2003 and could not

                        complete project goals assigned before that deployment

                        by the end of the year, he was granted a four-month

                        extension. He then was placed on another PIP in June

                        2004.

                        The PIP, however, also carries an inherent threat of

                        dismissal. The agency policy includes a clause that

                        authorizes "action to reduce in grade or remove" an

                        employee who reverts back to unacceptable performance up

                        to one year from the start of the PIP.

                        The summer 2004 PIP lasted 31 days and earned Mannarelli

                        a "fully successful" rating when it ended July 2, 2004.

                        The projects assigned a week later led to an

                        unacceptable performance rating and resulted in the

                        proposal to remove him.

                        The arbitrator ruled that management's documentation of

                        Mannarelli's activities sufficiently proved he would

                        have been removed regardless of union victories he

                        shepherded.

                        "On balance, I find the record to be more one of

                        scientific differences than of anti-union animus"

                        between Kurtzman and Mannarelli, the arbitrator wrote in

                        denying the grievance.

                        Technical troubles

                        Though the 2004 PIP was reinforced by that rejection of

                        union-related reprisals, it still proved pivotal in

                        overturning Mannarelli's termination.

                        Ag lab policy delineates PIPs as lasting between a

                        minimum of 90 days and maximum of 15 months. If PIP

                        goals are reached in less than 90 days, a supervisor

                        must wait at least 90 days from the start of the PIP

                        before rendering a new rating.

                        By returning Mannarelli to "fully successful" status

                        July 9, 2004, a premature evaluation was made, thus

                        invalidating the "unacceptable" rating and removal three

                        months later.

                        "I have no authority to ignore the intent of two clear

                        and consistent provisions requiring 90 days," the

                        arbitrator wrote.

                        New twist

                        The decision that mandated reinstatement for Mannarelli

                        ironically appears to also be the reason he has not yet

                        been hired back, according to Johnsen's interpretation

                        of ruling.

                        The finding inadvertently invalidated the union's

                        contract, Johnsen says, by circumventing language in the

                        contract and relying on descriptions contained in agency

                        policy.

                        "It's very troubling because it overruled the contract,"

                        Johnsen said. "What it did - and this is the challenge

                        for us now - is it overruled the negotiated bargaining

                        agreement with the union."

                        Mannarelli, on the other hand, sees that analysis as

                        simply a continuation of hard feelings toward him

                        personally and the union as a whole.

                        "What I really wanted was for them to clean the slate

                        and say we're going to work together," he said. "It

                        looks like that's just not going to happen."

                        Matt Buedel can be reached at 686-3187 or

                        mbuedel@pjstar.com.

                        

                        top of page

 

                  Website Maintained by Lusage Solutions, Inc.

                  Copyright© 2001 - 2003 QuincyNet.com a division of HCW Ltd.

                  Copyright© 2001 - 2003 Reserve Officers Association Department

                  of Illinois

                  All Rights Reserved

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joseph F. Prola

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, February 24, 2008

Section: LOCAL
Page: 17

Joseph F. Prola

SPRINGFIELD – Joseph F. Prola, 97, died Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2008, at Regency Nursing Care Residence. A resident of Springfield since 1930, he was the son of immigrants from Northern Italy.

Mr. Prola was born May 23, 1910, in Houghton, Mich., the son of Peter and Mary Verbena Prola. He grew up in Wilsonville and was a graduate of the University of Illinois. On Nov. 21, 1936, he married Olive Hill, who preceded him in death in 1995.

A member of ROTC at the University of Illinois, Mr. Prola graduated as a second lieutenant, was called to active duty in April 1941, served as an instructor at the Army General Staff School in Fort Leavenworth, and was called in October 1944 to serve at Third Army Headquarters, General George Patton commanding. Then a lieutenant colonel, he served as General Patton's supply officer in the Battle of the Bulge. He was promoted to the rank of full colonel in August 1945 and served in the reserves until May 1970. During his reserve officer service, he taught at the Pentagon during six terms on active duty and was

 

president of the Illinois Reserve Officers Association.

Mr. Prola's professional career began as a clerk at an insurance agency in Springfield in 1930, where he met his wife, Olive. He soon became the executive director and president of the association and an owner of what became Joseph F. Prola & Co. Insurance Agency. He also worked in the Savings and Loan Industry as president of Sangamon Home Savings and as executive vice president of Security Federal Savings and Loan Association, which subsequently became Security Bank. He retired at the age of 86.

Active in community organizations in Springfield for many years, Mr. Prola was a 40-year member and national president of the American Business Club, chairman of the Springfield United Fund in 1960, president of the Springfield and Sangamon County United Way, advisory board member for the Salvation Army for 15 years,

 

president of the Springfield Chamber of Commerce,

 

Lincoln Library Board member and president, member of the Illinois Savings and Loan Board for more than 20 years and president in 1986, president of the Illinois Association of Insurance Agents in 1955, president of the Illinois League of Savings Institutions in 1970 and on the Executive Committee of the United States League of Savings Institutions from 1975 to 1978. Mr. Prola also was a registered lobbyist for both the insurance and savings and loan industries. He was a member of Illini Country Club for more than 50 years, serving on its board of directors and as president in 1959, and of the Sangamo Club.

Joe also was a champion bowler during his early years in Springfield. He was an avid golfer who, along with his wife, Olive, traveled all over the country to play at premier courses, to Scotland to play at St. Andrews, and especially to Pinehurst, where he scored a hole-in-one at the No. 4 Course. He loved reading, ballroom dancing, gin and bridge.

He is survived by his daughter, Dee (husband, state Rep. Mark) Beaubien; four grandchildren, Mark J. Beaubien, Robert P. Beaubien, Joseph Prola and Hilary Prola; four great-grandchildren, Annie, Bobby, Ella and Mark; niece, Connie Deatherage; and nephew, Rich Berutti. He was preceded in death by his wife, Olive Prola; and son, Robert H. Prola.

Visitation will be from 4 to 7 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 24, 2008, at Boardman-Smith Funeral Chapel. A funeral service will be at 10 a.m. Monday, Feb. 25, 2008, at the funeral chapel. Interment will follow in Oak Ridge Cemetery, where military rites will be accorded by the Interveterans Burial Detail of Sangamon County.

Memorial contributions may be made to Regency Staff Continuing Education Fund, 2120 W. Washington St., Springfield, IL 62702.

Visit the online obituary at www.boardman-smith.net.

Caption: Joseph F. Prola

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Xa dennispmoore site – bruner – ucm – cellini – guy that hit me with car –

Xa sd – guy in white lab coat – ran into me on highway 5

 

 

 

Bernard Schoenburg: McCann OK with tea party, 9/12 support

 

By Anonymous

THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER

Posted Jul 17, 2011 @ 12:07 AM

People associated with local tea party and 9/12 groups were among those who cheered on state Sen. SAM McCANN, R-Carlinville, when he announced last week he is running for the state Senate in the new 50th District.

Among 35 or so people at United Contractors Midwest — run by McCann backer JIM BRUNER of Jacksonville — was RICH BRAHLER, owner of Brahler’s Truckers Supply in Jacksonville, and active in the “Take Back Illinois 9/12” organization. Brahler and his company combined to donate, loan or otherwise help the McCann campaign to the tune of more than $50,000 in McCann’s successful 2010 toppling of former Democratic state Sen. DEANNA DEMUZIO of Carlinville.

Also at the announcement was SANDY DRAGOO, the Springfield area tea party coordinator, and FRITZ PFISTER, whose intense speeches at tea party events in Springfield have included his appropriation of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I have a dream speech” into tea party talking points at the Illinois State Fairgrounds back in the spring of 2010.

“I dream of a November where every statist liberal congressman and senator that voted in support of this radical administration be voted out of office,” he said as part of that speech.

McCann also had some regular GOP organizational support at the event, as evidenced by appearances by state Rep. JIM WATSON, R-Jacksonville; and GOP county chairmen JOHN BIRCH of Pike County, FLOYD ALEXANDER of Jersey County and RICHARD MEYER of Calhoun County. At least three other GOP county chairs are also backing McCann.

All or parts of nine counties are in the new 50th, including part of Sangamon County. That’s the home of Sen. LARRY BOMKE, R-Springfield, who says he won’t run in the new 50th because it is too big for him to serve the way he prefers to.

Sangamon County’s GOP chairman, TONY LIBRI, a great Bomke fan, hasn’t made an endorsement in the 50th.

During the 2010 campaign, Brahler said McCann was a member of a 9/12 group. I asked McCann at his announcement if he belongs to tea party or 9/12 organizations.

“I don’t know if either one of those groups have membership cards,” McCann said. “You’re a member, I guess, believing in the standard core values and principles that the nation was founded upon … like personal responsibility and accountability.

“So when I show up to a 9/12 meeting or a tea party meeting, what I typically encounter is a roomful of people from all walks of life who are very proud to be Illinoisans, and very proud to be Americans. And they first thing they usually do is say the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag. The next thing they’ll do is maybe say a prayer to their creator. They might even sing the National Anthem.

“And then they typically have a program that talks about those core values and principles that made America great. And so, am I part of that? Regardless of what the label is, I’m all about that.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dennis mcdaniels –

 

Pubworks – garage

 

Brahler link

 

ANNIVERSARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, May 30, 2006


Benanti-55th

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Benanti of Springfield will celebrate their 55th wedding anniversary with a family dinner.

Benanti and the former

 

Pat Brahler

 

were married June 2, 1951, at St. Joseph's Church by the Rev. Francis Corcoran.

Mr. Benanti retired from R.D. Lawrence Construction. Mrs. Benanti is a homemaker.

They are parents of five children, S. Gregory (wife, Terri) Benanti of Louisville, Ky.; and Richard (wife, Jeanine) Benanti, John, (wife, Debbie) Benanti, Mary Pat (husband, Dennis) McDaniels and Nancy (husband, John) Cawley, all of Springfield.

 

 

3 public works employees on leave / While city probes reports that two avoided drug tests

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, July 26, 2007

Author: CHRIS WETTERICH STAFF WRITER

Three Springfield public works employees, including superintendent Dennis McDaniels , have been put on paid administrative leave pending an investigation of allegations that McDaniels let the other workers know about impending drug tests.

The State Journal-Register learned of the actions from four sources who spoke on the condition of anonymity.

The allegations are that the two workers on leave - Gianni Antonacci and Arthur Harmon - took time off July 3 after learning of the impending tests.

Roger Griffith of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Workers Council 31 confirmed that two members of AFSCME in public works are on administrative leave pending an investigation, although he declined to name the employees.

However, Griffith flatly denied that the workers were tipped off that they had been selected for testing.

"They have fully cooperated with the investigation," Griffith said. "They've been charged with no wrongdoing. I don't think any one of them has done anything wrong."

Griffith said he also understands that both passed drug tests administered after July 3.

He could not say how far in advance the union members had scheduled the time off.

Ernie Slottag, a spokesman for Mayor Tim Davlin, declined to say whether the workers are on paid leave or whether they had passed subsequent drug tests. He said those are private personnel matters.

The State Journal-Register reported on Sunday that three workers were alleged to have taken leave after being tipped off to the drug tests. But the third reportedly is no longer under scrutiny because that person's time off was scheduled well in advance.

McDaniels has worked for the city since 1988. Antonacci has been a city employee since 2000, and Harmon's employment dates back to 1985.

Antonacci and Harmon reportedly had failed drug screenings at some point in the past. Slottag and Griffith declined to comment on that.

Forty-three workers in the department were scheduled to be off July 3, one source said. Slottag could not confirm that number, although he said it was likely because that was the day before Independence Day.

The city does have a process for retesting employees who fail the urine-based drug tests, Slottag said.

If a worker fails a drug test, he or she must serve a mandatory 30-day suspension on the first offense and could be fired if a review of their disciplinary records shows it is warranted. A second offense within five years is cause for automatic termination.

Those who are not fired after the first drug-screening failure go into a follow-up test group who can be retested at any time, Slottag said. They also remain in the original, larger pool of people who are tested randomly for drugs.

"They could get more frequent testing," Slottag said. "It's quite likely."

After the allegations were made, the city changed drug-testing procedures so that only human resources director Larry Selinger knows who is to be tested. Those to be tested are now met by a human resources staff member on site and accompanied to the test.

Slottag refused to describe the old procedure in detail "because there's still an investigation." In the past, however, more than one employee, including people in the department of the worker to be tested, could have been informed of who was to be tested, Slottag said.

An independent contractor conducts drug tests for city workers who have commercial driver's licenses as a part of their jobs in public works and at City Water, Light and Power. Firefighters and police officers also are tested.

In addition, about 16 senior city officials, mostly department directors, are subject to drug tests, Slottag said.

 

 

Mcdaniels – comp time guy

 

City worker has pay gripe / Public Works employee wants overtime for attending meeting

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, December 3, 2007

Author: CHRIS WETTERICH STAFF WRITER

A worker in the city's Office of Public Works has written a letter to director Mike Norris complaining that he and others have not been paid for overtime they have worked, while a supervisor has.

Art Lawson, a public works zone manager, wrote Norris on Oct. 31, saying that he and others were required to attend a 15-minute meeting between 6:45 a.m. and 7 a.m., before their shifts started, but were not paid. Lawson asked that he be compensated.

A zone manager monitors where public works services are needed in the city's 10 wards, such as where branches need to be picked up.

"This meeting has been mandatory; however, neither I nor the other attendee receives monetary compensation or compensatory time for attending that meeting," Lawson wrote in the letter, which was obtained by The State Journal-Register from another source.

However, Lawson said,

public works superintendent Dennis McDaniels

gets an hour of compensatory time daily

"for reporting to work earlier than his normal starting time."

"I do not understand why Mr. McDaniels who holds a position higher in the department's chain of command than I receives one hour compensatory time while I and others similarly situated to me have received no compensation for attendance at daily meetings," Lawson wrote.

"At the very least we, should be treated in parity with the treatment extended to Mr. McDaniels."

A review of city payroll records for 2007 shows that McDaniels, who in February was listed as making $38.38 per hour, has received 309 hours of compensatory or paid overtime so far in 2007. All but 35 hours of it was paid, and all of the paid overtime occurred before Oct. 8.

About 266 hours was for out-of-the-ordinary events such as snowstorms, ice storms, the explosion at City Water, Light and Power, hazardous tree removal and the announcement of U.S. Sen. Barack Obama's presidential campaign.

Most of the rest of McDaniels' overtime occurred in the hour immediately preceding the start of his shift at 7 a.m. From June 7 through Sept. 3, McDaniels received no overtime.

Such overtime "is probably pretty typical of everybody in a supervisory capacity," Norris said, adding that about six people fit that description.

"At the end of the day and start of the next day you get people who call in sick, there's equipment that's not fixed. You check on it and get ready for the next day's operation. You review problems that came up."

Lawson and other zone managers were never required to attend the 6:45 a.m. meetings, Norris said, but a directive was issued in August specifically saying they should not attend.

No response has been sent yet to Lawson, Norris said, because the city's human resources and legal departments are reviewing it.

Lawson's letter is the latest in a series of internecine skirmishes in the department.

Some workers fought with the administration last winter after an ice storm over whether it was too cold to work. Allegations of drug problems and the posting of a racially charged flyer have flown about in recent months. And several workers have begun tape-recording their conversations while at work. But Norris said he does not see this dispute as evidence of bigger problems in the department.

"I don't see a larger issue," Norris said.

Copies of Lawson's letter were copied to his attorney, James Baker and Tim Timoney, a local attorney and Sangamon County Democratic Party chairman.

Baker represents Lawson in a lawsuit against Mayor Tim Davlin, Norris, the city and the city's Civil Service Commission. Lawson is contesting a 5-day suspension he received after crashing his city vehicle.

Lawson declined to comment for this story. Baker could not say whether a lawsuit was being considered in relation to the letter.

"I don't know," Baker said. "I thought it was a reasonable concern. I hope that it can be worked out. I know there were other people who had to go to the meetings."

Timoney said he had no idea why Lawson sent the Oct. 31 letter to him and that he has no role in the dispute.

 

 

 

Harold E. McDaniels

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, December 30, 2007

Harold E. McDaniels

CARLINVILLE – Harold Eugene McDaniels, 69, of Carlinville died Saturday, Dec. 29, 2007, at Memorial Medical Center.

He was the son of Charles Francis and Lula Huff McDaniels. He married Betty Wilson.

Mr. McDaniels retired from Cisco Steel as a truck driver.

Surviving are his wife, Betty McDaniels of Carlinville; children, Donald McDaniels (Barbara) of Carlinville, Dennis McDaniels (Mary Pat) of Springfield and Dale McDaniels (Betsy) of Colfax; eight grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and siblings, Beverly McDaniels (Sandy) of Carlinville, Charles McDaniels (Starr) of Pearl and Sheila Bright (Ron) of Petersburg.

 

 

Public works employees file suit / Six allege they weren't paid for time worked

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, January 30, 2008

Author: CHRIS WETTERICH STAFF WRITER chris.wetterich@sj-r.com

Six Springfield public works employees say the city did not pay them for time they worked, a federal lawsuit filed late last week charges.

Tony Manuele, Steve Logue, Joe Greer, Art Lawson, Harvey Richards and Peter Wilford all said that "for many years" they and others were required to report to work 15 minutes ahead of time for a meeting but were not paid for that time.

The city had no comment on the lawsuit Tuesday because it has not yet received it, said Ernie Slottag, a spokesman for Mayor Tim Davlin.

The lawsuit says the city has "on a regular and routine basis compensated an individual having supervisory authority over the plaintiffs for the time he has expended."

However, the suit says, the plaintiffs' requests for similar compensation have been ignored.

Several of the plaintiffs have connections to the local Republican and Democratic parties.

Manuele is a public works zone manager, which means he monitors public works services in designated wards. He is a Republican precinct committeeman.

Logue is also a zone manager and ran for the Springfield Park Board in 2005. Logue is a former Democratic precinct committeeman.

Lawson, a Democrat, is also a zone manager. He has another lawsuit pending against the city, Davlin, public works director Mike Norris and the Civil Service Commission that contests his suspension on allegations he ran a red light and crashed a city vehicle.

Greer, an assistant superintendent, is married to Caroline Petefish, a Democratic precinct committeeman and member of the Springfield Metropolitan Exposition and Auditorium Authority.

Lawson wrote Norris in October complaining about the pay discrepancy. In the letter, he said public works superintendent Dennis McDaniels gets an hour of compensatory time daily "for reporting to work earlier than his normal starting time."

Norris said then that Lawson's attendance at the meetings was not required.

A review of city payroll records for 2007 in December showed that McDaniels, who last year was listed as making $38.38 per hour, received 309 hours of compensatory or paid overtime through November. All but 35 hours of it was paid, and all of the paid overtime occurred before Oct. 8.

About 266 hours was for out-of-the-ordinary events such as snowstorms, ice storms, the explosion at City Water, Light and Power, hazardous tree removal and last year's announcement of U.S. Sen. Barack Obama's presidential campaign.

Most of the rest of McDaniels' overtime occurred in the hour immediately preceding the start of his shift at 7 a.m.

Norris has described McDaniels' overtime and comp time as typical of a supervisor in the department. He told aldermen last week that it was "the cost of doing business."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brahler - raynolds

 

 

 

 

Raynolds claims implied consent –

 

Father is scb – Charles robbins -

 

 

 

 

 

Raynolds – went to college w/ him – he knew sgro

 

Didn’t know him very well -

 

 

Father is SCB – randy

 

Charles robbins real estate/roth/dragoo –

(and see other tea party link, brahler is at wedding)

 

Also randy goes to Il realty assoc –

 

And was on study group for creation of SCDPH – Vaughn – animal control/jett – sharmin/community resources

 

 

 

 

 

Pete wagner is SCI  associate soccer coach – with Wharton – brahler is at wedding

 

And works for raynolds -

 

 

 

Brahler link

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, October 6, 1991



Wagner-Maddox Jennifer Lyn Maddox and

 

Peter Block Wagner,

 

both of Springfield, were united in marriage at 6 p.m. Sept. 7 at Westminster Presbyterian Church.

The Rev. James A. Todd officiated.

Cress and Laurie Maddox, 1039 Williams Blvd., are parents of the bride. Richard and Judith Wagner, 1621 Bates Ave., are parents of the groom.

Serving as maid of honor was Amanda Maddox.

Bridesmaids were Sarah Maddox, Jessica Maddox, Elizabeth Gramlich, Andrea Bornstein, Molly Spengler and Whitney Wagner Rosen.

Best man was John Wagner. Groomsmen were Judd Wagner, Alan Loken, Mike Brahler, Steven Rosen, Dave Bushey and John Barfield. Ushers were Mike Stutz, Mike Seiler, Tracy Predmore, Steve Brobst and Cress Maddox.

A reception was held at Illini Country Club.

The bride is a graduate of Springfield High School and Illinois State University. She is employed by Maintenance Supply Corp.

The groom is a graduate of Springfield High School and Bradley University. He is employed as an engineer with John Raynolds Registered Land Surveyor and is

 

associate coach for

Springfield College in Illinois men's soccer.


The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lincolnshire – Williamson – manufacturers – Gregg durham – note beagles

 

RANDY RAYNOLDS HAS BECOME A PRINCIPAL IN THE JOHN B. CLARK FIRM

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, March 14, 1990

In what followers of the Springfield real estate industry view as a significant change, RANDY RAYNOLDS has become a principal in the JOHN B.

CLARK REALTOR firm.

Raynolds , who had been director of marketing and sales for Julie Davis Inc.

Realtors since 1985, will be handling essentially the same duties with Clark.

Raynolds said the partnership arrangement "offered the opportunity to get back into ownership." He was owner of Raynolds Realty in Springfield from 1972 to 1985. Jay Clark, a 27-year veteran of Springfield real estate, has operated his own firm as a sole proprietorship for most of those years.

"It's a successful business (averaging more than $60 million in sales for the past decade), but the demands of that success make it more and more difficult for one person to handle," Raynolds said.

With Clark, Raynolds will be developing marketing programs, recruiting agents and handling general office management. Clark will be able to spend more time promoting home sales, listings and new construction, particularly in the new Lincolnshire subdivision.

"Both of us can become more active in community projects," Raynolds said.

John B. Clark Realtor has about 40 agents operating from offices on South Sixth Street and South MacArthur Boulevard. Raynolds said the company will try to build its sales force to between 50 and 55 people.

While at Julie Davis, another of the city's largest real estate companies, Raynolds implemented such marketing tools as kiosk home display booths and a television program that displays listed homes.

Among the things he'll be working on with John B. Clark is development of training, recruiting and alternative commission programs to allow the company to maintain its market position in the 1990s.

One alternative commission concept is a 100 percent commission program, in which sales agents pay the firm a monthly overhead fee but keep all their comissions. Companies such as Re/Max Professionals have used the concept successfully in recent years.

Raynolds has been active in professional real estate associations, serving as president of the Springfield Association of Realtors in 1982 and president of the Illinois Association of Realtors two years ago. He has been a director with the National Association of Realtors since 1980.

 

 

 

GET REALTY / SELLER WORKS TO FIND SEARCHERS' DREAM HOME

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, April 27, 1998

Author: NATALIE BOEHME STAFF WRITER

Just think of Lynn Raynolds as the matchmaker of the Springfield housing market.

"It's a matchmaking kind of business," said Raynolds of Re/Max Professionals. "I listen to people and try to figure out what they want."

After 13 years in the industry, it's a skill at which she is adept. Raynolds is among the top three realty sellers in the Springfield office, and her accolades include a certificate of excellence from REAL Trends Inc. and consistently making the 100 percent club, which recognizes Realtors whose annual income is in excess of $100,000. Raynolds realizes her job is much more than locating a dream home, and that's why every house hunt begins with a long conversation.

"Anybody can get on the computer and see what's out there. You have to know about the schools, where can they find a good gym or the soccer field. It's all about service," Raynolds said. "I have to know the community, as well as the housing market.

"It's my job to see what their main priorities are. I always put myself into the buyers' shoes."

For recent transplants Dave and Carolyn Smith, those priorities are a unique living space that will accommodate their family of four while doubling as a wise investment. It'd also help to be within 15 minutes of either downtown hospital, where Dave is on call as a pediatric surgeon.

Oh, and there's daughter Ariel's requirement -- a mature yard that has potential for separate tree houses for her and her brother.

During a recent outing with Carolyn Smith and Ariel, Raynolds clicked off the community features while pulling a key out of a lock box on a show house in Woodland Trail.

"It's a lot of details you don't see at other places -- the wide trim, the vaulted ceilings, a lot of finishing touches," Raynolds said after the Smiths had given the house a once-over.

Before entering another house, Raynolds warns, "This is a fixer-upper. There's a lot of TLC that's needed."

Two hours and four homes later, Raynolds and the Smiths are heading their separate ways with an appointment to look at more homes next week.

No sparks yet, but Raynolds is not daunted.

"The Smiths have taken a little longer than average, but we'll find them something," she said before returning to her office to work on some listings.

"Showing homes is the fun part of my work. The listings -- now that takes a lot more work . . . getting the bid, getting all the measurements on the house, investigating the local market to set the price, ads and home tours . . . It's time-consuming, and you feel the pressure and stress the seller is feeling."

Raynolds has been putting herself in the clients' shoes since 1984, when she got her Realtor license after taking over her husband's realty business.

She had been a social worker, but husband Randy became involved with the Illinois Realtors Association and had less time for the family business. Lynn quickly filled his shoes.

"If you work hard and do the best job you can, they'll come back and send you their friends," she said.

Caption: Lynn Raynolds took over the family business as a real estate agent

 

 

 

Girls soccer – SHS= Wharton

 

AROUND THE WORLD FOR SOCCER SOCCER TALENTS TAKE SHS' RAYNOLDS TO CHINA

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, February 4, 1993

Author: HAL PILGER STAFF WRITER

Halfway around the world, Kristin Raynolds is living in tomorrow while experiencing yesterday.

Raynolds , a senior midfielder for the Springfield High School girls soccer team and last year's State Journal-Register Girls Soccer Player of the Year, has begun a once-in-a-lifetime educational opportunity.

She's spending three weeks in China with the Chicago Sparta Soccer Club, which is competing in the Women's International Football Tournament in Kunming.

Raynolds left Jan. 26 and she'll return home Feb. 16. "They had a big ceremonial parade and banquet," said Bob Wharton, Springfield girls soccer coach. "Where they're living is like an Olympic village.

"She called (Tuesday) and we talked very briefly at about 4 a.m. They're 14 hours ahead of us. When it's 8 p.m. here, it's already 10 a.m. the next day over there.

"On Wednesday they were going to have a game against China, which was going to be on their national television. Kristin was pretty excited about playing in a 60,000-seat stadium."

A far cry from Eisenhower Field . . . "I told Kristin high school soccer is the last thing she'll be thinking about when she gets back," said Wharton, whose team will begin practice about three weeks after Raynolds returns. "I told her I didn't want her even touching a soccer ball for a few weeks when she gets back."

Sparta is representing the United States in the 10-team round-robin tourney, which features three of the world's six best women's teams -- China, Sweden and Norway.

The whole thing came about through an elaborate set of circumstances, including the fact the Sparta club is the reigning under-17 girls national champions.

They'll be facing some of the world's top women players, many of whom are around 25 years old, because the World Cup champion U.S. national team turned down the invitation in order to compete in another tournament.

Chinese national Coach Shang Rui Hua then contacted Sparta Coach Judy Keller about the availability of the Naperville/Aurora-based club for which Raynolds has been a member the last few years.

The Chinese coaching staff had spent time working with Sparta last summer during a U.S. training tour after Sparta had won the national title in Richmond, Va. Keller readily accepted the invitation and quickly added several top players from Texas, Florida and Michigan to help bolster an already impressive but youthful squad.

"When the U.S. (national) team dropped out, this was the best team the U.S. could send to China," Wharton said. "China hosted the women's World Cup in 1991, and it's their national team that Sparta is playing.

"Each team has the top 18 players from their country. This is a world championship tournament. It'll be tough."

But it's also a world-class adventure for Midwestern girls like Raynolds , who are experiencing first-hand not only the differences in global soccer but in global culture.

"Each team has two guides," Wharton said. "They're going to do a lot of sightseeing. They are being hosted by the Chinese government, so it's all free."

Wharton said arrangements have been made for Raynolds to complete any school work she's missing while on the trip.

"The district (186) and her teachers are real supportive of her taking this trip," Wharton said. "She's living history and seeing it, not just reading about it."

Caption: Kristin Raynolds is a member of the team representing the United States in a soccer tournament in China.

 

 

 

PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, May 25, 2008



RANDY RAYNOLDS has joined Coldwell Banker Devonshire Realty as managing partner in the western region. He will be responsible for leading and managing the residential brokerage offices in Springfield, Decatur, Virden, Lincoln and Chatham.

Raynolds has more than 35 years of sales, marketing and real estate education experience. Previously, he was the deputy vice president of the Illinois Association of Realtors in Springfield, where he developed broker/owner outreach programs on Professional Standards, Code of Ethics and industry-related issues and trends.

Devonshire Group LLC is headquartered in Champaign.

 

 

 

 

 

Manufactured housing – hart – homeway – ICI – spradlin – ubc – kwikwall – neisewander – arbeitman -

 

 

MOBILE HOME ORDINANCE TABLED SANGAMON COUNTY BOARD COMMITTEE TO STUDY MORE SUGGESTIONS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, May 4, 1993

Author: HILARY SHENFELD STAFF WRITER

The Sangamon County Board on Monday tabled a resolution that would have imposed a waiting period and more stringent requirements for potential

mobile home owners.

Board member John Raynolds ,

 

chairman of the

county's planning and

zoning committee,

 

said a vote may be taken on the issue at the board's next meeting. He said he needed the extra time to incorporate some suggestions from the Illinois Manufactured Housing Association regarding the term "permanent foundation."

The proposed ordinance -- which would not affect existing mobile homes or mobile home parks -- would require homes to be placed on a foundation, thus allowing the county to impose property taxes. Mobile home owners now pay taxes based on a home's model year and square footage.

Raynolds and manufactured housing representatives are discussing what constitutes a permanent foundation.

The proposed resolution also would require potential mobile home dwellers to wait up to three months while their request for residency goes through the zoning board of appeals and county board.

"I think that homeowners in the county should have a right to say if they would want a mobile home on a tract of land next to them," Raynolds said Monday. "It will cause an inconvenience . . . but I feel that's a warranted change to the ordinance."

Mobile homes can have a detrimental effect on property values, he said, and the ordinance would give nearby residents or other objectors, as well as county board members, the chance to review the location.

Currently, mobile homes can be placed on land zoned "A" (agriculture) or "RM-4" (mobile or single family homes) without such requirements.

A group of mobile home proponents was present at Monday's meeting to protest the proposed new guidelines, but left when the issue was tabled.

In other action, the county board: o Announced its Adopt-A-Highway program, which will allow volunteer groups to remove litter and debris from portions of county roads. The county must supply reflective jackets and garbage bags, and county employees then will pick up the filled bags, said board member Bill Clark.

The program will not cost the county any money, as the state will provide signs indicating which group is responsible for cleaning the road. o Tabled an ordinance that would have required taverns where dancing is allowed, or those where the liquor control commission deems necessary, to provide security officers. The proposal was tabled so the Sangamon County state's attorney's office could determine the legality of the issue, including how many officers would be necessary and at whose discretion, said Larry Bomke, county board chairman.

The ordinance may come up again at next month's meeting.

 

 

 

MCNEIL DECLINES STATE OFFICE BID

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, December 11, 1993

Author: BERNARD SCHOENBURG

After testing the waters, Springfield Ward 2 Ald. Frank McNeil has decided to stay out of the pool of statewide candidates in the March primary.

McNeil said Friday he won't be running for the Democratic nomination for lieutenant governor.

After reviewing the time and money needed to mount a statewide campaign, coupled with his late look at the possibility of a candidacy, McNeil said he decided not to run.

"I did get a lot of encouragement from people inside the party," McNeil said.

He said it would have taken a tremendous amount of work to gather the needed 5,000 petition signatures in time for the close of filing on Monday.

McNeil said earlier this week that he thought he would be able to attract a broader base of support than either of the announced Democratic candidates for lieutenant governor -- state Sen. Penny Severns of Decatur and businesswoman Sheila Smith of Palatine.

Meanwhile, GOP Sangamon County Board incumbent John Raynolds of Springfield said that he is not seeking another term in District 24. "It was a tough decision for me," Raynolds said, adding that he thinks he's done a good job. However, he said the time commitment to serve adequately had become too great.

 

Raynolds runs his own land-surveying business.

Sangamon County Republican Chairman Irv Smith said the party will support Andy Van Meter for the position. Raynolds said he has signed Van Meter's petition and will support him.

Jim Sargent of Springfield, a Democrat who ran against Raynolds in 1992, filed Friday for another shot at the District 24 seat. Sargent is a computer programmer with the Illinois Department of Public Health.

Smith also said that his son, Chip Smith, who works for the Illinois Department of Central Management Services, will run for the District 22 county board seat now held by Democrat Dan Robertson, who has filed for re-election; and Greg Stumpf, a GOP committeeman and plumber, will seek the District 16 seat now held by Democrat Joe McCarthy.

 

 

 

 

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, September 22, 2002



Henderson- Raynolds

Elizabeth Paisley Raynolds and David Joseph Henderson, both of Bolingbrook, were married at 4:30 p.m. Aug. 10, 2002, at First Presbyterian Church by the Rev. Gordon McLean.

The bride is the daughter of Randy and Lynn Raynolds of Springfield. The groom is the son of Barbara Henderson and Phillip Henderson, both of Galesburg.

Serving as maid of honor was Julie Raynolds . Bridesmaids were Katie Raynolds , Julie Keebler, Tiffany Warren and Kristin Raynolds .

Best man was Michael Kennedy. Groomsmen were Mark Henderson, Scott Raynolds , David Rupert and Mike Henderson. Usher was Ryan Panagos.

A reception was held at the Illini Country Club.

The bride is a graduate of the University of Kentucky and is attending the University of Chicago for her MBA degree. She is employed by AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals. The groom is a graduate of Northern Illinois University. He also is employed by AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals.

 

 

 

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 10, 2003


Panagos- Raynolds

Julie Crane Raynolds of Springfield and Ryan Edward Panagos of St. Louis were married at 7 p.m. June 14, 2003, at the De Menil Mansion in St. Louis by the Rev. Michael Trautman.

The bride is the daughter of Randy and Lynn Raynolds of Springfield. The groom is the son of Dennis and Beckey Panagos and John and Jane Timmons, all of St. Louis.

Serving as maid of honor was Katie Raynolds . Serving as matron of honor was Beth Henderson. Bridesmaids were Sanna Calhoun, Debbie Hawickhorst and Barb Palmer.

Best man was Mark Clardy. Groomsmen were Chris Jones, Bryan Barts, Doug Caskey and Jason Wandersee. Ushers were Scott Raynolds and Alex Panagos.

A reception was held at the De Menil Mansion.

The bride is a graduate of Truman State University. She is employed by Colliers Turley Martin Tucker as property manager for West Port Plaza. The groom is a graduate of the University of Missouri at Columbia. He is employed by Gaus Scott Co. as a commercial sales representative.

The couple lives in St. Louis.

 

 

 

 

Beagles – Wharton

 

SHS' BEAGLES TOP PLAYER IN CONFERENCE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, June 12, 1996

Author: CHRIS GRIMM STAFF WRITER

Megan Beagles' last game for the Springfield High School girls soccer team didn't quite turn out the way she wanted.

In a 5-4 loss to Peoria Richwoods in the Peoria Supersectional, Beagles scored two goals, assisted on two others and did, seemingly, whatever it would take to boost the Lady Senators into the state tournament.

"The only other thing she could have done was work the concession stand," SHS coach Bob Wharton says. "I'm in my eighth year at Springfield and I've never seen a player play like that."

