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State farm insured the dor bldg. – The bldg. I was framed for setting on fire. This was used as an excuse to harass me with private investigators and other recruits – YR’s – IERC – CR’s – vets – emps – unions – trucks – police – security guards – FF’s –

Pushed by people w/ control over jobs -

 

I was framed by MI, and then they used it as cover to harass me – they were told that if they couldn’t find anything incriminating, to make something up.

Kjell – gray – hart

See also Gov perry homicidal frame – GWB – sears tower – note these involve USSS – (Copeland) – vala –

 

And note talon frame – DOR is public – gov bldg. – see also CWLP as natsec threat – robinson – guards – ibt916

 

Note SF field office on southwest side – elston at 233 mp at abu ghraib – libri in Kabul – prisons – civaff – salt pit renditions – dyncorp ft worth – kevin vann

Arson frame – ingrum – noonan key frame – emails - http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyenglish

Bldg. I worked as security – framed for arsonhttp://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneydorcoffee

 

 

Narup – jurkanin – 2nd st landlord – jurkanin is ilfop and iletsb – narup is related and ISP ALJ – narup is atty for SF - insurance defense - fire

Arson frame – ingrum - noonan

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyenglish

jurkanin is ilfop secty – iletsb – BW – Dempsey pti

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyilfopngaoi

 

 

Bloomington – ING MI – see also panther

Bloomington FD chiefs bail 2009 –

 

Usarec link from feger – to redpath – to pubworks -

 

ING – airport – redpath as security – links –

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneywalnut

scrp links to ING

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyscrping

ING in spk – seems odd – and see sfg spk

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyinginspk

see also spk gop

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyspkgop

and see spk attys – how I ended up there – mail diverted – accepted to widener – forced to spk – sere – jpra – Mitchell jessen – caths – chemicals – sleep – pain – lies told about me – social isolation –

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyspkattys

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneycaths

 

 

*State farm exec vp – callis – baise –

Manufacturers – Greco – baise – vala -

 

Elston in 233mp – & State Farm - Elston/mcnulty @ DOJ

Mike elston at usdoj – partisans -

Elston as cmdr – 183 civeng

Elston at usdoj – mcnulty – AGAG -

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneydojhenhouse

elston is cmdr of 183 civil engineers

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaney183civeng

note esp – 5/4 memo – video – ovp/doj -

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyvideo

333mp site – same as 233

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaney333mp

legal cover in general – central dist il

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneycdilusattys

 

 

 

Mike sauer – State Farm

Jeff sauer – shg football

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyshgfootball

jeff sauer – dr paul – grandma -

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyimpactgrandparents

and see sauer – shg social network –

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneymvmvince

 

flamini – SHS – gray – works at state farm

 

 

Rutherford is from Bloomington area dist – terminix - ibt

Keen site – scso – 233 cmdr - terminix

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneykeen

keen – Romney – dennis p moore link – frequent urination

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneydennispmoore

 

 

LIUNA –

NOTE PEORIA – GAUWITZ – SPFLD DIOCESE – SHG IT

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyPLUNKETT

 

note generally – drug frame – “NA”

sd frame – scientologists at loft – narconon – kennedy misinfo – GU drug frame – zeman – hall misinfo –

note esp loft and detox – cult like activities – prostitution

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneypattern

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyocbunn

 

 

 

 

LIUNA Bloomington –

 

john penn – imp –replaces ed smith at Midwest 

 

Jack reid – buscher – reid – spd cmdr buscher – berkler

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneybuscherreid

**********************************************

Liuna – ed smith – southern Illinois – ken gray – Costello – gray – alongi –

 

BLOUNT WAS SOLAR VP – KENNEDY DRUG FRAME

ALCALDE FAY IS ISEMAN/MCCAIN - CACI

 

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneykengray

 

san diego – chris reid – links

 

 

Matt smith – at liuna Midwest – links – fanale – riverton

Rusciolelli – riv kc’s – vala as GK –

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneykcs

 

larkin at state farm – labor relations – const – AGC – sahba site

 

 

*Ed smith – jax pensions – neff on comte – HNB bomke – schaive on comte – schaive/libri – blago links -

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyliuna

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyblagoliuna

 

 

 

 

Note generally timeline on ed smith bail – ullico – busted hard – and see generally sommer – 2160 enterprise – Keebler – et al – and see also UCM etc.

 

 

Rutherford is also Bloomington area politician

Terminix – keen –

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneykeen

 

sauer – sommer –

 

harper ceo is sommer –

sommer is Bloomington area politician –

KEITH P SOMMER

Detective – note SF harassment from PI’s –

Insurance defense

LINKS – MINDER – shgfootball - borski

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyborski

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyshgfootball

AND NOTE LINKS – BANGERT – LG MAYOR - AIRPORT

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneybangert

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyairport

 

harpers QNEZ – trn link – brandt link – Rutherford link – keen terminix – 233 – links generally -

 

Rochester pd – sommer – tim sommer

Check English page for arson frame emails – on bottom of page -

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneyenglish

chamber link – gray – insurance industry – rust trosino – insurance defense – liability caps – judicial elections – BRT – mcgraw – IBRT – chi chamber – IPI - campo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sauer – mizeur – larkin – elston – state farm – spi –

 

TITLE: PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, August 21, 1991



STATE FARM Insurance agents Donna Barbian of Sherman and Mike Larkin, Ron Mays, Pam Mizeur and Marcia Peterson, all of Springfield, have been named recipients of the company's Legion of Honor Award.

Ed Blasius, Jeff Elston , Ralph Folkerts, Mike Sauer, Larkin, Peterson and Barbian have been named ...
 

 

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, October 5, 1991



Kurt A. Kelly LINCOLN -- Kurt A. Kelly, 22, of Lincoln died at 3:43 a.m. Friday at his residence.

Services will be at 2 p.m. Monday at Holland and Barry Funeral Home, Lincoln, with burial in Zion Cemetery, Lincoln.

Surviving are his mother, Mary Elston of Lincoln; two brothers, Shawn and Shannon, both of Lincoln; two sisters, Dawn Wells and Jennifer Kelly, both of Lincoln; and two stepbrothers, Gene Elston of Wheaton and Jeff Elston of Bloomington

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, October 20, 1996



Ruffner-Ramsey Mary Ellen Ramsey and Carey W. Ruffner, both of Springfield, were united in marriage at 1:30 p.m. Sept. 14 at St. Patrick's Church by the Rev. John Eck.

The bride is the daughter of B.J. and Mary Ann Ramsey of Springfield. The groom is the son of Don and Marilyn Ruffner of Danville and Linda and Jim Miller of Savoy.

Serving as maid of honor was Madonna Ramsey, with Angie Zanetello and Lisa Duffey as bridesmaids.

Serving as best man was Don Ruffner, with Jeff Elston and Roy Duffey as groomsmen. Ushers were Tom Dietrich and Ed Titsworth.

A reception was held at the Elks Lodge.

The bride is a graduate of Sacred Heart Academy. She is employed by Clifton Gunderson LLC. The groom is a graduate of Catlin High School. He is employed by Tharaldson Employee Management Inc.

The couple will reside in Springfield

 

 

 

FOR THE RECORD

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, November 20, 1999



Toni and Jeff Elston , Springfield, a son Thursday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

33rd IBCT

 

 

MI  unit - bloomington

 

 

 

 

 

 

COMPANY B, 33rd BRIGADE SPECIAL TROOPS BATTALION (MILITARY INTELLIGENCE)
1616 S. MAIN ST
BLOOMINGTON, IL 61701-6798

 

 

A troubling goodbye Families turn out to honor troops on deployment to Afghanistan

Pantagraph, The (Bloomington, IL) - Sunday, September 7, 2008

Author/Byline: M.K. Guetersloh;mkguetersloh@pantagraph.com
Edition: Main
Section: News
Page: B1

NORMAL - For the next 400 days, Lindsey Quam will face the day-to-day struggles of raising her two children alone.

Her husband, Lt. Michael Quam, is one of about 20 soldiers from the Bloomington-based Illinois National Guard unit that will be sent to Afghanistan as part of the 33rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team.

A deployment ceremony for the soldiers was Saturday afternoon at Heartland Community College.

For Lindsey Quam, the ceremony brought out her hesitation for her husband to leave. But it's not the birthdays or the holidays where she will miss her husband the most, she added.

"It's going to be the little things that we do every day that make us a family of four," Lindsey Quam said. The couple from Dubuque, Iowa, have two sons, Aiden, 2, and Keegan, 6 months.

"Bath time with the kids will be a struggle without him," she said. "Holidays we'll be with family so I'm not worried about that."

For Pat Grant of Charleston, watching the ceremony for his son, Trevor Grant of Bloomington, was more emotional that he thought.

"I'm proud of him but it is a little overwhelming," he said.

Missing the little things

Grant said he, too, will miss the little things while his son is away.

"I won't have the ability to see him whenever I want or have dinner whenever," Grant said. "I'll miss having the opportunity to talk with him about the things fathers and sons talk about when they're together."

The soldiers from the Bloomington unit will join about 2,700 other Illinois Guard members being sent to Afghanistan in the fall. The troops are expected at Fort Bragg, N.C., for training.

Maj. Brad Leighton, a spokesman for the Guard, said during the more than yearlong mission, the Bloomington soldiers will provide military intelligence for force protection for the units within the 33rd Brigade.

"What they will do in theater is save lives," Leighton said.

Maj. Gen. Dennis Celletti and Col. Michael Haerr addressed the soldiers and their families about what is ahead for them.

‘Great patriots'

Celletti called the family members "great patriots" and encouraged family members to work as a group to support each other while their soldiers are away.

Bloomington Mayor Steve Stockton called the deployment ceremony a double-edged sword.

"It is heartening to see volunteers who are willing to go off to another country for our protection," Stockton said. "But on the other hand, it is hard to see you leave your families."

In addition to the Bloomington soldiers, about 350 soldiers from the 634th Brigade Support Battalion were honored at a ceremony Saturday at the Sullivan High School.

 

 

 

For families, deployment can cause turbulence

Pantagraph, The (Bloomington, IL) - Sunday, August 17, 2008

Author/Byline: Ryan Denham;rdenham@pantagraph.com
Edition: Main
Section: News
Page: A1

BLOOMINGTON - Eric Short and his wife, Wendy, were newlyweds when he deployed to Germany with the Illinois National Guard in 2002.

Back then, the hard parts were learning the ins and outs of marital communication while separated by an ocean and haggling over money as they both raced to ATMs on payday.

This time, with Eric Short one of 2,700-plus soldiers from the Illinois Guard deploying to Afghanistan in the coming months, it's all about the Bloomington family's two children: Collin, 4, and Cooper, 15 months.

"When we first got the call-up, I was excited," said the 32-year-old Short, a sergeant with a Champaign-based maintenance unit. "But as the closer we got, I got more 50/50 on it. Now, it's just gonna be really hard, with the kids and everything."

Families across Illinois are preparing for the upcoming year-long deployment of about 30 units from the Illinois Guard to help train Afghan army and police, touted as the largest call-up of Illinois Guard units since World War II.

The first six units have already mobilized, including Pontiac's on Saturday; a Bloomington unit will join the rest heading out by the end of the fall.

In Central Illinois, the effect will be both significant and routine. Businesses will go without deployed employees for a year. Soldiers in college take time off from classes. Families pack a year of housework into a month or two before a spouse's deployment. Weddings are missed. Chicago Bears games are never seen.

Too busy to worry

As pre-deployment training winds down and families like the Shorts spend more time talking about wills, power of attorney and long-term financial security, the dangers of serving in Afghanistan become clearer. During the month of July, more U.S. troops died in Afghanistan than in Iraq, for the first time since the Iraq war started in 2003.

"I guess I wasn't worried too much because we were so busy," said Wendy Short, who said working at State Farm Insurance Cos. gives her a leg-up on sorting out her husband's military benefits. "But we only have so many weekends left before (Eric's) gone for a whole year."

Guard families who had at one time been thankful they were at least not headed to Iraq have shown increased apprehension with reports of increased violence in Afghanistan, said Annette Chapman of Atlanta, family readiness support assistant for the 33rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, made up of the 30-plus units.

"We're at a turning point in Afghanistan, for good or bad," said Staff Sgt. Brian Hempstead, 28, of Bloomington, who's deploying with his new wife, Spc. Elizabeth Hempstead, 25, and their Urbana-based headquarters unit.

The Hempsteads, who got married July 19 and will squeeze in a trip to Disney World before deploying, are in a unit that will be doing a lot of office work in Afghanistan.

That's a far cry from Brian Hempstead's other four deployments.

"Mentally preparing is not as difficult as it was when I went to Iraq with the invasion and I was on top of a Humvee with a machine gun," he said.

Still, his one big piece of advice for his wife on her first deployment was to expect the unexpected and stay flexible, an important lesson as they wait in "limbo" on a decision on whether they'll get to live together while there.

"We're lucky enough to be deploying together," said Elizabeth Hempstead, who works in customer service at Country Financial.

Military family readiness

For the families left behind - who some say have the toughest job of all - a large network of family readiness volunteers and full-time staff try to make sure nobody is left in the dark when military insurance or pay issues arise, for example.

Since the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, the military has more publicly linked family readiness to military readiness; the general thinking that a family well-supported at home is less distracting for a deployed soldier than a family that's offered no assistance. That's led to the creation of new positions like Chapman's and outreach methods that soldiers say were not around just a few years ago.