It was the kind of game that prompted Wharton to proclaim Beagles one of the best girls soccer players ever to wear a Senators' uniform.

For Wharton to lump Beagles in a group which includes former Senators' Liz Scheffler, Kristin Raynolds and Beth Raynolds -- to name a few -- should come as no surprise to those associated with girls soccer in the Springfield area.

As a senior Beagles notched 21 goals and 10 assists en route to earning one of two Springfield area berths on the all-state team. Megan Steward of Chatham Glenwood also was an all-state selection.

Beagles' statistics are an improvement from the year before, when she registered 21 goals and seven assists. But it's what the numbers can't say that helped make Beagles The State Journal-Register Female Soccer Player of the Year in the Central State Eight Conference.

Being the lone senior on a team hit by injuries early on, Beagles was called upon to step up and provide leadership.

"As a senior she meant as much as any player we've had," Wharton says. "From a leadership standpoint, she really stepped it up."

The Senators lost starters Julie Chrisman, Stacey Courtwright and Kelly Taylor to season-ending knee injuries.

"Partially," Beagles answers when asked if she had to assume leadership responsibilities. "But the juniors really stepped up."

The team regrouped from the injuries, finished 17-5-1 and kept alive its eight-year streak of being one of the final 32 teams still playing in late May.

However, it was Peoria Richwoods that scored in double overtime, giving the Knights the victory and dashing Beagles' hopes of making the state tournament.

"We had a pretty good season," Beagles says. "We weren't expected to be that good. It really made us stronger going through the adversity."

One of the areas Beagles had to step up was her versatility.

"The thing about Megan is that her points went up each year," Wharton says. "This year she had to play midfield more. We put her back there to get her into the game. That says a lot about Megan. She's played striker her whole life." "That was different," Beagles says. "I like all the positions. As long as I'm playing, I'm happy."

Beagles still hasn't decided where she will attend college next season, although she's leaning toward Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, where she would play soccer. But Beagles has other offers on the table that center around volleyball instead of soccer.

Beagles averaged 3.8 kills and 1.1 service aces per game during the volleyball season. The statistics were the second-best marks in the CS8. Beagles and Sacred Heart-Griffin's Melisa Lovekamp were named co-Central State Eight Conference Players of the Year by the SJ-R. "That was my biggest problem, deciding on college," says Beagles of choosing between soccer and volleyball.

Regardless of which sport Beagles chooses, just the fact she won't be available for the Senators on the soccer field will be a blow.

"I'm going to miss her tremendously," Wharton says. "Someone asked me the other day if we lose much to graduation. We only lose one senior, but it's going to hit us tremendously."

Caption: Megan Beagles led the Senators with 21 goals and 10 assists this season.

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, September 15, 1991

Koehl-Reed Anne-Marie Reed of Buffalo and James Joseph Koehl of Chatham were married

at noon Aug. 10 at St. Ann Church, Niantic. The Rev. Richard Chiola performed the ceremony.

Lee and Kathey Reed of Buffalo are parents of the bride. Joe and Mary Ann Koehl of Sherman are parents of the groom.

Serving as matron of honor was Lara Vespa. Bridesmaids were Melesa Kresse, Gail Rogers and Elizabeth Lacy. Flower girls were Colleen Raynolds and Alexis Rogers.

Best man was Eric Rees. Groomsmen were Steve Willoughby, Christopher Reed and Ward Thomson. Ushers were Tony Vespa and David McGlothin.

A reception was held in the Albert Hall in Buffalo.

The bride is a graduate of Tri-City High School and attended Lincoln Land Community College. She is employed by Kinder-Care Learning Center. The groom is a graduate of Williamsville High School, Lincoln Land Community College and the University of Illinois. He is employed by the state.

The couple will reside in Chatham.

 

 

 

REDUCED GREENFIELD PARK PLANS MOVE ON DESPITE OBJECTIONS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, November 7, 1997

Author: JEFFERSON ROBBINS STAFF WRITER

Angry neighbors watched a proposal for a rural subdivision roll through a planning committee Thursday over their strenuous objections.

The Land Subdivision Committee of the Springfield-Sangamon County Regional Planning Commission unanimously approved the draft plans for Greenfield Park, a far-west subdivision with 290 residential lots.

It's only one step on the road to the subdivision's construction. More formal plans must pass muster both with the full planning commission and the Springfield City Council.

Developer Mike Ryan of Springfield had withdrawn plans for his original 339-lot subdivision in the face of heavy heat from irate neighbors. Many feared the development would increase flooding and ruin the rural temperament of the area.

The Greenfield Park lots, to be built on 104 acres near West Washington Street and Bradforton Road, were reduced to 290 plus several acres of open space set aside for parks, along with a buffer area between Greenfield and the nearby Oakwood Estates neighborhood, said Ryan's planner John Raynolds . The smallest lot size grew from the original 65-foot width to 75 feet, Raynolds said.

Houses would sell for $87,000 to $150,000. Still, the new layout didn't appease many neighbors, who peppered the committee with questions and criticism before the vote Thursday at Lincoln Library.

"Anytime we allow a developer to move into this community, take total control, they're no longer developers," said Warren Atherton. "They're warlords." "It seems to me that we're cut out of the process after this point, unless we bring some political pressure to stop this," said Patrick Burns, a resident of Oakwood Estates.

Members of the committee -- composed of planning commission staff, Sangamon County highway officials, Springfield city engineers and City Water, Light and Power superintendents -- protested that they only analyze subdivision plans to make sure they comply with city and county subdivision ordinances and state law.

The plan for Greenfield Park meets all legal requirements, they said.

"We're looking at a subdivision with certain size lots and a street system that works," said Rich Berning, Springfield city engineer.

Committee chairman Steve Stewart, CWLP superintendent of water engineering, said he sympathized with neighbors' fears, but the committee had to vote based on compliance with the ordinances.

"If you want to restrict development in farm ground through politics, I'll help you, because I think we ought to do that," he said. ". . . But the only thing this committee can do is make a recommendation based on the law."

Don Craven, a Springfield attorney and longtime resident of the rural area, said the failure this week of Pleasant Plains schools to get a building-bond issue passed makes the subdivision proposal dangerous. Children moving into Greenfield Park would attend school in Pleasant Plains, where school officials say their classrooms are overflowing.

"If you're looking for a technical hook to hang your hat on, there's one," he told the committee in urging a no vote.

Committee passage sends a recommendation to the full planning commission that it approve the subdivision, contingent upon its annexation into the city. That annexation can't occur until Greenfield Park somehow becomes contiguous to the city's boundaries.

Ryan has said he's in negotiations with nearby landowners to create a bridge to the city limits so annexation can go forward.

 

 

 

 

PAT NOONAN ELECTED AS NEW CHAIRMAN OF COUNTY BOARD

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, September 13, 1986

Author: Jay Fitzgerald

On a straight party vote, Republicans elected Pat Noonan as the new chairman of the Sangamon County Board on Friday.

Noonan, 57, an 11-year veteran of the board, succeeds former Chairman Richard Austin, who retired Friday after eight years in office. He is taking a job with the federal General Services Adminstration in Chicago.

Vic Pambianco, a three-year veteran of the board and at one point a contender for the chairmanship, was elected vice chairman.

Noonan and Pambianco defeated Democrats Frank McNeil and Paul Marrin, respectively, who were symbolically nominated by the Democrats. The GOP controls the board 18-11. Larry Bomke was named chairman of the finance committee, a post previously held by Noonan. Republican board member John Raynolds was tapped by Noonan to fill out the committee.

Allen Hinds, an employee of City Water, Light and Power, also took a seat on the county board. He replaced Austin as the board member for the 22nd District

 

 

SCDPH link

 

ANIMAL CONTROL CENTER TO GET MAJOR OVERHAUL / COUNTY PLANS COMPLETION IN NOVEMBER

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, April 30, 1998

Author: JEFFERSON ROBBINS STAFF WRITER

Sangamon County officials vowed this week to completely renovate the county's aging animal control center, with construction to end in November.

Public health director Jim Stone declined to say how much the renovation might cost, but said it will add about 3,400 square feet to the 7,000-square-foot building at 2801 N. Fifth St., plus upgrade cages, build new administrative offices, expand parking and fix the long-leaking roof.

The improved shelter, with animals separated by plastic or metal barriers and every 10 cages on a separate ventilation system, should help prevent the spread of disease among the 6,000 or more dogs and cats that pass through the shelter each year.

"A lot of your disease transmission, especially among felines, can be stopped if we keep them isolated," Stone said.

Richard "Doc" Dobson,

director of the animal control division of the

public health department,

 

said the expansion should make the center more livable for both man and beast.

"We're not going be building the Taj Mahal, but I think if it turns out as we intend, we should have a much more workable, much more easily maintained and nicer facility than we currently have."

Key elements of the renovation, which Stone said may be financed over the next few years, are as follows: o Sections of 10 to 13 cages, with cages varying in size for small or large dogs. Each section would have its own ventilation system, to keep airborne disease from circulating.

The new system would allow the center to hold 25 percent more animals, Stone said. It can now cage at least 80 cats or small dogs and has 90 larger dog kennels. o Two-sided kennel cages, cut in half by a door. Animals could then be moved from one side of the cage to the other for easier cleaning and feeding. o Dividers between cages to keep dogs from making nose-to-nose contact and spreading illness. Presently, kenneled dogs are separated only by chain-link fence. o A holding area for incoming animals, isolation wards for animals known to carry communicable disease, and a "viewing room" where customers can see adoptable animals through a window before asking to handle them. o A new garage for Springfield and Sangamon County animal control officers to unload captured strays. o Locker rooms for animal shelter workers and animal control officers. o A new reception area, conference room and kitchenette, along with added parking and new exterior fencing for the center.

Stone said that although his department has a working blueprint, giving a public cost estimate on the project might influence bidding. He said the department will start soliciting bids next month and should sign a contract by July.

The tentative date for completion is Nov. 1. County Board Chairman Mary Frances Squires said the animal center renovation has been in the works since the animal control division was taken over by Stone's department in December 1996. Stone and Dobson toured animal shelters in other counties, looking for models for their project.

After that, Stone and Dobson joined a study panel with Dr. David Bromwell, chief veterinarian with the Illinois Department of Agriculture's Bureau of Animal Welfare;

Dan Vaughn, chairman of the Sangamon County Board's health committee; and

John Raynolds , a former county board member.

That group sent the plan to the Sangamon County Board of Health, which approved it earlier this month and forwarded it to the county board's finance committee. Stone didn't seek extra money from the county, saying financing is already within the means of the health department.

The most recent county budget set aside $84,000 to help kick-start the construction project.

The renovation plan comes on the heels of the county's pledge to finance a new juvenile detention center at a cost that could reach $6 million to $8 million.

"We feel that we have the money not only to build our juvenile center, but also to help the animals," Squires said.

Squires and Stone said the renovation plan was unrelated to a threatened lawsuit from Melissa Skilbeck Paige, former president of the Animal Protective League. Skilbeck Paige announced her plan to file suit last August after she adopted a puppy from the county shelter that later died. She called conditions there abhorrent and demanded changes in operations.

As of Wednesday, no such lawsuit had been filed. Skilbeck Paige couldn't be reached for comment.

 

 

 

STARS STILL GETTING THEIR KICKS FORMER SANGAMON STATE PLAYERS WORK WITH SOCCER YOUTH

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 5, 1990

Author: DAVE KANE

Shortly after arriving in Springfield several years ago, Charles Purser was ready to pack his bags and depart.

But like many young men who came here to play soccer at Sangamon State University for Coach Aydin Gonulsen, Purser had a change of heart and now calls Springfield his home. And like several other ex-Prairie Stars, Purser is giving something back to the game by coaching young players.

"It started back in '87 when I worked at one of Aydin's camps," Purser said. "I saw so much potential with the kids here. It made me think there will be a lot of talent coming out of the United States in the next 20 years, and I wanted to be a part of that."

In the beginning, Purser never envisioned himself living and working here, let alone playing at Sangamon State. After coming to the United States from his native Liberia, he was invited by Gonulsen to visit Springfield and SSU. "To be frank, I lived in Washington, D.C., the first four months I was here," he said. "Aydin talked me into visiting here, and I remember getting into town about 4 or 5 in the morning. I stayed at coach's house, and I got up about 9. "Coach took me downtown to show me around, and all I could think was, `This is it?' I was ready to pack my bags and go. After being in Washington, it seemed so small. But I ended up staying one week at coach's house, and everyone seemed so friendly. Gradually, it seemed like home."

Purser was speaking Saturday after

the Springfield Strikers, a boys' 12-under team,

had defeated a team from Rolla, Mo., in the Springfield Area Soccer Association Classic at SSU.

Purser has assisted

head Coach John Raynolds

with the Strikers the past two years.

He also served as head coach for Calvary Academy's high school team last fall.

Raynolds, who's been involved in youth soccer several years, doesn't claim to be the brains behind the team's success. He says Purser, who works full-time at Horace Mann, plays a major role.

"Charles really likes the kids, and the kids like him," Raynolds said. "They have a lot of respect for him, and he's a great person for our team to have.

"There's a lot of difference between being involved with the game and understanding the game. I've been involved for a while, but I didn't really grow up playing the game. A former player like Charles can help so much.

"I actually went looking for him two years ago. There's only so much a guy like me can teach them. A lot of guys in our (youth soccer) organization have former players helping them."

SASA President Barry Weiss echoed Raynolds.

"Youth soccer has grown a great deal here," Weiss said. "But without these people coming back, the program couldn't continue to grow."

There were a number of Prairie Star alumni in attendance Saturday, including Sam Tate, who coaches the SASA Sting under-16 boys team; Tim Amlong (Champion Soccer Club under-15 boys); Isiah Lincoln (Springfield Stars under-13 boys), and Chris Owsley (America Soccer Club under-10 boys). And SSU doesn't have the market cornered on college players who've come back to help the next generation. Tom Noonan, a Springfield High School graduate who played at De Pauw College, helps with the Springfield Spirits under-19 boys team.

There's also Chatham's Trish Criswell and Springfield's Rhonda Mays, who help with the SASA 77 under-13 girls team. Mays plays for the Southern Illinois-Edwardsville women's team, and Criswell is preparing for her senior year at Methodist College in North Carolina.

Then there's the dean of Prairie Stars-turned-coaches, Oscar Lambdin. A native Honduran who grew up in Urbana, Lambdin was one of the orginal Prairie Stars back in 1977. And like Purser, Lambdin didn't expect to be in Springfield very long.

"When I left Urbana, I was sure I'd graduate here, go back to Urbana and get a job," said Lambdin. "I never envisioned staying here. But now I have a family here and a job here, and I enjoy coaching."

Lambdin, who's coaching two teams in the SASA tourney and has worked with countless other local squads -- including Sacred Heart-Griffin's boys and girls -- likes being a part of major events like the SASA tourney. He said it's a sign of the game's growth.

"You look out at all the teams and all the kids, it's amazing," Lambdin said. "I didn't have this kind of experience until I was in college. Now, one of my goals is seeing these kids make it to college themselves."

Tate, a Granite City native who works at the Illinois Commerce Commision, said the job opportunity was the first thing that kept him here. But coaching helps keep him involved in the sport he grew up playing.

"In this country, soccer's not something you can get too far in as far as playing, unless you're an exceptional player," said Tate, in his second year coaching the Sting. "So what else can you do but coach? It's fun. I enjoy it. Plus, it's good for soccer in Springfield."

 

 

 

LOCAL GOVERNMENTS CAUGHT IN INSURANCE PINCH CITY OF SPRINGFIELD

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, September 22, 1985

Author: See Contributed Byline

This article was written by State Journal-Register city government reporter Doug Finke. Also contributing were reporters Max Baker, Caryl

Carstens, Bob Mahlburg, Doug Pokorski and Joe Stephens.

Five months ago the Springfield City Council was staring an insurance crisis in the face.

The city's fleet insurer, Illinois National Insurance Co., canceled the city's policy after years of steady losses, including three huge claims since 1982 and a fourth pending.

The Forsyth Insurance Agency, which has handled the city's fleet insurance for years, set about trying to find a new carrier.

"We must have sent out 20 requests for quotations," said William Forsyth. "Most companies didn't make an offer."

Finally, with the city facing the possibility that it would have to insure its vehicles itself, two companies responded. Government Insurance Exchange of Bloomington was willing to insure the city's fleet for about $273,000 a year, based on comparable coverage for both years. (The actual cost is more than $321,000 because the city bought additional coverage and was covering some newer vehicles). "The price we got them was a heckuva good deal," Forsyth said.

It's symptomatic of growing problems in the insurance industry that that "heckuva good deal" will cost the city $87,000 more than it had budgeted for insurance this year and about $143,000 more than the city spent for insurance in the 1984 fiscal year -- a 100 percent rate increase.

But the Government Insurance Exchange's offer was a "heckuva deal." That's because the only other quotation came from a company offering only partial coverage for $275,000. Coverage comparable to what the city bought, Forsyth said, probably would have cost up to $400,000 from the other carrier.

The city is not alone. The Springfield Mass Transit District recently went to self-insurance, after its fleet insurance was canceled -- despite a good claims record. Sangamon County government is anxiously waiting to hear from its insurance carriers.

As the SMTD case points out, a fairly clean claims record doesn't always account for much any more in the insurance business. Government agencies and many businesses are seeing the effects on their insurance of worldwide economic conditions.

"The problem is not losses alone," says John Hester of the Troxell Insurance Agency. "Overall in the last five years, the ability (of insurance companies) to earn money has diminished. These things run in cycles, but from what I've heard, this is the worst."

Governments and businesses across the country are paying the price now for past years, when insurance companies kept rates artificially low, Hester said.

"When interest rates were 18-21 percent, there was incentive for a price war as insurance companies competed for money to invest," Hester said. "Once you're in a price war, it's very hard to get out."

While interest rates were high, insurance companies earned enough investment income to cover their claims losses -- even with artificially low premiums. But when interest income fell, companies were slow to raise rates. Inevitably, the good times eventually came crashing to a halt.

"We began to read articles that the market was changing from soft to hard eight months to a year ago," Hester said. "But all that was speculation at that time. The problem we had is that we didn't want to cry wolf."

Nationwide, Forsyth said, insurance companies are paying out $1.30 for each $1 taken in on premiums. For Illinois National, the city of Springfield's former fleet insurer, the problem was even worse. That company had a 250 percent loss ratio on the city's fleet policy, Forsyth said, meaning it paid out $2.50 in claims for each $1 in premiums.

The loss in investment income, of course, was coupled with continuing claims payouts, losses Hester said are "staggering."

Some cities found that their insurance carrier simply stopped covering high risk groups, such as cities, altogether. When times were good, Hester said, some general carriers beganwriting coverage they hadn't previously offered to jump on the earnings bandwagon. Now, Hester said, some of these companies are returning to the coverages they offered before the boom cycle. That leaves some customers high and dry.

The state Department of Insurance is sufficiently concerned about the insurance problem that it has scheduled a series of hearings on the issue.

"What we have to do first is define the problem," said Dick Rogers of the Insurance Department. "We are not sure now how big of a problem we have. It appears insurance is available. It is a problem mostly of affordability rather than availability."

Rogers said the state is limited in what it can do to help businesses and governments. One possible solution, he said, is to establish marketing programs aimed at helping governmental units find a willing insurer.

ROGERS ALSO SAID cities and others are merely watching rates return to the levels they were four or five years ago, before the price war began.

Many insurance experts predict the problem will get worse before it gets better. Some have predicted that the insurance crisis won't bottom out until 1987. Hester, though, isn't making any predictions.

"It's just too hard to predict," he said. "It could bottom out sooner or it could bottom out later."

Here is how the insurance crisis is affecting several local governmental bodies.

Four major claims against the city since 1982 probably were the death knell for the city's fleet insurance from Illinois National. They also helped keep new companies from bidding on the city's policy.

Once in 1982 and again in 1984, city fire trucks were severely damaged in accidents, each at a cost of over $100,000. Also in 1982, a woman was struck by a police car and severely injured while crossing Sangamon Avenue. She settled out of court last year for $175,000. Finally, in 1982, Patricia Weller was severely injured when her car was struck by a vehicle fleeing a police chase. She died last summer, and a suit against the city is pending in court. Any settlement is expected to be well into six figures.

Despite these claims, Mayor Mike Houston and Health and Safety Com. Pat Ward say their departments' driving records are fairly good. Both have departmental driver education programs in an effort to keep accidents to a minimum.

BUT THE POLICE and fire departments are the high-risk fleets in the city. Neither City Water, Light and Power nor the Streets Department has been involved in a major traffic claim in recent years. Yet, since the city buys fleet insurance as a unit, those two departments are helping to underwrite insurance costs for police and firefighters.

"They (CWLP and Streets) could probably get insurance on their own, but then the police and fire departments probably wouldn't be able to get insurance at all," said Forsyth.

Neither Streets Com. Ossie Langfelder nor Utilities Com. Frank Madonia has any plans to seek insurance on his own. But Langfelder said his department is hard-pressed to come up with the extra $25,000 the fleet insurance is costing him this year. He is trying to reduce coverage on some older vehicles and otherwise try to cut his department's share of the bill. Langfelder said his budget crunch is so severe that he is unable to pay part of his premium right now.

Houston and Ward, though their departments had significant increases, had enough money in their budgets to pay the increase immediately.

WARD ALSO WATCHED the liability insurance for the city health department go from $15,290 to $22,855, while at the same time the coverage no longer extends to the doctors who treat patients for the department.

"I don't know what we're going to do about that," Ward said of the physicians' coverage.

"It's a nationwide problem with doctors," said Forsyth, who handles the health department insurance. "They're a target group."

Outside of the fleet and health department insurance, the city has been able to keep insurance costs under control, according to city officials. CWLP has even kept the cost of insuring the city power plants down despite the destruction of the Dallman 3 turbine in 1982. SMTD Springfield Mass Transit District Director Jack Lanich says he was astounded when he opened an envelope and found a notice that the SMTD's workers' compensation and liability insurance was being canceled.

"We're not like the city. We haven't had any major crashes," Lanich said. "And our carrier agreed that we had a good claim/loss record.

"But we still got canceled."

AS A RESULT, the SMTD this week became self-insured. This means that SMTD, instead of dealing with an outside insurance agency, has basically established its own insurance company, which will be responsible for investing its premium payments and for administering claims against the district.

Lanich said the move was forced on the district when its former insurance company discontinued all casualty coverage.

"It was a corporate decision to move away from all kinds of casualty insurance," Lanich said. "I don't know what started it, but it is a revolution in American business. They are putting themselves out of business."

Last year, the SMTD spent $129,000 on workers' compensation and liability insurance, Lanich said. While the SMTD found it difficult to get quotes on a replacement policy, it appeared that the cost of equivalent conventional insurance would have more than tripled, to $400,000 to $500,000. That was when the SMTD board decided to investigate self-insurance. Many of the state's school districts are self-insured. The Springfield School District, along with many other Illinois governmental bodies, also is considering developing its own coverage.

SELF-INSURANCE CUTS out the insurance company, or middleman, in an attempt to hold down premium costs. However, it also depends on the premise that there always will be enough money in the coffers to pay for claims made against the SMTD. If not, self-insurance raises the possibility that a tax increase may become necessary to pay a major claim.

But, in many instances, a self-insurance program is the only way for a public agency to provide adequate coverage.

The SMTD has hired Michel & Cully Claims Service as the administration agent, to investigate and oversee claims and payments.

Lanich said the SMTD board plans to invest its insurance funds in treasury bills, certificates of deposit and in high-interest savings accounts.

"We didn't go into this to cut costs. We were forced into this. It was a real shocker," Lanich said. "We laughed at other systems when it happened to them (a few years ago.) Then we got this notification of cancellation of service." Sangamon County Sangamon County also faces the unwelcome prospect of perhaps having to resort to self-insurance. County officials are nervously awaiting word on whether their present liability coverage will be extended.

Even if it is, the new policy could be "extremely expensive," says

county board

insurance chairman

John Raynolds .

Preparing for the worst,

 

the county's agent,

R.W. Troxell & Co.,

 

has been searching since early summer for an alternative carrier, but so far has found nothing, Raynolds says.

In the meantime, the county is studying the possibility and expense of self-insurance.

"IF WE HAVE to have a combination of insurance -- self-insurance and caps (limited coverage) -- we'll do it," says county board finance Chairman Pat Noonan. "It's not a pleasant prospect from a budget standpoint, but more and more bodies, particularly municipalities, are going to it."

Some insurance may be impossible to buy at any cost, Noonan notes, such as protection against mistakes by county officials.

"My biggest concern is just obtaining the full coverage we've had in the past," he says. "Many of the people that you would look to for coverage have just said, `No, thanks.' " Among the county's biggest risks are auto claims -- particularly sheriff's department cars -- and the recently publicized dangers of lawsuits involving the county jail.

The county already faces nearly $35 million in lawsuits stemming from jail incidents, including the death of a local woman late last year.

"If you had a $2 million civil rights suit or something horrendous (that the county lost), the only recourse would be to levy a tax on the citizens of the county," Noonan warns. School District 186 Despite insurance costs that have nearly tripled over last year, Springfield School District Business Manager Jim Cherry says the district is in good shape compared to other governmental bodies.

The school district is paying about $196,000 for its property and casualty insurance this year, up from just under $67,000 last year. But Cherry also notes that the district benefited last year from a pendulum effect when insurance rates actually dropped by $44,000. This year's increases occurred mainly in a $154,000 multi-peril package (which includes liability coverage and coverage for the district's buildings and their contents) and a $29,000 umbrella policy that provides extra coverage in case of "catastrophic" losses.

Out of 20 requests to bid this year, the district received only one bid (from Country Mutual) on the liability and umbrella policies, and two on the automobile policy.

CHERRY SAYS THE school district was lucky to get the few bids it did. Other districts, including some in the Chicago and Alton areas, received no bids at all, he said.

"Those districts that experienced any kinds of claims against them were just automatically dropped," he said.

District 186's low claims rate is partly luck, Cherry admitted, but the district also works to keep claims down, through its discipline code and building maintenance programs.

The district also has worked with Insurance Management Bureau, an Indianapolis-based organization, to help control costs and find bidders.

The firm is paid $3,900 a year to help the district draw up specifications for insurance policies and to oversee policy management. It also helped persuade reluctant companies to bid on the district's insurance.

COUNTRY MUTUAL, for example, does not normally insure schools in large cities. However, the consulting firm was able to convince the company that the Springfield district is a good risk. It also reduced the final cost of the package by $26,000 by persuading Indiana Insurance Co. to share part of the coverage.

If insurance costs continue to skyrocket, Cherry said, the district may be forced to look at self-insurance or raise its liability insurance tax rate, currently about 5 cents per $100 of assessed property value. State law allows school boards to raise that rate without a referendum.

The district is already self-insured in unemployment and workers' compensation. Cherry said those programs have worked out "quite well."

The rise in insurance costs may also affect the cost of bus service, which will be more than $2 million this year.

The district contracts with R. W. Harmon and Sons for bus service. Arnie Larsons, a spokesman in Harmon's insurance department, said the company's insurance rates went up significantly last year, particularly for umbrella coverage. Other bus companies have had similar increases.

Bus costs have not been affected by insurance rates yet, but the district's contract with Harmon expires at the end of this year. Convention center A rise in insurance costs, caused in part by SMEAA's new catering and concessions business, is a major reason for an increase in the overall convention center tax levy, according to Doug Clouse, finance administrator.

Clouse said insurance coverage for the center will cost $184,082 in 1985-86, 43 percent higher than in the previous year.

Until late last fall, catering and concession stands were managed by a private firm under contract to the center. Center management took over the activities in hopes of boosting total revenues. That required additional liability insurance.

THE GENERAL INCREASE in insurance premiums also contributed to higher insurance expenses.

The convention center's general tax rate is 5 cents per $100 of assessed valuation, but it assesses additional levies for insurance, municipal retirement payments and audits. Overall, center officials expect the next tax levy to total $666,891, or 19.5 percent more than taxpayers were billed this year. LLCC With insurance costs skyrocketing, Lincoln Land Community College is "studying self-insurance for everything," according to Melissa Hopp, vice president for business services.

When contracts were renewed this summer, "Our fleet insurance doubled (in cost); umbrella liability tripled," Hopp said. "The market's gone wild."

Fleet insurance rose from $2,278 last year to $4,660 this year. Umbrella liability jumped from $4,472 to $12,719. Luckily, most of the school's multi-year insurance contracts extend through 1987. "We're really fortunate," she said.

IN DECEMBER, HOPP will present college trustees with the results of a study of self-insurance. The tentative plan is to maintain "catastrophic" liability coverage, but provide its own primary coverage.

But to establish self-insurance, "you need money, and the money has to come from somewhere," Hopp said. That means increasing taxes or taking funds from other college programs.

Whatever decision trustees make, Hopp stressed that self-insurance is not necessarily forever.

"The insurance market is fluctuating so much that it might be a good idea to set up self-insurance this January," she said, "and then it might be the exact opposite (situation) next January."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note esp brad butcher – kuchar – uis police – drug frame -

 

 

 

From “Jacksonville”

 

 

 

 

Rossi links Taylorville to jax – rossi is dem and warden at jax prison – also prominent Taylorville repubs – xa Taylorville prison – link from cdb underwood to ICI – and note

 

Glyn ramage/liuna on cdb – son andy ramage at hinshaw with hardy and cdil usatty – and at llcc w/ gray – ramage is downstate liuna – xa gray and ed smith – and – liuna Midwest pensions is in jax -

 

And rossi is house clerks - cdb - blago staff – has family in Virginia il – cass county – near jax -

 

Watson is laguna link – to terr frame –

Ocbunn – civaff – psyops – xa misinfo -

 

Watson is 3d civil affairs – Pendleton

 

Watson is usmc – links to fickes – sternstein – rape frame – bite marks – cimarossa links – and note fickes as prez GWB detail – xa prez homicide frame – USSS – copeland -

 

Xa – FS jax – (rebbe) – minder – apl/sharmin – hurrelbrink

And see rebbe at cwlp – (ankle injury confirmed as planned event to be used for fibromyalgia pain)

 

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyhurrelbrink

 

 

 

Ed smith – liuna pensions – neff – hnb – bomke – schaive – et al – links to bomke/scb/brandt – ilsen - gray

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyliuna

and see blago links -

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyblagoliuna

 

and note generally – blue bag Caruso – chi – daley – garbage contracts – WM – Huizenga – ibt – Caruso/steil/durako – steil is sfd – arson frame – and sfd involved in harassment get OT in return for involvement – (steil link to liuna – ed smith – gray)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pfs – milburn – chad – const rico – links – sd –

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyfurmanmilburn

 

 

Watson at Pendleton – ilga – gray – bill black - 

 

Bunn in sd – oc – chamber – links – Lincoln club

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyocbunn

oc caths – karcher – kc’s -

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneypattern

walnut page – terr frame – proximity to san onofre

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneywalnut

 

Fs – hurrelbrink – shg – sfd – ingram – ankle – rebbe at FS – rebbe/cwlp – mumaw – redpath –

 

Rossi – prisons – in jax – cdb – blago – ilga – (note rossi as repub in t-ville) –

 

Grandma and grandpa – hosp’s – LSSI – noonan/mcd’s trucks – reinhart trucking – martin brower – prairie farms trucks – cimarossa – bonansinga in beardstown – mckenna – caths – chi gop

 

Ibt 916 – nestle in jax – trucks – clatfelter –

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyclatfelter

 

 

Schilling – Shimkus – Jacksonville – Taylorville links – staffers – davis as Taylorville – note brahler in jax – and see nudo – mccann – tea party – roth – dragoo – hart –

 

Put Virginia in jax site – shgcoaches – cass county – morgan county – sweatman – Ashland –

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyshgcoaches

 

 

 

 

 

Humint is hic/hpsci  

 

(*lahood was humint subcomte chair)

 

HIC = cunningham

 

 

 

Rep. Watson set to deploy to Iraq: 270-day tour will likely begin in February

Jacksonville Journal-Courier (IL) - Friday, January 4, 2008

Author/Byline: Kate Ramsay, Jacksonville Journal-Courier, Ill.
Section: State and regional

Jan. 4--Rep. Jim Watson , a Marine Corps reservist, is set to deploy to Iraq next month.

The 97th District legislator said his unit with the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, will be deployed to Fallujah after a few weeks of training at Camp Pendleton, Calif.

Details are still forthcoming, Rep. Watson said, but his tour will likely be 270 days. The Jacksonville Republican said, "I'm happy to go and serve."

Rep. Watson re-enlisted in May 2007 as an E-6 staff sergeant attached to the 3rd Civil Affairs Group in Camp Pendleton Calif. He said his likely duties in Iraq will be assisting the Iraqis in their efforts to build their provincial and municipal governments.

Rep. Watson was appointed to the 97th District seat in 2001 after Tom Ryder resigned and has since won three elections. He announced in August that he will seek re-election this year.

Some may make the deployment an election issue, Rep. Watson said. "There will be those who will be critical," of the nine months spent in Iraq, and not Illinois, he said.

If thousands of service men and women with jobs and families back home can go to Iraq, "How can it be wrong for an elected official to step up and serve," Rep. Watson said.

Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan has offered the "full support of his office," during the deployment, Rep. Watson said. Several Illinois representatives also have offered to hold office hours throughout the 97th District for Rep. Watson's constituents during his tour in Iraq, he said.

Memo: To see more of Jacksonville Journal-Courier or to subscribe to the newspaper, go to http://www.myjournalcourier.com/.

 

 

 

 

Jim Watson (Illinois politician)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Jim Watson


Member of the Illinois Senate
from the 97th district

In office
2001 -


Born

July 30, 1965 (1965-07-30) (age 45)
Jerseyville, Illinois

Political party

Republican

Jim Watson is a Republican member of the Illinois House of Representatives, representing the 97th district since 2001. Representative Watson’s diverse background includes teaching at both the high school and college level and 10 years of business experience.

Jim is a current Marine Corps reservist with the 3rd Civil Affairs Group in Camp Pendleton, CA, and is a veteran of the first Gulf War.

In the General Assembly, Representative Watson has been a strong advocate for veterans’ rights, serving as the Republican Spokesman for the Veterans Affairs Committee. His other committee assignments include Financial Institutions, Elementary & Secondary Education, Telecommunications, Public Utilities (Republican Spokesperson), Gaming, and State Government Administration.

In addition to veterans’ issues, Watson continues to focus on education issues, fiscal responsibility, and growing Illinois’ job market during his time in the General Assembly. Watson is a father of three and resides in Jacksonville.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] Biography

[edit] Education

B.A. in History, Eastern Illinois University, 1988 M.A. in History, Eastern Illinois University, 1990 M.B.A., University of Illinois at Champaign – Urbana, 1997

[edit] Professional Experience

Vice-President, Marketing, Wareco Convenience Stores, 1991–2001 Adjunct Professor, Strategic Management, MacMurray & Blackburn Colleges, Fall 1999 Social Studies Teacher, Highland High School, 1990 Graduate Assistant, Eastern Illinois University, 1989–1990 Social Studies Teacher, Auburn High School, 1988–1989

[edit] Military Experience

United States Marine Corps Reserve, 3rd Civil Affairs Group, 2007–Present Served in Operation Desert Storm, 1990–91 United States Marine Corps and Marine Corps Reserves, 1985–1991

[edit] Community Activities

Prairieland United Way Allocating Panel

American Red Cross (Jacksonville), Chairman of the 2005 Hero’s Campaign Big Brothers Big Sisters of West Central Illinois

[edit] House Committees

Public Utilities, Spokesman Veteran’s Affairs, Spokesman Elementary & Secondary Education Gaming Financial Institutions Telecommunications

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3rd Civil Affairs Group

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

3rd Civil Affairs Group


3rd CAG insignia

Active

Country

United States

Branch

USMC

Type

Civil Affairs

Role

Provide civil-military operations support to I MEF or other MAGTF in order to reduce friction between the civilian population and the MEF or other MAGTF.

Part of

Marine Forces Reserve

Garrison/HQ

Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton

Engagements

Operation Desert Storm
Kosovo Force

Operation Iraqi Freedom

Commanders

Current
commander

Col Paul K. Lebidine

3rd Civil Affairs Group (3rd CAG) is a civil affairs (CA) unit of the United States Marine Corps based at Camp Pendleton, California.[1] It is one of only two CA units in the Marine Corps, both of which are reserve units. The other unit is 4th Civil Affairs Group, based at Naval Support Facility Anacostia. 3rd CAG tends to support I Marine Expeditionary Force activities, while 4th CAG tends to support II Marine Expeditionary Force activities.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] Mission

Plan and execute civil military operations while serving as the liaison between military forces and civil authorities, the local population and non-governmental organizations. Conduct activities which enhance the relationship between the military and host nation personnel and organizations facilitated through application of civil affairs specialty skills in areas normally the responsibility of civil governments.

[edit] History

This section does not cite any references or sources.
Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2007)

3rd CAG was activated June 6, 1985, at Naval and Marine Corps Reserve Center, Los Angeles. Between 1987 and 1988, the group recruited and trained Marines to fulfill its mission of providing civil affairs support to active forces in training exercises in the United States and overseas.

During mid-August 1990, a provisional CA detachment deployed to Saudi Arabia to support I MEF in Southwest Asia for Operation Desert Shield. CA teams worked with I MEF personnel to reduce the chemical threat posed by the extensive chemical storage facilities at the commercial port of Al Jubail. CA Marines assisted in formalizing relations with Saudi civil defense and police forces to coordinate civil and military traffic patterns. In late December the majority of 3rd CAG Marines returned to the United States. The entire 3rd CAG was activated and deployed to Saudi Arabia in January 1991 for Operation Desert Storm. In April 1991, 3rd CAG returned home from deployment and was released from active duty.

In addition to conducting civil affairs activities, 3rd CAG provided limited tactical psychological operations support for mission accomplishment. 3rd CAG also relocated from Los Angeles to Camp Pendleton, California. The unit began providing liaison officers to I MEF, 1st Marine Division, 1st Marine Logistics Group, Marine Expeditionary Units, and the I MEF MAGTF Pacific, increasing 3rd CAG's accessibility and support to fleet units. In the summer of 1994, 3rd CAG proposed a revised table of organization to Headquarters Marine Corps that added a psychological operations planning detachment. 3rd CAG responded to potential hostilities in Iraq in October 1994 by deploying two Marines to Saudi Arabia.

As a reserve unit, 3rd CAG developed programs to better support active duty units to include training and deployments with the 11th MEU, 13th MEU, 15th MEU, and 31st MEU. 3rd CAG assumed the mission of Military Support to Civilian Authorities (MSCA), as a liaison function for I MEF.

From November 1995 through February 1996, 3rd CAG operated a displaced civilian refugee camp in Guam for Kurdish refugees during Operation Pacific Haven. The unit supported Operation Joint Guard in Bosnia from June 1997 to January 1999.

In the late 1990s, 3rd CAG Marines and Sailors supported the active components of all branches of the U.S. military during exercises and operations in Thailand, Korea, Kenya, Central America, South America, the Caribbean, Japan, and the United States.

In 2001, 3rd CAG supported United States Southern Command Humanitarian Civic Assistance operations in Central and South America, relying heavily upon the bilingual capabilities of its many Spanish-speaking Marines. 3rd CAG also provided staff planning support to I MEF and its forward operating units engaged in Operation Enduring Freedom, as well as to III MEF in support of exercises in Thailand and Korea. In November 2001, 3rd CAG activated and deployed a detachment of ten Marines to Kosovo to support United Nations peacekeeping operations. In May 2002, a second detachment of ten Marines was deployed to Kosovo. In 2001 and May 2002, 3rd CAG also deployed two Marines to Kuwait as part of Combined Joint Task Force/ Consequence Management (CJTF/CM).[citation needed]

[edit] Iraq War

This article does not cite any references or sources.
Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (October 2008)

In January 2003, 3rd CAG mobilized for Operation Enduring Freedom and deployed to Kuwait in anticipation of combat operations in Iraq. With the commencement of the ground war in March 2003, 3rd CAG helped restore Iraq's infrastructure and government, concluding its first tour of Operation Iraqi Freedom in September 2003. In January 2004, 3rd CAG mobilized and deployed for a second tour in Iraq to support I MEF in al-Anbar province and returned to Camp Pendleton in August. A detachment from 3rd CAG mobilized and deployed to Iraq from January to October 2005 as part of provisional 5th CAG in support of II MEF in al-Anbar. In December 2005, 3rd CAG mobilized and deployed in March 2006 for a third tour in Iraq to support I MEF in al-Anbar and returned to Camp Pendleton in October 2006.

[edit] Unit awards

A unit citation or commendation is an award bestowed upon an organization for the action cited. Members of the unit who participated in said actions are allowed to wear on their uniforms the awarded unit citation. 3rd CAG has been presented with the following awards:

Ribbon

Unit Award

Presidential Unit Citation

Navy Unit Commendation

Meritorious Unit Commendation

National Defense Service Medal with one Bronze Star

Southwest Asia Service Medal with two Bronze Stars

Iraq Campaign Medal

Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal

Global War on Terrorism Service Medal

[edit] Notes

  1. ^ ""Our Nations Civil Affairs Units"". Civil Affairs Association. 2002. http://www.civilaffairsassoc.org/caunits.htm. Retrieved 2007-11-08.  This webpage listed locations of civil affairs units throughout the United States.

[edit] References

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Marine Corps.

  • 3rd CAG. 231st Birthday Ball Ceremony Program. pp. 4–6. 
  • 3rd CAG. 227th Birthday Ball Ceremony Program. pp. 6–7. 

[edit] External links

United States Marine Corps portal

[show]

v  d  e

United States Marine Corps

Portal:United States Marine Corps · Category:United States Marine Corps

Leadership

Secretary of the Navy · Under Secretary of the Navy · Commandant of the Marine Corps · Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps · Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps · Four-star generals · United States Congress (House Subcommittee on Seapower and Expeditionary Forces · Senate Subcommittee on SeaPower)



Major commands

Organization of the Marine Corps · Headquarters Marine Corps · Marine Forces Command (II Marine Expeditionary Force· Marine Forces Pacific (I Marine Expeditionary Force · III Marine Expeditionary Force· Marine Forces Reserve · Fleet Marine Force (Atlantic · Pacific)

Structure

Marine Air-Ground Task Force · Bases · Battalions · Marine aviation · Marine Expeditionary Unit · MARSOC · Recon (FMF · Division)

Personnel and training

Personnel: Rank insignia · MOS · Notable Marines · Historical Marines · Marine Corps Association · Marine Corps League · Young Marines · Marine Military Academy · Hispanic Marines
Training:
Recruit Training · SOI · OCS · TBS · MCMAP

Uniforms and equipment

Uniforms · Awards · Badges · Weapons · Vehicles and aircraft · Individual equipment

History and traditions

History · Culture · Acronyms and terms · Birthday Ball · Eagle, Globe, and Anchor · Marine Band · Service Numbers · Marine Corps War Memorial · Flag · Marine One · Marines' Hymn · Mottos · National Museum · Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima · Rifleman's Creed · Semper Fidelis · Silent Drill Platoon · Toys for Tots

 

[show]

v  d  e

Major Commands of the United States Marine Corps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commanding Officer

Col Paul K. Lebidine
Commanding Officer
3rd Civil Affairs Group

In 1984, Col Lebidine enlisted in the Marine Corps, graduating Honorman at Recruit Training.  In 1986, after being meritoriously promoted to corporal, Col Lebidine was selected for the Enlisted Commissioning Program.

After completion of OCS, Basic School, Army Ranger School, and Airborne training, he served as a Platoon Commander and Company Executive Officer in 1st Battalion, 4th Marines (MEU-SOC).   His second deployment included Operation Desert Shield/Storm.  In 1994, after a tour at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego, Col Lebidine joined the Marine Corps Reserve.  During his tour with 4th LAR Bn, he served as a Company Commander, Fire Support Coordinator, and the Battalion Executive Officer.

In 2003, Col Lebidine mobilized to serve as the Executive Officer of the I Marine Headquarters Group, I MEF, for Operation Iraqi Freedom.  He eventually constructed and served as the Camp Commander of Camp Babylon, Iraq.  In 2004, Col Lebidine served as the Battalion Commander of 2nd Battalion, 23rd Marines.  In 2006, Col Lebidine mobilized to serve on the I MEF Staff, and was selected to advise an Iraqi Army Brigade in Al Qaim, Iraq.  In 2007, Col Lebidine served as the Operations Officer for 3D Civil Affairs Group.  In 2008, Col Lebidine mobilized and served on the MNF-I, CJ3 Staff as the Advisor/LNO to the Iraqi Prime Minister’s National Operations Center.  In November 2009, Col Lebidine assumed Command as the Commanding Officer for 3D Civil Affairs Group, Camp Pendleton.

Col Lebidine’s personal decorations include (3) Bronze Stars and (2) Combat Action Ribbons.  He holds a BA degree from the University of Florida and a JD degree from Thomas Jefferson Law School.

He is married to Angie Lebidine and they have two daughters, Brooke and Brynne.

 

 

 

Honors And Lineage

3rd Civil Affairs Group

Honors

  • Presidential Unit Citation Streamer - Iraq 2003
  • Navy Unit Commendation Streamer - SW Asia 1990 - 1991
  • National Defense Service Streamer with One Bronze Star
  • Southwest Asia Service Streamer with Two Bronze Stars
  • Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Streamer
  • Global War on Terrorism Service Streamer

Lineage

1980s - Present

  • Activated during the early 1980s at Los Angeles, California as 3D Civil Affairs Group, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve
  • Mobilized and participated in Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, Southwest Asia, September 1990 - March 1991
  • Relocated during 1994 to Camp Pendleton, California
  • Element Participated in Operation United Shield, Somalia, January - March 1995
  • Element Participated in Operation Vigilant Sentinal, Iraq, August 1995 and During 1997
  • Element Participated in Multiple Operations on the Balkan Peninsula, during 1997, January - July 1999 and January - November 2002
  • Element Participated in Operation Fuerte Apoyo, Central America, November 1998
  • Element Participated in Operation Stabilise, East Timor, 2000
  • Participated in Global War on Terrorism, Iraq and Afghanistan, 2003 to Present

 

 

 

 

Site Support Command

MISSION STATEMENT: The Site Support Command provides support to 3rd Civial Affairs Group, 4th MLG (Fwd) (West), and Intel Support Bn, A Co

 

HUMINT Platoon.

 

 

  • CO: LtCol Steven Crescini
  • XO: Maj Albert Corchuelo
  • 1stSgt: 1stSgt Edward Woodfork

Address:

Commanding Officer
Reserve Site Support Del Mar
PO Box 555123
Camp Pendleton, CA 92055

Phone Numbers:

S-1: (760) 725-6017
S-3: (760) 725-9680
S-4: (760) 725-9674
S-6: (760) 725-9667
Medical: (760) 763-5659
Fax: (760) 725-6006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brahler – emps

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jax – tea party – brahler

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Richard W Brahler II

Jacksonville, IL, United States

 

 

 

Bells are 'call to action' for non-partisan group

Jacksonville Journal-Courier (IL) - Sunday, July 18, 2010

Author: Greg Olson, Jacksonville Journal-Courier, Ill.

July 18--Red, white and blue liberty bells have been popping up in yards all across west-central Illinois in the past couple of months.

The bells, which are made of heavy, corrugated plastic, symbolize freedom for Americans "who are tired of the undisciplined spending by elected officials," according to Richard Brahler of Jacksonville, co-organizer of Take Back Illinois 9-12, a non-partisan group that is sponsoring the liberty bells.

"The reason we chose this symbol is not about politics, it is about principles -- those principles that were given to us by our founding fathers," Brahler said. "What these bells symbolize is a call to action for those that think that the intrusion of government has hindered our ability to grow and flourish. We believe less government is better."

The liberty bells cost $10 each or $25 for three and are available through Take Back Illinois 9-12 by calling (217) 245-0008 or online at takebackil912.org.

"If citizens buy the liberty bells, it displays their emotional investment and commitment to this movement," Brahler said.

People who buy the liberty bells also receive a printed statement which, in part, says, "Display this bell to show all that you are a proud American who will not tolerate injustice or loss of liberty."

The movement by Take Back Illinois 9-12, which was formed last year, is guided by nine principles and 12 values. One of the principles states that "The government works for me. I do not answer to them. They answer to me." Among the organization's 12 values are honesty, thrift and personal responsibility.

"What we are looking for in leadership are candidates that hold the same principles and values as their guiding force in making decisions and will be held accountable to their constituents," Brahler said.

The liberty bells -- which are made by 9-12 group member Tom Nudo, owner of Prime Panels in Springfield -- now appear in yards in Morgan, Sangamon, Macoupin, Madison, Pike, Montgomery, Christian, Jersey, Calhoun, Schuyler and Adams counties.

Take Back Illinois 9-12 holds monthly meetings in each of those 11 west-central Illinois counties, and the meetings focus on education, a discussion of candidates who hold the organization's principles and values and a call to action to get citizens involved in local and state issues.

"We are organizing this group on a long-term basis," Brahler said. "It is not about one election, it is about setting up an organization that will have a long-term impact on improving our local communities. Our short-term goal is to grow our numbers and grow our strength in our state."

The organization has about 2,500 members.

 

 

Joe the Plumber to visit the area for 9-12 org

Jacksonville Journal-Courier (IL) - Wednesday, August 4, 2010

Author: Jake Russell, Jacksonville Journal-Courier, Ill.

Aug. 04--One of the most iconic characters in the 2008 presidential election will be visiting west-central Illinois, including Jacksonville, this month.

Samuel "Joe" Wurzelbacher will speak in Pittsfield, Jacksonville and Springfield on Aug. 17-19 for the Take Back Illinois 9-12 organization.

Better known as Joe the Plumber, Wurzelbacher became a nationally known figure during the presidential election for his questions to then-presidential candidate Barack Obama about taxes and their effect on small businesses.

He is now a motivational speaker and commentator.

Richard Brahler ,

co-organizer with the

Morgan County chapter of

Take Back Illinois 9-12,

 

reached out to Wurzelbacher about three months ago when a mutual friend introduced them. Brahler saw the opportunity for Wurzelbacher to speak as a means to raise awareness and get more people involved.

"I thought, after talking to him, that he really holds a lot of the same values and principles that we do," Brahler said. "It's not about Democrat or Republican. We're in a real crisis in Illinois -- especially west-central Illinois -- for jobs. We really need to pull together and demand some changes from our government."

Wurzelbacher will speak first at The Crossroads Center at 125 W. Jefferson St. in Pittsfield on Aug. 17 with a dinner from 5:30 to 7 p.m. that will cost $25 a person. A general presentation will follow and is $10 a person for those who did not pay for the dinner.

He will be in Jacksonville the next day to speak at Hamilton's. There will be a $50-a-person reception at 5:30 p.m. and a meeting at 7 p.m. with a $10 admission charge if purchased separately. Tickets are available at Brahler 's Truckers Supply at 21 Harold Cox Drive.

The Springfield appearance will be Aug. 19 at Northfield Center at 3280 Northfield Drive with a reception from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. and a meeting afterward. Prices are still being determined.

"The neat part about this is 'Joe's' just a down-home guy thrust in the limelight by candidate Obama and it's changed his life," Brahler said. "If you ask him, he's just like you and I. He's purely independent and likes to say 'I'm pro-American' and that's what we're all about."

 

 

New player on local vending scene

Jacksonville Journal-Courier (IL) - Monday, December 8, 2008

Author: Greg Olson, Jacksonville Journal-Courier, Ill.

Dec. 8--A new competitor has appeared in the local vending machine market.

A few months ago, Rebecca Zito, of Jacksonville, ventured into the vending machine business by opening All In One Vending.

Mrs. Zito hopes to find a niche with Jacksonville businesses with a unique "four machines in one" vending device.

The four machines in one means they can carry canned sodas, water and juices and snacks, as well as provide a dollar bill changer.

"The one thing that our machines have that you won't find anywhere else in the area is Starbucks frappuccino," she said.

Planet Antares, based in Culver City, Calif., markets the vending machines. "Once I buy the machines, Planet Antares only helps with marketing," said Mrs. Zito.

The vending machines are 60 inches tall, 28 inches wide, 26 inches deep and weigh 240 pounds. "It's like a refrigerator that has a vending mechanism inside it," said Mrs. Zito, who has business owners choose what they want in their machines. "All I need is a plug-in and a space. I take care of everything else."

Mrs. Zito's vending prices range from 40 cents to $2. "I check the machines at least once a week to see if they need to be restocked," she said. And unlike many vending machines, Mrs. Zito's machines have individual coin mechanisms for each selection.

So far, Mrs. Zito has placed two vending machines in Brahler 's Truckers Supply, on the east edge of Jacksonville; one machine at Midland Farm & Home Supply; a machine at Neal Tire on East Morton Avenue; and one at US Bank on West Morton Avenue.

"There are businesses that have had vending machines in the past that have not had a large enough volume of business to make it profitable,"

said Mrs. Zito's husband, Frank, who co-owns the new business. "Our vending machines are targeted to small offices that have large foot traffic and to businesses with 10 to 100 employees."

The Zitos moved back to Jacksonville about three years ago after having lived in Alabama and California for more than 20 years.

Mrs. Zito, who was born and raised in Jacksonville, is the former Rebecca Decker, and Mr. Zito owned and managed the Sambo's restaurant at 1604 W. Morton Ave. (where Premier Bank is today) from June 1973 until October 1976.

 

 

Local businesses go on attack against governor's tax plan

Jacksonville Journal-Courier (IL) - Wednesday, May 9, 2007

Author: Kate Ramsay, Jacksonville Journal-Courier, Ill.

May 9--From the proprietor of a tire manufacturing company to the owner of a seed distributor, a diverse group of Jacksonville-area business leaders spoke out against Gov. Rod Blagojevich's proposed gross receipts tax at a news conference Tuesday morning. The 10 business leaders who convened at the Jacksonville Regional Economic Development Corp. office said the tax would halt economic growth statewide.

"(The gross receipts tax) will stymie the economy and ultimately trickle down to the consumers in this community," Richard Brahler , owner of Brahler Industries, said.


The group said their businesses would see a sizable jump in taxes and those costs would be passed to their customers. "If this goes through ... our increase will be 895 percent," Rusty Landes, owner of Landes Trucking, said. He said the gross receipts tax imposed on fuel alone would raise his company's taxes by $455,000. The gross receipts tax, part of Gov. Blagojevich's Tax Fairness Plan, would tax all income received by businesses that have more than $2 million in gross receipts, regardless of whether the business is profitable.

Since its proposal, the gross receipts tax has changed in both the rate it would tax companies for goods and services to what companies would be taxed in regards to total gross receipts. Currently, the tax would be imposed on businesses with more than $2 million in gross receipts and charge them 0.85 percent for revenue from sales, leases or rentals of tangible personal property and 1.95 percent for all other gross receipts, such as services. Gov. Blagojevich proposed his Tax Fairness Plan as a way to cut loopholes in the corporate income tax system and generate billions of dollars a year for education and a state-sponsored health care system. On Tuesday, the group of Jacksonville area business owners said they did not have a problem with a tax on profits. But, they said a tax on gross receipts is "regressive" and suggested it would devastate Illinois businesses, and ultimately consumers, with its "pyramiding effect."

The pyramiding effect of the tax refers to its compounding nature, meaning the tax is imposed on every transaction of a business cycle. According to the Center for Tax and Budget Accountability, a product can be taxed five times before it reaches a store's shelf with a gross receipts tax.

Brahler Industries includes a tire manufacturing company and a sales service business and would be "hit twice" with the tax, Mr. Brahler said. He added that in recent years, the state has passed several fees and taxes that have gutted the tire and trucking industry. The gross receipts tax could deliver the final blow, he said. "There's only one way for me to stay in business -- cut expenses, and that means jobs, and probably move some of my facilities across state lines," he said.

Mr. Brahler said relocating in Indiana or Missouri would allow him to continue competing against imports from China and India. He said he does not compete against local companies.

Andy Smith, of Bound to Stay Bound Books Inc., said commercials suggesting the gross receipts tax would affect only "corporate giants" are false.

"We're not a corporate giant. We're your average employer in Illinois," he said. He estimates that the tax would cost his company an additional $600,000 to $700,000 a year.

Bound to Stay Bound Books, which has operated in the Jacksonville area for 87 years, employs 250 people. If the tax is passed, Mr. Smith said, the book bindery would be forced to raise prices for its customers -- schools and public libraries -- which he said is "ironic" because the tax was proposed to help Illinois schools. Landes Trucking employs about 100 people and has operated in the Jacksonville area for more than 50 years. Mr. Landes said his company provides full health insurance for its employees. "Our full-time employees don't pay one penny (for health insurance)," he said.

Mr. Landes said the tax would cause many companies to drop their health care coverage, which would save them money, and have the state cover their employees with the proposed state-sponsored program. John Freeman, owner of Freeman Seeds, said the proposed tax would increase Illinois farmers' input costs by $87.5 million.

"We run on maybe a 3 percent (gross) margin," Mr. Freeman said. He added that every dollar invested into agriculture generates seven times that amount. He said the less money farmers have to invest into their operations, the less money it generates into the economy. Mr. Freeman warned that the tax will increase food prices.

"I think the residents of Morgan and Scott County need to know how this is going to affect businesses right here in our community and probably more importantly or as importantly, how it's going to affect them personally," JREDC President Terry Denison said.

Ginny Fanning, president of the Jacksonville Area Chamber of Commerce, said an Illinois family of four would see an increase of $2,000 for goods they purchased in one year. That additional cost to the consumer is being hidden by the governor, Ms. Fanning said. Mr. Denison said some local businesses, which he would not identify, are delaying expansion projects until the gross receipts tax issue is resolved one way or the other.

Mr. Brahler said he understands companies wanting to wait. "Why would companies take the risk?" he asked.

Devon Davidsmeyer, of Illinois Road Contractors, said projects would be contracted to out-of-state companies if the bill passes. He said Illinois Road Contractors has competed against companies from Iowa for past projects and would have lost them if the gross receipts tax were in effect.

"There's no good side to the (gross receipts tax). We can't afford it as employers and employees can't afford it either," he said. An alternative to the gross receipts tax, suggested by some groups, is an increase in personal and corporate income taxes. Linda Standley, of ILMO Products, said her company is already paying higher corporate income taxes than ever before. ILMO Products employs 72 people in Central Illinois. However, she said raising income taxes would save consumers in the long run compared to the gross receipts tax. ILMO Products may have to move some of its operations to Missouri if the tax passes, Ms. Standley said.

Gary Westermeyer, founder of Westermeyer Industries, said his six- year-old business is a small operation, employing about 35 people, but has over $2 million in gross receipts.

"I have no problem on paying taxes (based) on profits," he said. "I don't understand the rationale behind gross receipts tax." Ms. Fanning said the Jacksonville Area Chamber of Commerce passed a resolution opposing the gross receipts tax. She added that businesses that don't reach the $2 million minimum will still be impacted by the "pyramiding effect" of the tax.

Ms. Fanning, Mr. Denison and the 10 business owners who attended Tuesday's roundtable press conference urged local residents to voice their concerns about the tax to their state legislators. "Make a call to them," Ms. Fanning urged. "(The gross receipts tax) is detrimental to businesses and families in Illinois."

 

Local designer featured on TV show today

Jacksonville Journal-Courier (IL) - Monday, March 14, 2011

Author: Cody Bozarth, Jacksonville Journal-Courier, Ill.

March 14--A Jacksonville designer will be making a second appearance on "The Nate Berkus Show" this morning.

Lizzie Carney, lead designer for Euro Trash, was first featured on the program to display her house and speak about the company's signature style.

On the episode appearing at 11 a.m. on NBC, Carney will be displaying a sample interior design in another "House Proud" segment.

Carney said it was set up to show that stylish design can still be achieved on a tight budget.

"You don't need to buy pieces that are [fiberboard] or particle board," Carney said. "You can buy original pieces by original craftsmen and make them your own style."

Carney said she was invited back for a second appearance because Berkus loved Euro Trash's style and chose it as one of his "House Proud All-Stars."

The Jacksonville-based company Euro Trash, owned by Annie Brahler , imports furniture and other goods found at garage sales and markets in Europe, refinishing and reupholstering or selling them untouched to interior designers across the country.

It also does design work for clients all over the nation including a recent redecoration of Congressman Aaron Schock's office in Washington, D.C.

Carney said her recent appearance of "The Nate Berkus Show" was more involved but more fun. She said she liked being able to share Euro Trash's style of mixing vintage and modern pieces.

"You can achieve this look inexpensively," Carney said. "You just have to empower yourself with the knowledge to know what you're looking for."

 

 

'Illinois Stories' present to Jacksonville Public Library

Jacksonville Journal-Courier (IL) - Saturday, June 19, 2010

Author: David C.L. Bauer, Jacksonville Journal-Courier, Ill.

Jun. 19--Jerold Gruebel has a story to share with Jacksonville.

Thirty-one of them, actually.

As president of Network Knowledge, which includes the central Illinois Public Television affiliate WSEC/Springfield-Jacksonville, he has seen the region's rich history captured for posterity in the popular program "Illinois Stories."

At the urging of Beverly Ware of Jacksonville, he made sure Friday others get the chance to see those stories as well.

Gruebel presented Jacksonville Public Library Director Sharon Zuiderveld with DVDs of the "Illinois Stories" episodes that feature the area.

Among the shows are features on the Brahler House, where Anne Brahler runs her "Eurotrash" business, the story of Jacksonville's role in the Underground Railroad and a tour of the home of Gov. Joseph Duncan.

There are also shows about playwright Ken Bradbury, Camp Courage -- a summer camp for developmentally disabled children at Lake Jacksonville -- and the Elm City Center.

In making the presentation, Gruebel applauded Ware's efforts to make the donation a reality.

"It was Beverly's idea to make these programs available to the community through the public library," he said. "We are happy to make the donation in her honor."

He said she told him on several occasions about how the series captures the history of the Jacksonville area.

She hinted almost as frequently that such a contribution would be a good addition to the library, Gruebel said.

Ware, who was on hand Friday along with several WSEC and library board members, said she enjoys the program and was happy they would now be available for everyone.

Gruebel also hinted that there could soon be an episode 32, one following the revitalization of downtown Jacksonville.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brahler – belz link – shg – xa nudo – post emails – red cross -

 

 

 

 

Brahler – shg link

 

912 group – mccann – nudo -

 

 

James“Jim” Brahler, CBHS, 1957
(Inducted 2004)  

Jim Brahler, the name is synonymous with generosity, kindness and concern for others.  Jim is a 1957 graduate of Cathedral Boys High School .  He pursued a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from Illinois College in Jacksonville .  Certainly Brahler Tire Mart and Brahler Lube Centers are proof that Jim learned a great deal about running a good business.  His reputation tells the story of a successful businessman, as well as an understanding and compassionate employer.  What started as a small-scale tire mart has become one of Springfield ’s most successful locally owned businesses.  Brahler Tire Mart and Brahler Lube Centers employ 67 people, including four longtime employees who have been with Jim for 27 years.

Jim’s family have a father and grandfather to be proud of; they have a mentor and role model of a truly dedicated Christian, a selfless volunteer, a faithful friend and a committed steward. Consider his twelve year’s as chairperson of the Friend-in-Deed golf outing.  The event raised more than $800,000 in that time.  St. Martin de Porres center knows Jim as a dedicated and loyal volunteer.  In addition to working there 5-6 days a week, Jim has helped raise more than $115,000 for the Center; he provides two vans for the Center’s exclusive use and takes care of all expenses for the vans. 

Jim Brahler is a blessing.  He is a blessing to his family—three sons and two daughters; a blessing to Irene and Carol; a blessing to his many grandchildren; a blessing to the Springfield community and a blessing to the many persons who come to St. Martin ’s for food, clothing and daily necessities. Jim Brahler is a graduate of Catholic secondary education who integrated the values that Catholic schools endorse.  Jim knows the real meaning of  “Love God with your whole heart your whole mind and your whole soul and love your neighbor as yourself.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brahler links – montalbano – rebbe -  

Note esp – little flower men’s club – SV -

 

 

 

Montalbano

family

 

 

 

 

 

Rebbe link –

butternut –

bread trucksearly am. = 24/7

 

 

and pohlman – kingtech – dems – dead RN

 

brahler – 9/12 - auto

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, August 15, 1992



Daniel K. Rebbe Sr.

Daniel K. Rebbe Sr., 61, of Springfield died at 5:34 a.m. Friday at St.

John's Hospital.

He was born March 29, 1931, in Petersburg, the son of John and Marguerite Heflan Rebbe. He married Angeline Katherine Montalbano in 1955; she died in 1985. He then married Margaret K. Silveus in 1988. Also preceding him in death were a sister, Mary Leta, and a brother, Paul Edward.

A resident of Springfield most of his life,

 

Mr. Rebbe was a driver and salesman for Butternut Bread for 37 years.

 

He was a member of

Blessed Sacrament Church

 

and an Army veteran of the Korean War.

Surviving are his wife Margaret; four daughters, Mrs. Chris (Linda) Solomon, Mrs. Greg (Tammy) Gumble,

 

 

 

Mrs. Mark (Lisa) Brahler and

 

 

Susan Rebbe, all of Springfield;

 

five sons,

 

Daniel K. Jr.,

 

Joseph A.,

 

Timothy J.,

 

Phillip T. and

 

Edward G., all of

Springfield;

 

eight stepchildren, Mike Landers of Plato, Mo., Joe, Rob, John and Tom Landers and Terry Silveus, all of Auburn, Pat Corcoran of Springfield and Jud Silveus of Harbor Springs, Mich.; 10 grandchildren; 27 stepgrandchildren; six sisters, Margaret Thomas of Little Rock, Ark.,

Kathryn Pohlman of Gillespie,

Frances Ramsey of Littleton, Colo., Sister Charlotte Rebbe of Stonington, Judy Bennett of Decatur and Connie Stuhmer of Petersburg; six brothers, John L. Jr. of Ocala, Fla., Joseph W., James and Philip, all of Petersburg, Ronald of Springfield and Larry of Ursa; an aunt; several nieces, nephews and cousins.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brahler link – 912 –

tea party

 

Rebbe – doc’s sausage – minder – roscetti –

 

bedrocks

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, December 12, 1985

Edition: M1,M2,E1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 52

Angeline K. Rebbe Mrs. Angeline Katherine Rebbe, 52, of 1734 S. Pasfield died at 11:31 a.m.

Wednesday at St. John's Hospital.

A life-time resident of Springfield, Mrs. Rebbe was born on Feb. 16, 1933,

 

the daughter of Joseph and Grace Gucciardo Montalbano .

 

She married Daniel K. Rebbe in 1955.

 

Preceding her in death were her parents and one brother, Tony Montalbano .

Mrs. Rebbe was a member of Blessed Sacrament Church.

Surviving are her husband, Daniel K.; four daughters, Mrs. Chris (Linda) Solomon and Mrs. Greg (Tammy) Gumble, both of Springfield;

 

Mrs. Mark (Lisa) Brahler

 

of Junction City, Kan., and Miss Susan Rebbe at home; five sons, Daniel K. Jr., and Joseph A., both of Springfield, and Timothy J., Edward G. and Phillip T., all at home; four grandchildren; one sister, Mrs. Robert (Mamie) Hegland of Springfield; one aunt; several nieces and nephews.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brahler –

 

UISPD/matt kuchar

 

tony ruzic –

 

 

 

Kuchar  - UIS PD

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, February 11, 1996



Butcher-Timmons Andrea Timmons and

 

Brad Butcher,

 

both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. Dec. 30 at Little Flower Church by the Rev. John Ossola.

The bride is the daughter of Steve and Bev Timmons of Waverly. The groom is the son of Augie and Josie Butcher of Springfield.

Serving as matrons of honor were Kara Luttrell and Joni Ruzic. Bridesmaids were Jolyn Butcher, Stephanie Luttrell, Ronda Johnston, Lynn Frensko, Lea Shelton and Trisha Seymour. Flower girl was Sydney Timmons.

Serving as best men were Brock Butcher and Matt Kuchar. Groomsmen were Steve Vespa, Tony Ruzic, Matt and Rob VonBehren, Dave Brahler and Mike Otto. Ushers were Joel Antonacci and Ryan Link. Ringbearer was Michael Timmons.

A reception was held at the American Center.

The bride is a graduate of Waverly High School. She is employed by Blue Cross Blue Shield. The groom is a graduate of Griffin High School. He is employed by Augie Butcher Construction.

The couple will live in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Downstate ISP

Uis pd

 

Big picture –

Sleep deprivation/pain used as demonstration of “loyalty” for job applicants in political influenced jobs – jobs controlled by partisans – SCRP –

 

Within police – see also scso and isp -

See also children of the politically influential – spd matt goulet – Robert goulet – steil – vanhoos – long

Police links -

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyboesdorfer

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneybressan

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneybuscherreid

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneygillette

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyilfopngaoi

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneymrt

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyrailroadimpacts

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyscsodefendants

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyspddefendants

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyspringfield

 

 

Police involved in addiction rumors

 

 

 

I’ve written about this earlier. A couple years ago, back when I was using the car and I had to fill a gas can every day and that involved pain, I was at the thornton’s on Wabash. I used to go in about everyday to make dinner or lunch or get gas. I saw one of the employees talking to a spd officer . I think he came in after me and I was over by the microwave, but I walk around when I’m cooking things and I heard him say something about being  “in over his head” and drugs. The two were at one point both looking in my direction as they talked and then got quiet and looked away as got closer. I got the sense that they were talking about me and it didn’t seem very subtle. Don’t remember the name of the spd or which employee it was. I remember, however, that one of the employees at thornton’s, one of the more senior employees/mgmt was in the addiction community from Decatur. She was a white woman, slightly older than me with black hair and drove a red Pontiac. The spd didn’t talk to her, but based upon her comments I believe she may be involved in the addiction frame and harassment. She no longer works at that location and I haven’t seen her for a couple years. I have reason to believe that she may be claiming implied consent. While I used that store, I was exposed to pain, headache and stimulant, just like all other places I have used to buy/prepare food. 

 

 

 

Uis police – drug rumor – students – kuchar

 

Kuchar told to start rumor and recruit students by Mitchell at uis –

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

V Paul smith – mmc – sium – henkle – crabtree – graham – burge – plunkett/gauwitz – psychiatry dept –

Sangamo club – axa – chuck smith – parks – Stratton et al at parks – xa giganti

 

 

 

Dr paul and grandma is correct – link from smith at mmc – sangamo – xa sternstein and others

 

 

Barr – moscardelli – Ashland is involved in grandpa death –

 

 

 

 

Reinhart – cross – coll dems – promote addiction rumor – in 95/96 – see also gay rumor

 

Roommate Oscar mariona – 95/96 – also promote addiction rumor – xa gay rumor – boesdorfer link – mendenhall leach – alco frame –

 

 

See also dui frame in 96 – at halls – his girlfriend called in tip – I had 5 beers in 4 hours – not illegal bac – stopped by svpd – bac read 1.01. case was dismissed after money spent and still on record. Machine improperly calibrated. I got a dui in Carbondale in 91 when a woman actually hit me and had to come across two lanes to hit me. Very slight damage to cars but driver was instructed beforehand to cause collision in order to create dui ticket. Note that gray is influential in southern Illinois as is ed smith. Also worth pointing out here is that during a Halloween celebration in Carbondale, I was literally picked out of a large group of students and was arrested on grossly overcharged grounds. The group of students that were arrested were held over the weekend, at which time we were told the charges were reduced. I checked the records, a couple years ago and it stated that I plead to something that I did not plead to.