Chapman's husband, Harold, 40, is in the Bloomington-based unit, and the deployment to Afghanistan is his first. But when he went to basic training, Annette Chapman says her family felt an isolation that left her asking her husband's recruiter questions when his insurance and pay got messed up - because she didn't know where else to go.

"Because we are citizen-soldier families in the community, we don't live on an active-duty Army base. Our neighbor's not going through the same thing we're going through. So we do feel isolated because we are, in a sense."

Tammy Heap was a family readiness group leader for the Streator-based 1744th Transportation Company during its deployment to Iraq in 2006-07.

She said the most valuable part of the program was the emotional support spouses and parents were able to provide one another through monthly meetings and phone calls. Even more so when soldiers would come home for brief leaves and family members noticed their soldiers acting strangely similar.

"They had distanced themselves because they knew they had to go back," Heap said.

She said back then the military too often relied on soldiers to relay information about family readiness events to their loved ones, meaning some families got left out. It's more common now for families to be contacted directly by volunteers or full-time staff before and during a deployment, family readiness officials said.

'We know the risk'

Spc. Michael Chasteen's family doesn't know what to expect when he leaves. They may seek out support from other families; they may not.

The 25-year-old from Bloomington moved back in with his parents, Steve and Kay Chasteen, and didn't bother starting fall classes at Heartland Community College while waiting to deploy as a military policeman with a Machesney Park unit.

His parents know post-traumatic stress disorder- or something worse - are risks. But they've also heard the stories of soldiers who treat it as a job, come home OK and move on with their lives.

"That's the career he's chosen to do. He knows the risk, we know the risk, and everybody hopes nothing happens," said Steve Chasteen, whose family knows about worrying after his 27 years with the Bloomington Fire Department.

For now, Michael Chasteen says he's trying to appreciate day-to-day life more, riding his bike around town, jogging more, spending more time with friends.

"I'm not necessarily excited about going to war, but I'm definitely proud that I am," he said.

-----------------------------------------------------------

About the deployment

What: More than 2,700 soldiers across about 30 units from the Illinois National Guard's 33rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team (IBCT) are deploying to Afghanistan this summer and fall.

Why: The Illinois-led Task Force Phoenix VIII will train and mentor Afghan army and national police. They are relieving a New York combat brigade currently performing the mission as Task Force Phoenix VII.

When: The Pontiac unit's deployment ceremony was Saturday. Bloomington and the others are expected to deploy by late fall. Deployments will be for one year. Some Guard units who had deployed previously were on longer deployments, such as the Streator-based 1744th Transportation Company.

Who: Among them are 70 soldiers from the Bloomington-based Company B, Military Intelligence , 33rd Brigade Special Troops Battalion, based in the armory at 1616 S. Main St.; and 80 members of the Pontiac-based Troop A, 2-106th Cavalry. Central Illinois soldiers can serve in units based outside the area, and residents from across the state can serve in Central Illinois-based units.

The risk: In July, more U.S. troops died in Afghanistan than in Iraq for the month, for the first time since the Iraq war began in 2003. In all, 92 U.S. troops have died in Afghanistan this year, a pace that would surpass last year's death toll of 111. The U.S. death toll in Afghanistan is at least 500.

Training: The IBCT has been training since November 2007. A massive three-week training exercise in Fort Chaffee, Ark., in June used role players who acted as Afghan civilians in “theater-immersion training scenarios,” partly to educate soldiers on the cultures they will encounter once they land in Afghanistan.

SOURCES: Illinois National Guard, Pantagraph archives, The Associated Press

On the Web

Task Force Phoenix -- For more on the 33rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team's mission, log on to:

www.taskforcephoenix.com

 

 

1st step toward Afghanistan

Pantagraph, The (Bloomington, IL) - Wednesday, June 25, 2008

Author/Byline: Greg Cima;and Ryan Denham;gcima@pantagraph.com;rdenham@pantagraph.com
Edition: Main
Section: News
Page: A1

By Greg Cima

and Ryan Denham

gcima@pantagraph.com

rdenham@pantagraph.com

BLOOMINGTON - About 220 Illinois National Guard soldiers departed Tuesday morning from Bloomington's airport for Fort Bragg, N.C.

The soldiers, who were leaving for training before a yearlong deployment to Afghanistan, boarded two AirTran 737 passenger jets at Central Illinois Regional Airport.

Illinois Guard spokesman Mike Chrisman said he could not give details about when units board or depart planes. But he said the soldiers were not with the Bloomington- or Pontiac-based Guard units that eventually also will deploy to Afghanistan as part of a mission to train the Afghan army and police.

Chrisman said Tuesday he could not release further information, citing security concerns.

The Guard recently said about 85 Effingham-based soldiers were expected to be deployed this week for operations in Afghanistan. That infantry unit had a deployment ceremony Monday at its base, and those soldiers were expected to be among 220 from four units - the other three are based in Sycamore, Crestwood and Chicago - that will provide security forces for police mentor teams in Afghanistan.

Those four units are the first team to mobilize as part of the Illinois Army National Guard 33rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, which will form the backbone of Task Force Phoenix VIII, a mission to train and mentor Afghan army and police units.

Among the 2,700 Illinois Guard soldiers who eventually will deploy as part of the task force are 70 soldiers from the Bloomington-based Company B, Military Intelligence , 33rd Brigade Special Troops Battalion, based at the armory at 1616 S. Main St., and 80 members of the Pontiac-based Troop A, 2-106th Cavalry. Those units should ship out sometime by early fall at the latest, Chrisman said previously.

The 33rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team has been training in Fort Chaffee, Ark., in anticipation of the deployment, the Guard said. That training was expected to conclude by the end of June.

The soldiers shipping out Tuesday were expected to spend about two months training at Fort Bragg before heading to Afghanistan, Guard officials said.

Guard units are often made up of soldiers from areas outside where they are based. For example, soldiers from Central Illinois could be a part of a Guard unit from the Chicago area.

David Proeber contributed to this report.

 

 

 

Guard units in area awaiting deployment

Pantagraph, The (Bloomington, IL) - Thursday, June 12, 2008

Author/Byline: Ryan Denham;rdenham@pantagraph.com
Edition: Main
Section: News
Page: A3

By Ryan Denham

rdenham@pantagraph.com

SPRINGFIELD - Soldiers from two Illinois National Guard units based in Bloomington and Pontiac are training in Fort Chaffee, Ark., this month, ahead of an upcoming deployment to Afghanistan, a Guard spokesman said Wednesday.

Thirty units from the Urbana-based 33rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team are being called up for a yearlong deployment that includes about two months in a mobilization camp before going overseas, said Mike Chrisman from the Guard's public affairs office in Springfield.

About 2,700 Illinois Guard soldiers are set to deploy with the brigade this summer for Task Force Phoenix that will train Afghanistan's army and police force.

Among them are 70 soldiers from the Bloomington-based Company B, Military Intelligence , 33rd Brigade Special Troops Battalion, based at the armory at 1616 S. Main St.; and 80 members of the Pontiac-based Troop A, 2-106th Cavalry.

The large, three-week training exercise at Fort Chaffee is one of the final steps before deployment. It concludes at the end of June, Chrisman said. No specific deployment date has been set for the Bloomington and Pontiac units, but the first two Illinois units - from Crestwood and Sycamore - ship out this week.

The Bloomington and Pontiac units - made up of the traditional "one weekend a month, two weeks a year" soldiers - should ship out sometime by early fall at the latest, Chrisman said.

The Illinois Army National Guard is made up of about 10,000 soldiers, he said, and about 700 are currently deployed. Though numbers may change slightly as other units come and go, it is likely more than 3,000 Illinois Guard members will be deployed in the coming year.

The units will join several others from Central Illinois that have deployed in recent years. Among those are a Delavan-based unit that arrived home in mid-April, and the Bloomington-based 33rd Military Police Battalion - also based at the armory but not deploying with Task Force Phoenix - that returned to the Twin Cities in September 2007.

 

 

 

B-N, Pontiac units to be deployed

Pantagraph, The (Bloomington, IL) - Wednesday, February 20, 2008

Author/Byline: Ryan Denham;rdenham@pantagraph.com
Edition: Main
Section: News
Page: A1

BLOOMINGTON - About 150 soldiers from two Bloomington and Pontiac units are among more than 2,700 who are set to deploy to Afghanistan this summer to help train that country's army and police force, the Guard announced Tuesday.

The call-up of about 30 units from the Urbana-based 33rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team is the largest for the Illinois Guard since World War II, the Guard said in a statement. The deployment will last up to 12 months.

Included are about 70 soldiers from the Bloomington-based Company B, Military Intelligence , 33rd Brigade Special Troops Battalion, based in the armory at 1616 S. Main St.

Also expected to ship out this summer will be more than 80 members of the Pontiac-based Troop A, 2-106th Cavalry, which focuses on reconnaissance, surveillance and target acquisition, Guard officials said Tuesday.

"Previously, Illinois Guard battalions and companies have been mobilized and attached to another brigade once they arrived," said Maj. Gen. William Enyart, adjutant general of the Illinois Guard. "By mobilizing the entire (brigade), our soldiers will not only train together as a cohesive team, they will deploy together as a family."

While the Guard could not say Tuesday night how many of those being called up have already been deployed once since Sept. 11, 2001, it's likely that this will be at least the second deployment for many, Guard spokeswoman Stacey Rieger said.

But the Army National Guard's policy for individual units is four years of "dwell time" for every year of deployment, Rieger said.

For individual soldiers, the target is at least 12 months between deployments, which can be waived, she said.

The units have been training to form the backbone of Task Force Phoenix VIII for about four months, the Guard said. The brigade's call-up was announced last fall, but it was unclear then which units would ship out.

On Tuesday, the Guard detailed the units shipping out, from as far south as Carbondale to Freeport in Northern Illinois. Also on the list is the Marseilles-based Company A, Engineers, 33rd Brigade Special Troops Battalion.

In the coming months, the Guard will focus on 130 specific training tasks to reduce the amount of time of the overseas part of the deployment, the Guard said. These tasks include combat lifesaver training, weapons qualifications and driver's training, Rieger said.

Before mobilization, a final training exercise is scheduled in June at Fort Chaffee, Ark.

The Guard's statement came less than five months after about 70 members of the Bloomington-based 33rd Military Police Battalion returned home from a tour in Iraq. The battalion, which is not being deployed with the brigade, is the other unit based at the armory.

Questions on readiness

The recent deployments of Guard units to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have raised questions about military readiness in the face of natural disasters or domestic emergencies.

Officials stressed that even with the sizable deployment, the Guard still has "sufficient" capabilities to respond to emergencies or homeland security threats. More specifics were not available on Tuesday.

But the impact will be felt nonetheless, particularly with the loss of personnel in Central Illinois, Rieger said.

"We can't say it won't have any impact," she said.

On the Web

www.taskforcephoenix.com<Iz8f"Interstate-BoldCondensed">

 

 

 

 

 

Redbird ROTC

 

 

 

Nonte –

 

Dir – intel – Iraq operations – 2005/6

 

 

 

 

Bloomington MI

 

Guard saluted after time in Afghanstan

Pantagraph, The (Bloomington, IL) - Sunday, January 10, 2010

Author/Byline: Phyllis Coulter;pcoulter@pantagraph.com
Edition: Main
Section: News
Page: B1

BLOOMINGTON - Families felt "pride and relief" as 18 Illinois Army National Guard soldiers were honored Saturday at the Lafayette Club in south Bloomington.

"It's good we're back together again," said Annette Chapman, Atlanta, who attended with son Hayden, 14, and daughter Courtney, 16.

The Chapmans and about 50 others gave a standing ovation to the soldiers, who included their husband and father, Spec. Harold Chapman. He returned in October from a year-long deployment in Afghanistan with Company B, 33rd Brigade Special Troops Battalion.

Dignitaries thanked the soldiers and the families who supported them during Operation Enduring Freedom in the past year.

The soldiers are among about 650 statewide honored this weekend - including about 70 honored in Pontiac today - at events organized by the National Guard Bureau Freedom Salute Campaign.

The 33rd Brigade Special Troops Battalion lost 18 soldiers. More than 90 others were wounded.

"The Freedom Salute is one of the largest recognitions in Army history," said Lt. Jim Chism. The salute included a prayer for transition of the warriors to citizen soldiers.

Trevor Grant, Bloomington, was majoring in economics at Illinois State University when he left to serve as a medic in Kabul and southern Afghanistan.

"This (ceremony) is really nice," he said. "We say we don't need this. But we do appreciate it."

Sherral Wood, Bloomington, who leads a family readiness group, watched the ceremony with tears in her eyes.

"It's a year of answered prayers to have all my guys home," said Wood, whose group helped solve problems for the soldiers' families and arranged special events. For her efforts, she received the Center of Influence Award.

Each soldier was presented an encased American flag; a sequentially numbered commemorative coin; certificate of appreciation; and lapel pin. Families also were recognized for their support and sacrifice.

"You did great things where you were," said Col. Michael Haerr. He called the soldiers, "the cream of the crop."

Haerr said the readiness group and families had a "unique challenge" because these soldiers served in many roles in many places. Many solders were split from their company when they arrived in Afghanistan so they could support 226 bases.

First Sgt. James Iverson, who returned from his third deployment this fall, said the mission was "really complex." Some soldiers worked in military intelligence ; others as medics, combat medics and infantrymen - all "to win the hearts and the minds of the Afghan people and to train them to take over their own country."

"We accomplished a lot," he said.

State Rep. Dan Brady, a Bloomington Republican, was among elected officials at the ceremony. "We owe you a debt of gratitude that will never be forgotten," he said.

"The sacrifice you put forth, what you endured, what your families endured, can never be repaid ... ."

U.S. Rep. Debbie Halvorson, a Crete Democrat, called family members "heroes." Bloomington Mayor Steve Stockton thanked the soldiers on behalf of the community.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nonte at ISU is rotc cmdr and Iraq dir of intel for 2005/6

 

 

 

Names & Faces

Pantagraph, The (Bloomington, IL) - Wednesday, March 4, 2009



U.S. Army Col. Yvette D. Nonte, who serves in the Joint Staff Military Intelligence section in the Pentagon and has served two tours of duty in South Korea and one tour as the

director of intelligence for the multinational force in Iraq from 2005-2006,

received her bachelor's degree from Illinois State, where

 

she was the first battalion commander of the Redbird ROTC detachment

 

and president of the Tau Beta Sigma sorority.

 

 

 

 

A troubling goodbye Families turn out to honor troops on deployment to Afghanistan

Pantagraph, The (Bloomington, IL) - Sunday, September 7, 2008

Author/Byline: M.K. Guetersloh;mkguetersloh@pantagraph.com
Edition: Main
Section: News
Page: B1

NORMAL - For the next 400 days, Lindsey Quam will face the day-to-day struggles of raising her two children alone.

Her husband, Lt. Michael Quam, is one of about 20 soldiers from the Bloomington-based Illinois National Guard unit that will be sent to Afghanistan as part of the 33rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team.

A deployment ceremony for the soldiers was Saturday afternoon at Heartland Community College.

For Lindsey Quam, the ceremony brought out her hesitation for her husband to leave. But it's not the birthdays or the holidays where she will miss her husband the most, she added.

"It's going to be the little things that we do every day that make us a family of four," Lindsey Quam said. The couple from Dubuque, Iowa, have two sons, Aiden, 2, and Keegan, 6 months.

"Bath time with the kids will be a struggle without him," she said. "Holidays we'll be with family so I'm not worried about that."

For Pat Grant of Charleston, watching the ceremony for his son, Trevor Grant of Bloomington, was more emotional that he thought.

"I'm proud of him but it is a little overwhelming," he said.

Missing the little things

Grant said he, too, will miss the little things while his son is away.

"I won't have the ability to see him whenever I want or have dinner whenever," Grant said. "I'll miss having the opportunity to talk with him about the things fathers and sons talk about when they're together."

The soldiers from the Bloomington unit will join about 2,700 other Illinois Guard members being sent to Afghanistan in the fall. The troops are expected at Fort Bragg, N.C., for training.

Maj. Brad Leighton, a spokesman for the Guard, said during the more than yearlong mission, the Bloomington soldiers will provide military intelligence for force protection for the units within the 33rd Brigade.

"What they will do in theater is save lives," Leighton said.

Maj. Gen. Dennis Celletti and Col. Michael Haerr addressed the soldiers and their families about what is ahead for them.

‘Great patriots'

Celletti called the family members "great patriots" and encouraged family members to work as a group to support each other while their soldiers are away.

Bloomington Mayor Steve Stockton called the deployment ceremony a double-edged sword.

"It is heartening to see volunteers who are willing to go off to another country for our protection," Stockton said. "But on the other hand, it is hard to see you leave your families."

In addition to the Bloomington soldiers, about 350 soldiers from the 634th Brigade Support Battalion were honored at a ceremony Saturday at the Sullivan High School.

 

 

 

USAREC

 

 

Dod personnel

Induced to harass

 

Talked to recruiters in different places, thought I could avoid harassment by joining dod. Realized later that dod emps, prospectives, compelled to harass, stalk, chemical exposure.

 

USAREC big picture

 

 

Recruiters compel deps – recruits to carry out ops – harass me – RC – computer deli – garage door openers – modified exhaust – in public/in person – and see misinformation/disinformation – pedophile frame – mental illness frame – homicidal/suicidal – typically computer based – false attribution

 

Induced by jobs outside dod – contractors – BW – CACI – SAIC – et al.

 

Extortion for clearance – job preference – MI placement

 

See also locations – and esp GALV – deps – meps HOU – delay – and note galv/KBH – and see cheney and KBR – galv – tamug – gates – poison “crawdads” – galv island – note presence of Halliburton/kbr in galv/tamug – xa stimulant at meps – deps used as recruits in both hou/galv and spi

 

Sd harassment related to contractors – Bilbray C/S dannone – saic – caci – and see sd clc ufcw dean – locals – Pennell – saathoff at IAFF – saathoff/buraski

Spk dod links from Fairchild – usaf mcdevitt as usatty

Prob some prison workers like in Illinois – note prison workers in spk and abu ghraib work for caci – see esp KC in spk – note esp usccb timeline skylstadt – Gregory – brenardin – paprocki – and see cepeda as GU security – paramilitary – and BW backup in CDA – compare BW in spk – sd – Illinois – iletsb/jurkanin

 

 

 

TX wal mart link – ripper

Note moushon – sternstein –

Sternstein – fickes – usmc –

walmart – butch elzea – moushon – crosslink – terry nelson – dea frame – Hutchinson – grady - paragon

 

 

 

 

 

Went to spi recruiters – guy named wolf ran office out of Wabash location – don’t remember first name

 

Don’t think he’s related to ISP wolf – dist 9 cmdr

 

Usarec – army - wolf

 

Chris C Wolf

View Details

38

Milwaukee, WI
Saint Francis, WI
South Elgin, IL
Cudahy, WI

Maria C Wolf
Jack R Wolf

 

Have to consider public information is possibly altered to conceal family links and ID – dod practice for espionage related intel positions

 

 

 

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, September 11, 1991




Gloria Scott Gloria "June" Scott, 67, of Springfield died at 11:34 p.m. Monday at Memorial Medical Center.

She was born April 10, 1924, in Chatham, the daughter of Paul C. and Maude Lemmons Wolf Sr. She married Howard O. Scott in 1942.

Mrs. Scott was employed by the state Department of Public Health and Safety for 13 years until 1968.

She later worked for the Sangamon County treasurer's office

before retiring in 1980. Surviving are her husband, Howard; two daughters, Mrs. Thomas R. (Catherine) Howell of Decatur and Mrs. Richard

 

(Susan) Boone

of Springfield;

 

one son, Robert H. of Springfield; five grandchildren; two brothers,

Paul Wolf of Martinez, Calif., and

 

Jack Wolf

of Springfield;

 

one sister, Mrs. Donald (Mary Jo) Walker of Springfield; several nieces, nephews and cousins.

 

IHPA - AFSCME

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 7, 1994

Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 16

John Wolf John "Jack" Wolf, 58, of Springfield died Saturday at Memorial Medical
Center.

He was born March 22, 1936, in Springfield, the son of Paul C. and Maude E. Lemons Wolf.

Mr. Wolf was a resident of Springfield all of his life.

He was building and grounds lead I, state Historic Preservation Agency for 20 years.

He was a member of AFSCME Council 31 and local 805.

Survivors: sister, Mrs. Donald (Mary Jo) Walker of Springfield; brother, Paul S. Wolf of Martinez, Calif.; one aunt; one uncle; and several, nieces, nephews, cousins, great-nieces and great-nephews

 

 

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, May 12, 2002

Bryson W. Boyer

LINCOLN - Bryson Wayne Boyer, infant son of Joshua Boyer and Amanda Miner of Lincoln, died Friday, May 10, 2002, at Abraham Lincoln Memorial Hospital in Lincoln.

He was born Jan. 18, 2002, in Lincoln.

In addition to his parents, surviving are grandparents, Jerry Boyer of Middletown, Denice Miner, Eugene Miner, Vickie and James Schleder, all of Lincoln; great-grandparents, George Malone of Lincoln, Jack Wolf Sr. of Peoria, Winifred and Roy Meserole of Clinton; and great-great-grandparents, Ruth Flynn of Meredosia, Lilly Wilcox of Pittsfield and Harold and Eleanor Miner of Waverly.

 

 

 

 

 

Deaths

Press-Register (Mobile, AL) - Friday, October 26, 2007

 

. SUMMERDALE Jack R. Wolf Jack R. Wolf , 76, died Thursday, Oct. 25, 2007. The Summerdale resident was a retired United States Air Force veteran of more than 20 years, including service in Korea and Vietnam.

Wolf was a life member of the American Legion Post 99 in Foley, a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 5658 in Elberta, a member of the Knights of Columbus No. 666 in Mobile and an honorary member of the Knights of Columbus fourth degree in Mobile.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mcd’s link to spfld USAREC – msgt chris wolf – army –

Mcgraw – Albanese –

 

 

 

Chris C Wolf

2835 Cronin Dr

Springfield, IL 62711-7082

Household:

Kathy E Wolf,

 

 

2835 Cronin Dr = cobblestone – contri -

 

 

Name

Location

Age

Relatives

People Report

Christopher L Wolf

Bloomington, IL

21

Edward, Lauren, Richard, Roger, Roger

View Details

Christopher M Wolf

Scott Air Force Base, IL

34

Elizabeth, Jean, Jennifer, Melissa, Mellissa

View Details

Christopher Aaron Wolf

Smithton, IL

39

Tracy

View Details

Christopher J Wolf

Salem, IL

N/A

Frank, Robert, Tamara

View Details

 

Christopher L Wolf

Bloomington, IL

21

Edward, Lauren, Richard, Roger, Roger

View Details

Learn More Here

Sponsored by PeopleSmart.com


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TITLE: BUSINESS BRIEFS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 6, 1989

 

EMPLOYEES OF THE MONTH have been named at several Springfield businesses and institutions.

JOHN GRANNIS,

CHRIS WOLF ,

ANNETTE BOZARTH,

ANDREA WILLIAMS,

CHRIS FELD,

KERI MATSON,

LINDA JOHNSON,

SHANNON MCKINNEY at the eight Springfield McDonald's restaurants.

 

 

 

Trade talks / Inspired by the popular cable television show "Trading Spaces," two couples turn over their house keys and decorating decisions to each other

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, August 16, 2002

Author/Byline: Leah Friedman
Section: MAGAZINE
Page: 6A

At 7:45 a.m., it's already hot and humid when the neighbors gather. Both couples - Rebecca and Adelmo Marchiori and Rose and Jeff Stauter - are eager to trade house keys and get started on the 36-hour challenge that lies ahead. The neighbors will swap houses and, along with two local interior decorators and two carpenters, redecorate a room on a $500 budget.

The premise of the State Journal-Register-sponsored event is based on the hit show "Trading Spaces" on The Learning Channel.

Rose and Jeff, dressed in red, will work on Rebecca and Adelmo's kitchen with designer Cindi Jones of Savvy Shoestring Interiors, along with carpenters from Buraski Builders.

Rebecca and Adelmo, in blue, will work on Rose and Jeff's living room with designer Douglas Cullers of True Cullers 21 Interiors, along with carpenters from Michael von Behren Builder.

The neighbors won a contest with an essay explaining how they met and why they should be chosen for the local version of "Trading Spaces."

In 1992, Rebecca and Adelmo bought a house on South Walnut Street. Three years later, a house a few doors down was for sale, and they encouraged their friends Rose and Jeff to buy it, which they did.

Ever since, their families have been best friends.

"There is nothing hidden between us," Rebecca says. "We've gone on vacation together, so there aren't a lot of secrets."

Though they've seen the TV series and know that all endings are not happy, neither couple is worried about what could be done to their house. But Rebecca and Adelmo don't want their hardwood floors painted, and Rose and Jeff say they don't want any walls taken down -- their friend has already made a threat.

At 8:15 a.m., the neighbors trade keys and take off to meet with their design teams, who had about two weeks to prepare ideas for the rooms. The designers have created their plans, shopped and completed a lot of preparation. It's time to put the neighbors to work.

The red team heads into Rebecca and Adelmo's house, where designer Cindi Jones is waiting to reveal her plans for their kitchen.

Cindi tells them they are going to create a "rustic Tuscany" theme, inspired by both the couple's Italian heritage and an exposed brick chimney that cuts through the kitchen.

Her three-page to-do list in hand, Cindi tells the red team what she wants to accomplish today: prime a custom-built hutch, paint the walls, clean and prime the cabinets, and paint the floor.

Rose and Jeff are sent outside to de-gloss and prime the cabinet doors, while

 

Buraski Builder

 

carpenter Chris Wolf

 

works inside under the sink, fixing a cabinet that was being held up by a brick.

Meanwhile, down the street at Rose and Jeff's house, Douglas the designer gets the blue team started on their first project of the day: painting the walls butter cream yellow.

Rebecca sets up the ladder and starts rolling the walls. Adelmo gets to work on painting around the window trim.

As they paint, Rebecca and Adelmo express a little disappointment that Douglas has chosen not to get rid of the stucco wall above the fireplace.

"Rose has to clean it, that's why she doesn't like it," Rebecca says.

"Well, Jeff can clean it - we'll leave him a note," Adelmo says.

In the adjacent foyer, Jim Burnette, a carpenter from Michael von Behren Builder, patches the water-damaged ceiling, while in Rose and Jeff's front yard, von Behren carpenter Mike Grizzle cuts wood for two coffee tables and a custom entertainment center Douglas designed.

While everyone works, Douglas sits on the couch, overseeing the progress.