 

Additionally, on the dui, I was told that I would receive 5 yrs probation as it was a first offense and after that period it would be removed from the record. I didn’t think about it at the time, but the dui stop bt svpd happened just before the probation was set to expire. Dunbar ran svpd at the time and gray is/was the city atty.

 

Also, The first ticket I ever got was from bob dunbar, when he was at lgpd, I had been driving like a year or so and I got a ticket for driving with alcohol in the car. It was very late and I was sober, around the holidays, I think it was new years eve. I had driven quite a few people home and I had one person left in the car that had a beer or some liquor. I believe the car was towed and it was quite a hassle. That is an early dunbar link.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kuchar - uis

 

 

 

Jerry kuchar is uis police –

 

He actively participated in effort to cause me pain while on uis property, while in official capacity. he was ordered to recruit students to expose me to pain chemicals – ordered by uis police don Mitchell – see also spd don Mitchell – ev locker days – and see dui and resign or fired – that’s when he went to uis

 

 

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, April 13, 2003



Kuchar -Allen

Marcie Kay Allen of Riverton and Jerry Joseph Kuchar of Springfield were married at 2 p.m. Feb. 15, 2003, at St. James Catholic Church in Riverton by Monsignor Kenneth Steffen.

The bride is the daughter of Jim and Cathy Black of Riverton. The groom is the son of Jerry and Eileen Kuchar of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Amy Viola. Serving as matron of honor was Kerrey Pressler. Bridesmaids were Breanna VanHuss, Jessica Bice, Erica Bice, Amanda Brewer, Kelley Matthews and Jennifer Kuchar . Flower girls were Jasmine Campbell and Jourdan Pressler.

Best man was Brian Brewer. Groomsmen were Mike Trello, Chris Roth, Angelo Zaffiri, Marcus Allen, Jim Gusouskis, Jeremy Allen and Mark Marinelli. Ushers were Chris VanHuss and Zeek Pressler.

A reception was held at the Riverton Knights of Columbus hall.

The bride is a graduate of Riverton High School. She is employed by Memorial Medical Center. The groom is a graduate of Lanphier High School and Lincoln Land Community College. He is employed by the state of Illinois.

The couple lives in Springfield

 

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, April 28, 2005



Mary C. Kuchar

SPRINGFIELD - Mary C. Kuchar, 62, of Springfield died Wednesday, April 27, 2005, at her home.

She was born July 31, 1942, in Springfield, the daughter of Frederick and Catherine Reiser Kuchar.

Miss Kuchar graduated from Ursuline Academy. She retired from Illinois Bell Telephone Co. and Ameritech in 1990 and was a consultant in the telecommunication industry. She was a member of Illinois Bell Pioneer Club.

Survivors: two sisters,

Catherine and

Freda JoAnn Kuchar, both of Springfield;

three brothers,

John A. Kuchar of Springfield,

the Rev. Matthaus Kuchar, OSB, of Ettal, Germany, and

Jerry (wife, Eileen) Kuchar of Springfield;

several nieces and nephews; six great-nieces; and a great-nephew.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is important

 

Riv kc’s – vala – rusciolelli – fanale –

 

ippolito

 

Walter H. Black

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 3, 2008

Section: LOCAL
Page: 10

Walter H. Black

RIVERTON – Walter H. Black, 59, of Riverton died at 9:18 p.m. Friday, Aug. 1, 2008, at his residence.

He was born June 15, 1949, in Springfield, the son of Byron S. and Ida M. Ippolito Black.

He was preceded in death by his parents.

He is survived by a brother, Jim (wife, Cathy) Black of Riverton; a niece, Marcie (husband, Jerry) Kuchar ; a nephew, Jeremy (wife Amy) Allen; three great-nephews, Eli, Jake and Mikey; and several cousins.

He was a lifelong resident of Riverton. He was a member of St. James Church in Riverton and was a faithful volunteer at Riverton Party Store.

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, July 21, 2005



Ida M. Black

RIVERTON - Ida M. Black, 94, of Riverton died Tuesday, July 19, 2005, at her home.

She was born Jan. 22, 1911, in Riverton, the daughter of Vito and Dominica Santarelli Ippolito. She married Byron Black in 1945; he died in 1971.

Mrs. Black was a cook for St. John's Sanitarium and worked at Sangamo Electric Co. She was a member of St. James Church in Riverton.

Survivors: two sons, Walter Black and James (wife, Cathy) Black, both of Riverton; two grandchildren; two great-grandsons; and many nieces, nephews and cousins.

 

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, October 31, 2004


Baker-Viola

Amy Catherine Viola and John Byron Baker, both of Riverton, were married at 2:30 p.m. May 29, 2004, at St. James Catholic Church in Riverton by Monsignor Kenneth Steffen.

The bride is the daughter of Robert and Linda Viola of Riverton. The groom is the son of Ron and Karen Wilson of Avon, Ind., and Bruce Baker of Danville, Ind.

Serving as matron of honor was Marcie Kuchar. Serving as maid of honor was Erica Bice. Bridesmaids were Kerrey Pressler, Jessica Bice, Breanna VanHuss and Amanda Brewer. Flower girl was Emma VanHuss.

Best man was Michael Lynch. Groomsmen were Joseph Wynn, Jerry Kuchar , Tony Cusumano, Chris VanHuss and Dan Seaman. Ring bearer was Eli Allen. Ushers were Marty and Danny Viola.

A reception was held at the Knights of Columbus Hall in Riverton.

The bride is a graduate of Riverton High School. She is employed by Cingular Wireless. The groom is a graduate of Danville High School in Danville, Ind. He is employed by Hundman Lumber.

The couple lives in Springfield.

 

 

 

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, July 31, 2001



The following LINCOLN LAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE students were named to the dean's list: Joseph Copley of Ashland; Tara Ostlund of Assumption; Nino Digiovanna, Carol Reiterman and Ted Rucker, all of Athens; Jenna Hogan, April Huff, Jon Huff, Melinda Ladage, Joshua Marques, Jodi Powell and Kathryn Zak, all of Auburn; Brenda Hall, Yesenia Reyes and Abby Ward, all of Beardstown; Nicolette Leka of Buffalo; Melissa Howard of Cantrall; Susan Brogdon of Chapin; Alyssa Bursott, Christopher Castelletti, Jennie Dotson, Timothy Franke, Stacy Haacke, Brenda Ham, Susan Kessler, Caleb Kestle, Alayna Kopp, Alison Lynch and Alisha Sheetz, all of Chatham; Debra Kent of Coffeen; Kimberly Buis, Kristin Freeman, Ben Holinga and Robert Hood, all of Dawson; Kimberly Tegeler of Divernon; Leann Houston and Kimberly Hysler, both of Edinburg; Christina Heffren of Farmersville; Jill Buckman and Jeremy Tongate, both of Girard; Dale Schultz of Glenarm; Evita Garnett of Greenview; Mark Sturtevant of Gurnee; James Storm and Sheena Wisnasky, both of Hillsboro; Veronica Boas of Irving; James Barnett, Joseph Buhlig, Lesly Burries, Stacey Carl, Jennifer Cathers, Timothy Darr, Leah Fechter, Brian Harvey, Brooke Hickox, Joanne Hubbard, Scott Hudson, Aaron Jackson, Heather Laskowski, Nicholas McDannald, Penny Ruiz, Jeremiah Schaller, Troy Staats, Eric Tosh, all of Jacksonville; Doris Collins, Joshua Mulvaney and Kathy Sedlock, all of Kincaid; Carl Beechler, Cassandra Ernst, Rob Garee and Judy Juenger, all of Litchfield; Jennifer Morgan of Loami; Mariah Rueter of Manchester; Kurt Andrews, Tyler Cunningham and Justin Dodson, all of Mason City; Danielle White of Mechanicsburg; Reannin Brown of Modesto; Sarah Cramer, Joshua Hawley and Blake Reed, all of Morrisonville Jennifer Hagerman of Mount Olive; Shaun Meyers and Kari Benson, both of Mount Pulaski; Heather Birdsell, Sheryl Nichols and Alyssa Zulauf, all of Murrayville; Luke Goss, Rebecca Kemp, Michael Kinner, Tiffany Peecher and Cassandra Reiterman, all of New Berlin; Miranda Braye, Mindy Carroll, Angela Hoffman, Rachel Maretti, Jacob Marquess, Kristofer Martin and Shannon Stewart, all of Nokomis; Jonathan Ferguson and Mack Raikes, both of Oakford; Brenton Baker and Landon Landes, both of Palmyra; Terah Anderson, Amanda Ashby, Amanda Ashby, Stuart Clemence, Sarah Hailey, Alana Hill, Robert Hogan and Emily Morehouse, all of Pawnee; Jenna Boeker, Jacob Gronewold, Leslie Hutson and Robert Rollins, all of Petersburg; William Kane, Kimberly Lambert, Michael Miller and Kathryn Neuman, all of Pleasant Plains; Nicole Adams and Seth Brockmeyer, both of Raymond; Shannon Ballog, Jennifer Giacomini, Staci Howard and Jeffrey Nichols, all of Riverton; Kelly Bernardin, Jessica Bolser, Matthew Collins, Sara Collins, Jack Eleopoulos, Bryan Lenzi, Vincent Lenzi, Lindsay May, Corey McDonald, Jon Tarr and Jason Warren, all of Rochester; Robert Ervin, Dustin Michaels, Shon Mitchell, Sarah Rue and Damon Tanke, all of Sherman; Anne Agnew, Richard Amini, Aaron Andrews, Jennifer Bandy, Lindsey Barnard, Nicholas Barnard, Summer Beck, Richard Benanti, Catherine Benjamin, Erika Blackburn, Brian Boatman, Michael Bollero, Candice Burress, Megan Buskirk, Shawn Carter, Mary Chiti, Lesley Cox, David Crickard, Jennifer Daberkow, Reier Deloney, Erin Dilbaitis, Sheila Dwyer, Shana Erwin, Brittany Etchill, Rebecca Field, Tracy Flemming, Kirsten Golbach, Brian Grieme, John Hall, Jeffrey Hand, Kathryn Handy, Rebecca Harley, Kevin Heard, Adrienne Hendee, Lana Houston, Jeremy Huffstedtler, Kara Humphrey, Kristine Jerving, Jeremiah Johnson, Kelly Joyner, Amanda Kennedy, Diana Kienzler, Vanessa Kilburn, Jerry Kuchar , Alexis Kulavic, Nicholas Kuntzi, Jessica Lacey, Graham Lamontagne, Kimberly Leichsenring, Deidra Lockhart, Jaime Longobardi, Sarah Lowman, Frank Lowry, Samuel Martin, Shawn McKinney, Melissa Miller, Timothy Morris, Ryan Murphy, Sarah Musch, Amy Nation, Lori Needham, Nathan Nelsen, John Nelson, Marie Nelson, Amanda Oliver, Temitope Oshodi, Natalie Overman, Kirk Polley, DeAnna Pruett-Boushele, Maria Qureshi, Aakashdeep Raut, Kevin Reed, Richard Reese, Brooke Robinson, Tarek Samara, Michele Sapp, Jennifer Schlemm, Brian Schroeder, Brandon Schutt, Nicholas Shuster, Kimberly Sieving, Karsten Slater, Ashlee Sloman, Edward Spann, John Stanulis, Ryan Stout, Gretchen Till, Pamela Tintori, Francesca Valentini, Laura Wade, Tina Ware, Paul Watson, Randi White and Rebecca Yokem, all of Springfield; Heidi Stiltz of Tallula; Amanda Sneed of Taylor Springs; Ricci Adams, James Baker, Bryce Benton, Marissa Burnett, Sarah Chase, John Collins, Martin Durbin, Jacqueline Foil, Melissa Hainaut, Ernest Irwin Jr., Hannah Jelley, Daniel Johnson, April Keel, Jarrod McLaughlin, Colleen McLeod, Melissa Midland, Jimmy Moore, William Newberry, Randy Reynolds, Annette Sides, Tien Tsai, Melvin White III, all of Taylorville; Aaron Smith of Thayer; Justin Hays, Matthew Hupp, Kathleen Murphy and Tia Schoth, all of Virden; Stephen Clark of Virginia; Tammy Lynch of Williamsville; Stacey Staake of Winchester; Jennifer Charles and Aaron Golitko, both of Witt; and Joey Rees of Woodson

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trello works with Kaiser at dot – eng/bridges –

 

Xa chuck smith

 

And see moushon – wal-mart links -

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, February 20, 2000



Trello-Antonacci

Amelia Ann Antonacci and Michael James Trello, both of Virden, were married at 2 p.m. Oct. 23 at St. Aloysius Church by the Rev. John Titus.

The bride is the daughter of

 

Linda Antonacci of Riverton, and the late Richard Antonacci.

 

The groom is the son of George and Susan Trello of Springfield.

Serving as matrons of honor were Angela Moushon and Audra Moffitt. Bridesmaids were Amy Trello, Pam Trello, Jessica Gibson, Kathy Saulsberry and Hillary Hagen. Flower girl was Kaitlyn Moffitt.

Best men were Brian Brewer and

Jerry Kuchar .

Groomsmen were George Trello IV,

J.P. Graham,

Derrick Hallman, Kevin Moushon and Greg Trello. Ushers were John Dillon and

 

Tim Graham.

 

Ringbearers were Jacob Moffitt and Logan Moushon.

A reception was held at the Artisan Building at the Illinois State Fairgrounds.

The bride is a graduate of Springfield College in Illinois and the University of Illinois at Springfield. She is employed by the Sangamon County Probation Department. The groom is a graduate of Springfield College in Illinois and Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville. He is employed as a bridge engineer for the state Department of Transportation.

The couple will reside in Virden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note crumly link here – see pokora – henry – page –

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 10, 1988

Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 19

Kuchar -Moan Julie Lynn Moan and James Anton Kuchar , both of Springfield, were united

in marriage at 2 p.m. May 28. The Rev. Riley Powell officiated the ceremony at the First Church of the Nazarene.

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Moan, 2312 Grinnell Drive. The bridegroom is the son of Sandie Kuchar and Wayne Kuchar of Springfield.

Serving as matron of honor was Lisa Hesson, and Kate Zimmerman, Theresa Moan, Teresa Mueller, Kathy Franklin and Jennifer Kapp served as bridesmaids. Flower girl was Kristi Hesson.

Chris Jarvis served as best man, and serving as groomsmen were Gary Kroeschel, Kevin Hesson, Michael Crumly, Keith Kuchar and Bob Jefferson. Ushers were Todd and Mark Bordignon, and Jack Meidel. Curtis Hughes served as ringbearer.

A reception was held at Baur's Opera House.

The bride, a graduate of Ursuline Academy and Lincoln Land Community College nursing program, is employed at St. John's Hospital. The bridegroom, a graduate of Glenwood High School, is employed by SignKraft.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the ball / The Hitting Center adds golf to its indoor training facility

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, January 22, 2005

Author/Byline: DANIEL PIKE STAFF WRITER
Section: CITY/STATE
Page: 8

Every day, Austin Kuchar tries to drag Jeff Kuchar to the driving range.

Jeff agrees several times a week, even though his interest in golf is limited. He might play four times a year.

But Austin demands more from Jeff, and the pair's trips to the range often end in tears.

It's a shame when parents press their children too hard to excel in sports.

Fortunately, that's not the case here.

Austin is a 3-year-old golf fanatic who introduces himself as "Tiger Woods." He's less enthralled by SpongeBob SquarePants than by the hushed highlights of some decades-old Masters Tournament on the Golf Channel.

"He started watching it on TV," says Jeff Kuchar , Austin's father. "He picked it up himself. We've never given him lessons. We're not pushing him or anything, we're just going to let him do his thing."

So Austin has become a regular at the new indoor driving range at The Hitting Center, a baseball and softball training facility operated by Calvary Temple Christian Center at the old Landmark Ford dealership, 1800 S. Dirksen Parkway.

Jeff volunteers at the center largely to give Austin greater access to the range, which was added to the sprawling facility in December.

On average, Austin hits six to eight large buckets of golf balls per trip. That's about 550 balls. If the Kuchars visit the range three times a week, the toddler will have taken roughly 1,650 swings.

"He'll leave crying when we don't have any more," says Jeff, whose family attends Calvary Temple.

The driving range is the most recent addition to the site. The church's Hope Thrift Center and Cafe Speranza moved there last year from Chatham Road. Then the church took over The Hitting Center when it moved into the location last spring.

The entire facility is not-for-profit, and all employees are volunteers. The money raised by all four endeavors is devoted to mission work, according to Jeff Hunt, athletic facilities director at Calvary Temple.

"That's the main goal of this program," he says.

But it's not the only one. Bob Laurent, manager of The Hitting Center, envisions the complex as an all-purpose athletic training facility. It's already equipped for baseball, softball and golf, and there are plans to add football and 3-on-3 soccer capabilities. Area high school and college coaches are regularly consulted.

Laurent says Calvary Temple's ownership is not an afterthought.

"If you are going to be involved in sports as a church, then you should be a Christian influence," says Laurent, a Calvary Temple member. "If not, then why (be involved)? And we don't mind being accountable for that."

The project can be traced to another Calvary Temple project: the Capitol Retirement Village, a housing development for low-income seniors that opens next month at the church, 1730 W. Jefferson St.

The land Calvary Temple devoted to the retirement village previously had been used by Calvary Academy as athletic fields. The loss of those facilities partly motivated the church to buy land at the former site of Xanadu, a recreation complex that was proposed for Second Street and Recreation Drive in the late 1990s but never materialized.

Calvary Temple's plans for the old Xanadu site include recreation facilities. In the meantime, The Hitting Center, and especially the driving range, are test programs that will gauge the city's desire for sports services.

"Springfield has seen athletic endeavors fail," Laurent says. "What we hope to do here is prove in this footprint ... the ability to accomplish a project of that nature."

Eventually, The Hitting Center could move to the Xanadu site. There's no timetable for that, however.

Laurent is confident The Hitting Center, which was full of practicing baseball and softball players one recent January night, won't go the way of the Xanadu development.

"It's going to be here," he says, "for kids who are 6 years old all the way up until they are through college."

The netted driving range is open only four hours a day - from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. It uses the same space as baseball and softball facilities, which draw a large clientele of school kids later in the afternoon.

"Right now, we've kind of focused about breakfast and lunch, until we see that we need to extend our hours," Hunt says. "We've seen a fairly decent number of people come through, but we're continuing to get the word out."

Only about 50 yards long and 40 yards wide, the range won't accommodate little Austin when he starts launching Tiger-esque drives. But it's a heated, indoor practice spot - the only one of its kind in Springfield.

"It doesn't give you the full flight of the ball, obviously, but it does give enough flight to show if you are slicing or hooking the ball," Hunt said. "The feedback we've had is that it's an excellent place to work on your swing."

In the morning, the driving range charges $6 for a large bucket of balls and $4 for a small one. During midday hours, $10 gets you all the balls you can hit in a half hour.

The golf facility can be reserved during off hours. Gift certificates for The Hitting Center and driving range also are available.

For information, you may call Hunt at 546-9700, ext. 233, or The Hitting Center at 522-6653.

Caption: 1. Austin Kuchar , 3, takes a break from practice with his father, Jeff Kuchar , at The Hitting Center's new indoor driving range in Springfield. / 2. Golfers practice at The Hitting Center's new indoor range in the former Landmark Ford building on South Dirksen Parkway. In the evening, the range is converted into a softball and baseball practice facility.

 

 

 

 

 

Angela shields – bordignon – Holstein –

-      Neighborhood – nelson – adorjan – brinkman -

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, July 26, 1985

Edition: M1,M2,E1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 8

Agnes C. Kuchar Agnes C. Kuchar , 76, of Springfield died at 1:15 a.m.

Thursday at the

Regency Nursing Home.

She was born Aug. 19, 1908, in Cresco, Iowa, the daughter of James and Mary Alice Weightman Shields.

Surviving are her husband, Andy; one daughter, Mrs. Mary Jane Bordignon of Chatham; two sons, Wayne and Paul Kuchar , both of Chatham; nine grandchildren; one great-grandchild; four sisters, Margaret Anderlik of Cresco, Iowa, Alice Gabrielson of North Hollywood, Calif., Mrs. Lucy Wheeler of Springfield and Mrs. Rachael Harvey of Virden; one brother, James Shields of Limespring, Iowa.

 

 

 

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, April 29, 2001



Kuchar -Tebrugge

Deanna Lynn Tebrugge and Mark Joseph Kuchar , both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. March 10 at St. Agnes Church by the Rev. David Lantz.

The bride is the daughter of David Tebrugge and Nancy Tebrugge, both of Springfield. The groom is the son of JoAnn Kuchar of Springfield.

Serving as maids of honor were Dana and Dawn Tebrugge. Bridesmaid was Katie Kuchar . Flower girl was Megan Kuchar .

Best man was Matt Kuchar . Groomsman was Paul Garrett. Ushers were Jeff Bostwick and Michael Harrod.

A reception was held at the Crowne Plaza.

The bride is a graduate of Sacred Heart-Griffin High School and St. Louis University. She is employed as an

instructor at Springfield College in Illinois. The groom is a graduate of Griffin High School and Illinois College. He is employed as

CFO of the Professional Independent Insurance Agents of Illinois.

The couple will reside in Springfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copiers – hard drives –

 

Begue – trn club

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, May 24, 1987



Kuchar -Law Rulene Sue Law of Litchfield and Jeffrey Paul Kuchar of Chatham were united in marriage at 4 p.m. April 18. The Rev. W.W. Gillespie and the Rev. Phil Schneider officiated the ceremony at the Litchfield Assembly of God Church in Litchfield.

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Law of Litchfield. The bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Kuchar of Chatham.

Serving as maid of honor was Maleah Law, with Tami Brewer, Tina Kuchar and Maria Jurgena serving as bridesmaids. Flower girl was Kimberly Law.

Best man was Ed Law, and serving as groomsmen were Matt Begue, Phil Jessup, and Jeff Alinger. Ushers were Todd Bordignon, Jim Kuchar , and Donavon Patton. Ringbearer was Grant McGiveron.

A reception was held immediately after the ceremony at the church.

The bride is a graduate of Litchfield High School. The bridegroom, a graduate of Chatham Glenwood High School, is employed by the C.D.S. Office System as a service technician.

The couple will reside in Franklin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hillen/frito link –

 

Evans – rusciolelli link

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, December 8, 2002



Weder-Mohay

Michelle Renee Mohay and Benjaman Kendric Weder, both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. Sept. 21, 2002, at Third Presbyterian Church by the Rev. H. Warren Wilkewitz.

The bride is the daughter of Michael and Barbara Mohay of Springfield. The groom is the son of Pamela Malwick of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Kristin Taylor. Bridesmaids were Anne Hillen, Christine Wagner and Laura Kuchar . Flower girl was Lexie Kuchar .

Best man was Jeremiah Hobbs. Groomsmen were Randall Hobbs, Terry Wagner and Jeremy Merz. Ring bearer was Brendan Weder. Ushers were Matthew Kuchar and Elliott McKinley.

A reception was held at the Eagles Club.

The bride is a graduate of Lanphier High School. She is employed by

Evans Services Inc. The groom is a graduate of Southeast High School. He is employed by

Contech Construction.

The couple will live in Springfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Possible Schnapp link

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, January 27, 2002



Kuchar -Scott

Kendra Sue Scott and Mathew Calif Kuchar , both of Pawnee, were married at 3 p.m. Oct. 20, 2001, at Trinity Lutheran Church in Auburn by the Rev. Richard Harre.

The bride is the daughter of Charles Scott and Richard and Karen Schnapp, all of Pawnee. The groom is the son of Larry and Becky Kuchar of Pawnee and Dee Gardner of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Nikki Jones. Bridesmaids were Aisha White, Christina Thompson and Violet Kuchar . Flower girl was Sierra Jones.

Best man was Ryan Kuchar . Groomsmen were Chris Kuchar , Shawn Busby and Chris Howard. Ringbearer was Clint Kuchar . Ushers were Scott Howard, Chris Pierce and Kevin Haubold.

A reception was held at the American Legion Hall in Kincaid.

The bride is a graduate of Pawnee High School. She is employed at Cedar Nook Daycare. The groom is a graduate of Pawnee High School. He is a construction worker.

The couple will reside in Pawnee

 

 

 

 

FOR THE RECORD

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, May 2, 2004



PERSONAL

Births



Jeff and Shelly Kuchar , Springfield, a son, Jared Stephen Kuchar , Monday, Feb. 23, 2004. Grandparents are Keith and Jean Livesay of Ware and Ken and Kathy Kuchar of Springfield. Great-grandparents are Marcia Treece of Anna and Willard and Lucille Kuchar of Springfield.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, April 30, 1989



Kuchar -Campbell Kelly Ann Campbell of Springfield and Keith Bradley Kuchar of Chatham were united in marriage at 1:30 p.m. April 8. The Rev. Stanley J. Haxton performed the ceremony at Jerome United Methodist Church in Springfield.

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roy E. Campbell, 2460 Idlewild Drive. The bridegroom's parents are Wayne and Sandra Kuchar , 1941 Woodside Road.

Kim Campbell served as maid of honor, with Jennifer Bachman and Stephanie Rogers as bridesmaids. Flower girl was Suzanne Wright.

Best man was James Kuchar , and serving as groomsmen were Jeff Borg and John Theodor. Jack Meidel and Mark Bordignon served as ushers, and Derek Zentgraf was ringbearer.

A reception was held at the fellowship hall.

The bride, a graduate of Southeast High School, is employed as a pharmacy technician by Osco Drug on Wabash Avenue. The bridegroom, a graduate of Glenwood High School, is employed as a supervisor by Osco Drug at Fairhills Mall.

The couple will reside in Chatham.

 

 

 

Homeless link

 

HOMELESS ADVOCACY GROUP TO HOLD HEARING WEDNESDAY

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, September 25, 1988

Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 18

The Illinois Coalition for the Homeless and Springfield's Contact Ministries will co-sponsor a local hearing on Springfield's hungry and

homeless from 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesday at the city council chambers in the Municipal Building.

Those scheduled to testify are Ethel Butcher of Contact Ministries; Bret Kuchar , Serenity House Shelter; Bill Maier, Inner City Mission; Capt. Pat McPherson, the Salvation Army; Kathy Howell, Kumler Food Pantry; Sue Coplea, Rutledge Youth Foundation; Kaywin Davis, Youth Service Bureau; Pam Pathneal, the Senior Citizens Center; and Judy Groves, Fifth Street Renaissance.

The panel will include Mayor Ossie Langfelder, state Reps. Karen Hasara and Mike Curran, and state Sen. John Davidson. Moderator will be the Rev. Mary Moore of the Unitarian-Universalist Fellowship.

Jim Arth of the Illinois Coalition for the Homeless said the purpose of the hearing is to let government leaders know that a serious problem exists in the area

 

 

 

 

Jett link

 

GARY SHORT NEW PRESIDENT OF PARENTS WITHOUT PARTNERS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, April 15, 1987

Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 16

Gary Short has been elected president of Parents Without Partners, Springfield Chapter 213.

Other officers elected were Ray Carey, administrative vice president; Pamela Callarman, secretary; Suzette O'Connor, treasurer; Letoy Smith, vice president membership; Karen Vaughan, director adult activity; Michael Lacquement, vice president family and youth; Sondra Achenbach, director new members; Jan Droegkamp, vice president program and education; Dee Kuchar , director member services; Norma Bradley, director public relations; Carol Pomatto, newsletter editor; Martha Little, director membership involvement; Luke Pritchett, director ways and means; Nancy Wheelwright, director community services; Ellis Hutcheson, director awards; Gerald Adkins, director Jacksonville; Geneva McCarthy, ethics/grievance chairman; Penny Rodgers, ethics/grievance vice chairman; and Connie Lynn, parliamentarian.

Parents Without Partners is a volunteer, mutual-help, educational, non-profit organization of single parents who meet to promote a happy family environment.

Membership is open to any single parents. Custody of the children is not a requirement for membership. For more information, call 525-9449.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ippolito impacts – riv

Weiland link

 

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateSun, Jul 6, 2008 at 7:58 PM

subjectDENNIS WIELAND BAILS - CLEARLAKE TOWNSHIP

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details 7/6/08

 

 

 

WIELAND BAILS

GOP appointees to represent party in November race

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - February 6, 2008

Author/Byline: JOHN REYNOLDS STAFF WRITER / john.reynolds@sj-r.com

Section: LOCAL

Page: 22

 

Two Republican appointees to the Sangamon County Board fought off challengers in Tuesday's primary and will represent their party in the November general election.

 

Jim Good defeated Jeff Hubbs in District 8 by a vote of 391 to 101, or 79 percent to 21 percent; and Linda Fulgenzi defeated Tom Shafer in District 12 by a vote of 392 to 137, or 74 percent to 26 percent.

 

Good was appointed to the county board in November to replace

 

Dennis Wieland , who resigned a month earlier citing health reasons and a desire to spend more time with his family. Good previously served on the Riverton School Board.

 

In the general election, Good will face Democrat James "Rob" Mehan, who was unopposed in Tuesday's primary.

 

Fulgenzi was named to the board in July to replace Cathy Scaife, who had moved from District 12. Fulgenzi, who served for eight years on the Leland Grove City Council, is not related to Sangamon County Board member John Fulgenzi, who represents the area near the Illinois State Fairgrounds.

 

Linda Fulgenzi also is the mother of Springfield Park Board member Jim Fulgenzi Jr.

 

No Democrat has filed to run in the District 12 county board race.

 

 

WIELAND'S 'HORSE TRADING' A PERSISTENT PROBLEM FOR BOARD

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - April 16, 2000

Section: EDITORIAL

Page: 17

 

The longtime highway commissioner of Clear Lake Township, RICHARD WIELAND, was told in no uncertain terms by members of his township board last July that using township equipment for private work is illegal.

 

Wieland, whose work on private property has been the subject of an Illinois State Police probe and is under review by the Sangamon County state's attorney's office, says he hasn't done any bartering since July.

 

But before that ban went into effect, he says, he had done work for some township board members over the years.

 

At least two of those board members indicate Wieland is referring to favors he did for them that they didn't ask for.

 

Wieland has also used county equipment to fill potholes in the entrance drive at The Oaks Golf Course, where last week Wieland's cousin, Sangamon County Board member DENNIS WIELAND , had a $15-per-person fund-raiser.

 

Course owner DANNY PESCH did not charge Dennis Wieland to use the property. He also hasn't charged for use of banquet facilities at the course for Christmas parties Wieland has put on in recent years

 

During the 11 years he has owned the course, Pesch said, "three times maybe he's filled some potholes on our driveway. To be a good neighbor, we've let him use the banquet facility."

 

Pesch said Richard Wieland has done a good job on township roads, and use of the golf course banquet room in the off season costs him virtually nothing.

 

"You want to be friends with your neighbors," Pesch said.

 

He said he wouldn't let Wieland do any road work at the course now.

 

Pesch and the Wieland cousins spoke with me at the golf course last week, where Dennis Wieland had come to cook for his fund-raiser. Pesch said Dennis Wieland had cooked for some outings at the course even before entering politics.

 

"People just don't understand that money's not the name of the game," said Dennis Wieland .

 

But while many people praise Richard Wieland's efforts during his more than two decades as highway commissioner, some are also concerned about his apparent habit of doing work on private property.

 

Some of that work has been in exchange for labor to benefit the township, while some helped homeowners or schools. Several examples of such work have come to light since I wrote recently about four swapping instances and one case in which Wieland did surfacing for Riverton Middle School.

 

KURT SICILIANO, who runs a small construction company, in March of 1999 billed the township for work on five culverts and ditches.

 

The total amount came to $4,180, but the bill shows a reduction of $1,200 for oil-and-chip surfaces at two addresses along Oaklane Road, including the address of Siciliano's company.

 

In exchange for some of the work, Richard Wieland said, Siciliano "asked about doing the driveway. So I went to the board and asked the board, and I said, 'How about him trading a day's work for doing his driveway?' And they said, 'If we don't know about it, we don't worry about it.'"

 

Wieland identified board member RON HANDLIN as making the statement.

 

Handlin denies making such a comment. "I don't even remember the question coming up," he said.

 

Wieland also said he hauled rock to Handlin's house.

 

"I will admit I talked to Richard about rock," Handlin said. However, he said, he merely asked if Wieland knew how much rock cost and how to get it delivered.

 

"I came home one night and it was there," he said. "I don't know who delivered it. ... I never found out."

 

Wieland says of another board member, SARA KERSKE, "We pushed snow and stuff out of her driveway."

 

Kerske said her husband, who has since died, had terminal cancer when a big snow hit in January 1999. She wanted her driveway plowed in case she needed to get him to a doctor. She called Wieland to see if he could suggest someone, she said, but "I made it very clear to him that I did not want township equipment nor township employees to be plowing my driveway. ... If you're an elected official, you don't have them do favors for you."

 

When someone called to say he would plow, Kerske said the man told her he was employed by FS, his endloader belonged to FS, and he was going around helping people by plowing driveways.

 

Wieland also said there are "five or six places" where he has put oil-and-chip surfaces at ends of private driveways to allow school buses to turn around. The owner of one of those driveways is township board member TAMMY VIEIRA (who works at The State Journal-Register.)

 

Nineteen or 20 years ago, Vieira said, she feared for safety of her children along the road, and Wieland, who was already highway commissioner, paved her driveway - a length of about 100 yards - and a turnaround area.

 

"Can I bake you a pie or something?" she recalls asking. Wieland instead asked her to run for township clerk, which she did - and won. She has won subsequent elections for trustee.

 

She didn't think anything was wrong with the arrangement.

 

"It was just how it always was," Vieira said.

 

Wieland has periodically resurfaced the turnaround area, she said.

 

Wieland also said he supplied some equipment, including lawn-mowing equipment, to an auto auction business run by the son of current Township Clerk CONNIE SCOTT.

 

DON SCOTT, whose business is Advanced Marketing, said he's gotten no benefit from Wieland.

 

He did do Wieland a favor by storing an unusable pavement roller owned by the township at his business, Scott said, but then it took several months to get Wieland to pick it up.

 

Any mowing Wieland did in the area was not on business property, but on township property for which Wieland is responsible, Don Scott said.

 

The July 6 board meeting was called to discuss allegations from township resident J.C. PETITT that Wieland had been working on private property.

 

Minutes show that at that meeting, Wieland repeatedly called bartering "horse trading."

 

"You can't do it; it's against the law," Township Supervisor VIC PAMBIANCO told him. "We've gone through it before, and you cannot barter with people with public funds that are for public roads."

 

"Saving the township money, that's what I'm trying to do," Wieland said.

 

"That's not going to keep you out of jail," said board member DON SLOPER.

 

Wieland also said at the meeting that "I do work for the school all the time."

 

Pambianco told him, "The school's a taxing district. ... They have their own funds."

 

Wieland also argued that he needed to help local farmers so they would help him in emergencies.

 

"They pull my equipment out and help me here and there," Wieland said. Board members aren't "out there when snows a-flying and (it's) 20 or 30 below zero," he said.

 

Wieland, 61, who is paid $28,519 annually, has said he personally has not benefited from any of the work he's done on private property. His lawyer, MICHAEL METNICK, has said that Wieland didn't violate any criminal laws.

 

Wieland oversees an annual road budget that tops $500,000 for the year that began April 1. That's up from less than $360,000 two years earlier.

 

Sangamon County State's Attorney JOHN SCHMIDT said the case is still under review.

 

Just an observation: While some in Clear Lake Township say such work is the norm, imagine the reaction if city trucks were doing work on private driveways in Springfield subdivisions.

 

According to the state constitution, "Public funds, property or credit shall be used only for public purposes."

 

 

Changes urged for fire district boards

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - May 10, 2006

Author/Byline: JOHN REYNOLDS STAFF WRITER

Section: CITY/STATE

Page: 9

 

A former Riverton firefighter told the Sangamon County Board Tuesday that changes should be made in the way fire protection district trustees are appointed.