"I'm going to be directing this morning," he says. "I painted for three weeks straight, and I'm done."

Cindi's friend, Matt Sherrow, 32, has arrived to help and begins priming the 7-foot custom-built hutch, which is in two pieces in the living room.

Frank Buraski and his son Jason spent 12 hours building it the previous weekend.

"This is awesome," Cindi says, jumping up and down and clapping as she looks at the fixture.

In the kitchen, Chris the carpenter stands on a ladder using a nail gun to mount molding to the top of the cabinets. Even with one thin strip of the molding up, the kitchen already looks different.

10:46 a.m. Cindi's husband, Gene, who is a hobby carpenter, begins working on the exposed brick chimney, cutting away pieces of concrete and chicken wire.

11 a.m. There is one coat of paint on the living room walls. Adelmo is painting the floor trim, while Rebecca paints the first of two coffee tables bee balm red. When she puts the first coat on, though, Douglas says he does not like the way the color is drying - it's too "watermelony."

Douglas says tomorrow they will create some original artwork, but other than that, Rebecca and Adelmo don't know what else he has planned.

"Doug is keeping everything secret," Rebecca says. "Oh well, if they love it, we'll say it's all our ideas, and if they hate it, it's all Doug's fault -- I've got it all worked out in my head."

11:37 a.m. Rebecca and Adelmo are left to work on the room alone as their designer, Douglas, sits in the dining room, talking on his cell phone.

1:39 p.m. Carpenters Mike and Jim bring in the entertainment center in three pieces and nail it together in the living room. Once it's in place, Douglas paints a few brush strokes on it with a shade of mint green.

Adelmo is still painting the floor trim, whistling along with the radio, while Rebecca paints the coffee tables another shade of red.

3 p.m. Von Behren carpenters Mike and Jim pack up and leave.

While the tables dry, Rebecca starts painting three sitting chairs that Douglas found at a store off North Grand for $5 each.

"Don't ask what I was doing on North Grand Avenue," Douglas says.

3:26 p.m. Douglas leaves to get white paint for the foyer ceiling, more roller brushes and a different color for the entertainment center. The first shade of green had too much blue in it, he says.

2:10 p.m. Rebecca and Adelmo's kitchen is almost totally painted golden straw yellow. Rose is painting the door trim, and Jason Buraski is painting the walls up the stairs, while his sister, Heather, paints cabinets. Cindi's friend Matt and her husband, Gene, are in the living room painting the hutch wine red.

Outside, Chris has cut out the center of two cabinet doors and inserts frosted glass, which Cindi found at a local glass store that offered the scrap pieces to her free.

Matt has to leave, but Cindi's friend, Mary Ann Dobucki, arrives to take his place.

4 p.m. Chris is on the ladder, installing the first of five corbels on the soffit above the cabinets. A corbel is a small column-like structure that gives height to the room.

"I love architecture," Cindi says as she oversees Chris' efforts. "Design is all about architecture to me."

The corbels are unevenly spaced on purpose, Cindi says.

"You need some negative space," she says. "The eye needs to rest. What isn't there is as important as what is."

Once the corbels are up, both Jeff and Rose are in awe.

"I thought we would just put paint on the walls," Rose says, looking around the room.

4:38 p.m. Cindi says, "We are right where I thought we'd be."

All that's left for today is painting the counter and the floor.

5 p.m. Just like on the TV show, Douglas is assigning "homework" for the night: Paint the shelves on the entertainment center the new shade of green and touch up the chairs. He has dinner plans, so he will not be around much longer, he says.

6:53 p.m. Douglas leaves. By 6:54 p.m., the mutiny begins.

Even though Douglas did not want to paint the foyer, Rebecca takes a can of the butter cream and starts rolling the walls. Rebecca and Adelmo also wanted to give Rose and Jeff radiator covers, but Douglas said no to this as well. With Douglas gone, though, they decide to paint the radiators to make them blend with the walls. But can you paint radiators with latex paint? A quick call to Lowe's paint center gives them the answer they want: yes.

6:20 p.m. Gene measures the floor to start laying out a diamond design with tape. Rose and Jeff will paint it for their homework.

8:03 p.m. The floor is taped, and Cindi instructs Rose and Jeff to use two coats of paint, then holds a floral-arranging lesson in the dining room as she makes two arrangements for the hutch.

"When doing florals, remember God does not grow things in straight lines," she says.

8:30 p.m. Douglas comes back after dinner to check on Rebecca and Adelmo's progress. About 10 minutes later, he heads home for the night.

9 p.m. Rebecca finishes painting the entertainment center.

"I think today went well," Rebecca says. "We got a lot accomplished. I'm pleased, and I love the colors. I think I would be discouraged if we had a ton left to do, but I think tomorrow will be cake to do."

"I'm pretty pleased," Adelmo says. "We've been painting since 8:30 this morning, and we are still painting. The colors fit with the Stauters' style."

"It would have been nice, though, if Doug had hung out with us more," Adelmo says.

10:10 p.m. The countertop has been painted black, and the floor design is one-third of the way done. Despite the fact that Cindi gave them these tasks as homework, she and Gene are still there, helping Jeff and Rose.

10:32 p.m. "I think we should call Rebecca and tell her that we painted her counter top black," Jeff says.

Cindi pulls up the tape around the black diamonds.

"Every room should have black in it," Cindi says, looking at the floor. "It anchors it. It gives it a little drama."

Jeff stands back and looks at the room, stunned.

"What's funny is that Rose and I wouldn't have thought to work with a designer," Jeff says. "Next room we do we'll probably use a designer. Even as creative as you are, you never think to paint a countertop black or put up corbels."

11:06 p.m. Back at Rose and Jeff's house, Rebecca and Adelmo are painting the inside of Rose and Jeff's front door -- another extra project they decided to do without Douglas the designer.

They still want to do more to the room - more than Douglas has planned - so Adelmo and Rebecca attempt to find Mike and Cheri von Behren's home phone number to see if Mike would make radiator covers and help them decorate the room a little more. But to their dismay the von Behrens are not listed in the phone book.

Discouraged, the two get back to work.

11:39 p.m. Rose and Jeff have completed the kitchen floor, but they still need to apply a coat of polyurethane.

Cindi and her husband are still there. She takes a step back, looks around the room and says, "This is what I saw."

Jeff is tired and decides to take a smoke break. He says he has not smoked in years but needs the energy.

While Jeff steps outside, Cindi takes Rose upstairs to show her what she purchased to decorate the hutch. Cindi also shows her the light fixture she found for the kitchen.

"The light fixture I wanted was $70, so I scoured St. Louis and found an oversized lantern that Gene electrified," she says.

12:15 a.m. Cindi and Gene head home.

After they put a coat of polyurethane on the painted diamonds, Jeff and Rose go to bed at 2:30 a.m.

Day 2

8:07 a.m. Cindi and Gene begin the second day at Rebecca and Adelmo's house.

A couple of minutes later, builder Frank Buraski arrives.

8:35 a.m. Chris the carpenter arrives with the window valance, and Cindi starts to glaze the walls "to give it depth and texture." The glaze color is just one shade off the golden straw yellow. She brushes it on in an X shape and then wipes it off with a rag. She practices on the wall where the hutch will go in case she messes up.

Then Cindi teaches Rose how to paint on the glaze.

"We're coasting," Cindi says, noting that they should be done before the deadline of 8 that night.

Rebecca and Adelmo are tired. They did not go to bed until 12:45 a.m. because they wanted to finish painting the front door and the foyer trim.

They also added a third shade of paint to the tables and touched up the chairs.

8:45 a.m. Douglas has still not arrived, and Rebecca and Adelmo wonder aloud what they are doing to do today.

"I hope he buzzes in and says, 'You need to do this and this,' but we have no idea what we're going to do," Adelmo says. "We know we need to do the chairs, but he did not seem concerned that we did not have a sewing machine. He said today is arts and crafts day."

"Painting-wise, we have to paint (the foyer) ceiling, touch up the radiators and touch up the tables," Rebecca says.

9:21 a.m. Douglas arrives.

So, what's going to happen today, Douglas?

"Magic," he says.

Douglas approves the third color on the coffee tables and starts cutting material for the slipcovers, which will go on the back of the sitting chairs.

"Could we make the budget larger?" Douglas asks. "Could we add just one more zero?"

9:30 a.m. Rebecca puts a second coat of the approved paint color on the tables.

Douglas then measures the windows and writes the measurements on a napkin.

9:42 a.m. Douglas asks if Rebecca can find him a sewing machine. Rebecca calls her friend Jane to bring a sewing machine, and asks, "Can you help us sew?"

10 a.m. Douglas leaves to get more supplies.

Tensions are running high.

"I'm scared they're doing so much more over there, and I hate that feeling," Rebecca says. "He didn't have enough fabric. He had three weeks to prepare. It wasn't like you came to him two days ago."

"Did he pick out nice stuff? Yes. Did he do all he could do? No." Rebecca says. "I feel like I have to apologize to Jeff and Rose because they are probably doing so much more. He didn't want to do foyer or radiators.

"It's been a good thing, but I had expected more," she says. "He acts like this is the last place he wants to be, and it makes you feel bad."

"We've had fun, and we'd do it again, but we do wonder where he's headed sometimes," Adelmo says. "Here he's still going out and buying stuff. He's done a good job with the colors. The Stauters will like it. We just question whether they did more creative stuff that Cindi probably has prepared for a month, and he's just in and out, in and out. Maybe that's just the way he works."

11:41 a.m. Things look up when builder Mike von Behren arrives. Douglas is still out, so Rebecca and Adelmo ask Mike about building radiator covers and putting new trim around the fireplace and the foyer.

11:47 a.m. Mike brings in a measuring tape and gets to work on their requests.

9:57 a.m. The hutch is moved into Rebecca and Adelmo's kitchen and put together on the wall.

Rose is three-fourths of the way done glazing the walls.

"Every day it gets more unbelievable," Jeff says, looking at the hutch.

10:31 a.m. An ornate medallion is glued to the ceiling, and the light fixture is hung.

11:07 a.m. Gene starts packing up his boxes of supplies.

11:51 a.m. Cindi's friend Matt has returned for the second day, and he and Rose sew the window treatment in the dining room.

1:25 p.m. The cabinet doors are back up, and the walls are done. Things are in the final stages.

2:42 p.m. Everyone pitches in to paste red diamond-shaped pieces of wallpaper on the white backsplash tile to give it a patterned look. And Cindi's friend Helen Stannard, a local artist, stands on a ladder while she paints a fresco with vegetables above the doorway. Only two cabinets are left to glaze, and the refrigerator is back in place.

3:11 p.m. The only thing left to do is paint a faux granite finish on the counter top.

4:24 p.m. Once the artwork is done, the floral arrangements and plates are put on the hutch. Gene nails up a calendar and a bulletin board on the basement door, and the brick that used to hold up the sink acts as a decorative piece in the corner near the chimney flue.

4:40 p.m. Everyone signs the inside door to the hutch. And at 5:09, the red team goes to dinner together.

12:30 p.m. Douglas walks in after running errands. Rebecca is sitting at the dining room table eating lunch. The tension has grown too great, and it breaks when Rebecca confronts Douglas.

"Why did you agree to do this?" Rebecca asks.

Then she expresses resentment that he has not been helping with the work, and she wants to know if he treats clients this way.

Douglas responds by saying he does not think she appreciates all the time he's put into this project, and how accommodating he's been to all of their suggestions.

Rebecca then explains that she instinctually knows they are doing great things in her kitchen, and she wants to live up to that.

Douglas does not really respond, so Rebecca gets up and leaves the room. She sits on the basement steps and cries.

1 p.m. A truce is made, and work resumes. Thirty minutes later, Cheri von Behren arrives and, sensing the tension, she begins to help.

2 p.m. The door opens and Mike walks in with radiator covers that he put together in his shop. Made from scrap, they're not included in the total cost.

Douglas paints wooden mats for two Impressionist posters he purchased a few hours before for $15 each.

Mike the carpenter puts up two new wall sconces from Lowe's that cost $34.98 each, and Rebecca sews the slipcovers. Adelmo paints a border in the foyer.

As Mike von Behren sits in front of the fireplace, he wishes aloud that he could have redone the tile in front of it.

Instead, he and Cheri get on their hands and knees and scrub the tile.

5:15 p.m. The couch, tables, a new $59 area rug and chairs are in place.

Cheri purchased flowers to spruce up the room. She arranges them in two large vases with greenery from Rose and Jeff's back yard and puts them on the new radiator covers.

Rebecca stands in the living room admiring a photo of her and Adelmo that she had a friend enlarge. She places it in the hole on top of the entertainment center as a joke for Rose and Jeff.

5:45 p.m. Everyone rushes to clean up.

Before the "reveal," as it's called on the TV show, both designers sit down to give their final thoughts.

"It's perfect," Cindi says about Rebecca and Adelmo's kitchen. "It's exactly what I wanted. It's what I saw."

She says she was a little stressed in the beginning when they did not get started on time, but her husband, friends and the Buraskis pitched in, which kept them right on schedule.

What does she like best?

"That's hard to say," she says. "Probably the floor, but the hutch is awesome, and the fresco is incredible."

Cindi came in 14 cents under budget.

"Basically, everything is paint," she says. "Anyone can paint, and paint is cheap. And shop at discount stores. I only paid full price on two things -- the plate and the planter."

Douglas was going for the clean and simple look in Jeff and Rose's living room, he says.

"When you have a smaller space, you need to think clean and simple," he says. "I think it's a great start for the room for them. I would have liked to have done more, but when you have a budget, that's that. You do what you can."

Douglas went over budget by $27.22.

The "reveal"

At 6:15 p.m., Rebecca and Adelmo lead Rose and Jeff, who have their eyes closed, into their living room.

"Wow," Jeff says when he opens his eyes.

"Oh, my God," Rose says.

They love that the foyer ceiling was finally fixed, and Jeff calls the radiator covers "incredible."

"I'm just dumbfounded," Jeff says.

Both Jeff and Rose stand in awed silence as they look around the room. They are pleased.

Fifteen minutes later, Rose and Jeff lead Rebecca and Adelmo into their kitchen.

"Oh, my goodness! I love the floor," Rebecca squeals. "Holy cow. This isn't even like the same the same house."

"Whose feet do I kiss first?" she asks.

"Look at all the space," Adelmo yells, looking at the hutch.

"Thank you," Rebecca says to Cindi who is watching from the family room.

Then she kisses her.

"This is so 'Trading Spaces,' " Rebecca says.

"This beats 'Trading Spaces' ...," Jeff says. "If they have $1,000, they can do two rooms in my house."

Caption: 1. Left, the first day gets started with direction from designers. Cindi Jones explains to Jeff and Rose what they will be doing to the Marchioris' kitchen while Douglas Cullers gets Rebecca and Adelmo started on painting Rose and Jeff's living room. Above, Jones and her husband, Gene, along with Frank Buraski help tear into the kitchen. Rebecca applies the first of three coats of paint to Rose and Jeff's new furniture while Douglas makes calls. / 2. Above, Adelmo stretches his sore back late Saturday night while Rebecca paints two tables, for the third time. "I'm pretty pleased," Adelmo said. "The colors fit with the Stauters' style." Left, Rebecca vacuums just before showing the room. / 3. Jeff and Rose apply a black checkerboard pattern in Rebecca and Adelmo's kitchen. The final coat of polyurethane is completed well after midnight Saturday. Right, the red team signs the inside of the hutch door. The kitchen is finished with more than an hour to spare. / 4. Jeff and Rose get their first look at the finished living room. They love that the foyer ceiling was finally fixed, and Jeff calls the radiator covers "incredible." "I'm just dumbfounded," Jeff says. / 5. Adelmo and Rebecca are ecstatic about their new kitchen. "This isn't even like the same house. Whose feet do I kiss first?"

 

 

 

Beccue trucking – madonia –

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 15, 1999



Webber-Melcher Desiree Neally Melcher of Cantrall and Alexander Douglas Webber of Springfield were married at 4 p.m. June 5 at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, Sherman, by the Rev. James Stuenkel.

The bride is the daughter of Peggy and Curt Melcher of Cantrall. The groom is the son of Brian Webber of Rochester and Theresa Webber of Chatham.

Serving as maid of honor was Tiffany Melcher. Bridesmaids were Laura Moroney, Audrey Webber and Nikki Berardi. Flower girls were Stephanie and Lauren Webber.

Serving as best man was Jason Hensley. Groomsmen were Joe Reeves and Kirk Steckenrider. Groomsmaid was Kathy Wolf . Ushers were Eugene Neal, Rod Beccue and Brian Hayes.

A reception was held at the Artisans Building at the state fairgrounds.

The bride and groom are graduates of Athens High School. She is a graduate of Illinois State University and is a math teacher at Duval County School District in Jacksonville, Fla. He is a reactor operator in the U.S. Navy stationed in Kings Bay, Ga.

They will live in Jacksonville, Fla.

 

 

 

Dahlkamp recruits kids – SHS – gray – also see cravens – off books “guards” – IDFPR violation

 

Greco link

 

Bomke wife at sased

 

 

Dahlkamp-Gunkel  (dahlkamp=spd)

 

 

 

Cory Elaine Gunkel of Sherman and David Edward Dahlkamp of Springfield were married at 5 p.m. June 10 at Westside Christian Church by the Rev. Charles L. Lee.

 

The bride is the daughter of Neal and Bette Gunkel of Sherman. The groom is the son of Bill and Barb Dahlkamp of Springfield.

 

Serving as maid of honor was Jamie Benner. Bridesmaids were Amanda Nases, Gail Ridek and Amy Dahlkamp.

 

Best man was Brian Hayes.

 

Groomsmen were Bill and Steve Dahlkamp and

 

Adam Gunkel. Ushers were Mike Clump,

Mike Greco

 

and Brent Uhlig.

 

A reception was held at the Artisans Building at the Illinois State Fairgrounds.

 

The bride is a graduate of Illinois State University. She is employed with SASED.

 

The groom is attending the University of Illinois. He is employed as a nurse at Memorial Medical Center.

 

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

Six comprise police evidence destruction team

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, May 27, 2008

Section: LOCAL

Page: 3

Springfield's evidence-destruction team includes a lieutenant, a sergeant, a police officer, two evidence technicians and a civilian.

 

Currently, the team is:

Lt. Jim Henry ;

Sgt. Todd Taylor; evidence technicians

Bobby Dorsey and

Brian Hayes,

both of whom are sworn police officers; Officer

Dan Szabados; and civilian employee

Michelle Lauterbach.

 

Evidence technicians work in the section three years at a time. The others serve a year at a time as members of the destruction team. The lieutenant is appointed by the police chief; the sergeant and the officer are appointed by the Police Benevolent & Protective Agency, the officers' union.

 

The evidence technicians and Lauterbach do most of the heavy lifting and paperwork involved with destruction. The other officers have an important mainly serve as a check-and-balance that everything has been properly documented, that what needs to be destroyed is, and that nothing is included that should not be destroyed.

 

Dorsey, who worked on last week's burn, is in his second year in the evidence section.

 

"It's very interesting. You see the evidence as an officer. You bring it here and you leave it, but you never know what happens to it. This way, you get to see the end result," he said.

 

Cmdr. Al Pinter said the destruction team is a popular assignment request.

 

"A lot of the officers are people who are interested in this (evidence technician) job. At some point maybe they want to come down here, and it's a way for them to be exposed to it and see if they're interested in it. Or they may come down here and figure out they're not interested at all," he said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not sure what to do with this

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, December 20, 1992



Hamrick-Wolf Angela M. Wolf and Richard Lewis Hamrick, both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. Nov. 14 at Church of the Little Flower. The Rev. Dan LaCount officiated.

The bride is the daughter of Robert J. and Alta Wolf of Springfield. The groom is the son of James L. and Lorraine Hamrick of Springfield.

Serving as matron of honor was Theresa Webber. Bridesmaids were Mary Brown, Barb McGrew and Chris, Judy and Kathy Wolf . Flower girl was Ashleigh Hamrick.

Best man was James Hamrick. Groomsmen were Rob Bartlett, John Hall, Jay Hoskins, Doug Dictel and Tim Wolf. Ushers were John Hall and Tim Wolf.

A reception was held at Knights of Columbus Hall, Chatham.

The bride is a graduate of Southeast High School and is employed St. John's Hospital. The groom is a graduate of Chatham Glenwood High School and is employed as a salesman by Heil Beauty Supply.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beccue

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, December 24, 1995


Saladino-Rohrig Michele Lee Rohrig and David Matthew Saladino, both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. Nov. 11 at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church by the Rev.

Patrick Gibbons.

The bride is the daughter of Richard and Sharon Rohrig of Springfield. The groom is the son of Carl and Nancy Saladino of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Ann Reynolds, with Kim Robinson, Maria Sakowicz, Karen Miller and Karen Saladino as bridesmaids. Flower girl was Kara Gallagher.

Serving as best man was John Saladino, with Pat Sullivan, Vince Madonia , Jeff Sauer and Tim Kell as groomsmen. Ushers were

 

Jeff Beccue ,

 

Jim File and Jim Tresouthick. Ringbearer was Greg Gallagher.

A reception was held at the Northfield Center.

The bride is a graduate of Southern Illinois University and the University of Illinois, where she earned a MS degree. She is employed as an advertising account executive with Professional Images. The groom is a graduate of SIU. He is employed as an environmental scientist with Andrews Environmental Engineering.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

TX wal mart link – ripper

Note moushon – sternstein –

Sternstein – fickes – usmc –

walmart – butch elzea – moushon – crosslink – terry nelson – dea frame – Hutchinson – grady - paragon

 

 

 

 

 

 

John b clark –

 

Tea party – roth –

 

todwdelaney@gmail.com

 

dateWed, Feb 20, 2008 at 2:40 PM

subjectlafountain

mailed-bygmail.com

 

hide details 2/20/08

 

 

Todd LaFountain – father at honeyell – see also regina hill husband – simplex, johnson controls etc.

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - October 31, 1993

 

Ripper-Russell Julie Marie Russell and Todd David Ripper, both of Corpus Christi, Texas, were married at 1 p.m. Oct. 2 at the Country Club United Methodist Church in Kansas City, Mo. The Rev. Harold Dodds officiated.

 

The bride is the daughter of Jan Russell of Kansas City, Mo. The groom is the son of Gordon and Pauline Ripper of Chatham.

 

Serving as maid of honor was Tami Latimer. Bridesmaids were Dawn Townsend and Tammy Dugger.

 

Best man was Bill Townsend. Groomsmen were Joe Conlon and Jim Havens. Ushers were Jim Burwitz and Todd LaFountain .

 

A reception was held at the Embassy Suites, County Club Plaza, Kansas City, Mo.

 

The bride is attending Texas A&M and is employed as a communications coordinator at the Goodwill Industries of South Texas. The groom is a graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia and is employed as an assistant manager of Wal-Mart in Corpus Christi, Texas.

 

The couple will reside in Corpus Christi, Texas.

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - September 19, 1993

 

(Dave Capps is atty in carbondale , I think)

 

Capps-Ferricks Melanie Sue Ferricks of Athens and David Grant Capps of Springfield were united in marriage at 4:30 p.m. Aug. 21 at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Athens by the Rev. Richard Becker.

 

The bride is the daughter of Donald and Marilynn Ferricks of Athens. The groom is the son of J. Kent and Karolyn Capps of Springfield.

 

Serving as maid of honor was Angela Dugger. Bridesmaids were Kristin Wells, Julie Robeson, Tanya Vietmeier and Delyn Duggins.

 

Best man was Matt Burns. Groomsmen were Steve Capps, Jay Bohn, Todd LaFountain and David Ferricks. Ushers were Glenn Beccue and Adam Beccue.

 

A reception was held at River Ridge Restaurant in Petersburg.

 

The bride is a graduate of Illinois College and is employed by Coldwell Banker Perfect Address and John B. Clark, Realtor. The groom is a graduate of Illinois College and is employed by First of America Bank.

 

The couple will live in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roth is legal cover – ING – 33rd

 

camp Lincoln – tea party

 

 

 

Roth is legal guy at camp Lincoln – legal cover

And see pedigo

 

 

Links to sahba roth -

 

And tea party - ilfopngaoi

 

Dragoo – 9/12 – nudo – brahler – nudo emps – implied consent – nudo apl – nudo armbruster

 

Also roti/nudo related – Caruso – liuna – blago – buraski saathoff – (buraski sahba)

 

steil/Caruso – irv/iema/sfd – OT – comp time pecoraro – glenwood – burton/netznick

 

 

steil/Caruso/durako – WM – plunkett – stl – landfills –

zeman – Costello – stl – GU – Gregory – bommarito –

Cellini/spitzer – usccb – skylstadt – mail intercept – from ftl went to spk –

 

Spk= west was en – timeline – west mcdevitt at usatty – allows shumate – Mitchell jessen – mcdevitt=usaf – sere/jpra – rotc – cepeda – (tony caruso mention) shriners hops spk – (and see galv – shriners – mendenhall) – BW at CDA – Nethercutt – delay – lundquist/ovp – Kaiser – Hurwitz – perry – seidl – spk attys –

(zito = seidl at cellnet – *links zito to delay) – mention GU law -  usaf guy w/ new game 22’

 

Campo in 96 – rnc conv – salsa – gingrich in atl – just gets house – (note Gregory from Belleville to atl)

(and note noonan in atl – emory – gingrich – gardner peckham – baker) – (and note while in galv a guy said JAB behind harassment) – site: texas – xa Pennell homicidal frame – gov perry – monty Pennell – arson – dallas – continues frame across states – additional frame around same theme corroborates earlier frame

 

 

 

 

Gray= dod – rummy cambone –

 

YR’s – IERC – clubs – ing – dick Austin – adj gen – smtd – libri –

 

Roth= uis coll repubs – gabrielle weigand –

Riggle at llcc and uis – eck at uis soccer – noonan at llcc soccer – (note siebert at troxell w/ eck and aiello – and note vala/siebert at rt 66 – and note val aruns able where copeland works – ingrum - )giacomini – Jackson filipiak – nifong – burkhardt at sangamo – irv and burkhardt in ftl 2000 – gay rumors violence filipiak – and see noonan and soccer llcc – key frame arson – noonan scb – dick hart – Cellini atty - caths – capranica – cable provider – Carlyle – gwb – heminghous – Wackenhut – guards – cellini – nf state bldgs – ifpe – vala – able – dowdy – ingrum – Carlyle Carlucci – cia goss – Wackenhut is wpb -

 

Weigand coffey –

 

And see Murphy at Charlie parkers – and coffey – zito – and see huebner from iml – and ihpa dana Thomas – Albanese – ihpa= Cellini – smarjesse – probs w/ emps – new salem Hedrick guinan – and dana/tom -

 

 

But see also – reinhart – coll dems – blago – roti – kjell – Cellini – gay rumors – 95/6 – and see reinhart – cib – Henderson – duraneb/henkle – vono – sd – shg – perrin in sd – linked to loft – drennan – cohen – ccdc – ubc is investor for harbor towers guy – senturia -

 

 

 

 

State of Illinois Telephone Directory

Military Affairs, Department of [49] Alphabetical Listing

 

Updated: 01/07/2011 − − 01:46:18 AM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ROTH, ROBERT

 

Stf Judge−Adv Ofc CAMP LINCOLN

 

 

FL 003 BLDG 1 SPRINGFIELD

IL 62702

 

217−761−3515

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, September 7, 1997



Thomas-Roth Jayne Ann Roth of Sherman and Greg Matthew Thomas of Springfield were married at 4:30 p.m. Aug. 16 at West Side Christian Church by the Rev. Charles L. Lee.