 

It wasn't the only fire-related issue before the board. Earlier at the same meeting, a plan that guarantees everyone in the county has fire protection was unanimously approved.

 

John Ippolito was one of about a dozen firefighters who resigned last month when the five-member Riverton Fire Protection District Board replaced the longtime chief. Some firefighters complained that they weren't given any input and that the new chief, Louie Rogers, came from outside the department.

 

The 29-member county board appoints trustees to the various fire district boards throughout the county. Usually, the appointees are recommended by the county board member who represents the area in question.

 

Ippolito suggested that the trustees should be elected instead.

 

"I think it needs to be switched over to where our town votes for these people," he said. "They need to take it out of these people's hands."

 

Ippolito said

Dennis Wieland, the county board member who represents the Riverton area, has appointed friends, in particular fire board president Alex Lyons, with whom Wieland works at Clearlake Township .

 

Wieland, the Clear Lake Township supervisor,

 

said Lyons, the elected township highway commissioner, is independent of him.

 

"I have no control over him whatsoever," Wieland said. "... (Lyons) was a great appointment. He is known in the community as a fair man. He is very community-involved."

 

Sharyl Ellis, another former Riverton firefighter, told the board she has attempted to get copies of minutes from fire trustees' meetings, but so far, she hasn't been able to.

 

Rogers, the new Riverton fire chief, also addressed the board. He said the department has 25 members and continues to answer calls in a timely manner.

 

Wieland did not object to Ippolito's suggestion that fire board trustees be elected.

 

"I appointed these people, and I have to back them 100 percent until their appointment comes around again. Now, if these people want to go out and get them elected, then so be it," he said.

 

County board Chairman Andy Van Meter said there is not a lot the board can do.

 

"It is our responsibility to appoint the trustees of the various fire protection districts, and we have generally deferred to the elected county board members in that area on the theory that they have the best understanding of the community's needs. I don't think there is really a further role for the county board in regard to that," Van Meter said.

 

As for the other fire-protection issue, the county began work on its comprehensive plan in 2004. Drawn up with the help of area fire chiefs, it puts everyone in Sangamon County in a fire protection district.

 

Previously, some property owners were not.

 

"This is going to fill in the voids we had," said Rochester Fire Chief Dick Rentschler. "It will better define which fire district is going to get called to a particular piece of property."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don Mitchell – uis

 

 

 

 

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateMon, Jan 28, 2008 at 2:38 PM

subjectdistrict 186 - bommarito - mitchell at celanese - armbruster

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details 1/28/08

 

 

Dist. 186-  phil Schmidt from LHS gets 186 HR dir. position from irv smith, see also hade IFT, irv smith was regional supt. – Helen Tolan is current reg. supt.;

see Wharton and coaches, boosters, scholarships – harassment in 2000 when teaching. Also father of john Schmidt* scsa

Note IFT/IEA conflict and mom's role in barg for iea and iea friends at LHS

See also LHS boosters and similar affinity groups

 

TITLE: PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - April 1, 1994

 

T. TROY AND MARY TOLAN of Pleasant Plains have become independent distributors for Conklin Company, a Minneapolis-based specialty chemical manufacturing firm.

 

Conklin distributors sell more than 100 products including acrylic latex and Hypalon roofing systems, lubricants, fuel conditioners, and nutrition and personal care products.

 

 

 

Bommarito – stl lcn – auto's renfrow, parts, mullins/renfrow, stoldt martin, landmark and sattler

 

FINAL VOTE TOTALS LISTED FOR CITY SCHOOL BOARD

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - November 9, 1989

The accompanying chart shows final vote totals from Tuesday in the race for the Springfield School Board. A similar chart in Wednesday's State Journal-Register included incorrect totals for Linda Hartman in Subdistrict 1 and for both Gwenn Klingler and Bob Bommarito in Subdistrict 4. The newspaper regrets the errors.

 

FINAL RESULTS IN DISTRICT 186 176 of 176 precincts reporting District 1 Tom Schierholz 264 Robert Goldman 1,930 Patrick Giordano 386 Linda Hartman 649 District 2 Rick Schuster 911 Ron Peters 164 Darrell Williams 69 Thomas Blasko 1,283 District 3 Rick Heironimus 1,786 Peter Kennedy 252 Kent Cook 78 Ralph Foster 156 District 4 Robert Bommarito 1,310 Gwenn Klingler 3,057 District 5 Kurt DeWeese 611 Donald LoBue 285 Dulany Sriner 121 Paul Hafel 314 Bill Enlow 1,871 District 6 Theodore Curtis 1,017 Gloria Hale 828 Walter Southall 19 James Hankinson 49 James Solenberger 55 District 7 Nina Giavaras 1,424 Barry Lee Nass 57 Marco Moreno 299 Marie Watts 775 Arthur Campbell 91 Patrick Kelly 95 Tom Bland 87

 

 

CITY, CAB DRIVERS TANGLE OVER `EXPIRED' LICENSES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - March 6, 1986

Author: Pat England

A breakdown in communications may have resulted in the stopping of several Springfield cab drivers by city police Tuesday afternoon. On the advice of city licensing officials, officers were told that all cab drivers' city licenses had expired and were told that citations should be written under a city ordinance.

 

However, the cab drivers contend their permits do not list an expiration date and that the city had not given them notice of the expiration date this year as has been the practice in past years.

 

Officials would not admit Wednesday there was a misunderstanding. However, officers were told not to stop cabs less than two hours after they were told all permits had expired.

 

Mayor Mike Houston also decided that the cab drivers would be given until Friday to renew their licenses, said police legal adviser Jack Pecoraro Wednesday. Houston also decided that citations would be "withdrawn" for cab drivers who renew their licenses by Friday, Pecoraro said.

 

All city cab drivers are required to apply each year for a city permit. The tickets issued to the cab drivers carried a fine of $100 to $500, Pecoraro said. The permits cost $10. There is an additional $5 investigation fee for new applicants.

 

At 3:37 p.m. Tuesday, radio dispatchers told police, "Mr. Robert Bommarito , city license inspector, has advised that all city taxi cab drivers do not have valid city of Springfield taxi cab drivers license . . . All city of Springfield 1985 taxi cab drivers' licenses expired Feb. 28, 1986," according to printed copies of the dispatch.

 

The dispatch also told officers that citations should be written under a city ordinance for no valid city taxi drivers license.

 

A note indicated that the message was to have been read at police roll calls for five days.

 

At 5:15 p.m., officers were told to ignore the message. "We are to disregard giving out citations for expired taxi drivers licenses," according to another dispatch copy.

 

Bommarito, supervisor of licensing, was contacted by The State Journal-Register Tuesday night. He referred all questions to Pecoraro.

 

 

 

 

 

Celanese – don Mitchell uis police/ fired from spd/ ev locker controversy w/ pennel et al

See also big tobacco (filters), Houston, smuggling, organized crime,

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Claudio Sonder (1942)

·         First appointed: 2005. End of current term: 2009.

·         Position: retired; last position held: Chairman of the Managing Board of Celanese.

·         Nationality: Brazilian and German.

·         Supervisory directorships and other positions held: member of the Supervisory Boards of Companhia Suzano de Papel e Celulose S.A. (Brazil), Suzano Petroquimica S.A. (Brazil), RBS-Media Group (Brazil), Cyrela Brazil Reatty S.A. (Brazil), Hospital Albert Einstein (Brazil) and member of the Board of the Ibero-America Association, Hamburg (Germany).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Royer link to uis PD

 

 

Royer is spd

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyspddefendants

 

he is also cmdr 233 mp

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaney333mp

 

links between 233 and scso

http://sites.google.com/site/scrping

 

Gillette is also 233 mp - scso

http://sites.google.com/site/gillette

 

 

*royer is “force protection” for 233 – CIFA –

and see royer at Cellini hotel – ramada ren -

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 16, 1998

McConnell-Taylor Benetta L. Taylor and Jonny G. McConnell, both of Springfield, exchanged wedding vows at 3 p.m. July 30 in Springfield. Judge Donald Cadigan performed the ceremony.

The bride is the daughter of William H. and Joanne Fisher of Mahomet. The groom is the son of the late C.W. and Avis McConnell.

Serving as maid of honor was Mary Royer . Serving as best man was Dan Mancini.

The bride is employed as a training supervisor for the Springfield Police Department. The groom is employed as chief of the University of Illinois at Springfield Police Department.

The couple will reside in Springfield

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*IMP

 

 

Chris roth is at kuchar wedding

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, April 13, 2003



Kuchar -Allen

Marcie Kay Allen of Riverton and Jerry Joseph Kuchar of Springfield were married at 2 p.m. Feb. 15, 2003, at St. James Catholic Church in Riverton by Monsignor Kenneth Steffen.

The bride is the daughter of Jim and Cathy Black of Riverton. The groom is the son of Jerry and Eileen Kuchar of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Amy Viola. Serving as matron of honor was Kerrey Pressler. Bridesmaids were Breanna VanHuss, Jessica Bice, Erica Bice, Amanda Brewer, Kelley Matthews and Jennifer Kuchar . Flower girls were Jasmine Campbell and Jourdan Pressler.

Best man was Brian Brewer. Groomsmen were Mike Trello, Chris Roth, Angelo Zaffiri, Marcus Allen, Jim Gusouskis, Jeremy Allen and Mark Marinelli. Ushers were Chris VanHuss and Zeek Pressler.

A reception was held at the Riverton Knights of Columbus hall.

The bride is a graduate of Riverton High School. She is employed by Memorial Medical Center. The groom is a graduate of Lanphier High School and Lincoln Land Community College. He is employed by the state of Illinois.

The couple lives in Springfield

 

 

 

 

 

Chris roth is

roth fam – tea party

 

 

 

For bowling Roths, perfection is a family affair

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, March 6, 2004

Author/Byline: RYAN MAHAN STAFF WRITER
Section: SPORTS
Page: 47

Steve Roth watched as members of his family all were notching perfect scores.

After getting back into bowling, he rolled a 300 of his own, making it five siblings - three brothers and one sister - to all roll a 300 game.

"I am definitely honored to be in a family like this," said Chris Roth, Steve's sister.

Paul Roth has bowled six 300s, Tom Roth has five, Chris Roth has four and Ken Roth has three. Tom was the first in the family to shoot a 300.

"I bowled my first 300 in 1979 (in a summer league)," Tom Roth, 43, said. "I had the only 300 bowled at King Pin that year."

Steve, 41, took a few years off bowling to be able to take care of his kids, and when he came back, he worked hard at getting his average back up to where he thought it should be.

"I was just disappointed that I came out rusty," Steve said, happy to have gotten his first 300. "It's about time it happened. The monkey is off my back now."

As it turned out, Steve rolled his 300 on Oct 16 in the Jack Dye League at King Pin Lanes. All of his siblings were on hand and the brothers were all bowling with him. Chris, 38, was bowling in a women's league down the lanes.

If it came anywhere, it was fitting it came at King Pin Lanes, where all five siblings have worked at one point or another.

"It's always special," Tom said. "It was just neat to be here and see it, you know?"

"He could have done it some other time and nobody would have seen it. But the way it was, everybody saw it and we were all pulling for him."

Paul added: "We have a good time bowling. We all get along really well."

This year, the Roths all bowled in the Central Illinois Tournament at King Pin Lanes, and they enjoy bowling together as a family.

"We have a good time," Ken, 31, said. "We get to see the family each Thursday night. We have a good time bowling. We have a good team, and I look forward to it every week."

Steve started bowling in 1973 at the Old Spillway on Sangamon Avenue. His first league average was a 104. However, Steve took some time away from bowling and got back into it a few years ago.

"For his sake, I was happy for him," said Ken. "He took a long time off bowling, and I wasn't sure if he was ever going to have one (a 300) like the rest of the family did."

"We've all had them and we were just waiting for Steve to get his. When he got it, we knew it was just a big weight off his shoulders.''

Although the 300 may have surprised Steve, Tom wasn't shocked when Steve bowled the 12th strike in a row.

"We all knew he could do it,'' Tom Roth said. "He had one before in open bowling and he acted like it wasn't no big deal at all."

Ken Roth , who had his first of three 300s in 1997, has another goal he'd like to accomplish as a family.

"I'm looking forward to us all having an 800 series," he said.

Right now, Paul says they are just looking forward to winning their league.

"We won the league last year and we are up by 16 pins now," Paul, 37, said. "These are the only two years that we have bowled together."

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, October 3, 1999



Kmett-Schildt Angela Christine Schildt of Quincy and Craig Donald Kmett of Springfield were married at 2 p.m. April 24 at St. Aloysius Catholic Church by the Rev.

John Titus.

The bride is the daughter of Ronald and Sandra Schildt of Quincy. The groom is the son of Donald and Patricia Kmett of Springfield.

Bridesmaids were Angela Lecocq, Heather Daudy and Amy Hathaway. Flower girls were Lauren Hathaway and Mariah Maher.

Best men were John Stremsterfer and Sean Noonan. Groomsman was Chris Kmett. Ushers were Josh Berg-feld, Chris Roth and Jeff Kienzler.

A reception was held at the Hilton.

The bride is a graduate of Quincy Senior High School and Quincy University. She is employed as a quality coordinator at Automation International. The groom is a graduate of Ursuline Academy and Western Illinois University.

The couple will reside in Danville.

 

 

 

Mike the dentist is member of sangamo – son joel was in my class at ghs – didn’t hang out with joel at all – don’t really know him – different group of people entirely from the one I associated with.

 

 

Sternstein link – see moushon/sternstein –

 

Sternstein is claiming implied consent –

 

link to sangamo club – smith at mmc – “fight club”- henkle – crabtree – fibro –

 

bite marks frame –

 

I hung out with jay in early high school, he was following class at ghs, he went to the east coast around sophomore/junior year or so. Jay didn’t drink or do drugs. Haven’t seen him since the early 1980’s. not sure where the implied consent argument comes from

 

 

 

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, February 22, 2004



Roth-Kulavic

Jessica Marie Kulavic of Pawnee and Gregory Robert Roth of Alton were married at 2 p.m. Sept. 27, 2003, at Blessed Sacrament Church by the Rev. David Hoefler.

The bride is the daughter of Jerome and Mary Kulavic of Pawnee. The groom is the son of Robert and Cynthia Roth of Alton.

Serving as matron of honor was Jennifer Laurenzana. Bridesmaids were Rachael Steinstein, Tamie Stojan, Ashley Scaife, Andrea Roth and Katie Roth. Flower girl was Shelby Roth.

Best man was Chris Roth . Groomsmen were Joe Rohlfing, David Bolin, Brian Hruby, Aaron Bandy and Chris Wilson. Ring bearer was Christopher O'Connor. Ushers were Kevin Richardson, Neil Fisher and Mike Hudek.

A reception was held at the Hilton Springfield.

The bride is a 1996 graduate of Sacred Heart-Griffin High School and a 2000 graduate of Southern Illinois University at Carbondale with a bachelor's degree in finance. She is employed by Ford Motor Credit in St. Louis. The groom is a 1997 graduate of Alton Marquette High School and a 2001 graduate of Southern Illinois University at Carbondale with a bachelor's degree in business administration. He is employed by Toyota Tsusho America in Troy, Mo.

The couple lives in Alton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Very important – trucks= ibt

 

Tea party – dragoo – roth – ken roth – keith hillen – frito lay trucks -

 

 

Ken roth – keith hillen

 

Frito lay – trucks – ibt – exhaust

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, February 22, 1998

Hillen-Rappe Susan Rebecca Rappe and

Keith Henry Hillen, both of Springfield, exchanged wedding vows at 2 p.m. Oct. 18 at St. Joseph's Church.

The bride is the daughter of Ronald and Mary Jo Rappe of Springfield. The groom is the son of Henry and Vickie Hillen of Rochester.

Serving as maid of honor was Angelina Bloodworth. Bridesmaids were Sherri and Shelby Rappe, Angie Prince, Carrie Tisckos, Kim Bolt and Kathy Byerline. Flower girl was Kayla Hillen.

Best man was Ken Roth . Groomsmen were Scott Rappe, Jason Stone, Kevin Hillen, Frankin Hammitt, Johnny Thomas and

Brian Stratton. Ushers were Craig Kmett and Russ Suter. Ringbearer was Anthony Swann.

A reception was held at the Sherman Athletic Club.

The bride is a graduate of Ursuline Academy and attended Springfield College in Illinois. The groom is a graduate of Riverton High School and attended Lincoln Land Community College.

He is employed by Frito-Lay.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, April 24, 1994

Suter-Heironimus Lynnett M. Heironimus and Russel W. Suter, both of Springfield, were married at 11 a.m. April 9 at Springfield Southern Baptist Church by the Rev. Jeff Blevins.

The bride is the daughter of Rick and Carol Heironimus of Springfield. The groom is the son of Russ and Sue Suter of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Lori Suter. Bridesmaids were Patty Hinrichs and Noelle Blevins. Flower girl was Megan Fitzgerald.

Best man was Duane Moreland.

Groomsmen were Keith Hillen and Andrew Heironimus. Ushers were Sean Kleingartner and Ken Roth .

A reception was held at the Mather Gun Club.

The bride is a graduate of Lanphier High School and is attending Lincoln Land Community College. She is employed by Springfield Bell Credit Union as an accountant. The groom is a graduate of Lanphier High School and is employed by Jack's Discount as a department head.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

 

Tea party – dragoo - Roth – burge link –

 

 

 

ANNIVERSARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, November 13, 2007

Sprinkel-40th

Mr. and Mrs. Carl J. Sprinkel of Springfield will celebrate their 40th wedding anniversary with a trip to Canada and Niagara Falls and with a family dinner.

Sprinkel and the former

Sandra J. Burge

 

were married Nov. 4, 1967, at Sacred Heart Church by the Rev. Raymond Reick.

Mr. Sprinkel retired from the Springfield Police Department after 27 years.

Mrs. Sprinkel retired from the state Department of Public Aid after 27 years.

They are parents of two children, Christopher (wife, Sharon) Sprinkel of Girard and

 

Jennifer (husband, Ken) Roth of Sherman.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tony ruzic

 

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateFri, Apr 16, 2010 at 12:50 PM

subjectron riggle at LLCC athletics

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details 4/16/10

 

Ron Riggle –

(AD @ LLCC – libri – mike Houston/jaycees – Borski)

Riggle – libri

 

Pol campaigns

 

Llcc AD

 

Jeff Borski

 

Riggle - chamber

 

Riggle - jaycees

 

Bertolino

 

Riggle jr

 

 

Riggle is libri campaign chair

This is the link to LLCC athletics – see gray as chair of board

 

And note partisanship for board races – low profile – many jobs – ift/hade/Cellini

 

And note ramage/liuna/hinshaw/cdb at llcc board

 

Links to libri campaign – schackmann – reardon

 

Note reardon – sjh/dol – parks – homicide link

 

 

 

Ruzic – Wharton – shs – sfd link  -

 

And link kracik LLCC ad

Riggle – llcc ad

 

 

 

FIREFIGHTERS ELIMINATED

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, August 10, 1987

Edition: M1,M2,S1

Section: SPORTS

Page: 14

NAPERVILLE -- The

 

Springfield Firefighters

 

were limited to four hits as they were shutout by LaGrange 8-0 Sunday afternoon and eliminated from the Continental Collegiate Baseball Tournament.

 

LaGrange scored five runs in the third inning on a grand slam by Greg Buksa that was followed with a solo shot by Robert Rafferty. LaGrange scored two more runs in the fourth inning and one in the fifth.

 

Tony Ruzic,

 

Bobby Carlsen, Pat McGuire and Brian Kracik accounted for Springfield's offense with one hit apiece. Kracik's hit was a one-out double in the second inning, but he was left stranded as the next two batters struck out.

 

Ron Riggle took the loss, going 5 1/3 innings before Mike Wheeler came in from the bullpen. LaGrange's Jim Kairis went the distance while striking out 12 batters.

 

LaGrange will face Naperville today for the title and a trip to the Continental Collegiate World Series in Quebec, Canada.

 

The Firefighters finished the season at 30-14.
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

912 GROUP

 

Mccann – nudo – brahler -

 

 

 

Sam mcann –

 

 

Sahba

 

Ihba

 

brahler –

 

Brahler is related to montalbano and pohlman - tech guy at kingtech – and see sjh RN

 

 

 

 

Home builder seeking GOP nomination in 49th state Senate District

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, November 21, 2009

Author/Byline: BERNARD SCHOENBURG, THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER
Section: homepage

William "Sam" McCann, a Carlinville construction company owner, says he's running for the Illinois Senate because state government and its tax structure are causing businesses to leave Illinois.

"The state of the state is horrible," McCann, a past president of the

 

Home Builders Association of Illinois

and the

 

Springfield Area Home Builders Association,

 

said in a telephone interview.

"Only a fool would open a business in Illinois, I believe, at this point," he said. "There's no one that seriously considers Illinois for a new operation. We're overregulated, overtaxed. And we have to stimulate this ecomomy."

McCann, 40, has never run for public office before. He filed as a Republican candidate in the 49th Senate District, where Democratic Sen. Deanna Demuzio, also of Carlinville, is seeking another term. They are each unopposed in their respective primaries on Feb. 2. McCann formally announced his campaign this week.

A West Virginia native and married father of two children, McCann moved to Carlinville at age 19.

As evidence of Illinois' dire situation, he noted the state's loss of congressional districts in recent decades following shifts in population to other states. Illinois had 22 U.S. House districts in the 1980s, 20 in the 1990s, and 19 now. McCann said it could go to 18 after the next Census.

"Businesses are leaving the state," he said. "The employees, the people, are leaving the state."

McCann Construction Co., owned by the candidate, is "doing OK right now," McCann said, but he said that's due in part to the company being very diversified, building homes but also being involved in light commercial construction and remodeling.

To address the state's budget hole while trying not to hurt the business climate, McCann said, he would "probably leave taxes alone for a year." In the longer term, he said, "I think we're going to have to seriously consider a corporate tax decrease."

And while he would "never say never" to a vote for a tax or fee increase, he doesn't foresee doing so.

"We do not have a revenue problem," he said. "What we have is a spending problem."

"Everyone realizes that there is a lot of waste and graft in Illinois politics," he said.

While he said he has good friends who work for the state, McCann said, "We may have too many folks in middle management not really answering to anyone."

McCann said he is pro-life on abortion and would consider the procedure only when the life of the mother is at stake. He is also a life member of the National Rifle Association and favors allowing private citizens, with training, to carry concealed guns.

Demuzio followed her late husband, Vince, in the Senate seat, and a Demuzio has represented the area since the mid-1970s.

McCann said he would plan to spend no more than 10 years in the Senate.

"I don't want to be referred to as a politician," McCann said. "I want to be a public servant. I think career politicians are a cancer upon our society."

Asked if he was referring to Demuzio, he responded, "I'm talking about career politicians."

He said he has raised about $25,000, including $15,000 from himself. He said he would spend "as much as I need to" on the race, but didn't estimate how much that would be.

 

 

 

PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, January 17, 2007



SAM MCCANN , owner and president of McCann Construction Inc., based in Carlinville, has been installed as president of the Home Builders Association of Illinois.

McCann began working full time in construction as a laborer/carpenter in 1987. In 1993, he established McCann Construction Co. and in 1996 moved to his current offices in Carlinville.

 

PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, February 20, 2005



KELLI SHAMHART with Michael von Behren Builder Inc. of Springfield has been named president of The Springfield Area Home Builders Association for 2005.

Other officers are Terry Day, Day and Co., first vice president and state association vice president; Curt Trampe, Home Works Inc., second vice president; Steve Sturm, Truss/Slater, secretary; Jim Lauwerens, United Community Bank, treasurer; and

 

Sam McCann , McCann Construction Co., immediate past president.



New board members are Dale Shafer, Dale Shafer Builders & Son; and Jon Reynolds, JNC Inc. Continuing board members are Susan Mason, The Lighting Center of Springfield Electric; Jason Buraski, Buraski Builders; and Brian Giacomini, Giacomini Construction LLC.

Jill Sommer, Bank of Springfield, has been named associate vice president and home show director.

 

 

PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, March 3, 2004

Section: MARKETPLACE
Page: 32

SAM McCANN , president of McCann Construction Co. in Carlinville, has been named president of the Springfield Area Home Builders Association for 2004.

Other officers are Kelli Shamhart, Michael von Behren Builder Inc., first vice president; Brian Giacomini, Giacomini Construction LLC, second vice president; Steve Sturm, Truss/Slater, secretary; Jim Lauwerens, United Community Bank, treasurer; Terry Day, Day and Co., state association vice president; and Mike Niehaus, Windsor Homes, immediate past president.

New board members are Curt Trampe, Home Works Inc., and Jason Buraski, Buraski Builders. Continuing board members are Susan Mason, The Lighting Center of Springfield Electric; Ken Spann, KLS Construction Inc.; and Ed Miller, Miller Construction Inc.

The Springfield Area Home Builders Association is a professional trade association representing 130 home builders, developers, associated service companies and suppliers in central Illinois.

 

 

 

Mccann – roth – sahba  

 

PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, February 3, 2002



KEN SPANN of KLS Construction Inc. has been installed as president of the board of directors of the Springfield Area Home Builders Association for 2002.

Other officers are Michael Niehaus, first vice president; Jason Evers, second vice president; Michael von Behren, secretary; and Dean Graven, treasurer.

Directors are Royle Campbell, Michael Lantz, Ed Miller, Terry Roth and Kale Walker.

In addition, Sherry Fuchs and Mark Patrick are associate vice presidents. Susan Mason is home show director. Sam McCann is state association vice president. John Benanti is immediate past president.

 

 

 

Bernard Schoenburg: Taking blog material and running with it

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, September 5, 2010

Author/Byline: THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER
Section: news_columnists

Tangential issues have tended to be a big part of the race for U.S. Senate between Republican U.S. Rep. MARK KIRK and state Treasurer ALEXI GIANNOULIAS. And an interesting episode in that process unfolded last week.

KIRSTEN KUKOWSKI, spokeswoman for Kirk, e-mailed a copy of a blog post from www.biggoverment.com, which is run by ANDREW BREITBART, to me, and apparently, to some other reporters.

The post was headlined: "Did Alexi Giannoulias Dodge the Draft in Greece?" It features a photo of Giannoulias playing basketball, apparently during his pro days in that country.

The post said many Americans holding dual Greek citizenship travel to Greece, and raised the question of whether Giannoulias should have been required to serve in the Greek military. Kukowski just noted the "interesting" nature of the questions raised.

"Alexi Giannoulias has concentrated much of his campaign on attacking Mark Kirk's military record," said the post on Breitbart's site - although it didn't note that most of the attacks have resulted from Kirk's own admitted misstatements about his record. "If Alexi Giannoulias found a way to evade his own obligations, that should be national news."

Breitbart, you might recall, used the same website some weeks back to post misleading video of former federal Agriculture Department worker SHIRLEY SHERROD. Sherrod was fired, but when the full video was shown, it was clear that Sherrod, a black woman, was really talking about racial reconciliation. The administration backtracked - and President BARACK OBAMA even called Sherrod - after the truth came out.

I didn't take the bait to look into the Greek military question, but when Kirk was in Springfield on another issue this week, another reporter asked Kirk what he thought about his campaign circulating a Breitbart story that raised questions - without answering them - about Giannoulias.

"No comment," Kirk said. "That's for Alexi to work out."

Pushed to say something about his campaign's role in circulating the material, Kirk said, "I will certainly say that there's an awful lot that's put on blogs."

Asked if his staff acted appropriately, he said, "I will just say that what is put on blogs is blasted everywhere by both sides. I think both sides do that. I think you get quite a number of e-mails from the Giannoulias campaign. I would expect you'll get quite a number more."

Asked about the credibility of Breitbart after the Sherrod incident, Kirk amplified his talk about the presence of blogs these days.

"One commentator said the blogosphere is like an Irish bar at midnight," Kirk said. "Everybody is throwing chairs at each other, and then the next morning, no one remembers what the argument was about.

"I will tell you that if you stand for public office these days, you're going to be in the blogosphere, and it is the First Amendment with turbochargers on it."

OK, but does that mean a campaign should take no responsibility for the veracity of something before distributing it?

"Stuff is out there and both sides are absolutely sending it around," Kirk said, "and I expect my opponent will do the same thing. We have a full First Amendment in operation in this campaign."

KATHLEEN STRAND, spokeswoman for Giannoulias, said the candidate has dual citizenship by virtue of the fact that his father was born in Greece. However, since Giannoulias was never a permanent resident of Greece, he wouldn't be required to serve in the Greek military.

"There was no draft when he was there" while playing basketball, she added.

"The Kirk campaign has gone from the ridiculous to the absurd in peddling discredited, right-wing blogs," she said.

Clearly, both sides do alert reporters to the stuff that's out there. Back in June, for example, Strand sent along a link to a post from the liberal Daily Kos site, headlined: "Mark Kirk exaggerated Desert Storm service in constituent letter." It described how Kirk had called himself a veteran of the conflict even though he served at the Office of Naval Intelligence, just outside Washington, D.C., during that conflict.

Thankfully, two months from now, the election will be history. Also in the Senate contest are LeALAN JONES of the Green Party and Libertarian MIKE LABNO.

A Chicago Tribune,/WGN-TV poll of 600 likely voters conducted Aug. 28 through Wednesday had Kirk and Giannoulias tied at 34 percent, with 6 percent for Jones, 3 percent for Labno, and 22 percent undecided.

IEA protests "Race' finish

To say the Illinois Education Association was not happy that Illinois was not among states that are being granted federal Race to the Top funding would be an understatement. The program is to provide millions of dollars to states selected in the competition.

KEN SWANSON, president of the IEA, and AUDREY SOGLIN, its executive director, wrote a letter last week to U.S. Secretary of Education ARNE DUNCAN - who used to run the Chicago Public Schools - to let him know of their "profound disappointment."

"To be honest, we feel we have been misled," they say in the letter, copies of which were sent to folks including President Obama.

They say the IEA worked hard with state officials, lawmakers, foundations and advocacy groups to do what was asked with "little drama," but still, no grant.

"We are dismayed and disillusioned," the letter states. "In our view, the process was unfair and fatally flawed." They likened the denial of the state after a second round of applications to a student who carefully followed a teacher's instructions for improvement, only to have a different teacher - who didn't talk to the first one - assess the student as failing again. The fact that the first and second set of federal reviewers were not on the same page led to Illinois receiving lower scores in round two for some things highly rated in round one, which "defies common sense," the letter said.

"As the secretary of education, you had an obligation to ensure the grants went to the right states," the IEA officials tell Duncan. The union's involvement was a large part of why Illinois should have been successful, they add.

"This was not reflected in our point score, and it makes us wonder whether the department truly values and understands how important unions are to successful deployment. "

"We will remain true to our organization's mission of effecting excellence and equity in public education, as we advocate for education employees. This was a wasted opportunity."

Bell-shaped yard signs benefit 9-12 groups

It's a small state, but it just so happens that the factory floor in Springfield where Republican gubernatorial candidate BILL BRADY made one of his jobs program announcements last week also is where yard signs in the shape of the Liberty Bell - sold to benefit some 9-12 and other conservative groups - are produced.

Brady was at Prime Panels Inc., on Springfield's far northeast edge. It was a great backdrop to talk about jobs, given that the massive building has some big machines and stacks of panels and other products.

TOM NUDO is president of the company, which has 10 employees, and after the Brady news conference, Nudo showed me the old 90-ton punch press, nicknamed "Goliath," that punches out the red, white or blue bells, one at a time, from 18-by-24-inch sheets of polypropane - material similar to that used in making milk cartons.

RICH BRAHLER , a Jacksonville businessman and head of the 9-12 group in Morgan County, was among businesspeople who attended the Brady news conference.

Brahler has said his group is selling the bells for $10 each or $25 for the three-color set to raise money for the organization, which in the central part of the state is called Take Back Illinois 9-12. TV and talk-show host GLENN BECK launched the movement, which gets its name from the day after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks - a time of U.S. unity, Beck says. Brahler has said it promotes "conservative values and principles."

Nudo said he's joined a 9-12 group and thinks government needs to be more responsible with money.

"I am taxed enough already," he said. "I am an individual over time that tends to vote their pocketbook."

Nudo gave me a printed statement that went out with some of the bells, calling each a symbol of liberty and justice.

"Today our country is experiencing a more serious crack to our system of liberty and justice," it states. "Due to personal agendas and greed, there are those who would expand the size and role of government, increase our national debt, and trample our personal freedoms.

"Display this bell to show all that you are a proud American who will not tolerate injustice or loss of liberty."

Nudo, Brahler and SAM McCANN, a 9-12 member and GOP candidate for state Senate in the 49th Senate District, are among those signing the statements.

Brahler said those statements aren't going out with the bells anymore, in part because tea party and Constitution-based groups are also selling the bells, which they buy from Prime Panels. Distribution now is in other states, including Florida and Arkansas.

Nudo said the bells are a good way to provide a subtle message that "we're for liberty; we're for retaining the rights we have as American citizens, without being obnoxious or trying to put forth something that's offensive."

State election records show that Prime Panels donated $2,500 to Brady's campaign on June 30.

 

 

 

 

 

Bernard Schoenburg: Dems hit McCann on military references

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 11, 2010

Author/Byline: THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER
Section: opinions

The military background of a candidate for the state Senate from Carlinville is the subject of a skirmish in the 49th District race.

Construction company owner SAM McCANN , a 40-year-old Republican, is taking on incumbent Sen. DEANNA DEMUZIO, D-Carlinville. McCann talked to me last week for a column item about how, two decades ago, he joined the U.S. Marines only to be injured in a construction accident before he went to boot camp.

Thanks to U.S. Senate candidate MARK KIRK, this has become a year for military-record questions in Illinois. As a result, some of McCann's responses, combined with characterizations included in his campaign literature, led to a missive from the political director of the Senate Democratic Victory Fund.

"McCann's early campaign literature and political website stated he was a "member of the U.S. Marine Corps (1989-1990)' and "received an honorable discharge.' However, McCann was quoted this week in a newspaper interview saying "I never claimed to be a veteran' and that he was not sure of the formal type of discharge he received," the Democratic news release said.

The Greene Prairie Press, a Carrollton newspaper, also quoted McCann in regard to the values he learned in the Marine Corps, the Democratic release said.

"I think people in Illinois are tired of politicians "misremembering' their service record," said JAY ROWELL, head of the Senate Democratic committee. "Since Sam McCann first announced his intentions to seek political office, his story about his military service record has continued to change.

"The voters in the 49th Senate District have a right to know the truth."

McCann responded by telling me that he's tried to be accurate. "There's no scandal," he said, although he also conceded, "I may have used an incorrect term."

What McCann's campaign literature said was that he was a "Member of the U.S. Marine Corps (1989-1990), received an honorable discharge prior to completion of training due to an accident." That still sounds like the word "veteran" would apply, though McCann told me last week he's never claimed that title.

"I've never sought veterans' benefits," McCann said after Rowell's statement came out. "I didn't get to boot camp.

"I didn't say I was a veteran. I said I was a member of the Marine Corps. If the Marine Corps doesn't call that being a member of it, I apologize for making a misstatement. But I signed a contract, took an oath of office.

"Different people have different definitions" of the term "veteran," he added.

"If I made a mistake I'm by no means trying to take anything away from the heroes that are fighting."

McCann also said earlier that he wasn't sure technically what type of discharge he received, but said he has called it "honorable" because he knows it was not dishonorable.

Late in the week, McCann said he no longer has the discharge paper he got when his dream of being a Marine lifer was quashed, but he's asked the military for another copy. He said he's waiting for it to arrive.

The Greene Prairie Press story refers to "the courage I learned in the Marine Corps," according to a copy of the story provided by the Demuzio campaign.

McCann said he's not sure of the context, but said he was referring to the testing and processing he went through to be a Marine. That included his being given a booklet or paper that, as he recalls it, described courage as not the ability to be unafraid, but the ability "no matter how afraid you are, you still do your duty."