The bride is the daughter of

William and Sandy Dragoo of Sherman and

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Roth of Springfield.

The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs.

Francis Thomas of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Zenaida Falcon. Cindy McGill, Sara Crowe, Tamra Conner, Stephanie Franks and Sandy Dees were bridesmaids. Flower girls were Rebecca Borowiecki and Stephanie Roth.

Best man was Dennis Kooken. Mike Rieman, Rich Polic, Terry Roth, Greg Clark and Lee Delay were groomsmen. Ushers were Nick, Jason and Tim Roth.

Ringbearer was Andrew Borowiecki.

A reception was held at the Crowne Plaza.

The bride is a graduate of Lincoln Land Community College, Western Illinois University and attends the University of Illinois at Springfield. She is employed as a

health inspector for the Sangamon County Department of Public Health.

The groom is a graduate of LLCC, and Illinois State University. He is employed as a

health inspector for the state Department of Public Health.

The couple will live in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, February 22, 2004



Roth-Kulavic

Jessica Marie Kulavic of Pawnee and Gregory Robert Roth of Alton were married at 2 p.m. Sept. 27, 2003, at Blessed Sacrament Church by the Rev. David Hoefler.

The bride is the daughter of Jerome and Mary Kulavic of Pawnee. The groom is the son of Robert and Cynthia Roth of Alton.

Serving as matron of honor was Jennifer Laurenzana. Bridesmaids were Rachael Steinstein, Tamie Stojan, Ashley Scaife, Andrea Roth and Katie Roth. Flower girl was Shelby Roth.

Best man was Chris Roth. Groomsmen were Joe Rohlfing, David Bolin, Brian Hruby, Aaron Bandy and Chris Wilson. Ring bearer was Christopher O'Connor. Ushers were Kevin Richardson, Neil Fisher and Mike Hudek.

A reception was held at the Hilton Springfield.

The bride is a 1996 graduate of Sacred Heart-Griffin High School and a 2000 graduate of Southern Illinois University at Carbondale with a bachelor's degree in finance. She is employed by Ford Motor Credit in St. Louis. The groom is a 1997 graduate of Alton Marquette High School and a 2001 graduate of Southern Illinois University at Carbondale with a bachelor's degree in business administration. He is employed by Toyota Tsusho America in Troy, Mo.

The couple lives in Alton.

 

 

 

TITLE: ENGAGEMENTS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, October 6, 1996



Roth-Casper The engagement of Toni Leigh Casper to Terry Robert Roth , both of Springfield, is being announced. She is the daughter of Lynn and Barbara Casper of Williamsville and Jay and Sandra Kelley of Murfreesboro, Tenn. He is the son of Robert E. and Faye Roth of Springfield and William and Sandra Dragoo of Sherman.

No wedding date has been set

 

 

 

Havey= caths – dio – young’s security - crimestoppers

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, October 21, 1990



Vandercar-Cummins Elizabeth Marie Cummins and Theodore John Vandercar, both of Decatur, were married at 2 p.m. Sept. 8 at St. Thomas Church in Decatur by the Rev.

Dennis Kalross.

Serving as maid of honor was Mary Cummins. Bridesmaids were Mary Vandercar, Julie Fauble, Loretta Smith and Suzanne Minton. Flower girl was Meredith Havey.

Best man was Anthony Vandercar. Groomsmen were Matthew Vandercar, Nicholas Vandercar, David Cummins and Dan Frerichs. Ushers were Robert Roth and Timothy Havey.

A reception was be held in the City Plaza Ballroom.

The bride is a graduate of MacArthur High School and the University of Illinois. She is employed as a teacher at Brush College Elementary School. The groom is a graduate of St. Theresa High School and Illinois State University. He is employed as a CPA for KPMG Peat Marwick.

The couple will reside in Decatur.

 

 

 

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, February 4, 2007



* Electrical/HVAC: Ron Bisby, Southeast High School, son of Terry and Ron Bisby; Jeremy Roth, Athens High School, son of Lenore and Robert Roth

 

BUILDING PERMITS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, December 9, 2005

Section: MARKETPLACE
Page: 40

Building permits issued Nov. 28-Dec. 4

Springfield


* Single-family residential construction at 2808 Rutherford Trek in Centennial Park Place. Owner/contractor is Robert Roth ; $215,000.

 

 

 

TITLE: FOR THE RECORD

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, August 18, 1999



Rachael Dawn Lynch and Terry Robert Roth , both of Springfield.

 

TITLE: PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, September 14, 1986



SPEC. 4 NICHOLAS ROTH, son of Sandra and Robert Roth of Sherman, has completed a U.S. Army primary leadership course in West Germany.

Roth is a medical supply specialist with the 226th Medical Supply Optical Maintenance.

 

 

 

TITLE: ENGAGEMENTS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, April 13, 1986

 

Roth-Hopkins The engagement of Lenore Hopkins to Robert Roth , both of Athens, has been announced.

Miss Hopkins is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Larry Hopkins of 42 Bonanza Pass. Roth is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Roth of 219 W. Calhoun.

They plan to be married May 31 at Athens Christian Church.

 

 

 

 

ANNIVERSARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, November 21, 2006



Kruger-65th

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Kruger of Rochester will celebrate their 65th wedding anniversary with a family dinner.

Kruger and the former Helen M. Richardson were married Nov. 23, 1941, in Troy, Mo.

Mr. Kruger was superintendent of Springfield Sand and Gravel for 21 years and worked for the state Department of Transportation for 17 years.

Mrs. Kruger, a homemaker, was a seamstress for interior decorators.

They are parents of six children, David (wife, Lil) of Chatham, Faye (husband, Bob) Roth , Sharon (husband, Charles) Sakris, Frank (wife, Pam) and John (wife, Gail), all of Springfield; and Pam Kruger of Tucson, Ariz.

There are nine grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.

 

 

 

SHOWCASE OF HOMES / SCARBOROUGH PLACE IS HOSTING EVENT STARTING TODAY

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, June 21, 1996

Author/Byline: CHRIS DETTRO BUSINESS EDITOR
Edition: M1,M2
Section: BUSINESS
Page: 37

The Springfield Area Home Builders Association's biennial Showcase of Homes kicks off a 10-day run at 4 p.m. today at Scarborough Place subdivision at

Iles Avenue and Archer Elevator Road.

The showcase, which spotlights new ideas in construction, decorating and design, will run for 10 consecutive days through June 30 this year, rather than weekends only, as have the past two events.

The local home builders' association had its first showcase in 1992 after an 18-year hiatus and drew about 10,000 to a site in Lincolnshire subdivision over two weekends. The every-other-year event returned in 1994 to the same subdivision and attracted similar crowds in less-than-perfect weather.

Melinda Cobern, executive officer of the association, said larger crowds are expected this year because of the extended hours.

Admission is $4 for adults; children 12 and under get in free. Proceeds from concession sales at the event will benefit The Parent Place of Springfield.

Nationally, builders cut new home and apartment construction in May to the lowest level in five months. Housing starts fell 4.7 percent, to a seasonally adjusted 1.43 million annual rate, and erased a 4.6 percent gain in April. Starts were down in every region except the South, although the Midwest has been one of the stronger regions this year to date.

Springfield, however, is going against the national trend, and home building continues to be strong, Cobern said.

Single-family building permits are ahead of last year's pace through May, and more duplexes also are being built.

Permits for 198 single-family homes worth $22.2 million have been applied for through the first five months of this year, compared to 137 homes with a value of $16.7 million for the same period last year. A total of 43 duplex permits have been applied for in 1996, compared to 31 in the January-May period of 1995. Nine single-family residences constructed by nine different builders will be on display along Thyme Drive in the second addition to Scarborough Place. The homes, in a variety of styles, contain many extra amenities that often don't show up in the asking price because suppliers and manufacturers are vying to showcase their products, too.

The homes range from 2,000-square-foot ranch-style to 3,500-square-foot two-story houses.

Participating builders for the '96 showcase, many of whom participated in previous showcases, are: Dave Cation, Cation Construction Co.; Tony DeFrates, Tony DeFrates Builder; Michael Lantz, Michael Lantz & Sons Inc.; Raymond Larson, Larson Carpentry Inc.; Terrance Miller, Miller & Son Builder; Keith Moore, Keith Moore Builder Inc.; James Moughan, Moughan Builders Inc.; Bob Roth , Roth Home Construction Inc.; and Michael Ryan, Ryan Construction.

New ideas in design and construction, many of them brought back from the National Association of Home Builders show in Houston earlier this year, are apparent in the showcase homes.

The association presented 1996 showcase awards at a preview reception Wednesday. Winners in the seven categories are: o Best landscape design, Roth Home Construction; first runner-up, Tony DeFrates Builder. o Best exterior design, Ray Larson Carpentry Inc.; first runner-up, Keith Moore Builders. o Best entryway, Roth Home Construction; first runner-up, Moughan Builders. o Best kitchen, Ray Larson Carpentry Inc.; first runner-up, Keith Moore Builders. o Best bathroom, Cation Construction Inc.; first runner-up, Ryan Construction. o Best overall floor plan, Michael Lantz & Sons Builders; first runner-up, Terry Miller & Son Builder. o Best use of decorating accessories, Roth Home Construction; first runner-up, Ray Larson Carpentry Inc.

Scarborough Place is being developed by Elaine Mayer and Paula Ryan of E&P Development Co. The showcase homes are in the northwest corner of the 40-acre development. The subdivision derives its name and the names of its streets from "Scarborough Fair Canticle," a 1970s Simon and Garfunkle song.

Hours for the showcase are 4 to 9 p.m. today and June 28; 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturdays; 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays; and 4 to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

Caption: This home built by Roth Homes Construction won three Showcase of Homes awards, best landscape design, best entryway and best use of decorating accessories. This home built by Larson Caprentry, Inc. won best exterior design

 

 

 

 

SHOWCASE OF HOMES OPENS DOOR

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, June 10, 1994

Author/Byline: CHRIS DETTRO BUSINESS EDITOR
Edition: M1,M2
Section: BUSINESS
Page: 33

The yards have been landscaped to an emerald sheen, interiors decorated in the latest styles, and the lights turned on for the 1994 Springfield Home

Builders Association 1994 Showcase of Homes.

The show, last held in 1992 and before that in the early 1980s, is along Wittington Court at Lincolnshire Boulevard in Lincolnshire subdivision, which is south of Wabash Avenue just off Old Chatham Road. It starts from 4 to 7 p.m. today and continues from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Hours are the same for next weekend.

"I walked through all the homes Saturday, and there is something innovative in every house," said Steve Ross of K. Reinke Jr. & Co. of Illiopolis, who is show director. "There's the latest in decorating, in lighting, electric eyes for utility rooms and bathrooms . . . half the houses have entertainment centers. If somebody can't find some ideas here, I'll be very surprised."

He said entertainment centers, supplied by Team Electronics, go far beyond a television set and stereo system.

"They're big-screen TVs and family theaters, really," he said.

The 1994 showcase will feature 11 single-family homes and five condo/duplexes built by 15 contractors from the Springfield area. The addition of duplex/condo homes is the biggest difference from the '92 show, Ross said.

About 10,000 people bought tickets to the 1992 showcase, which also was held in Lincolnshire. Ross expects as many, if not more, to come this year.

"We have a lot more houses, and we're hoping for a lot of repeat business," he said. "If people take their time, it may be difficult to see everything in just one trip." "People have put in a lot of long hours, and it came down to the wire, but we're ready," said Tony DeFrates, president of the association. "People were out here at all hours this week making sure everything was done."

The homes are of various styles -- ranches, two-stories and Cape Cods -- each with special amenities. All are professionally decorated, furnished and landscaped.

Ross said the home-building industry has changed since 1992, with lots of white kitchens, larger bathrooms and multilevel "tray" ceilings being shown. Homes also are featuring steeper roof lines.

The homes range in size from 2,200 to 2,600 square feet and in price from $170,000 on up. Duplex/condos are from 1,500 to 2,000 square feet and $110,000 and up. They contain features not normally found in those price ranges because suppliers have provided items at discounts.

As was the case two years ago, the association will have a tent set up with more than 40 booths for suppliers, banks, landscapers, plumbing firms, etc. to dispense materials and ideas. Concessions also will be sold.

Admission is $4, with children under 12 admitted free when accompa-nied by an adult. A percentage of the gate receipts will be donated by the home builders association to the Springfield Make-A-Wish Foundation.