"I've had the courage to step out there and to run against the machine," McCann told me. "Now it's going to be up to the voters to have the courage to vote for the right person."

McCann also called the Democrats' news release "a smokescreen by the Demuzio camp to cover up that she has been in the Illinois Senate since 2004 (and) she's personally overseen, along with others, the bankruptcy of the state of Illinois. Instead of Deanna Demuzio's camp and Jay Rowell issuing statements about semantics and my life experience, why don't they tell us the top 10 things that the senator and the Chicago machine have done for us in the last eight years?" he said.

"Let's stick to the issues. If she's done something worth getting rehired, then let's talk about that."

Responding to McCann's response, Rowell said that, "It's pretty clear what the real smokescreen is here - that Sam McCann is unwilling to make clear what his military record is."

Rowell himself is from Chicago. However, he pointed out, LEE LoBUE, Demuzio's spokesman, lives in Carlinville. Field director AMY AMIZICH is from Wood River. And at the Senate, Senate President JOHN CULLERTON's chief of staff is ANDREW MANAR, the chairman of the Macoupin County Board.

"This is not the Chicago Democratic machine," Rowell said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brahler related-montalbano&pohlman

tech guy at kingtech –

and see sjh RN

 

 

 

 

Montalbano

family

 

 

 

 

 

Rebbe link –

butternut –

bread trucksearly am. = 24/7

 

 

and pohlman – kingtech – dems – dead RN

 

brahler – 9/12 - auto

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, August 15, 1992



Daniel K. Rebbe Sr.

Daniel K. Rebbe Sr., 61, of Springfield died at 5:34 a.m. Friday at St.

John's Hospital.

He was born March 29, 1931, in Petersburg, the son of John and Marguerite Heflan Rebbe. He married Angeline Katherine Montalbano in 1955; she died in 1985. He then married Margaret K. Silveus in 1988. Also preceding him in death were a sister, Mary Leta, and a brother, Paul Edward.

A resident of Springfield most of his life,

 

Mr. Rebbe was a driver and salesman for Butternut Bread for 37 years.

 

He was a member of

Blessed Sacrament Church

 

and an Army veteran of the Korean War.

Surviving are his wife Margaret; four daughters, Mrs. Chris (Linda) Solomon, Mrs. Greg (Tammy) Gumble,

Mrs. Mark (Lisa) Brahler and

Susan Rebbe, all of Springfield; five sons, Daniel K. Jr., Joseph A., Timothy J., Phillip T. and Edward G., all of Springfield; eight stepchildren, Mike Landers of Plato, Mo., Joe, Rob, John and Tom Landers and Terry Silveus, all of Auburn, Pat Corcoran of Springfield and Jud Silveus of Harbor Springs, Mich.; 10 grandchildren; 27 stepgrandchildren; six sisters, Margaret Thomas of Little Rock, Ark.,

Kathryn Pohlman of Gillespie,

Frances Ramsey of Littleton, Colo., Sister Charlotte Rebbe of Stonington, Judy Bennett of Decatur and Connie Stuhmer of Petersburg; six brothers, John L. Jr. of Ocala, Fla., Joseph W., James and Philip, all of Petersburg, Ronald of Springfield and Larry of Ursa; an aunt; several nieces, nephews and cousins.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Extensions for

page 13/14

 

see also SV – waldmire –

addiction community

 

 

“rebbe”  – montalbano – link up bedrocks – Aiello – siebert – ioicc -

 

ANNIVERSARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, August 7, 2001


Montalbano -45th

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Montalbano of Springfield celebrated their 45th wedding anniversary Saturday.

Montalbano and the former Carole Lawson were married Aug. 4, 1956, at Church of the Little Flower Quonset by the Rev. Alvin Campbell.

Mr. Montalbano retired from Interstate Brands Corp. after 32 years as a bakery salesman. Mrs. Montalbano is a homemaker.

They are parents of four children, Terry (wife, Kathy) and John, both of Springfield, Karen (husband, Hoyt) Hampton of Knoxville, Tenn., and Mark (wife, Tamela) of Chatham. There are five grandchildren.

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, March 19, 1990

Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 8

Lester E. Lawson Lester E. Lawson, 83, of Springfield died at 9:48 p.m. Saturday at his

residence.

He was born in Auburn on Aug. 20, 1906, the son of Edward and Julia Murphy Lawson. He married Louise Anning in 1927 and she died in 1988. He also was preceded in death by a brother, Paul Lawson.

A resident of Springfield most of his life, Mr. Lawson was a desk clerk and later manager of the St. Nicholas Hotel, retiring in 1970 after 42 years of service.

He was a member of Church of the Little Flower.

Surviving are four daughters, Shirley E. Lawson of Tallula, Mrs. Patricia Flores of Bremerton, Wash., Mrs. Sam (Carole) Montalbano of Springfield and Diane L. Lawson of Virginia; one son, William E. Lawson of Springfield; 12 grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren; several nieces, nephews and cousins.

 

 

Cellini link

Copeland

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 11, 1996



Zink-Copeland Lucinda Copeland and David Zink, both of Normal, were married at 2 p.m.

July 27 at Lincoln Christian Church by the Rev. Paul Boatman.

The bride is the daughter of Trudy Copeland of Lincoln. The groom is the son of Gloria and Fred Zink of Normal.

Serving as matron of honor was Tawana Murphy. Bridesmaids were Cathie Montalbano , Heather Fuller and Linda Lees. Flower girl was Chelsea Trone.

Best man was Steve Schreiber. Groomsmen were Dale Ahle, Tony Cellini and Joe Copeland. Ushers were Shannon McAuley and Mark Lees. Ringbearer was Nicholas Montalbano .

A reception was held at the church.

The bride is employed by Illinois State University. The groom is employed by IAA Trust.

The couple will live in Normal.

 

Ippoliti link

 

ENGAGEMENTS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, February 2, 2003



Brewer-Ippoliti

The engagement of Gabrielle Ippoliti to Kevin Brewer, both of St. Louis, is being announced.

She is the daughter of Bonnie Redfern of Springfield and John Ippoliti of Houston.

He is the son of Kathy and Terry Montalbano of Springfield and Dale Brewer of Clinton.

A May 2004 wedding is planned.

 

 

 

 

Arena foods

 

TITLE: BIRTHDAYS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, August 1, 1995


Montalbano -85th Ann Montalbano of Springfield celebrated her 85th birthday with a party hosted by her family at St. Cabrini's Hall.

She was born July 2, 1910, in Montevago, Sicily.

Miss Montalbano was employed by the International Shoe Factory for 38 years and worked in the dietary kitchen of St. John's Hospital and also at Horace Mann cafeteria.

 

 

And see exposure – sjh cafeteria

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, September 25, 2003


Antonia Montalbano

SPRINGFIELD - Antonia "Ann" Montalbano , 93, of Springfield, formerly of Sicily, died Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2003, at St. Joseph's Home.

She was born July 2, 1910, in Montevago, Sicily, the daughter of Leo and Jennie Montalbano .

Miss Montalbano worked at International Shoe Factory for 38 years, in the cafeteria at Horace Mann Insurance Co. and in the dietary kitchen at St. John's Hospital.

She was a member of St. Frances Cabrini Church, Italian Madonna Society, St. Cabrini Altar and Rosary Society, Ss. Peter and Paul 55 and Over Club and Third Order of St. Francis.

Survivors: two sisters,

Mamie Frankell Unser and

Marguerite "Mickie" Culton, both of Springfield;

three brothers, Tony (wife, Marilou) Montalbano of Ormond Beach, Fla., and

Frank (wife, Eva) and

 

Sam (wife, Carole) Montalbano , both of Springfield;

 

and many nieces, nephews and cousins

 

 

 

Eva M. Montalbano

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, September 11, 2007

Section: LOCAL
Page: 9

Eva M. Montalbano

SPRINGFIELD – Eva Mary Montalbano , 85, of Springfield died at 11:31 a.m. Friday, Sept. 7, 2007, at Memorial Medical Center.

She was born Nov. 20, 1921, in Carlyle, the daughter of Fred and Grace Hill Skilbeck. She married Frank J. Montalbano on Jan. 31, 1951. Her parents, two brothers and two sisters preceded her in death.

Mrs. Montalbano was a lifelong resident of Springfield and retired from the Illinois Public Destruction Department. She was a member of Calvary Temple.

Surviving are her husband, Frank of Springfield; brother, Walter Skilbeck of Sherman; and several nieces and nephews

 

 

 

 

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, April 27, 2005



Tamela L. Montalbano

CHATHAM - Tamela L. Montalbano , 44, of Chatham died Monday, April 25, 2005, at St. John's Hospital.

She was born March 1, 1961, in Springfield, the daughter of Donald and Pauline Tarvin Brewer. She married Mark E. Montalbano in 1981.

Mrs. Montalbano was a teacher's aide at Chatham Elementary School and a Mary Kay Cosmetics consultant.

 

She was a member of

South Side Christian Church.

Survivors: husband, Mark; daughter, Nicole A. Montalbano of Chatham; son, Sean M. Montalbano of Chatham; mother, Pauline (husband, Dean) Washburn of Springfield; sister, Tracy Bailey of Springfield; and several aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins.

 

 

 

 

Brahler link – 912 –

tea party

 

Rebbe – doc’s sausage – minder – roscetti –

 

bedrocks

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, December 12, 1985

Edition: M1,M2,E1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 52

Alfred Johnson Alfred Johnson, 75, of Eastgate Manor died Monday at the manor.

Services will be at 11 a.m. Thursday at W.W. White-Pettiford Memorial Chapel, with the Rev. W.R. McCoy officiating. Burial will be in Oak Ridge Cemetery. Angeline K. Rebbe Mrs. Angeline Katherine Rebbe, 52, of 1734 S. Pasfield died at 11:31 a.m.

Wednesday at St. John's Hospital.

A life-time resident of Springfield, Mrs. Rebbe was born on Feb. 16, 1933,

 

the daughter of Joseph and Grace Gucciardo Montalbano .

 

She married Daniel K. Rebbe in 1955.

 

Preceding her in death were her parents and one brother, Tony Montalbano .

Mrs. Rebbe was a member of Blessed Sacrament Church.

Surviving are her husband, Daniel K.; four daughters, Mrs. Chris (Linda) Solomon and Mrs. Greg (Tammy) Gumble, both of Springfield;

 

Mrs. Mark (Lisa) Brahler

 

of Junction City, Kan., and Miss Susan Rebbe at home; five sons, Daniel K. Jr., and Joseph A., both of Springfield, and Timothy J., Edward G. and Phillip T., all at home; four grandchildren; one sister, Mrs. Robert (Mamie) Hegland of Springfield; one aunt; several nieces and nephews.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Neighbors – 1000 blk north 5th – gutman - FLA

 

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, January 9, 2007


Charles R. Gutmann

SPRINGFIELD - Charles R. Gutmann, 55, of Springfield died Monday, Jan. 8, 2007, at Memorial Medical Center.

He was born March 24, 1951, in Springfield, the son of Joseph L. and Irene Robinson Gutmann.

Mr. Gutmann was a welder and foreman at Howden Fan Co. for 30 years.

Survivors: two daughters, Carie (husband, George) Fettis Jr. and Beckie Gutmann, both of Springfield; companion, Hallie Gutmann of Springfield; four sisters, Mary Lou (husband, Tony) Montalbano of Florida and Nancy Gutmann (companion, Richard Williams) of Edinburg and Ann (husband, Gerald) Lutch and Carol Olker, both of Springfield; four brothers, John (wife, Gladys) Gutmann of Florida, Jerry (wife, Kay) Gutmann of Springfield, Jim (wife, Lois) Gutmann of Wood River and Donald (wife, Chris) Gutmann of Washington State; and several nieces, nephews and cousins.

 

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, September 7, 2005


Dean Washburn

SPRINGFIELD - Dean Washburn, 71, of Springfield died Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2005, at Capital Care Center.

He was born March 7, 1934, in Marshall, the son of Foster and Eula Parson Washburn. He married Pauline C. Tarvin in 1997 in Houston. A stepdaughter, Tamela Montalbano , preceded him in death.

Mr. Washburn was a

sheet metal worker and

sold real estate.

He was a U.S. Navy veteran. He was a member of

Ansar Shrine, Masonic Central Lodge 71,

Arab Patrol, Eagles and

American Legion Post 32.

Survivors: wife, Pauline; stepdaughter, Tracey Bailey of Springfield; five grandchildren; four sisters, Eula May Hall of Universal, Ind., Karen Millhouse and Cora Frances, both of Marshall, and Patsy Thompson of Edwardsville; and several nieces, nephews and cousins.

 

 

 

COMING TO AMERICA / Despite the obstacles, immigrants flocked to the United States in the early 1900s

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, November 25, 2005

Section: MAGAZINE
Page: 10A

Before the Titanic sank in 1912, immigrants sailed to America in droves. After the much-publicized sinking, some changed their plans.

Braver souls such as former Springfieldian Mary Scott Sampson still came, but their trip was affected by the disaster.

Sampson was born in Scotland in 1892 and immigrated to Springfield in 1923. She described her trip in a 1975 interview for the University of Illinois at Springfield's Oral History Archives.

Sampson came here to marry her boyfriend, who had asked her to immigrate a year earlier. She was reluctant to leave home, but reconsidered when a friend told her that America was starting an immigrant "quota system" that might greatly delay her travel.

According to the Ellis Island Web site (www.ellisisland.org), in the early 1920s lawmakers passed quota laws, which restricted the number of immigrants from each country to "preserve the ethnic flavor of the 'old immigrants,' those earlier settlers ... The perception existed that the newly arriving immigrants mostly from southern and eastern Europe were somehow inferior to those who arrived earlier."

Many immigrants rushed to beat the quotas. As a result, Sampson's and others' trips were postponed at least once. She finally left Scotland in September 1923 as a second-class passenger.

Her voyage was better than third class (steerage), where passengers were packed like cattle in the ship's bottom, but it wasn't cushy. "You never go to first class unless you are a passenger," she said. "But second class could go down to steerage," which she did to visit friends.

Unlike steerage, second class had daily entertainment. "The ship would have its own orchestra, but they usually played for the first-class passengers. They would eventually come to second class at a certain time," she said.

The class segregation had been the same on the Titanic, but that ship's sinking had improved certain things. Sampson's ship - and all others - were required to have sufficient lifeboats and to hold safety drills.

"If you didn't show up (for the drill), they would come look for you," Sampson said.

"I wouldn't have cared if (the ship) had gone down," she added, describing her violent seasickness. "Just heave, heave, heave and heave."

Some immigrants lost 20 to 30 pounds. Sampson lost plenty, and a stewardess encouraged her to eat by saying, "You look so pale and so thin; they never will let you off (the boat) when you get to New York."

Only sickly first- and second-class passengers had to be inspected at Ellis Island before being allowed into the country; the rest were quickly inspected onboard. However, all steerage passengers had to undergo cursory physical exams at Ellis. The government wanted to ensure immigrants wouldn't become dependent on the state for medical or other reasons, hence the "six-second physicals."

"By 1916, it was said that a doctor could identify numerous medical conditions (ranging from anemia to goiters to varicose veins) just by glancing at an immigrant," the Web site says.

Despite her sickness, Sampson did "get off the boat" and headed straight for Springfield, where she was married the day after arriving.

Former Springfieldian Ann Montalbano and her mother weren't as lucky when they immigrated from Italy in 1921. They were joining Ann's father, whom she'd never met. She was 101/2 years old, and her father had worked here her whole life.

When their ship landed in New York on Feb. 14, 1921, it was quarantined. Montalbano , who died in 1993, described the experience in her 1974 UIS oral history:

"At that time they were lots of ships coming in from all parts of the world and on account of sickness, lice, and so forth, all the ships were quarantined and had to wait ... to disembark their patrons."

Her father, Leo Malone, had traveled from Springfield to meet them. He could only wave at them from the dock. Montalbano asked her mother which man was her father. "It's the man with the green felt hat," she replied.

He came every day while the ship was quarantined. In order to communicate on the noisy dock, Montalbano 's mother threw her husband a rope from the ship. He attached a basket and a note, which Montalbano read for her illiterate mother. Montalbano wrote her father that she was cold and needed a coat. "He used to bring food that the relatives (in Brooklyn) prepared... boiled eggs, bananas, fruit, chicken soup, and all that" and put it in the basket, she said. "And we'd pull it up."

After 14 days of quarantine, Montalbano and the other passengers were allowed to disembark. Montalbano hugged her father for the first time.

 

 

Reynolds works for vala – CCS

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 31, 1988



Johnson-Reynolds

Frances Kay Reynolds

and Frederick Arthur Johnson, both of Springfield, exchanged weddings vows at 2 p.m. July 16. The Rev. Robert Heppner performed the ceremony at Church of Christ in Havana.

The bride is the daughter of Edwin and Joan Reynolds of Havana. The bridegroom is the son of Milton O. and Rosemary J. Johnson of Rockford.

Serving as maid of honor was Susan Lippert, with Tammy Sneed as bridesmaid. Flower girl was Allysa Lippert.

Best man was David Lippert, with Frank Montalbano as groomsman. Ushers were Bill Evans, Kent Reynolds and Dennis Reynolds, with Timmy Reynolds as ringbearer.

A reception was held at the church's Fellowship Hall following the ceremony.

The bride, a graduate of Havana High School, is employed at

Complete Care Systems.

The bridegroom, a graduate of Guilford High School and Carthage College, is employed as a manager at Eagle Finance

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, June 6, 1988



Louise J. Lawson Mrs. Louise J. Lawson, 80, of Springfield died at noon Saturday at St.

John's Hospital.

She was born in Springfield on Jan. 5, 1908, the daughter of the late Herbert and Bridget Brennan Anning. She married Lester E. Lawson in 1927. A lifelong resident of Springfield, Mrs. Lawson was a member of the Church of the Little Flower.

Preceding her in death were three sisters, Florence Ryan, Mary Haughawout and Betty Kern; and three brothers, Herbert, Ernest and John Anning.

Surviving are her husband, Lester E. Lawson; four daughters, Shirley Lawson of Tallula, Mrs. George (Patricia) Flores of Bremerton, Wash., Mrs.

Sam (Carole L.) Montalbano of Springfield and Diane L. Lawson of Virginia; one son, William E. Lawson of Springfield; 12 grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; two sisters, Mrs. Mildred Monroe and Frances Lawson, both of Springfield; several nieces and nephews; and cousins.

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, February 21, 1988



Robert W. Hegland Robert W. Hegland, 63, of Springfield died at 11:30 p.m. Friday at St.

John's Hospital.

He was born on Feb. 3, 1925, in Springfield, the son of James and Mary Tominsek Hegland. He married Mamie Montalbano in 1948. He was preceded in death by a son, Joseph. A lifelong resident of Springfield, he was employed at Fiatallis Manufacturing Co. for 43 years, retiring in 1985. He was a veteran of World War II. Surviving are his wife, Mamie; two daughters, Mrs. Richard (Jan) Winningham and Miss Diane E. Hegland, both of Springfield; one son, Randy of Springfield; two grandsons; mother, Mrs. Mary Hegland of Springfield; and several aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins.

 

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, June 28, 1992



Donald E. Brewer Donald E. Brewer, 53, of Tulsa, Okla., formerly of Springfield, died at 10:22 p.m. Friday at St. John's Hospital.

He was born Nov. 18, 1938, in Hannibal, Mo., the son of William and Helen Wilson Brewer. He was preceded in death by his father in 1982. Mr. Brewer was a member of Plumbers and Steamfitters Union Local 137 and Church on the Move, Tulsa, Okla.

Surviving are two daughters, Tammy Montalbano and Tracey Bailey, both of Springfield; four grandchildren; mother, Helen Brewer of Springfield; a brother, James W. of Springfield; a sister, Judy Proctor of Litchfield Park, Ariz.; two nieces; and three nephews.

 

 

SS. PETER & PAUL SCHOOL TO HOLDS `FAMILY' REUNION

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, September 17, 1995

Author/Byline: ELIZABETH BETTENDORF STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 13

In a photograph of Ss. Peter & Paul's Catholic Church snapped at the turn of the century, two women stroll down the deeply shaded street in a

fashionable blur of long gowns and wide-brimmed hats. A man stands with his bicycle, back to the camera, spokes glinting in a column of afternoon sunlight.

Long a spiritual landmark to local Catholics, the Romanesque-revival style church at the corner of Sixth and Reynolds streets -- its reddish bricks hand-made in the kilns of August Kloppenburg -- has stood since 1866 in this north end neighborhood.

It is also the oldest continuously operating church in the city.

But it was the legendary Ss. Peter & Paul's parochial school, a no-nonsense teach-'em-the-basics institution, closed since 1971, that forever shaped the lives of generations of Springfield students.

"It was an excellent school; they used to say you could always tell if somebody went to Peter & Paul," says Sam Montalbano a 1943 graduate and a member of the Sangamon County Board. "In those days, when people went right into jobs after high school, if you told an employer that you went to Peter & Paul, you were in.' " When nearly 700 Peter & Paul alumni gather at the old church this afternoon, they will participate in a special Mass celebrated by eight priests who also attended the school. The crowd will then flock to a buffet reception at a parish center at the Church of the Little Flower. There, they will watch a historic video researched by alumnus Bill Becker, whose great-grandfather, Fred Rauth, laid the bricks for the church.

"The story goes that his team of workhorses were so well-trained that whenever they saw a pile of bricks, they would stop," recalls Becker, who graduated from Ss. Peter & Paul School in 1948 and is one of generations of family members who attended the school. "On Sundays, the family would walk to church so the horses could rest."

For more than a century, thousands of obedient children (thanks to the strict disciplinary dedication of the nuns) sat at the school's wooden desks that were outfitted with inkwells and cast-iron legs. They learned to diagram sentences, recite the preamble to the Constitution and coax their loopy penmanship into the cool, elegant script of the Palmer Method.

Becker, along with Florence Hertenstein, a 1951 Ss. Peter & Paul graduate, and Montalbano , has been engrossed in planning the mega reunion since February. After stumbling across a metal filing cabinet in the rectory brimming with unidentified class photos dating back almost a century, they turned to friends and acquaintances to attach names to faces.

"I say everybody knows somebody, and our efforts worked," says Montalbano , one of six siblings who attended the school.

The team spread the news of the reunion by word of mouth, through bulletins at rural Catholic churches, even by heralding the event on an AM radio swap shop. Among the oldest graduates expected to attend is Becker's 97-year-old aunt, an Alton nun who graduated from the school in 1912, as well as a 1916 graduate who lives in Valley View and a 1918 graduate from Peoria.

Alumni from Illinois, California, Utah, Idaho, Nebraska, Florida and Texas -- even people who attended the school but never graduated -- are making the pilgrimage today to their beloved alma mater.

"From very early on, the nuns and teachers taught us to share," says Montalbano . "After school, we used to go to the neighborhood drugstore for penny candies, pies, little novelties and pastries. Sometimes we played marbles. Some of the kids had no money for these things. But we all shared. It was just expected."

Graduates are still impressed with the school's solid commitment to strong English and math skills. They still cherish the memory of annual ham suppers, the Christmas plays, the nun's solid moral teachings and the sense of equality among students rich and poor.

Most of all, they remember the gentle-but-firm discipline meted out regularly by one nun whom they feared as children but grew to respect as adults: Sister Joseph Hindert.

In school pictures, Sister Joseph is a solid, square-jawed woman, mouth creased into a reluctant smile, harmless enough looking, but larger than life to the children who sat in her classroom.

"If you didn't do what she told you, then you stayed until dark," recalls Hertenstein. "She was very strict, and as an English teacher, she was a stickler, but I learned a lot. I can still recite who the president and members of his Cabinet were at the time -- even the postmaster general."

Montalbano still chuckles -- and perhaps winces a little -- when he recalls his punishment for his antics as class wiseguy: "I had to write 500 times on the blackboard in the Palmer Method that I would not do whatever it was that I was doing again," he says. "She must have been 80 years old at the time. She called me a `blockheaded goose' -- her word for students who misbehaved. I wrote and wrote. It was seven o'clock at night before I got out of there."

Though the church itself has weathered the procession of time -- the modest school occupied several buildings over the years. A more modern structure erected in the mid-1960s, as well as the old, tough-looking "Deutsch Pen," with its cloak rooms and fire escape tunnel, have since been demolished.

Perhaps the memory Bill Becker savors most is the tender, fleeting recollection of the steaming hot chocolate and cinnamon rolls -- compliments of a church family who owned a bakery -- served one Friday each month in the school basement.

"Oh, the aroma was just wonderful," he says, a hint of childlike contentment in his face. "Sometimes, even now, I can still smell it."

Caption: Ss. Peter & Paul school occupied this building for many years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brahler family

 

 

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, July 22, 2004

Section: LOCAL
Page: 44

Today's notices: BRAHLER , James E.; CHULICK, Josephine; COLEMAN, Morris J.; COWAN, Ruby C.; DeCLERCK, Wayne R.; FIENIE, Ethel A.; FINIGAN, Mary; KELLEY, Shirley I.; KENNEDY, H. Nelson; KIRK, Mary E.; KISNER, Nora E.; LOGUE, Edna M.; MAHAN, Dolores H.; McGOVERN, Andrew; PETERS, William A. Jr.; TOUCH, Violet; Relatives: STEVENSON, Ronald B.

James E. Brahler

SPRINGFIELD - James Edward "Jim" Brahler , 65, of Springfield died Tuesday, July 20, 2004, at St. John's Hospice.

He was born May 13, 1939, in Springfield, the son of Christian Joseph and Ella Cecelia Murray Brahler . He married Irene L. Butcher in 1959 in Springfield; she died in 2001. He then married Carol Griffin Flannigan in 2003.

Mr. Brahler founded Brahler Tire and Auto Center and Brahler Lube Centers and retired as president. He was a member of Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church and Knights of Columbus. He was the co-chairman of the Friend-In-Deed/Contact Ministries Golf Outing. He was administrator of the St. Martin de Porres Center for the last three years. He was inducted into the Sacred Heart-Griffin Alumni Hall of Fame in 2004. He graduated from Cathedral Boys High School and Illinois College.

Survivors: wife,

Carol;

three sons, Mark (wife, Lisa),

David (wife, Elizabeth) and

Michael Brahler , all of Springfield;

two daughters, Michele (husband, Jim) Reavy and

Denise (husband, Marty) Vespa, both of Springfield;

three stepchildren, Erin Flannigan-Davies of Schaumburg,

Mary Pat Flannigan-Williams of Mission Hills, Kan., and

Patrick Joseph Flannigan of Springfield;

22 grandchildren; two brothers, R.W. "Bill" (wife, Mary) Brahler of Quincy and

John Brahler of Murphysboro;

five sisters, Nancy Ryan and Pat (husband, Sam) Benanti and

Mary Jo Brahler , all of Springfield,

Dorothy Brahler of Murphysboro, and

Barb (husband, Larry) Ziliak of Indiana; and many nieces and nephews.

 

 

 

 

 

Brahler -

 

Kuchar  - UIS PD

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, February 11, 1996



Butcher-Timmons Andrea Timmons and

 

Brad Butcher,

 

both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. Dec. 30 at Little Flower Church by the Rev. John Ossola.

The bride is the daughter of Steve and Bev Timmons of Waverly. The groom is the son of Augie and Josie Butcher of Springfield.

Serving as matrons of honor were Kara Luttrell and Joni Ruzic. Bridesmaids were Jolyn Butcher, Stephanie Luttrell, Ronda Johnston, Lynn Frensko, Lea Shelton and Trisha Seymour. Flower girl was Sydney Timmons.

Serving as best men were Brock Butcher and Matt Kuchar. Groomsmen were Steve Vespa, Tony Ruzic, Matt and Rob VonBehren, Dave Brahler and Mike Otto. Ushers were Joel Antonacci and Ryan Link. Ringbearer was Michael Timmons.

A reception was held at the American Center.

The bride is a graduate of Waverly High School. She is employed by Blue Cross Blue Shield. The groom is a graduate of Griffin High School. He is employed by Augie Butcher Construction.

The couple will live in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chad Slusarski,

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, December 10, 1989



Slusarski--Muller Kristine Marie Muller of New Orleans, La., and

 

Joseph Andrew Slusarski

 

of Springfield were married at 1 p.m. Nov. 11 at Saint Raphael Church in New Orleans, with the Rev. Mark Lomax officiating.

The bride is the daughter of Julius and Sue Muller of New Orleans. The groom is the son of Sharon Slusarki, 2116 Saratoga Drive, and Richard Slusarski of St. Charles, Mo.

Serving as matron of honor was Michelle Kempff. Bridesmaids were Michele Muller, Laura Slusarski, Gina Bono, Jennifer Buras, Susan Mollere and Julie Muller. Flower girl was Rebecca Green.

Best man was Mark Slusarski. Groomsmen were

 

 

Chad Slusarski,

 

Tony Ruzic ,

 

Keith Schmitt, Mark West, Brian Muller and Jeffrey Green. Ushers were Philip Dehner and Kevin Kempff. Ringbearer was Shaun Murphy.

A reception was held at Messina's.

The bride is a graduate of Cabrini High School and attended the University of New Orleans. She is employed by Policy Management Systems Corp. in New Orleans. The groom is a graduate of Griffin High School and Lincoln Land Community College. He attended the University of New Orleans and is employed as a pitcher for the Oakland A's baseball organization.

The couple resides in New Orleans.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, December 26, 1993

Hulligan-Cooper Suzanne Cooper of Decatur and Michael John Hulligan of

Springfield were married at 2 p.m. Nov. 6 at St. Patrick's Catholic Church, Decatur, by the Rev. David Lantz.

The bride is the daughter of David and Sandy Cooper of Decatur. The groom is the son of James and Dorothy Hulligan of Springfield.

Maid of honor was Tami Robinson. Bridesmaids were Jill Bouvet, Sarah Nelson, Melissa Cramer and Julie Hartsock.

Best man was Chad Slusarski . Groomsmen were Sam Trigillo, Todd Nelson, Mark Grywacheski and Rhett Mays. Ushers were Jeff Kramer, Bryan Hartsock and Tim Teater.

A reception was held at Knights of Columbus Hall, Decatur.

They both are graduates of Illinois State University. The bride works for Von Maur in Bloomington. The groom works for City Bank of Bloomington.

The couple will live in Bloomington.

 

 

 

 

GRIFFIN REVEALS A HONOR ROLL FOR FIRST SEMESTER

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, February 19, 1987

Griffin High School has announced its first semester honor roll.

Students placing on the A honor roll must earn at least three A's with no

grade lower than a B. Those on the A honor roll are Eric Brown, Christian Carrico, Robert Chamberlain, Chris Dishon, Robert Fix, Alan Fowler, David Graham, Donald Hayden, Timothy Hull; Michael Hulligan, Stephen Johnson, Kevin Kelly, James Lanter, Jeremy Link, Robert Mandeville, David Manfredo, Jeffrey Pigati, Eric Roselle, Chad Slusarski and Tino Villaflor, seniors; Joseph Bonansinga, Willard Dahlkamp, Robert Davis, Stephen DePaul, Robert Figueras, Michael Halbig, David Holmin, Juan Jimenez, Thomas Jirgal, Terry Kelly, Chris Laird, Sean Londrigan; Matthew Maier, Matthew McDonald, Brett Mizeur, Jeffrey Myhra, Michael Napier, Anthony Nestler, Charles Pirrera, Richard Pohlman, Richard Poulson, David Schafer, Bruce Sommer, Paul Stephans, David Szcinski and Daniel Wilson, juniors; John Albright, Mark Arisman, Stephen Boyer, Kevin Burke, Michael Erickson, Thomas Fiaush, Timothy Fromm, Lawrence Gotanco, Rodney Gowin, James Green; Chris Hood, Craig Jones, Mark Knipfer, Peter Lynch, Chris McPeek, Stephen Moseley, Mark Quenette, Brad Rotherham, Chris Stapleton, Edward VonBerg, Mike Wang, Kraig Washburn and Troy White, sophomores; And John Becker, Jason Beeler, John Casey, Brian Davis, Chris Fikes, Jon Jenkins, Michael Madonia, John Maurer, John McCue, Nathan Rightmire and William Standish, freshmen.

TITLE: PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, July 17, 1985

GRIFFIN HIGH SCHOOL second semester honor roll students are: Seniors -- Jason Bowie, Mark Caselton, Brian Doerfler, John Geyston, Daniel

Gietl,
James Graham, Robert Hull, Joseph Jansen, Keith Jesiolowski, Patrick Kelly, Daniel Laird, Tracy McCabe, Jeffrey Miller, Brian Minder, James Petterchak, Martin Schlipf, Michael Senalik, Timothy Sutton, Chris Vonnahme.

Juniors -- Matthew Bilinsky, Michael Casey, Todd Eddington, Michael Edmonds, David Haller, Michael Handwerk, Robert Harris, Paul Manca, Chris Ondrula, Bruce Radke, Douglas Reid, Lawrence Sandhaas, Mark Savoie, Matthew Simpson, Steven Stone, Thomas Wall, Richard Westenberger, Raymond Wheeling.

Sophomores -- Eric Brown, Christian Carrico, Robert Fix, David Graham, Edward Gresham, Timothy Hull, Patrick Hurley, Stephen Johnson, James Lanter, Jerome Lassa, Todd Maggiore, Robert Mandeville, Daniel McCain, Joseph Montgomery, Chad Slusarski , Charles Tripp, Tino Villaflor.

Freshmen -- Stephen Blazis, Chris Brey, Willard Dahlkamp, Robert Davis, Stephen DePaul, Robert Figueras, Douglas Hembrough, David Holmin, Juan Jimenez, Thomas Jirgal, Dennis Kracik, Sean Londrigan, Peter Manuele, Matthew McDonald, Anthony Nestler, Gregory Schelonka, Richard Sgro, Gregory Steil, Paul Stephans, David Szcinski, Louis Weller and Daniel Wilson.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ruzic – background

 

 

 

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, July 24, 2002


Julia M. Ruzic

VIRDEN - Julia May Ruzic, 88, of Virden, formerly of Springfield, died Tuesday, July 23, 2002, at Sunrise Manor Nursing Home in Virden.

She was born April 1, 1914, in Breeze Hill, Kan., the daughter of August and Anna Polowich Bart. She married Anthony "Tony" Ruzic in 1935; he died in 1956.

Mrs. Ruzic worked for Sangamo Electric, International Shoe Factory and as a receptionist at Concordia Lutheran College. She was a former member of St. Aloysius Church.

Survivors; two sons, Robert A. (wife, Zelma) Ruzic of Girard

and Ronald J. (wife, Janet) Ruzic of Springfield; five grandchildren; two stepgrandchildren; three great-grandchildren; five step-great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews

 

 

ANNIVERSARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, July 13, 2004



Ruzic-45th

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Ruzic of Girard

recently celebrated their 45th wedding anniversary. A trip is planned for a later date.

Ruzic and the former Zelma Brooks were married July 11, 1959, in Jacksonville.

Mr. Ruzic retired from Operating Engineers Local 965 after 47 years. Mrs. Ruzic worked for Super-X Drugs for 16 years.

They are parents of two children, Terri (husband, Joe) Summerson of Glenarm and Tony Ruzic of Springfield. There are three grandchildren.

 

 

TITLE: FOR THE RECORD

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, August 4, 1995

HAPPENING TODAY Events
….

Joni and Tony Ruzic , Springfield, a son Thursday.

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, November 5, 1989

Flynn--Catalano Patricia Ann Catalano and Brian Patrick Flynn, both of Springfield, were

united in marriage at 11 a.m. Oct. 14 at St. Aloysius Church. The Rev. Jeff Holtman officiated.

The bride is the daughter of Joseph and Beverly Catalano, 1808 N. 23rd St.

The groom is the son of Bernard Patrick and Maribeth Flynn, 715 Ridgely Ave.