Patrons will enter Lincolnshire on Renwick, the south entrance to the subdivision off Old Chatham Road. They will then be directed to park in a grassy area on the south and southwest side of Lincolnshire.

Representatives of four Springfield banks judged the homes for nine awards Wednesday. The banks -- Bank of Springfield, First of America Bank-Springfield NA, Magna Bank of Central Illinois and Town & Country Banc Mortgage Services -- were co-sponsors of the home builders' preview party Thursday night.

As was the case two years ago, people attending the show will get to vote on a "People's Choice" award that will be announced after the conclusion of the show next weekend.

The other nine award winners, followed by the number of the home (posted in the front yard) are: Roth Home Construction Inc., home 2, best decorating; Moughan Builders, home 1, best kitchen design; Robert McCurley Contractor Inc., home 9, best overall floor plan; Hollywood Homes, home 16, best duplex floor plan; Ryan Construction Inc., home 4, best landscaping design; Tony DeFrates Builder, home 3, best bathroom; Luzinski Homes, home 7, best entryway; Precision Builders, home 11, best exterior design; and Homes by Ted Koester, home 14, best duplex exterior.

Contractors participating in the showcase are Rick Bahr, Precision Builders; Jim Snell, Hallbeck Homes; Bob McCurley, Robert McCurley Contractor Inc.; Frank Buraski, Buraski Builders Inc.; Roger Luzinski, Luzinski Homes; John Benanti, J. Benanti Builders; Keith Moore, Keith Moore Builders Inc.; Michael Ryan, Ryan Construction Inc.; Tony DeFrates, Tony DeFrates Builder; Bob Roth , Roth Home Construction Inc.; Jim Moughan, Moughan Builders; Ted Koester, Homes by Ted Koester; Dave Cation, Cation Construction; Bryce Hager, Lamar-Hager Construction; and Brian Hall, Hollywood Homes.

The association has a membership of about 200, which includes builders, suppliers, banks and others involved in the home-building trade.

Caption: Steve Ross, right, Showcase of Homes director, is assisted by Pat Smith as they install home contractor signs in front of every home on display in Lincolnshire.

 

 

SHOWCASE OF HOMES WILL BE EXPANDED

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, November 14, 1993

Author/Byline: CHRIS DETTRO BUSINESS EDITOR
Edition: M1,M2
Section: BUSINESS
Page: 42

After a one-year hiatus, the SPRINGFIELD AREA HOME BUILDERS ASSOCIATION is planning an expanded SHOWCASE OF HOMES for June 1994.

Ground will be broken Wednesday for showcase homes at Lincolnshire Boulevard and Wittington Court in Lincolnshire subdivision, which also was the site of the 1992 showcase. Construction for the 1994 event will be in the northwest corner of the subdivision, which is being developed by John B. Clark, Thomas Faller and John Vaughn.

Lincolnshire is one mile south of Wabash Avenue just off Chatham Road.

The 1994 showcase will feature 11 single-family homes and 5 condo/duplexes built by 15 contractors from the Springfield area. The homes will be of various styles, each with special amenities. All will be professionally decorated, furnished and landscaped.

Proceeds from the 1994 event will benefit the Springfield Make-A-Wish Foundation.

The 1992 showcase featured nine homes by eight different builders, and about 10,000 people attended the three-day showcase. The 1994 event will be held over two weekends -- June 10-12 and June 17-19 -- and spread over six days, said Nancy Klockenga, executive director of the Springfield Area Home Builders Association.

Contractors participating in the 1994 showcase are Rick Bahr, Precision Builders; Jim Snell, Hallbeck Homes; Bob McCurley, Robert McCurley Contractor Inc.; Frank Buraski, Buraski Builders Inc.; Roger Luzinski, Luzinski Homes; John Benanti, J. Benanti Builders; Keith Moore, Keith Moore Builders Inc.; Michael Ryan, Ryan Construction Inc.; Tony DeFrates, Tony DeFrates Builder; Bob Roth , Roth Home Construction Inc.; Jim Moughan, Moughan Builders; Ted Koester, Ted Koester Homes; Dave Cation, Cation Construction; Bryce Hager, Lamar-Hager Inc.; and Brian Hall, Hollywood Home Builders.

 

 

 

INSIDE STORY / INTERIORS DRAW ATTENTION IN THE SHOWCASE OF HOMES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, June 28, 1992

Author/Byline: Chris Dettro Business Editor
Edition: M1,M2
Section: LIFESTYLE
Page: 33

Although the purpose of the 1992 Showcase of Homes at Lincolnshire subdivision is to spotlight the special efforts of Springfield Home

Builders Association builder-members, the interior decor of the 10 showcase homes certainly hasn't gone unnoticed by the crowds.

Two homes built on adjacent lots demonstrate contrasting decorating styles, while both feature the latest in decorating techniques and special touches that make a home distinctive and unique.

A 2,105-square-foot ranch-style home built by Robert McCurley Contractors is done in a traditional style, while next door, a two-story, 2,500-square-foot Bob Roth -built home sports a bold, contemporary California style.

The McCurley Construction home won the award for best use of decorating accessories at the show.

Sterns Carriage House did the interior decorating "right down to the knickknacks and plants," McCurley said.

"The house has a very livable floor plan," McCurley said. "I've been hearing that it's something you can move right into and feel at home. It's not sterile."

One of the more attractive features of the house is the view upon entering the front door. A circle-topped window, combined with quarter-round windows on each side create an elegant picture-window effect. The window overlooks a deck and parkway land behind the house.

"It is appealing when you walk in the door," McCurley said. "It draws the outdoors in."

Wallpaper borders of different designs are used at the ceiling throughout the house with the exception of the family room.

The baths have coordinating shower curtains and window treatments. The master bath has a Jacuzzi and separate shower and two vanity sinks divided by a glass-fronted wooden linen cabinet. Kitchen-Bath and Cabinet Co. of Springfield did the kitchen cabinets and bathroom vanities.

The master bedroom uses white mosquito-net tenting to create a canopied bed. The other two bedrooms are decorated for a boy and a girl.

Unique window treatments are used in many of the showcase homes, and the McCurley-built home is no exception. Coordinating wallpaper is used to cover the curtain rod in the master bedroom, adding color.

The Roth Construction home was done by Jim Wilson Interiors. It is bright, cheerful and bold and definitely an eye-catcher.

Dining room, entryway, living room and family room walls are done in yellow and burgundy, with bright greens and blues as accent colors.

"It gives you something different to think about," Roth said. "We've had interesting comments, both pro and con."

The home has all-white kitchen appliances with a white ceramic tile floor and a white island stove top and oven. The kitchen wallpaper is white with blue stars and one small wall is done in blue and white paper that looks like a bookcase. Cabinets are hand-done and doors with an arched top are used throughout the house.

Windows in the family room, which has a white, all-brick fireplace, are topped with bunched grapevines and red berries for an artistic touch.

A large blue and white urn filled with real flowers greets visitors in the entryway. The urn had fish swimming in it for last week's home show preview.

The dining room, which is painted burgundy, also has an unusual wall treatment that creates a shadowbox effect.

Upstairs, the "bonus room" or fourth bedroom uses six different shades of browns, beiges and grays. Bookcase wallpaper is part of the wall treatment.

Roth, who usually builds larger homes, said he went for a marble effect in the master bath, with Jacuzzi, shower and vanity in that decor. Large corner windows overlook the park above the Jacuzzi.

Caption: Left, The McCurley home features arched windows in the living area. Decorating was done by Sterns Carriage House. Below, the home built by Roth Construction and decorated by Jim Wilson Interiors has a "contemporary, California style."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guard unit gets community send-off - Effingham's Bravo Company will be deployed on Monday

Herald & Review (Decatur, IL) - Sunday, January 6, 2002

Author/Byline: SUSAN REIDY ; H&R Staff Writer
Section: News
Page: A1

TEUTOPOLIS - William and Maggie Goodwin will spend eight of the first nine months of their marriage on different continents.

William Goodwin, 26, of St. Elmo ships out Monday for an eight-month deployment somewhere in Europe as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. The couple pushed their June wedding day to Dec. 7 after Goodwin got his orders.

"We got married by the justice of the peace. We're going to have the ceremony when he gets back," said Maggie Goodwin, 20. "I'm nervous, but I'm proud of him, and I support him."

Hundreds of people gathered at the Knights of Columbus Hall on Saturday night to say goodbye to sons, brothers, husbands and fathers. They did it with a mixture of fear and sadness - but mostly pride.

The 109 men in the Effingham National Guard Bravo Company 130th Infantry Battalion leave from Springfield on Monday for several weeks of training in Georgia before heading to Europe. Gov. George H. Ryan's send-off ceremony from O'Hare International Airport in Chicago for other deployed Illinois Guard members will be telecast in Springfield, said Capt. Charles Pedigo , unit commander.

Once in Europe, the battalion will guard U.S. military installations, but Pedigo said he didn't know the exact assignments. This is the "Blackhawk" group's first large-scale deployment since the Korean War, he said.

"The community support has been very good," Pedigo said. "Soldier morale is pretty good, but it's tough to be away from kids and family."

Community members were asked to donate money for the dinner and to set up an account to help the guardsmen and their families.

Cindy Funneman, who helped coordinate the event along with other guardsmen's wives, wasn't sure how much was raised, but it definitely covered the cost of Saturday's meal.

Several people donated their time to help serve the meal and decorate the hall, while others supplied cakes and a bus ride for the guardsmen from the armory to the hall. The Effingham American Legion Post 120, which counts among its ranks several veterans of the battalion, also helped organize the event and raise funds.

"I think it's really good the community could do something like this for us," Goodwin said. "It really helps our send-off seem a lot better."

James Sims of Neoga and his parents also enjoyed the dinner and the time they spent together. With three sons in the military, mother Sharon Sims is used to saying goodbye.

"I'm just glad we could be with him," she said. "I know that he'll be missed."

Sims, who's seen active duty in Hawaii, Japan and Australia, is looking forward to the mission.

"I'm anxious to do what I can to make things better," said Sims, who has a 7-year-old daughter and 3-year-old son. "It's getting harder to explain to them why I'm leaving. I don't want to scare them, but I want them to know that I've got to do this for them, for their future."

In the past few days, Nathan and Carla Wheeler of Olney also have explained to their 2-year-old son and 4-year-old daughter that daddy will be gone for a while.

"She understood. Her exact words were, 'OK, bye,' " said Carla Wheeler. "We've only been here a short time, so it will he harder on me than him because I don't really know anybody.

"It's going to happen whether we like it or not. The sooner he leaves, the sooner he can get back."

Although Nathan Wheeler said he'll miss his family, he's excited about the idea of a real mission.

"It's what we train for all the time - a real world mission for your country; that's fun," said Wheeler, who's been in the military almost five years and the Guard two years. "I know everybody here can accomplish the mission; there's no reason to be nervous."

Susan Reidy can be reached at sreidy@herald-review.com or 421-7963.

Caption: Herald & Review/ Carlos T. Miranda SNAPPY BERET: 'I'll miss my family,' said Sgt. Nathan Wheeler while holding his 2-year-old son, Austin, at a family dinner in Teutopolis for departing National Guard troops. Wheeler is part of the Effingham National Guard Bravo Company 130th Infantry Battalion, which is being deployed to Georgia on Monday before heading to Europe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PANTHER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Computer deli - kingtech

 

Apple in spfld –

 

Micro power – computer deli – Kingtech

 

 

Apple in Cupertino – panther – heminghous –

 

Pennell

 

 

 

CIACCIO IS AT KINGTECH - BONANSINGA

 

CIACCIO – SACCO – CAMPO –

 

CAMPO/NOLL

 

SCSO/SACCO

 

 

King technology – bonansinga - cruickshank

 

King tech does BI –

 

Location = next to dad’s apt – Toronto rd. – (4 wheeler)

 

Note similarity between kingtech and ciber – office automation - tracking

 

 

 

Computer deli is apple – they have stores in Bloomington – ING – MI –

 

Note Pennell/heminghous at apple – X’ – panther – hart and noonan at panther – ftl hockey –

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Computer deli – radio frequency controlled devices – garage door openers – hart doors

 

And see Henderson nebulizers

 

See also “hammer’s hobbies” at Sinclair property at 11th/S grand, remote control vehicles, planes

 

Note new mission for 183, UAV’s not jets, and see Jett family in texas sells RC plane engines (hou= the hammer)

 

See also Bloomington Military intelligence, disinformation,

 

And see rust, trosino at state farm and “special investigation units”, using MI for insurance defense

(Note rust as edgar apptee to judicial oversight board) and see rust/trosino at IBRT and USBRT, and chamber leadership, see also funder at UIUC and UIS, computer programs, see also INFRAGARD,

quasi –FBI group of volunteers, like cipac for critical infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, November 13, 1987

Nicholas D. Ciaccio Nicholas D. Ciaccio , 63, of Springfield died at 7:30 a.m. Thursday at St.

John's Hospital.

He was born on Dec. 7, 1923, in Springfield, the son of Leonard and Maria Sacco Ciaccio . A resident of Springfield all his life, he married Jean Bardi in 1945. Preceding him in death were his parents and four brothers, Vito and Ignatius Ciaccio and Dominic and Peter Campo .

Mr. Ciaccio practiced law in Springfield until he retired due to illness.

He was a member of Christ the King Church. He was a graduate of Springfield College in Illinois and Lincoln College of Law.

Mr. Ciaccio was executive secretary of the Motor Vehicle Laws Commission;

a member of Illinois State Bar Association;

and was past president of the Roman Cultural Society.