Matron of honor was Mary McQuern. Bridesmaids were Sandra Catalano, Patrice Flynn, Denise Douglas and Heather Daughtery. Flower girls were Jessica Flynn and Cortney McQuern.

Best man was Charles Hunt. Groomsmen were Larry Poggenpohl, Tony Ruzic , Jay Kennedy and Brad Lloyd. Ushers were John Paul, Keith Bailey and Don McQuern. Ringbearers were Joe and Bob Catalano.

A reception was held at the Banquet Hall in Springfield.

Both are graduates of Lanphier High School. The bride is employed as a program technician at the Association for Retarded Citizens of Springfield. The groom is employed as a truck driver for National By Products in Mason City.

The couple will live in Springfield.

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, February 11, 1996



Butcher-Timmons Andrea Timmons and Brad Butcher, both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. Dec. 30 at Little Flower Church by the Rev. John Ossola.

The bride is the daughter of Steve and Bev Timmons of Waverly. The groom is the son of Augie and Josie Butcher of Springfield.

Serving as matrons of honor were Kara Luttrell and Joni Ruzic. Bridesmaids were Jolyn Butcher, Stephanie Luttrell, Ronda Johnston, Lynn Frensko, Lea Shelton and Trisha Seymour. Flower girl was Sydney Timmons.

Serving as best men were Brock Butcher and

Matt Kuchar.

Groomsmen were Steve Vespa,

Tony Ruzic ,

Matt and Rob VonBehren,

Dave Brahler and

Mike Otto. Ushers were Joel Antonacci and Ryan Link. Ringbearer was Michael Timmons.

A reception was held at the American Center.

The bride is a graduate of Waverly High School. She is employed by Blue Cross Blue Shield. The groom is a graduate of Griffin High School. He is employed by Augie Butcher Construction.

The couple will live in Springfield.

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, June 27, 1993



Bozarth-Wilson Cheryl Marie Wilson and William Leroy Bozarth, both of Chatham, were married at 6 p.m. June 5 at Trinity United Methodist Church by the Rev. David Bigley.

Mr. and Mrs. Orville Wilson of Springfield are parents of the bride. Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Bozarth of Rochester are parents of the groom.

Serving as matron of honor was Joni Ruzic. Bridesmaids were Pam Barringer, Cindy Bomke and Lora Luzinski. Flower girls were Chelsie Wilson and Charlee Downs.

Best man was Gary Bozarth. Groomsmen were Brian Bozarth, Tony Ruzic and Jad Ryherd. Ushers were Kevin Wilson, Carolyn Wilson and Shelli Bozarth. Ringbearers were Chase Bomke and Klayton Koontz.

A reception was held at St. Jude's Parish Center in Rochester.

The bride is a graduate of Pleasant Plains High School and is employed by Blue Cross Blue Shield. The groom is a graduate of Rochester High School and is employed by the

 

 

Rochester Township

Road Commissioner.

 


The couple will reside in Chatham.

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, September 1, 1991


Donovan-Pasley Kathleen Marie Donovan and Richard Kent Pasley, both of Springfield, were married at 1:30 p.m. Aug. 10 at St. Cabrini Church.

Paul and JoAnn Donovan, 200 N. Daniel, are parents of the bride. Rick and Marge Pasley, 2277 E. Keys, are parents of the groom.

Serving as maid of honor was Debra Fox. Bridesmaids were Connie Vaughn, Tracey Donovan and Maria Krueger. Flower girl was Kate Pasley.

Best man was Steve Pasley. Groomsmen were Tony Ruzic , Greg Richards and Tracy Tyson. Ushers were Rick Ingold and Joe Donovan. Ringbearer was Rik Austin.

A reception was held at the Sangamo Surf Club.

They both are graduates of Lanphier High School. The bride is employed as bookkeeper at Central Illinois Ice Company. The groom is employed by Ironworker Local No. 46. The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

 

FAU = FTL

 

LINCOLN LAND'S SEIDERS IN HIGH DEMAND

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, May 16, 1990

Author: LARRY HARNLY

while ex-Logger Tony Ruzic (Lanphier) is a graduate assistant at Florida Atlantic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, December 10, 1989



Slusarski--Muller Kristine Marie Muller of New Orleans, La., and

 

Joseph Andrew Slusarski

 

of Springfield were married at 1 p.m. Nov. 11 at Saint Raphael Church in New Orleans, with the Rev. Mark Lomax officiating.

The bride is the daughter of Julius and Sue Muller of New Orleans. The groom is the son of Sharon Slusarki, 2116 Saratoga Drive, and Richard Slusarski of St. Charles, Mo.

Serving as matron of honor was Michelle Kempff. Bridesmaids were Michele Muller, Laura Slusarski, Gina Bono, Jennifer Buras, Susan Mollere and Julie Muller. Flower girl was Rebecca Green.

Best man was Mark Slusarski. Groomsmen were

 

 

Chad Slusarski,

 

Tony Ruzic ,

 

Keith Schmitt, Mark West, Brian Muller and Jeffrey Green. Ushers were Philip Dehner and Kevin Kempff. Ringbearer was Shaun Murphy.

A reception was held at Messina's.

The bride is a graduate of Cabrini High School and attended the University of New Orleans. She is employed by Policy Management Systems Corp. in New Orleans. The groom is a graduate of Griffin High School and Lincoln Land Community College. He attended the University of New Orleans and is employed as a pitcher for the Oakland A's baseball organization.

The couple resides in New Orleans.

 

 

 

Bartlett –

CWLP – renfrow –

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, June 15, 1986



Clark-Krehbiel Terri Lynn Krehbiel and Scott Lee Clark, both of Springfield, were united in marriage at 7:30 p.m. May 30. The Rev. Vaughn Beeman performed the ceremony at West Side Christian Church in Springfield.

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dale Krehbiel of 2543 Cherry Road. The bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Clark of 2355 Ramsey Road.

Maid of honor was Myona Weller, with Amy Pinkerton, Sarah Rinaberger and Vicki Babbs serving as bridesmaids. Flower girl was Lisa O'Brien.

Best man was Tracy Smith, with

 

Jay Bartlett,

 

Bob Clark and

Tony Ruzic

serving as groomsmen. Ushers were Tom Krehbiel, Todd Clark and Michael Clark. Kainan Rinaberger served as ringbearer.

A reception was held at the Knights of Columbus hall following the ceremony.

The bride graduated from Springfield High School and attended Lincoln Land Community College. The groom graduated from Lanphier High School.

Both are employed by the Department of

 

Central Management

Services.



The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

SANCHEZ'S HOMER CAPS WILD FIREFIGHTERS' TITLE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, July 8, 1985

Author: Bob Reed

RIVERTON -- Rich Sanchez pulled a Rick Camp on Sunday to win the wild championship game of the Riverton Athletic Club's Fourth of July baseball

tournament for Springfield Firefighters.

Sanchez, a pitcher who wasn't supposed to bat, cracked a leadoff homer in the top of the seventh to give his club an 11-10 win over the Chicago Orioles.

The Orioles forced a one-game showdown for the title with a 12-0 win over Riverton Athletic Club/American Legion Post 32 and a 10-5 victory over Firefighters, who made five errors in the first inning.

The championship game featured bench jockeying that almost got out of hand, purpose pitches and Firefighter coach Bruce Richards, who gave plate umpire Scott Nance a tobacco shower after Nance ejected Richards for arguing a check-swing call in the seventh.

That wasn't the only mistake Richards made on Sunday. In the sixth inning he removed starting pitcher Drew Hummel and replaced him with Sanchez. Hummel moved to first base, and first baseman Dan Buck came out of the game.

Firefighters, who used Mike Wheeler as a designated hitter for Hummel, lost use of the DH because Hummel stayed in the game and took Buck's spot in the lineup. Richards forgot the rule and sent Wheeler up to lead off the seventh.

Oriole coach Dave Ciarrachi pointed out the mistake and the proper batter, Sanchez, was sent to the plate. After taking one feeble swing, he crushed a 1-2 fastball from Mike Sedarski over the left-center field fence to win the game.

"That's the first home run I've hit since Sandy Koufax," Sanchez said. "That was about seven years ago."

Sanchez added that he's really a pretty good hitter. "I was really unprepared, but I've hit a lot this season. I DH'd one game this tournament and I've got about 40 at-bats. I'm hitting over .300." Ciarrachi, who also made a managerial blunder, had a different opinion of Sanchez's hitting. "He (Sanchez) was the guy we wanted to face, and he lines one over the fence," he said. "Thirty-nine times out of 40 we get him out."

But Ciarrachi could have waited until after Wheeler had batted, pointed out the mistake to the umpires if he reached base and had him called out for batting out of turn.

"The umpires weren't sure," Ciarrachi said. "If the mistake wasn't pointed out before he batted, they probably weren't going to call it."

The umpires seemed right on top of the situation. Base umpire Brad Stearns checked the lineup and, after a brief discussion, sent Sanchez to the plate.

"I know the rule as well as anyone," Richards said. "I made a mistake."

Richards' second run-in with the umpires was more serious. Also in the seventh, Richards headed toward the plate from the third-base coach's box and jawed with Nance after a check-swing strike was called on Bob Dowson. Nance threw Richards out of the game, and Richards spat his tobacco squarely into Nance's face.

After the game, Richards claimed it was an accident. "I was spitting it out and it just blew out," he said. "It was not intentional. He (Nance) is a good friend of mine -- I apologized."

Nance -- who played at Lincoln Land, where Richards is an assistant coach -- refused to comment on the incident.

Controversy aside, Firefighters won an exciting game. They grabbed a 5-0 lead in the second on a two-run homer by Wheeler and a three-run, opposite field shot by Adam Giganti.

Giganti, who doesn't look like your typical power hitter, went three for four with four runs batted in.

"I'm about 5 feet 10 and I rarely am above 160 pounds. I'm a right field hitter, and I went that way on that one. It was a fat 3-1 pitch, and I hit it just the way Bruce taught me."

He said that he and his teammates took incentive from taunts by Oriole players throughout both games. "The game before we were pretty pathetic," Giganti said. "They got on us badly. They were a good team, but there was no call for that."

Giganti added that Firefighters also took offense when Oriole starter Doug Blake hit Buck in the back with a pitch after Wheeler's home run.

"We play hard and we do bench jockey -- it's part of the game," said Ciarrachi. "If they don't like it they shouldn't be out there. This isn't high school baseball or legion ball. With the kind of time and money we spend on the game, we play to win, not for a six-pack after the game."

The Orioles, who fell behind 9-3 in the fifth, almost won. They scored four in the fifth on a grand slam by Dave Heintzel to make it 9-7. Firefighters added a run in the sixth before the Orioles tied the game in their half of the inning.

After the Orioles scored two runs charged to Drew Hummel, Jeff Rutter singled off Sanchez to tie the game at 10. Third baseman Tony Ruzic ended the threat with a diving catch of a line drive by Mike Hansen that saved a run.

After Sanchez's hit his homer, he walked the first two batters in the seventh and was relieved by Kevin Williams. Williams got Holling to line into a double play before Jeff LeRiger flied out to end the game.

Center fielder Mark Alstott of Firefighters, who had four hits and three RBIs in the last two games, was named the tournament's most valuable player.

SECOND GAME FIREFIGHTERS (5) CHICAGO ORIOLES (10) Collier 2b 4 0 1 0 Alstott cf 4 2 2 1 Ruzic 3b 4 1 1 3 Dowling c 4 1 1 0 Hummel 1b 3 0 1 0 Sanchez 1b 0 0 0 0 Buck rf 3 0 1 0 Dhabalt p 0 0 0 0 Giganti dh,rf 2 0 0 1 Dowson lf 2 1 0 0 Thompson ss 3 0 0 0 Holling cf 3 1 1 0 LeRiger ss 4 2 3 3 Ross 2b 4 2 3 2 Kleinhuber dh 3 0 2 1 Rutter rf 1 1 0 1 Bailes rf 2 0 1 1 Heintzel 1b 4 0 0 0 Kirk lf 4 1 0 0 Lutz 3b 3 1 1 0 Hansen c 3 2 2 1 26 5 6 5 31 10 13 7 Firefighters 100 100 3 -- 5 Chicago Orioles 510 004 x -- 10 E -- Ruzic 3, Dowling 2, Heintzel. DP -- Firefighters 1. LOB -- Firefighters 5, Orioles 6. 2B -- Collier, Kleinhuber 2, Hansen. HR -- Alstott, Ruzic. SB -- Ross, Rutter, Hansen, Holling, Le Riger, Lutz.

Wheeler L 5 9 8 4 2 0 Dhabalt 1 4 2 2 0 0 Saladino W 7 6 5 4 2 11 U -- Moomey, McAvoy, Nance. T -- 2:00. THIRD GAME FIREFIGHTERS (11) CHICAGO ORIOLES (10) Collier 2b 3 1 0 0 Giganti lf 4 2 3 3 Alstott cf 4 2 2 2 Dowling c 3 0 1 1 Dhabalt pr 0 1 0 0 Ruzic 3b 3 1 1 0 Wheeler dh 3 1 2 2 Sanchez p 1 1 1 1 Buck 1b 2 1 0 0 Hummel p,1b 1 0 0 0 Dowson rf 3 1 1 1 Thompson ss 3 0 0 0 Holling cf 4 1 1 0 LeRiger ss 4 0 0 1 Ross 2b,lf 3 2 3 0 Kleinhuber lf 3 2 1 0 Lutz 2b 1 1 1 2 Rutter rf 3 1 2 1 Heintzel dh 3 2 2 4 Hansen c 4 0 2 0 Bailes 3b 3 0 0 0 Ortega 1b 3 1 2 2 Kirk pr 0 0 0 0 30 11 11 10 31 10 14 10 Firefighters 050 041 1 -- 11 Chicago Orioles 001 243 0 -- 10 E -- Le Riger 3, Alstott. DP -- Firefighters 1. LOB -- Firefighters 4, Orioles 6. 2B -- Ross, Heintzel, Hansen, Ortega, Alstott, Dowling. HR -- Sanchez, Wheeler, Giganti, Heintzel. SB -- Collier, Giganti, Bailes. Sac -- Thompson. SF -- Le Riger, Dowson.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

Kevin schott – 183fd –

Carlinville fd –

Mccann link -

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kevin schott – seiu – 183fd steward –

 

Carlinville fd – mccann –

 

Xa Carlinville – ruyle – linc lib guy

 

LOCAL

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, December 17, 1999



John R. Madden

CARLINVILLE - John Richard Madden, 72, of Carlinville died Thursday, Dec. 16, 1999, at Sunshine Manor in Carlinville.

He was born Feb. 3, 1927, near Plainview, the son of Joseph Vincent and Sarah Elizabeth Alward Madden. He married Betty Lee Campbell in 1956 in Alton.

Mr. Madden attended Gillespie High School and served in the 237th Engineer Brigade of the U.S. Army from 1954-56. He farmed until 1963. He retired in 1995 as owner and operator of M & B Cabinet Shop in Carlinville. He was a member of Ss. Mary and Joseph Catholic Church.

Survivors: wife, Betty; two daughters, Cathy Ann (husband, Henry) Singletary of Wilmington, N.C., and Diane (husband, Kevin) Schott of Carlinville; three grandchildren; a brother, Vincent (wife, Lorene) Madden of Carlinville; several nieces; and a nephew.

 

 

 

Air Guard firefighters respond to few emergencies

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 17, 2011

Author: BRUCE RUSHTON

Firefighters assigned to the 183rd Fighter Wing at Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport don't respond to many emergencies, according to call logs from the unit due for dismantling this fall.

Logs show that the firefighters responded to fewer than three calls per week between 2006 and 2010. However, that total includes such things as issuing welding permits, standing by when contractors descend into manholes or other confined spaces and going on alert when the National Weather Service warns of tornadoes or severe thunderstorms.

Since 2008, the 183rd firefighters annually have responded to fewer than two dozen emergencies on airport property, including medical-aid calls, mishaps on the runway and fires, according to detailed incident reports for those years obtained via a Freedom of Information Act request. The call volume increases when standby responses for pilots reporting in-flight trouble are considered, but those planes almost always land without incident, according to files.

The small number of emergency calls came as a surprise to state Sen. Larry Bomke, R-Springfield, who attended a recent meeting between state and federal officials set up by Lt. Gov. Sheila Simon, who wants National Guard firefighters to remain stationed at the airport at an annual cost of more than $1 million, which is paid by the federal government.

Firefighters at the closest Springfield fire station on North Grand Avenue are five minutes away, said Springfield Fire Chief Ken Fustin. The next-closest station at the fairgrounds is seven minutes away.

During the meeting, officials were told that the 183rd firefighters responded to as many as 200 calls per year, Bomke said. He said he believed the calls were of an emergency nature.

"I was basing my support on the fact that I understood they responded to quite a few calls each year," Bomke said.

Nonetheless, he said he still wants National Guard firefighters to remain at the airport.

"I still think we want to try to protect those guys out there," Bomke said. "If you have a catastrophic situation and you're right on site, obviously, you're going to respond much quicker than if you were seven minutes away."

At full staffing, the fire unit has 18 employees, but with recent transfers to a Guard unit in Peoria, the Springfield unit is down to 14 employees — two supervisors, a temporary worker and 11 union firefighters, said Maj. Bradley Leighton, Illinois National Guard spokesman. Protocol calls for four firefighters to be on duty around the clock.

Kevin Schott , a 183rd firefighter and union steward, said airport-based firefighters are needed.

"Although we don't have a lot of emergency calls, when we're needed, we're needed," Schott said. "Someone is having the worst day of their life."

'Fortunate thus far'

The firefighting unit, in jeopardy since the Air National Guard unit lost its flying mission in 2008, is scheduled to be dismantled in September, at the end of the federal fiscal year.

There were no disasters when F-16s were stationed at the airport, but the firefighters were needed because any mishap involving a fighter jet could be catastrophic, Leighton said.

Bomke isn't alone in calling for firefighters to remain at the airport.

A half-dozen members of the state's congressional delegation last month signed a letter to the Secretary of the Air Force, asking that the firefighters stay at the airport. Shutting down the unit would harm disaster-response capabilities in Springfield and the rest of the state, the elected officials said.

Signers included U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill.; U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk, R-Ill.; U.S. Rep. John Shimkus, R-Collinsville; U.S. Rep. Tim Johnson, R-Urbana; U.S. Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Peoria; and U.S. Rep. Bobby Schilling, R-Colona.

"Senator Durbin is grateful that there have not been terrible emergencies over the past few years that the unit has had to respond to, but the fact is that when an emergency does occur, the airport and the city must have the capability to respond," wrote Christina Mulka, Durbin spokeswoman, in an email.

Simon spokeswoman Kathryn Phillips said safety is the lieutenant governor's primary concern.

"If your plane goes down, you want the fire department there," Phillips wrote in an email.

Schilling also stands by the letter he signed last month.

"We have been fortunate thus far, and Rep. Schilling believes that it is crucial that we maintain capabilities necessary to provide the appropriate response to residents of Illinois and the surrounding area in the event of a natural disaster down the line," wrote Schilling spokeswoman Andie Pivarunas in an email.

Steve Dutton, Schock's spokesman, said via email that airport firefighters are important to the region's disaster-response capability.

"Additionally, it's still our goal to see that the 183rd receives a new flying mission, and having firefighters on site is essential in accomplishing this goal," Dutton said.

Springfield Mayor Mike Houston said he, too, would like to see the firefighters remain.

"If we were to get a flying mission, there would be a necessity to have them," Houston said.

Sparks will fly

Call logs and accompanying incident reports provided by the National Guard show that the number of responses has increased since 2006, when firefighters recorded 125 responses to incidents.

Firefighters reported 174 responses in 2009 and 138 last year, records show. However, the records show that most of the 312 responses during those two years did not involve emergencies.

More than 135 of the responses involved issuing welding permits to contractors or standing by while workers entered manholes or other confined spaces. Other responses included:

* Standing by while the Illinois Department of Transportation conducted a student driver training course, with no reported accidents.

* At least 18 training exercises.

* Standing by when President Barack Obama visited Springfield and when fallen servicemen were returned from overseas.

* Going on alert at least three times when the National Weather Service warned of tornadoes or thunderstorms.

* Picking the remains of a bird off the runway after it collided with an airliner.

In 2009, records show that the 183rd firefighters responded to two mishaps on runways or taxiways, both involving small aircraft and neither of which resulted in serious injuries. That same year, files show the firefighters handled seven medical calls at the airport, with patients refusing treatment in at least two cases. There were no reported fires at the airport, although firefighters based there helped the Sherman Fire Department extinguish three blazes.

Firefighters stood by nine times when small planes in flight reported problems, but there were no reported injuries. With the exception of nose landing gear that collapsed on a plane with four hours of fuel left on board, all landed without incident.

Last year, there were no reported mishaps on runways or taxiways and no fires on airport property. Firefighters provided medical aid a dozen times on airport property, responding to such problems as falls, personnel overcome by pepper spray during a training exercise and a construction worker who suffered a cut.

By contrast, the least-busy Springfield fire station, on Toronto Road, responded to 39 fires and 920 medical calls between March 9, 2009 and Dec. 31 of last year, according to city records — that's .04 fires and .88 medical calls per day. Station One near city hall handled the most medical aid calls, 2,264 (or 3.42 per day), during the same time period. Station Five on East Clay Street, which responded to 231 fires (.35 per day), handled the most fire calls.

Immediate protection

All told, detailed incident reports for the airport firefighters show 55 emergency calls (including standby responses when planes in flight reported problems) in 2008, 26 calls in 2009 and 22 calls last year.

Schott, the firefighter and union steward, said the numbers for 2009 and 2010 are low due to problems with Air Force computer tracking equipment.

"2008 is about the average," Schott said. "Fifty-five calls, to a lot of people, aren't going to seem like a lot of calls. But to those 55 people we helped, it meant the world."

Schott acknowledges that firefighters handle more false alarms and routine matters than emergencies.

"We don't have a lot of real fires, thank goodness," Schott said. "But if we do, and we're not here, the dollar loss is going to be tremendously greater."

Authorities usually have notice when planes in flight have problems with landing gear or other equipment, Schott said, but a Lear jet that landed hard in January and slid off a runway shows why airport-based firefighters are needed. A small fire broke out, and logs show that 183rd firefighters reached the scene in one minute, 35 seconds. Four passengers walked away, but the pilot and co-pilot were taken away by ambulance, reportedly with minor back injuries.

Airport firefighters can reach the midpoint of the largest runway within three minutes, Schott said, but that won't be possible if the 183rd fire unit is shut down.

"All of the general aviation or state-owned aircraft aren't going to have immediate fire protection," Schott said. "That's a huge concern for us. ... Because of where the city of Springfield sits, they can't make those response times."

The city is negotiating with the National Guard to provide fire-protection services at the base, Leighton said.

"We're confident that the fire services on the base will not cost nearly as much as it has to maintain a fire department," Leighton said. "We're comfortable that things will operate safely."

But Fustin said he would prefer an airport-based department.

"The fire department, let's face it, is a big life-insurance policy—it's an accident-insurance policy," Fustin said. "We hate to see the coverage diminished at any level."

Rig to be on standby

Mark Hanna, airport director, said the airport will put a fire rig that exceeds Federal Aviation Administration standards on standby when commercial flights land or take off. The rig will have a crew of one to three employees, he said.

"We will meet all the FAA regulations," Hanna said. "However, we will not be able to provide the robust response that the 183rd was able to provide on a 24-hour, 365-day basis."

The airport provided first-responder fire-protection service prior to 2003, Hanna said, and is prepared to do so again.

"It's no surprise to us that it's going to happen," Hanna said. "Would we prefer to have the 183rd? Absolutely.

"The reality is, we need to be responsible and prepared. We've done it before, and it's something that isn't new to airports—it's something that airports across the country do."

Sherman Fire Chief Rich Coon said he will miss the 183rd firefighters, who helped with calls in Sherman at least 19 times between 2008 and 2010, according to Guard records. Firefighters from the airport also cover the village when Sherman firefighters are elsewhere. In 2009, for example, 183rd firefighters protected Sherman for more than three hours while village firefighters were in Williamsville after a tornado hit.

"When we have accidents or medical calls on that side of our district, we call them on a regular basis," Coon said. "It helps provide a lot better service to the people who need us, and a lot faster."

***

Most calls are routine

Logs, incident reports and other records obtained from the Air National Guard show that firefighters assigned to the 183rd Fighter Wing at Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport responded to as many as 174 events in a given year between 2006 and 2010. However, most of those calls involved routine matters, such as issuing welding permits.

In addition to summaries for 2006 through the present day, the National Guard provided incident reports from 2008 through the present that provide details about calls and what firefighters did. A State Journal-Register analysis of those reports shows that firefighters responded to fewer than two dozen emergency calls on airport property in any given year.

The newspaper did not include calls in which patients refused treatment or calls that were canceled before firefighters reached scenes. The newspaper also cataloged mutual-aid calls in which firefighters helped other departments outside the airport.

Cases in which firefighters stood by after pilots reported problems with aircraft ranging from low fuel to malfunctions with landing gear also were recorded. Files show that all of those aircraft landed without significant injuries.

***

* 2008

Medical aid on airport property: 19

Fires on airport property: 0

Aircraft problem on tarmac: 2

Standby for in-flight aircraft reporting problems: 20

Mutual aid fire calls: 3

Mutual aid medical calls: 11

Total: 55 calls

* 2009

Medical aid on airport property: 5

Fires on airport property: 0

Aircraft problem on tarmac: 2

Standby for in-flight aircraft reporting problems: 9

Mutual aid fire calls: 4

Mutual aid medical calls: 5

Natural gas leak: 1

Total: 26

* 2010

Medical aid on airport property: 12

Fires on airport property: 0

Aircraft problem on tarmac: 0

Standby for in-flight aircraft reporting problems: 5

Mutual aid fire calls: 1

Mutual aid medical calls: 4

Total: 22

The cost

The federal government routinely spends more than $1.3 million in payroll to maintain the 183rd Fighter Wing firefighting unit at Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport. Here's a look at the numbers.

2010: $1.33 million

2009: $1.24 million

2008: $1.3 million

2007: $1.37 million

2006: $1.3 million

 

 

 

 

Schott= seiu – xa bus monitors – access – Austin

And see pieper – hade – afl/cio – sipe – 96 -

 

 

Carlinville – mccann

 

TITLE: FOR THE RECORD

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, July 8, 1992

HAPPENING TODAY Events

Wayne Coniglio Duo, Artist on the Plaza, noon, north side of Old Capitol Plaza; free.

Springfield Municipal Band, 7:30 to 9 p.m., Washington Park gazebo; free.

"Dreamgirls," 8:30 p.m., Springfield Muni Opera, 815 E. Lake Drive; $7.50 reserved, general admission $5 adults, $4 seniors, children 12 and under free tonight.

Government Gov. Jim Edgar: afternoon office time in Springfield.

Conventions/Visitors Illinois Coalition for Community Service, Ramada Renaissance. Attendance: 275. ILLINOIS LOTTERY Tuesday's numbers Daily game: 292 Pick Four: 2324 Estimated Lotto jackpot: $12 million PERSONAL Births Memorial Debra Howard, Springfield, a daughter Wednesday St. John's Susan Brown and Tony Burnett, Meredosia, a son Monday.

Diana and Kevin Schott , Carlinville, a daughter Monday.

Laura Shake, Taylorville, a son Monday.

Cindy and Thomas Weissing, Springfield, a son Monday.

Mr. and Mrs. Roger Lettimore, Virden, a son Tuesday.

Dawn and Curt Christensen, Chatham, a daughter Tuesday.

 

TITLE: PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, May 3, 1987


KEVIN SCHOTT , son of Lois Schott and grandson of Thelma Schott, both of Carlinville, has graduated from Air Force basic training at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas.

He is a 1975 graduate of Carlinville High School.

 

 

 

Schott is at Carlinville FD

 

And instructor – LLCC

 

Grant announcement timing questioned / Sen. Demuzio denies political motivation

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, March 24, 2002

Author: DEAN OLSEN STATE CAPITOL BUREAU

Thirteen months ago, state Sen. Vince Demuzio, D-Carlinville, made a big splash in his hometown weekly newspaper when he announced that Carlinville would receive a $200,000 Illinois FIRST grant to help expand its cramped fire station.

Questions remain, however, about whether the veteran senator abused his wide-ranging power to benefit a relative when he awarded state money for a pet project. Such projects are known in the General Assembly as "member initiatives."

"To me, it's emblematic of all the problems with pork-barrel spending and Illinois FIRST," said Jay Stewart, staff attorney at the Chicago-based Better Government Association. "There are no rules, and there is no real administrative review."

Demuzio, 60, who denies he did anything wrong, unfair or unethical, made the grant announcement Feb. 19, 2001, providing plenty of good publicity for his son and Carlinville's mayor, Brad Demuzio.

A few days later, the younger Demuzio won the Democratic nomination over challenger Richard DeBiase and then a third term in the April general election as the city's part-time mayor.

Brad Demuzio, 37, was quoted in a front-page story and appeared in a photograph published in the Macoupin County Enquirer as part of the paper's coverage of the grant announcement.

He won the primary against DeBiase by 165 votes out of 1,209 cast - a margin of 57 percent to 43 percent - in the city of 5,700 people. Demuzio then breezed to another four-year term over a Republican write-in candidate who received only 80 votes.

Vince Demuzio said he didn't time the announcement to benefit his son, but rather to encourage local officials to begin planning for the project before the money arrived.

"Brad is his own man," Sen. Demuzio said. "The firemen were anxious to get their project under way, and so I wanted to get it going as quickly as I could. I announced it with the intention of helping the fire department. Now, if that accrued to the benefit of Brad because he was the mayor, why, there's nothing I can do about that . . . that was OK with me. I wasn't trying to harm anyone."

But the announcement didn't lead to a quick receipt of the state money needed to start the $295,800 project. The state agency in charge of doling out most "member initiative" grants didn't receive Vince Demuzio's request for the $200,000 from the Senate Democratic caucus until four months after the announcement.

The money still hasn't arrived in Carlinville, although an official from the Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs said a check should be on its way in the next few weeks.

City government would come up with the remaining $95,800 through money the city council has set aside for that purpose, Brad Demuzio said.

DeBiase, 42, said the timing of the Carlinville announcement was unfair and apparently politically motivated.

When asked whether the publicity led to his defeat, DeBiase, who has lived in Carlinville fewer than five years, replied: "It's within the realm of possibility. It's difficult to know the unknowable. This was publicity favorable to Mayor Demuzio in a close election. It would have been a close election one way or the other."

And Kevin Schott ,

a member of Carlinville's "paid, on-call" fire department

who backed DeBiase,

questioned the political timing when the grant was announced. He also questions whether the city deserves the grant now, during a statewide budget crunch while many other downstate volunteer fire departments are more needy.

"I'm not against us getting the extra room. .. . But it's not something we couldn't live without," said

Schott, 44, a member of the board of the

Illinois Society of Fire Service Instructors

who works full time as a firefighter in Springfield for the Air National Guard.

Most of the $12 billion Illinois FIRST program, spearheaded by Gov. George Ryan, is paying for improvements to roads, transit systems and schools.

But Ryan and legislative leaders in 1999 also agreed to set aside more than $1 billion of the total for legislators' and the governor's pet projects, to be awarded through a secretive process with virtually no public oversight.

That "member initiative" program has received criticism from government watchdog groups because legislators control when to make grant announcements and which projects to fund. The program also has come under fire from people who want the General Assembly to tap a specific pool of $107 million in unspent member-initiative money to prevent some planned layoffs and other state budget cuts.

Schott said the member-initiative process in this case benefited Brad Demuzio unfairly.

"There's no reason for this addition to this fire house, other than it made him look good to the public," Schott said. "My tax money is being abused horribly, as far as I'm concerned. I don't see how they could have announced this when the grant wasn't even awarded or well on its way."



But Carlinville Fire Chief

Bill Healy and

assistant chief

Jerel Loveless

 

said the fire station has needed an expansion for years to speed up response times, ensure the safety of firefighters, allow more space for training and make room for needed equipment.

Loveless, who was the chief when the grant was announced, said he didn't care about the timing. "I don't worry about politics," he said. "When I was chief, I just worried about the department.

Demuzio acknowledged Friday that he could have waited until after the election to make the announcement, but didn't. "I thought it was appropriate," he said.

Former state Rep. Tom Ryder, R-Jerseyville, whose district included Carlinville, joined Demuzio in the February 2001 announcement. Ryder retired from the House last year and works for the Illinois Community College Board.

Ryder said he didn't think the announcement put DeBiase at a disadvantage.

Brad Demuzio, who makes $11,000 a year as mayor and earns an $81,600 salary in Springfield as chief deputy director of the Illinois secretary of state police, wouldn't speculate on whether his re-election bid benefited from the grant announcement.

He said he didn't ask his father to make the announcement at a certain time.

Sen. Demuzio, a state lawmaker since 1975 who served as chairman of the state Democratic Party in the mid- to late-1980s, requested the money for Carlinville sometime earlier in February 2001. He received swift authorization from the Senate Democratic Caucus to announce the grant because of its importance to the city, caucus spokeswoman Cindy Huebner said.

She said the caucus, as part of the process set up after the General Assembly approved Illinois FIRST in 1999, submits member-initiative grant requests to DCCA "on an ongoing basis."

She said a four-month lag in the caucus notifying DCCA, as was the case in Demuzio's request, was not unusual in light of the potential paperwork involved.

Huebner said lawmakers in the caucus are aware that it's common for many months to elapse before requested grant money actually is issued from the state treasury.

Stewart, the Better Government Association lawyer, said the BGA would like to see all member initiatives appear as specific line items in annual state budgets so their merits can be debated before the money is spent.

He said the issues of timing and appropriateness raised by the Carlinville grant already have arisen in other parts of the state and are likely to recur until the current system is changed. "The central problem is there are no standards," he said. "This will continue to eat at the perception of the legislature."

 

 

 

Dozens attend rally for 183rd flying mission

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, June 1, 2008

Author: NICOLE MILSTEAD Staff Writer nicole.milstead@sj-r.com

A rally to save the 183rd Fighter Wing's flying mission and keep the unit's firefighters in Springfield drew a crowd of about 100 people Saturday, but several scheduled speakers were derailed by the ongoing state budget debate.

Col. Gene Blade, who brought the firefighters to what is now Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport in the 1980s, said the city is lucky to have the firefighting unit available.

"The firefighters are trained for homeland security in nuclear, biological and chemical attacks, he said. "We are fortunate to have it for this community."

U.S. Sen. Barack Obama sent a letter thanking by name the nine firefighters from the 183rd who returned from Iraq on May 13. He also thanked all of the firefighters for help they provide to the other area fire departments.

Three of the recent Iraq returnees attended Saturday's rally.

"These men did not have to go to Iraq, they volunteered and they did it for their unit, which is about to disappear," said Kevin Schott , who has served as a 183rd firefighter for 18 years and is the unit's union spokesman.

The rally was held at American Legion Post 32, 1120 Sangamon Ave. Post Commander Loren Barnes gave the three returned firefighters –

 

Jay Watts of Riverton,

 

Eric Benson of Pekin, and

 

Rick Reiman of Pawnee –

 

free memberships to the American Legion to thank them for their service.

State Sen. Larry Bomke and Rep. Raymond Poe, both R-Springfield, and Rep. Rich Brauer, R-Petersburg, were scheduled to speak at the rally, but the legislative session kept them at the Capitol.

However, the lawmakers sent letters of support, as well as a copy of a House resolution that urges Congress and the National Guard Bureau to retain the Air National Guard fire-protection services at the Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport.

"If we don't do something, we are going to lose some good people," Schott said.

The firefighters and other flight support staff for the Air National Guard unit are pushing for a new flying mission for the wing.

The 183rd's F-16 jets are scheduled to leave Springfield in October. Unless a new mission is earmarked for the 183rd, that would mark the first time in 60 years that the unit will be without flying duties.

Caption: Retired Col. Gene Blade speaks at a rally to save the 183rd Fighter Wing's firefighters and flying mission Saturday at American Legion Post 32. At left is 183rd firefighter Mike Evans. (06012008rally.jpg)

 

 

Airport to buy fire vehicle / $1.9 million grant will help if Air Guard firefighters leave

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, April 16, 2008

Author: CHRIS DETTRO STAFF WRITER chris.dettro@sj-r.com

Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport has the money to buy a new aircraft-rescue and firefighting vehicle as a backup in case Springfield loses the Air National Guard firefighting unit that now protects the airport.

The airport recently received a $1.9 million federal grant partly to buy the new vehicle, part of its contingency plan should it lose the federally funded firefighting personnel.

If the Illinois Air National Guard's 183rd Fighter Wing doesn't get a new flying mission by October, the airport will have to find fire protection elsewhere - possibly from the city of Springfield.

 

Kevin Schott ,

 

senior firefighter for

 

Service Employees International Union Local 73,

 

 

who is stationed at the airport, was in Washington earlier this month to talk to Illinois congressmen about what might be done when the 183rd loses its F-16 jets later this year.

Federal, state and local officials are lobbying for the 183rd to retain at least a cargo-flying mission. That would keep Air Guard firefighting crews in place, Schott said.

The airport strongly supports that effort, airport executive director Mark Hanna said.

"But we must do what is reasonable and logical at a time like this and plan accordingly with the information we have," he said.

The grant, from the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Federal Aviation Administration, also will be used to improve the existing fire station on the north side of the airport and for the first phase of replacing perimeter fencing around the entire airport.

"This isn't a crisis, but it certainly is a reality," Hanna said of the contingency planning, which has been under way for 18 months. "Right now, we're preparing for our July 1 fiscal year and preparing some different options."

Hanna said it is "a natural assumption" that the city of Springfield might provide fire protection at the airport if the 183rd's crews are lost, but he added that the city isn't the only option.

Before 2003, the airport had its own firefighting/rescue unit, and that remains an option for the future as well, he said.

"We have to meet FAA requirements whatever we do," Hanna said.

The airport already is seeking bids to buy the new vehicle, which Hanna said will be a large rescue/firefighting truck - one that could handle emergencies involving most types of aircraft likely to use Capital Airport.

The equipment won't be wasted if the 183rd's firefighters remain at Capital Airport, he added.

"We've had preliminary discussions with the Air National Guard about allowing them to use the new equipment," Hanna said. That, in turn, could allow the Air Guard to devote its funds to personnel, he said.

The federal government pays a total of $1.4 million in salary and benefits for the 183rd's firefighters. Schott said the unit is authorized to have 24 firefighters, but that number is down slightly because younger firefighters, unsure of their future, have sought employment elsewhere.

The firefighters would stay at Capital Airport as long as a flying mission is announced to be at the airport within two years, Schott said.

"The sooner we get this resolved, the sooner we can fill those positions," Schott said.

Hanna said the Springfield airport won't need that many firefighters if it loses the Air Guard unit. The 183rd is staffed to deal with multiple jets in the air at once and also has to have backups for periods when some of the firefighters might be deployed elsewhere.

The 183rd's firefighters, in addition to providing rescue services and fire protection for the airport, are trained to respond to emergencies involving hazardous materials, chemicals and biological agents. They also respond to other local emergencies through mutual-aid agreements with other fire departments.

For instance, the unit provided its foam truck to fight the fire at City Water, Light and Power's Dallman electric generating station following an explosion in November. The Sherman Fire Department called them on consecutive days last week to help at car crashes near "Bud's Corner" at Illinois 29 and Andrew Road just north of the airport.

The 183rd firefighters also are the only department in the area certified to deal with chemical and biological events.

Caption: 1. Robert Gonterman, an employee of the Springfield Airport Authority, unloads items from the airport's mass casualty incident trailer. A $1.9 million grant will allow the airport to buy a new aircraft-rescue and firefighting vehicle and other equipment. (04162008GRANTMONEY_TIF.SMP) / 2. Air National Guard firefighters, shown here in a drill, will leave Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport if the 183rd Fighter Wing does not get a new flying mission. (0416GUARDFIRE_TIF.SMP) / 3. The grant also will finance improvements at the airport's fire station. (0416SAFETY_TIF.SMP)

 

CHILDREN'S SAFETY COMMITTEE SCHEDULES BENEFIT GOLF OUTING

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, October 1, 1994

A golf outing sponsored by the Children's Safety Committee will be held Oct. 21 at The Oaks Golf Course.

Golf, car, food, and beer and soda will be provided. There will be a 50/50 raffle with a prize on every hole. A hole in one wins a 1994 Miata. The cost is $50 per golfer. A putting tournament will have an entry fee of $5. Reservations should be mailed to Bob England, 47 Harbauer, Springfield, Ill., 62702 by Oct. 20. Checks should be payable to Children's Safety Committee. All proceeds will go to the Children's Safety Village.

To donate items for use at the outing, contact Becky Flynn, ESDA, 3807 N. Ware Road, Springfield, Ill., 62707, or call 789-2280. For more information, call Loren Larsen at 753-6840 or Kevin Schott at 788-2391.

 

 

 

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN FOR CHARITY GOLF OUTING

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, April 17, 1995

A golf outing May 26 at The Oaks Golf Course will benefit the Children's Safety Committee of Springfield and Sangamon County.

The men, women and mixed four-person golf scramble will begin at 12:30 p.m. with a shotgun start. Prizes will be awarded at every hole, and a hole-in-one wins a 1995 Mazda Miata or Dodge pickup from Wagoner Mazda.

Entry fee of $50 per golfer includes golfing, use of golf cart, food and refreshments.

To register, contact

Bob England at 788-8488,

Loren Larsen at 753-6373,

John Pyle at 753-6878, or

Kevin Schott at

788-2391 by May 1. Proceeds will be used for construction of a Children's Safety Village.

 

 

BARBARA PETRILLI NEW LEADER OF CHILDREN'S SAFETY COMMITTEE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, January 14, 1996

Barbara Petrilli has been elected chairman of the Children's Safety Committee of Springfield and Sangamon County.

Other officers are Kevin Lerch, vice chairman; Rosalie Mottar, secretary; and Susan Dodson, treasurer. Glenna Senger is the immediate past chairman.

Two new board members are Becky Flynn and Diane Apa. Other members of the board include Bud Rudin, Kevin Schott , Dave Leonard and Bob England.

The Children's Safety Committee was formed in 1989 to provide safety education for children.

The committee is currently working on creating a Children's Safety Village, a permanent facility where Sangamon County citizens can receive safety/prevention educational programs year-round.

 

 

 

183rd's jets to fly away in October / Rally planned

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, May 21, 2008

Author: BRUCE RUSHTON STAFF WRITER bruce.rushton@sj-r.com

The Springfield-based 183rd Fighter Wing will lose its F-16 jets in October, an Illinois National Guard spokeswoman confirmed Tuesday.

State officials and wing employees have known since 2005 that the federal government wanted to transfer the 15 fighter jets from Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport, but the date of departure was disclosed only recently to wing employees.

Kevin Schott , who has been a firefighter attached to the 183rd Fighter Wing for more than 18 years, said the Department of Defense has notified him and his fellow firefighters that they will receive their last paychecks on Oct. 15.

He said his last day on the job isn't certain, but he believes it will be Oct. 1.

An Illinois National Guard spokeswoman verified that the jets are due to leave by mid-October.

However, she could not estimate just how many jobs will be affected aside from the 27 firefighting positions.

"Basically, yes, there are some positions, like the firefighting ones, that will be lost because they are tied to the (F-16) aircraft," said the spokeswoman, 2nd Lt. Stacey Rieger.

In announcing removal of the aircraft in 2005, the federal government said Springfield would lose 163 full-time jobs, or more than half of the Illinois Air National Guard's civilian and military positions at the airport.

In addition, the Pentagon said in 2005, the city would lose about 100 jobs outside the airport.

The decision to transfer the jets was part of an Air Force and Air Guard reorganization put in place by the Base Realignment and Closure commission in 2005.

Rieger and Schott attempted Tuesday to put a positive spin on the departure date, noting that state officials have been working with Illinois' congressional delegation to replace the fighter jets with a different type of aircraft.

"I really think we're still in this fight," said Schott.

He said he will be less than two years from retirement age when the jets leave and has no firm job prospects.

As a union member, he has been lobbying to keep the jets in Springfield or bring in other aircraft and keep the firefighter jobs.

Rieger said some employees will be retrained and that jobs not dependent on the F-16s will remain in Springfield.

"The wing itself will remain; the wing is not closing," Rieger said.

Unlike Schott, however, Rieger would not say whether she is optimistic that the state will be able to convince the federal government to send new planes to Springfield.

"I really couldn't speculate," Rieger said.

Rally planned

American Legion Post 32 has scheduled a rally Saturday, May 31, to build support for keeping military airplanes stationed in Springfield.

The rally is set to begin at 10:30 a.m. at post headquarters, 1120 Sangamon Ave.

In addition to speeches, the post plans to honor nine firefighters attached to the 183rd Fighter Wing who recently returned from voluntary deployments to Iraq.

Caption: F-16s will be gone from Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport by mid-October. (0827AIR183RD2_TIF.SMP)

 

 

 

183rd firefighters lobby for mission

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, March 27, 2008

Author: CHRIS WETTERICH STAFF WRITER chris.wetterich@sj-r.com

Members of the 183rd Fighter Wing's fire department are lobbying federal lawmakers for a new flying mission that would allow them to keep their jobs protecting Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport.

If the Illinois Air National Guard unit does not receive a new flying mission by October, the 24-full-time firefighting positions will be lost, and the city will have to provide fire protection to the airport. The firefighters and their combined $1.4 million in salary and benefits are paid for by the federal government.

Kevin Schott , a crew chief with the department, said Wednesday keeping the firefighters on the base is not just about saving their jobs, but also about the homeland security advantages to having them in central Illinois.

Schott plans to meet next week with U.S. Reps. John Shimkus, R-Collinsville, Phil Hare, D-Rock Island, and Ray LaHood R-Peoria, and Illinois' Democratic U.S. Sens. Dick Durbin and Barack Obama to press the case for the firefighters.

"It's a public safety issue. It's an economic issue," said Schott. "Once we're gone, all of our equipment is going to go away so that, locally, we can't support the city of Springfield."

The firefighters at the 183rd are trained to respond to emergencies involving hazardous materials, chemicals and biological agents. They also have responded to other local emergencies through mutual aid agreements, including providing much-needed foam to fight the fire at City Water, Light and Power's Dallman electric generating station in November.

While the Springfield Fire Department has a hazardous-materials team, the 183rd has unique training in the event the capital city faced a chemical or biological attack, Schott said.

If, for example, someone got a hold of a crop-dusting aircraft and deployed a toxic chemical over Springfield, the 183rd's firefighters have special training and equipment to decontaminate the area, Schott said.

Mayor Tim Davlin said the Springfield Airport Authority would pay the city to provide two firefighters to protect the airport 24 hours a day if the unit does not get another flying mission. But Schott said such costs could mean higher landing fees and tickets.

"Once we lose the ability to have any mission whatsoever ... the chances then of (the Air Force) coming back are slim to none," Davlin said.

Gov. Rod Blagojevich has written a letter to the secretary of the Air Force asking that the 183rd Fight Wing's F-16s not be moved, but if they are, then the Air Force should consider making Springfield home to cargo aircraft. The governor also is battling the move in court.

The Base Realignment and Closure Commission (BRAC) decided in 2005 to redeploy Springfield's F-16 jets and 163 full-time personnel. The jets are expected to leave sometime this year.

 

 

Shimkus, Durbin push for 183rd cargo planes

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, April 16, 2008

Author: CHRIS DETTRO STAFF WRITER chris.dettro@sj-r.com

U.S. Rep. John Shimkus, R-Collinsville, and U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin, a Springfield Democrat, have upped the ante in efforts to create a cargo-flying mission for the Illinois National Guard's 183rd Fighter Wing.

The wing is based at Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport in Springfield.

Shimkus has an earmark in the defense appropriations bill for six C-21 small cargo planes to be transferred to Capital Airport.

Durbin also has asked the Senate Armed Services Committee to authorize $12 million for the transfer of four C-21 aircraft as a bridge mission to the 183rd no later than Oct. 1, 2009. He wants the Air Force to develop a plan for a suitable flying mission no later than Oct. 1, 2010.

"They feel really good about getting that earmark," said, Kevin Schott , a senior firefighter with Service Employees International Union Local 73 stationed at the airport, said this week.

"They're working this together," Schott said of the area congressmen. "They're positive about the chances."

A spokesman for Durbin's office said this week the request is part of the 2009 fiscal appropriations process. A decision could take "a couple of months, or it could be longer," he said.

The C-21 is the military version of the Lear Jet 35A and is used for cargo and passenger airlift. It can carry eight passengers and has 42 cubic feet of cargo space.

Schott said four of the C-21s being requested are in storage in Arizona. The other two in Shimkus' earmark are at a base in Japan "and don't have a home yet."

Schott met recently in Washington with Shimkus, and Reps. Phil Hare, D-Rock Island, and Ray LaHood R-Peoria, along with staff members for Durbin and U.S. Sen. Barack Obama to lobby for the firefighters.

Springfield Mayor Tim Davlin also is lobbying for the cargo-flying mission. Gov. Rod Blagojevich has written a letter to the secretary of the Air Force asking that the 183rd Fight Wing's F-16s not be moved. But if they are, he asks the Air Force to consider making Springfield home to cargo aircraft.

Blagojevich also has challenged the jets' move in court.

The Base Realignment and Closure Commission (BRAC) decided in 2005 to redeploy Springfield's F-16 jets and 163 full-time personnel. The jets are expected to leave sometime this year.

 

 

 

AIR GUARD SECURITY, FIREFIGHTERS PROTEST FORCED SERVICE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, June 4, 1998

Author: JOE MAHR STAFF WRITER

They may protect Springfield's Air National Guard base, but they don't necessarily want to be Guard members themselves.

More than 50 base security, firefighter personnel and family members picketed outside the 183rd Fighter Wing base Wednesday to complain that Guard officials are balking in what's become a seven-year debate over forced membership.

The Illinois Department of Military Affairs, however, contends that the stall tactics are coming from the pickets' union -- Local 73 Service Employees International.

And each side said they'd agree to binding arbitration, although union members said they don't trust Guard officials to follow through.

At issue is whether the two dozen military police and firefighters working full time at Springfield's base should also be required to be members of the Guard.

As members, they must work an extra weekend a month, along with the potential of being called up for service overseas. In particular, firefighters work every other Saturday as part of a three-day, 40-hour week. Guard duty adds another two Sundays a month.

"We lose two weekends instead of just the one weekend," said firefighter Kevin Schott .

The union prefers a requirement that they be Guard members for only the first four years after being hired. Then it would be an employee's option.

Granted, most of the two dozen police or firefighters would opt to stay in the Guard for the extra benefits the service provides, Schott said. But others would opt to be strictly full-time civilian employees, in order to spend more time with their families.

Guard officials, however, argue that wouldn't work.

With a leaner full-time military, the Guard is being called in more than ever to help out in trouble spots throughout the world.

"If they (security and firefighters) were not members of the National Guard, they could not even be asked to go overseas," said Guard spokesman Maj. Mark Hurley.

"The whole concept is that the whole wing could go over and act as a self-sufficient unit," he said.

Union officials argue that the Guard could make do by filling the open weekend slots with part-time personnel, who would just work as either security or firefighters for one weekend a month or two weeks a year.

But the big issue, to Guard officials, is having military personnel protecting military equipment.

"They were hired by the military to do perform a military mission, which is to protect weapons systems such as F-16 fighters," Hurley said.

The union maintains that it's not asking for anything special. In fact, union leaders said, out of 41 bases similar to Springfield's, only six (including the one in Peoria) require their full-time firefighters to be Guard members as well.

Hurley said he wasn't aware of that statistic. Regardless, he said, Guard officials here would prefer to have their personnel be members of the military.

For years, officials refused to bargain over forced membership, saying it wasn't a required bargaining issue. But, in 1995, the State Labor Relations Board ruled that it was a legitimate bargaining issue. A state appeals court did the same in 1996. In the meantime, both sides agreed to a contract that didn't deal with the issue. That contract expires in September 2000. The next meeting between the two sides is set for June 11, when they're expected to discuss the specifics of binding arbitration. The union has already proposed one of three arbitrators to settle the dispute.

"We want an arbitrator picked. We want a date picked, and we want it over with," Schott said.

Caption: Pickets representing Local 73 Service Employees International Union arrived at 7 a.m. Wednesday in front of the Illinois Air National Guard entrance at Capital Airport.

 

 

 

National Guard firefighters to stay in Springfield one more year

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, July 17, 2009

Author: DEANA POOLE, THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER

The 183rd Fighter Wing will continue to maintain F-16 jet aircraft at Springfield's Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport for at least another year, U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin's office announced Thursday.

The one-year extension means the airport will keep its National Guard firefighter unit, and about 18 full-time employees will keep their jobs through at least September 2010.

In a news release, Durbin's office said Gen. Harry Wyatt, director of the Air National Guard, informed Durbin of the temporary extension, which also allows more time to find a permanent flying mission at Springfield.

"This continuing maintenance work will allow Capitol Airport to maintain the National Guard firefighters and firefighting equipment for another year," Durbin said in the release. "This is welcome news, as these highly skilled firefighters are critical to Springfield's ability to handle an emergency.

"I will continue to work with the Air Force, the National Guard and the State of Illinois to see that good-paying jobs remain in our state and these important emergency response capabilities are not lost," Durbin said.

Without the extension, the firefighters were scheduled to leave Springfield's airport Oct. 1.

Kevin Schott , senior union firefighter with SEIU Local 73, called the extension "very good news."

"We're extremely excited," Schott said. "We're going to continue in our efforts to secure a flying mission for the 183rd that would make it permanent and ensure the longevity of this base."

Last year, Durbin and then-Sen. Barack Obama got a one-year year extension for the firefighting unit.

Securing a permanent flying mission for the 183rd has been a top priority for the city as well.

The last of about 17 F-16 fighter jets left the Illinois Air National Guard base at the Springfield airport last fall as part of a federal base realignment. The unit has since picked up an engine-repair mission.

Through his spokesman, Davlin said the city is grateful for Durbin's efforts.

"This is great news for Springfield, those who use our airport and for the 183rd Firefighters," Davlin said. "By extending the maintenance mission, we will have a greater opportunity to solidify support for the assignment of a new permanent flying mission for the 183rd."

 

 

 

CARLINVILLE FIREFIGHTER APPOINTMENT DISPUTE PUTS HEAT ON MAYOR

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, July 22, 1989

Author: Mark Schlee

CARLINVILLE -- Mayor Jack Pascoe has taken over appointment of Carlinville volunteer firefighters, a move that is raising the ire of some

firefighters.

Members of the fire department say they are concerned that the mayor's approach apparently gives them no voice in selection of new firefighters.

Pascoe defended himself Friday, saying "the city is supposed to be run by elected officials -- this is the democratic process."

The fire department dispute is another indication that, after three months of calm, Pascoe's political honeymoon is over.

The conflict erupted after the mayor and members of the city council rejected the nomination of high school principal Richard Spohr to be a volunteer firefighter because Spohr lives outside city limits.

Spohr was nominated under a longstanding procedure in which Fire Chief Louis Daugherty suggested names to the mayor for appointment. The city council's Public Lands Committee then ratified the selections.

However, a 1982 city ordinance that gives the mayor authority to appoint firefighters contains no requirement that the fire department or fire chief be consulted.

"The ordinance book says that the mayor makes appointments with the approval of the aldermen," Pascoe said. "If I need input from the fire chief or the committees, I'll bring it up at the regular council meeting."

Daugherty acknowledged that the ordinance is the final arbitrator.

"The problem is that the ordinance needs to be changed," he said.

Firefighter Kevin Schott said, "If they would have voted, we would have submitted another name, but instead, they played this political game."

Firefighters complain that the intent of the '82 ordinance is vague and that it has never been enforced.

"We've put five firemen on since that ordinance was passed and we haven't heard a word about it," said Daugherty. "As of now, we've got no input."

Daugherty said he isn't asking for total control, just to have a say in who is named to the department. So far, he said, the city council has not responded.

"I've been trying to get a meeting with the mayor and the Public Lands Committee for the last month and a half," Daugherty.

Daugherty said the mayor lacks experience both as an administrator and as a firefighter, which is why the ordinance needs to be rewritten.

But Public Lands Committee Chairman Sonny Albertine said the dispute goes to the heart of representative government.

"What's the point of being an elected official if an appointed employee is going to run the government?" said Albertine.

"How would they (the fire department) know any more than we who's a good firefighter until they're proven?" he added.

Pascoe's dispute with the firefighters comes on the heels of controversy over his decision Monday to place Police Chief Ronnie Reiher on 24-hour suspension. The suspension, which took effect Wednesday morning, happened after Reiher refused to place Officer Rory Rathgeb on the day shift, allegedly because of the patrolman's energetic enforcement of drunken driving statutes.

Debra Judd, substance abuse counselor at Carlinville Area Hospital, said of Rathgeb, "Sounds to me like that man is just doing what he's paid to do." "DUIs are one of the vehicles we use to get people into treatment," said Judd, a recovering alcoholic herself. "That's what it takes for some people to get help."

However, Gerald Smith, alcohol counselor at Macoupin County Mental Health, said Rathgeb may have gone too far.

Rathgeb reportedly has been spotted outside local taverns arresting patrons as they left. "That's entrapment," Smith said. "His time would be better spent somewhere else."

Smith is also upset that enforcement of DUIs may not be fair.

"There are a lot of tickets not being written. The supposed backbone of the community get away scot-free."

Pascoe has refused to discuss the chief's suspension, reportedly because he believes any comment would only aggravate the situation.

 

 

State officials trying to keep 183rd firefighters in Springfield

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, June 16, 2011

Author: ANDY BROWNFIELD

A coalition of Illinois state legislators, representatives of congressmen, firefighters and the military met with Lt. Gov. Sheila Simon on Wednesday to look at ways to keep firefighters with the 183rd Fighter Wing in Springfield on the job.

There are currently 15 active firemen at the Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport who work around the clock in shifts of four. It was announced last year that they would be laid off after the 2008 loss of the 183rd's F-16 flying mission. The firefighters were given a one-year extension through Sept. 30, 2011.

The 183rd now fixes jet engines, a spokesman for the Illinois National Guard said. The new mission does not require the presence of firefighters, he said.

State Sen. Larry Bomke, R-Springfield, said the group Wednesday looked at three options to keep the firefighters employed.

One option would be to obtain another flying mission for the 183rd. As that would have to be assigned federally, it is unlikely that will happen by Oct. 1, Bomke said.

Another alternative is to create a fire protection district that encompasses the airport.

Such a district could apply for a federal SAFER (Staffing for Adequate Fire & Emergency Response) grant to continue to pay the salaries and benefits of firefighters, at least temporarily.

While the district could have the power to levy taxes, Springfield Mayor Mike Houston said he doesn't think it would require voter approval by referendum.

"It is my understanding that if there is no fire protection in an area, a district can be created," Houston said.

However, it also is unlikely that a district could be established and a grant approved before the Oct. 1 layoff date, Bomke said.

A third, more feasible option would be another extension while a fire protection district is created and Illinois congressmen lobby for another flying mission, he said.

The firefighters say they play an important role in public safety at the airport.

"If there's an aircraft incident, and we've had aircraft incidents out there, we want to be able to provide not only firefighting, but rescue services immediately," senior fireman Kevin Schott said.

The closest fire station to the airport is at 801 North Grand Ave. W., with a response time of seven minutes, according to Bomke. When lives are on the line, it makes more sense to have fire and rescue on-site, he said.

Erich Bloxdorf, executive vice president of the Greater Springfield Chamber of Commerce, also attended the meeting. He said the Illinois National Guard, which controls the 183rd, is a major economic engine in Springfield.

"We want to help in any way we can to help that base grow and prosper," he said. "The viability of the 183rd, especially in attaining a new flying mission, depends on there being a fast emergency response time."

Springfield firefighters honor Sept. 11 victims

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, September 12, 2009

Author: DEANA POOLE, THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER

Standing inside the bay of the fire station at Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport Friday morning, a group of more than 50 gathered to honor the 343 New York City firefighters who were killed during the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

Many say memories of that day - from where they were when they heard the news to the startling images on television that followed - remain etched in their minds eight years later.

Bill Casson, a former firefighter with the Illinois National Guard 183rd Fighter Wing, said that usually when remembering the anniversary of the death of a loved one or tragic event, it seems to get a little easier with time.

"This is one day here that I remember what I was doing on Sept. 11," he said. "Every time September 11th rolls around, I come to the same feeling. I guess that's a good thing."

The predominant sentiment was that we must never forget.

"It wouldn't be fair to the people who lost their lives," said Paul Bernardy, a base maintenance technician at the airport for 15 years. "We were a great nation before that. Working here was the best job in the world before that. But after that, it was just sobering how fragile what we considered the freedoms we have here are."

Gina House said ceremonies such as the one Friday morning are important, especially as more time passes.

"I think that things like this have to happen so we don't forget," she said.

House and her mom, Mary Ann Johnson, both of Springfield, attended the 20-minute ceremony Friday.

It was the fourth year the Guard unit has held the commenoration to pay tribute to the New York firefighters who died, as well as to honor fellow squadron personnel who are serving in southwest Asia.

About 40 firefighters, civilian and military, attended, including members of the Sherman Fire Department. Friends and family also attended.

They focused on Engine 4, Ladder 54, which was based a block away from Times Square that day. Its motto: "Never missed a performance."

Fifteen firefighters from Engine 4, Ladder 54 responded to the World Trade Center. Only three survived, said John Ring, senior master sergeant. The names of the 12 fallen firefighters were read followed by a bell ceremony.

Kevin Schott , a senior union firefighter with SEIU Local 73, spoke about how the life of a firefighter is associated with a ringing bell.

With the start of each shift, a bell rings, he said. When a firefighter is needed, a bell sounds.

"And when the call had ended, and the alarm was completed, it was the bell that rang three times to signal the end," Schott said. "And now they have completed their task, their duties well done, and the bell rings three times followed by a pause, three times followed by a pause and three times in memory of and in tribute to their lives and service," Schott said.

A bell was then rung three times.

Then three more.

And then three final times.

No-fly missions for 183rd

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, July 1, 2008

Author: JOHN REYNOLDS STAFF WRITER john.reynolds@sj-r.com

Illinois National Guard officials announced two new missions for Springfield's Air Guard base Monday.

Neither involves assigning aircraft to the 183rd Fighter Wing after the unit's F-16 fighters leave Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport for the last time this fall, but local chamber of commerce officials were upbeat about the announcement.

"This demonstrates that the Illinois Air National Guard is a viable site for new investment by the Department of Defense," said Brad Warren, executive vice president of the Greater Springfield Chamber of Commerce.

The two new non-flying missions include an engine-repair facility and an Air and Space Operations Center, which is also referred to as a "Component Numbered Air Force" or c-NAF.

The c-NAF in Springfield would be called the 183rd Air Operations Group. The new unit would augment Air Force headquarters staff in planning, coordinating and controlling air operations in wartime theaters.

"For many of us, this would be a logical progression - going from aircraft operators at the tactical/unit level of war to planners at the operational/theater level of war," said Col. Rick Yoder, 183rd Operations Group commander. "We'll no longer be tasked with operating, fixing, supplying or supporting a single airplane. We'll be seeking solutions to issues that affect a whole theater of war."

Warren said he has talked to federal officials about the new missions and was told that the 183rd's facilities at the airport will need renovation. He added that local officials will need to keep pressing federal officials to ensure that enough money is allocated for the renovations.

"This is a great step forward, but there is still work to be done to make sure they are fully implemented," Warren said.

The 183rd Fighter Wing has operated aircraft in Springfield since 1948. The unit started with the P-51 Mustang of World War II fame and has operated the F-16 Falcon since 1989.

In 2005, the Base Realignment and Closure Commission decided to redeploy the unit's jets.

Some of the 17 jets have already been sent to other bases. The rest are expected to be moved by Sept. 30.

The new missions do not affect the 183rd's fire department, which is expected to be disbanded when all of the jets depart.

"These two missions were expected. They are not a surprise," said Kevin Schott , senior union firefighter for Local 73, the union that represents the 183rd's firefighters.

Schott said the firefighters are still hoping that the base will get a flying mission. Just last week, he said, he was in contact with the offices of U.S. Sens. Dick Durbin and Barack Obama. The two are lobbying on Springfield's behalf.

U.S. Rep. John Shimkus, R-Collinsville, and Durbin urged the Air Force to transfer C-21 cargo planes to Capital Airport.

A spokesman for Durbin's office said the senator continues to push for the C-21s, but no decisions have been made.

 

 

Effort to keep 183rd fire unit is crucial

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, March 30, 2008

THE 2005 decision by the Base Realignment and Closure Commission to remove the 183rd Fighter Wing's F-16 jets and 163 jobs from Springfield still stings.

Though a court challenge by Gov. Rod Blagojevich to the move is still pending, nearly everyone involved in the fight to keep the jets here has accepted that they will be gone in October.

Yet there is one aspect of the impending departure of the 183rd for which the fight is only just starting. Unlike the battle to make BRAC change its mind on the 183rd, which many people knew going in would be next to impossible, many are hopeful that this one will succeed.

AT ISSUE is saving the 24-member fire department that serves the 183rd and also assists the Springfield Fire Department and many area volunteer departments in emergencies. One noteworthy example of that assistance came in November, when the 183rd's fire department sent its foam truck to help extinguish the fire that followed the explosion at the Dallman electric generating station.

While the 183rd still will be headquartered at Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport after the F-16s depart, the loss of its flying mission means the loss of the fire department. For the Springfield area, that will mean loss of a highly skilled team of firefighters trained in, among many other things, addressing attacks with chemical and biological agents. It is the only department in the area certified to deal with chemical and biological events. It's loss also will mean a greatly reduced fire protection force for the airport, which will have to partner with the city to keep two firefighters on duty at all times at the airport. That could mean airport passengers pay more in fees, which would not help the airport's ongoing efforts to draw both passengers and airlines.

THIS WEEK firefighter Kevin Schott , a longtime member of the 183rd's fire department, heads to Washington to seek help from this area's congressional delegation. The goal is to secure a flying mission for the 183rd that would mean, in turn, retention of the fire department.

Mayor Tim Davlin last week said a plan to bring four to six C-21s - the military version of the Lear jet - to the 183rd is a realistic option. The jets are used as both cargo and passenger carriers.

It's in this community's interest that Schott's trip to Washington is successful. From a public safety and homeland security standpoint, the closing of the fire department would be a tremendous loss. That is the strategy Schott and others involved in this effort must take.

"When you point out the safety and the need, you have a better chance than if you just try to put a dollar figure on it," said U.S. Rep. Phil Hare, D-Rock Island, noting that appeals to BRAC based on financial arguments don't work.

THERE IS ANOTHER reason gaining some kind of flying mission is important. BRAC will issue another report in 2010, and if the 183rd has neither a flying mission nor fire department then, it's much more likely to be passed over for a new mission, Schott said.

We hope our representatives in Congress fare better with this effort than with the admittedly Herculean task of taking on the BRAC report in 2005. The outcome this time could have public safety consequences for this community for many years to come.

Effort to keep 183rd fire unit is crucial

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, March 30, 2008

THE 2005 decision by the Base Realignment and Closure Commission to remove the 183rd Fighter Wing's F-16 jets and 163 jobs from Springfield still stings.

Though a court challenge by Gov. Rod Blagojevich to the move is still pending, nearly everyone involved in the fight to keep the jets here has accepted that they will be gone in October.

Yet there is one aspect of the impending departure of the 183rd for which the fight is only just starting. Unlike the battle to make BRAC change its mind on the 183rd, which many people knew going in would be next to impossible, many are hopeful that this one will succeed.

AT ISSUE is saving the 24-member fire department that serves the 183rd and also assists the Springfield Fire Department and many area volunteer departments in emergencies. One noteworthy example of that assistance came in November, when the 183rd's fire department sent its foam truck to help extinguish the fire that followed the explosion at the Dallman electric generating station.

While the 183rd still will be headquartered at Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport after the F-16s depart, the loss of its flying mission means the loss of the fire department. For the Springfield area, that will mean loss of a highly skilled team of firefighters trained in, among many other things, addressing attacks with chemical and biological agents. It is the only department in the area certified to deal with chemical and biological events. It's loss also will mean a greatly reduced fire protection force for the airport, which will have to partner with the city to keep two firefighters on duty at all times at the airport. That could mean airport passengers pay more in fees, which would not help the airport's ongoing efforts to draw both passengers and airlines.

THIS WEEK firefighter Kevin Schott , a longtime member of the 183rd's fire department, heads to Washington to seek help from this area's congressional delegation. The goal is to secure a flying mission for the 183rd that would mean, in turn, retention of the fire department.

Mayor Tim Davlin last week said a plan to bring four to six C-21s - the military version of the Lear jet - to the 183rd is a realistic option. The jets are used as both cargo and passenger carriers.

It's in this community's interest that Schott's trip to Washington is successful. From a public safety and homeland security standpoint, the closing of the fire department would be a tremendous loss. That is the strategy Schott and others involved in this effort must take.

"When you point out the safety and the need, you have a better chance than if you just try to put a dollar figure on it," said U.S. Rep. Phil Hare, D-Rock Island, noting that appeals to BRAC based on financial arguments don't work.

THERE IS ANOTHER reason gaining some kind of flying mission is important. BRAC will issue another report in 2010, and if the 183rd has neither a flying mission nor fire department then, it's much more likely to be passed over for a new mission, Schott said.

We hope our representatives in Congress fare better with this effort than with the admittedly Herculean task of taking on the BRAC report in 2005. The outcome this time could have public safety consequences for this community for many years to come.

 

 

 

LOCAL GUARD UNIT'S TIPS ON FIRE PROTECTION SENT NATIONWIDE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, July 11, 1995

From their base at Capital Airport, members of the 183rd Fighter Group Fire Department are producing a newsletter that goes nationwide.

Hot Talk is a semiannual update on fire protection activities in the Air National Guard for Air Guard firefighters. About 85 copies are sent to Air National Guard bases nationwide.

Making its debut last July, Hot Talk includes information on activities, changes and challenges faced by Air National Guard fire departments.

"It's specifically designed for Air Force, Air Guard firefighters," says TSG Mike Mayfield, training chief and a member of the editorial staff.

"But a lot of the information, like the training and some of the equipment, would help a civilian also."

The Guard bureau in Washington asked fire chief SMS Frank Wombwell (now executive editor) to publish the newsletter.

The front page of the third issue published this month features a color photo of the Lake Superior College ARFF Training Center in Duluth, Minn.

There are 18 pages of information, including firefighters' experience after the April 19 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Building in Oklahoma City and the theme of Fire Prevention Week Oct. 8-14, "Watch What You Heat: Prevent Home Fires!" The newsletter might include news about "people who've retired, new fire chiefs, old fire chiefs, new equipment that's out, mishaps or responses," says Mayfield. "Other departments can read about it and learn."

The newest issue features a profile on the 117th Civil Engineer Squadron Fire Department in Birmingham, Ala. That department's history dates to the Korean War.

"Everybody around the countryside is going to read about them," says Wombwell.

The fire department of the 183rd Fighter Group is primarily responsible for fire protection of aircraft and structures.

"We're all emergency medical technicians (EMTs)," says Wombwell. "We do the hazardous materials response for the base."

Mayfield has experience in layout after working for several years for a printing company; SGT Kevin Schott has written for the newspaper in Carlinville; and SSG Brian Olmsted is a journalist at Sauk Valley Community College near Rockford.

"Like anything, people see something new that comes out and ask, `How long do you guys think you can keep this up?' " says Wombwell. "We want it (out) right on July 1st and January 1st."