He was assistant secretary of state under four different secretaries of state.

Surviving are his wife, Genevieve "Jean"; one daughter, Mrs. David (Therese) Florey of Springfield; one son, Nicholas Peter Ciaccio of Springfield; one sister, Mrs. Rose Reynolds of Peoria; and one brother, Joseph Ciaccio of Springfield

 

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, May 23, 1997



Joseph J. Ciaccio Joseph J. Ciaccio , 74, of Springfield died Wednesday at St. John's Hospital.

He was born Dec. 21, 1922, in Springfield, the son of Leonard and Maria Sacco Ciaccio . He married Angela R. Sodaro in 1947. Mr. Ciaccio , a lifelong resident of Springfield, was a graduate of Cathedral Boys High School, Springfield College in Illinois, Lincoln College of Law, and admitted to the Bar in 1951. He was an attorney for 35 years for the state

Department of Financial Institutions and

Office of Commissioner of Banks and Trust Companies.

He was an Army veteran of World War II serving in the European Theater of Operations. He was a member of Christ the King Church,

Knights of Columbus Fourth Degree,

Sangamo Club, Illinois and Sangamon County Bar Association, Eagles Club and was

past president of Roman Cultural Society.

He served as first Deputy Commissioner of Banks and Trust Co. by appointment of Governor Richard B. Ogilvie and was reappointed by every governor until retirement in 1979.

He also engaged in private practice of law in the firm Ciaccio and Ciaccio .

Survivors: wife, Angela R. Ciaccio ; three daughters, Mary Alsup, Angela Foley and Mrs. Jay (Natalie) Bales, all of Springfield; two sons, Joseph and Nicholas Ciaccio , both of Springfield; 10 grandchildren; a great-grandchild; and several nieces, nephews, and cousins.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CORPORATION FILE DETAIL REPORT


 Entity Name

COMPUTER DELI, INC.

 File Number

61930671

 Status

ACTIVE

 Entity Type

CORPORATION

 Type of Corp

DOMESTIC BCA

 Incorporation Date (Domestic)

12/05/2001

 State

ILLINOIS

 Agent Name

KIM GUTTSCHOW

 Agent Change Date

12/05/2001

 Agent Street Address

1306 E EMPIRE

 President Name & Address

TODD GUTTSCHOW 1306 E EMPIRE BLOOMINGTON 61701

 Agent City

BLOOMINGTON

 Secretary Name & Address

KIM GUTTSCHOW SAME

 Agent Zip

61701

 Duration Date

PERPETUAL

 Annual Report Filing Date

12/02/2009

 For Year

2009

 

 

 

 

 

Deaths

Pantagraph, The (Bloomington, IL) - Saturday, January 17, 2009

 Harold B. Harkless

MORTON - Harold B. Harkless, 82, of 2724 W. Reservoir Blvd., Peoria, formerly of Morton, died at 12:30 a.m. Thursday (Jan. 15, 2009) at Proctor Endowment Home in Peoria.

Cremation rites have been accorded and a memorial service will be at 3 p.m. today at the Morton United Methodist Church, 420 N. Tennessee Ave., Morton. The Rev. Paul Walles will officiate. Visitation will be one hour prior to the service at the church. Memorials may be made the building fund at his church or to the John C. Proctor Endowment Home. Arrangements are by Cumerford-Hurd Funeral Home, Peoria.

He was born April 1, 1926, in Ellisville, the son of Willis and Cora Marie Dalton Harkless. He married Carol E. Johnson on April 11, 1953, in Canton. She survives.

Also surviving are his children, Sarah A. (Roger) Gilbert, Mount Pleasant, Mich.; Thomas M. (Lesley Noer) Harkless, Mequon, Wis.; and Janet E. ( Todd) Guttschow , Bloomington; stepdaughter, Elizabeth (Jeff) Card, Mount Pleasant, Mich.; stepson, James (Marcie) Gilbert, Big Rapids, Mich.; grandchildren,

 

Thomas,

Grant and

Benjamin Guttschow, Bloomington;

 

and Caroline Ann Harkless, Mequon, Wis.; and stepgrandsons, Wyatt and Colton Gilbert, Mount Pleasant, Mich.

He was preceded in death by his parents and one sister.

He was a World War II veteran, serving in the U.S. Navy. He served on the aircraft carrier Princeton in the Atlantic.

He graduated from Monmouth College in Monmouth and the executive management program at Indiana University in Indiana.

He worked in the financial industry all of his life, retiring from the

 

Security Savings and Loan as president.

 

 

 

Maid-Rite chain seeking Champaign location

News-Gazette, The (Champaign-Urbana, IL) - Monday, September 27, 2004

Author/Byline: DEBRA PRESSEY
Edition: all
Page: C-7
Column: IT'S YOUR BUSINESS

Food news! Maid-Rite, an Iowa fast-food chain that stakes its fame on its "loose meat sandwich," says it wants to open one of its restaurants in Champaign soon.

But first, the company has to line up a franchisee for the area and choose a piece of ground.

One of Maid-Rite's owners, Tania Burt, said her company is already working with Rock Island-based developer Todd Raufeisen, who is helping select a property in Champaign for the restaurant and will get the building up.

Raufeisen is a University of Illinois graduate with Champaign-Urbana connections. In a separate deal, he said he recently secured an option on the Chancellor Hotel in Champaign and is working with several interested companies on redevelopment prospects for that corner at Neil Street and Kirby Avenue.

Maid-Rite, based in Des Moines, Iowa, has been in business since 1926 and has 80 locations in the Midwest. Burt said she and her husband, Bradley Burt, bought the company 2 1/2 years ago with plans of expanding to 1,000 locations.

Maid-Rite serves, in addition to its signature sandwich, such things as chicken, barbecued pork, fish, hot dogs, chili dogs, salads, fries, onion rings and hand-dipped ice cream and shakes. It also has a breakfast menu and kids' meals.

Burt said a new franchisee for her company doesn't necessarily need a restaurant background. She and her husband have their own corporate training center and they have trained franchisees brand-new to the restaurant business. The company also sends in a team to help the new franchisee through the opening, she said.

In terms of investment, the franchisee would be taking on a lease for the building and would need about $125,000 in liquid capital for the equipment package, plus the ability to borrow, Burt said.

"I'd love to talk to anybody interested and I'd really love to be in your city," she added.

For more information, check out the chain's Web site at
www.maid-rite.com, or call the company at 515-276-5448.

Help available for dieters

Sandra Ahten, a local artist and former group leader for Weight Watchers, has started a diet support group of her own called Changes, with Mary Beth Wade, a professional life coach and psychology professor.

Ahten said she had been operating a private support group from her home and studio and recently decided to open it to the public as a business.

Changes is based in the Lincoln Building at 44 E. Main St., C, and offers weekly group meetings on Tuesdays and Saturdays.

Ahten said Changes strives to find the diet that is right for each individual and to support each person in following the program. She said she supports any diet that is reasonable and healthy.

For more information, call 367-6345, or visit the Web site at
www.spiritofsandra.com and click on "classes."

New store opens

Bloomington-based Computer Deli has opened a store in Champaign at 39 E. Marketview Drive.

It carries more than 1,200 items for building, upgrading and repairing a desktop computer.

"We're kind of like a NAPA Auto Parts for computer people," said owner Todd Guttschow .

Store hours are 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m Sunday.

Other Computer Deli stores are in Springfield, Peoria and Bloomington.

Computer repairs being offered

If you're having trouble with your computer, technician Michael Hunt of Champaign will make house calls through his new business called Your PC Connection.

Hunt is offering repairs and custom computer builds and is serving Champaign-Urbana and Savoy.

Hunt said he's worked with computers for about 10 years, including three years with Best Buy as a computer technician.

He can be reached at 721-0651

or by e-mail at
yourpcconnection@soltec.net

Are you opening a new business or changing something at your existing business? Debra Pressey can be reached by phone at 351-5229, or
800-252-3346; by e-mail at dpressey@news-gazette.com, or regular mail at The News-Gazette, c/o It's Your Business column, P.O. Box 677, Champaign, IL 61824-0677.

 

 

 

COMPUTING PRICE CLIMB // PC COSTS REVERSE DOWNWARD COURSE

Pantagraph, The (Bloomington, IL) - Saturday, January 15, 2000

Author/Byline: ASSOCIATED PRESS WITH PANTAGRAPH REPORTS
Edition: MAIN
Section: BUSINESS
Page: D6

For people used to constantly dropping computer prices, here's a shocker: It's suddenly tougher to buy a cheap home PC.

A recent spike in computer parts prices and reduced competition among manufacturers is pushing up prices for the first time in years. At the same time, fortunes are flagging for upstart companies that gave away PCs to anyone who signed a long-term contract for Internet service or agreed to watch advertisements on the Web.

While the upward trend in prices could be just a blip, it's renewing questions about how long computer prices can continue a largely uninterrupted decline that has encouraged the spread of high technology through the home and workplace.

For now, higher prices may give a short-term lift to profits at PC makers, who have been struggling to make money. But they also could discourage some first-time computer buyers from taking the plunge, as well as drive up technology costs for small businesses.

Local residents can rest easy, however - despite concerns nationwide, retailers say pricing in the Twin Cities seems fairly stable.

Todd Guttschow , store manager at Connecting Point Computer Center, 1306 E. Empire St. in Bloomington, said he has not seen an increase in prices at the store.

Furthermore, Guttschow noted, he "can't imagine" prices are going to rise on PCs anytime soon.

A representative from Best Buy, 2103 N. Veterans Parkway, also had seen little change in prices. Because computer pricing is "a day-to-day thing," the representative said it is difficult to predict if cost increases will make their way to Bloomington-Normal.

Doug Sharp, owner of Desktop Micros, Inc., 1116 E. Oakland Ave. in Bloomington, said any increases he has seen are attributable to chip shortages and problems with discount computer makers.

"Besides the recent chip supply problems, one contributing factor is that some of the manufacturers of the really low-priced home PCs have gone out of business," he explained. "These companies tended to promise more than they could deliver and still make a profit."

Across the country, the average price of home computers sold at retail abruptly reversed course last fall, edging up from $790 in September to $844 in December, according to the PC Data research firm.

Driving the prices are two trends. Rivalry among PC companies dropped dramatically last year after IBM, Packard Bell-NEC and Acer pulled out of retail stores, smarting from price wars that had slashed profits. The reduced competition gave the remaining heavyweights - notably Compaq and Hewlett-Packard - more leeway to raise prices.

Also lending upward pressure was an increase in memory chip costs last fall, the aftermath of an earthquake in Taiwan that damaged some chip factories and disrupted supplies.

This month, Hewlett-Packard raised its lowest-priced home computer by $100 to $649, and Compaq Computer raised its cheapest model by $150 to $699. The prices don't include rebates or a $150 monitor.

Even eMachines, an upstart that vaulted to become the No. 3 PC seller at retail last year on the strength of its $400 machine, is crawling up the price ladder. While eMachines still sells that cheap model, it recently introduced $800 and $900 home computers that sport more processing power and hard drive storage space.

The unusual trend is casting doubts on the longevity of the flurry of free PC offers that have hit the market.

Just last summer, America Online, Microsoft's MSN and other major Internet service providers trotted out promotions that gave PC buyers $400 rebates in exchange for buying three years of Internet access at a cost of $21.95 a month.

For buyers of the $400 eMachines model, the offer amounted to a free PC.

While those offers still stand, manufacturers might have to become creative to keep things free, analysts say. For example, makers might still sell cheap PCs, but offer fewer features, such as a 2-gigabyte hard drive instead of 3 gigabytes.

"I'm sure there will still be deals around," said Roger Kay, an analyst at International Data Corp., the high-tech research and consulting firm. "But there may be some other gimmick to squeeze it through."

In addition, start-ups trying to lure consumers with freebies continue to face huge risks.

Free-PC, a champion of freebies that gave away PCs to consumers who agreed to watch advertisements, was swallowed up by eMachines last fall. DirectWeb.com stopped giving away PCs in October.

One problem, analysts say, is getting users to stick with an Internet service that makes money by parading a steady stream of advertisements across a user's screen.

Despite problems, some providers of free PCs are persevering.

PeoplePC offers a fairly powerful unit made by Toshiba or Compaq with monitor, speakers and three years of Web access from MCI WorldCom for $24.95 a month and no down payment other than a shipping fee of $48.

Caption: PHOTO, GRAPH
For the first time in years, the cost of personal computers is climbing because of fading rivalries among manufacturers. Although the rise could be a blip, it has raised questions about how long computer prices will continue to decline.

 

 

MAC IN THE BOX>APPLE'S NEW IMAC RETURNS TO THE ALL-IN-ONE STYLE OF THE PAST -- WITH MUCHY MORE THAN STYLE PUT INTO IT

Journal Star (Peoria, IL) - Saturday, August 8, 1998

Author/Byline: VALERIE LILLEY
Edition: ALL
Section: BUSINESS NEWS
Page: C1

PEORIA -- Just when you thought PCs were the only option you had, the Mac is coming back.

Apple Computer Inc. is re-entering the consumer market next week as it debuts the iMac, its newest Macintosh computer with a suggested retail price of $1,299. "It's one of the first lower-cost computers from Macintosh in a long time," said Kevin Hause, an analyst with International Data Corp. in Mountain View, Calif. "It's Apple's entrance into the more affordable market. " Back to the box The iMac, which was unveiled May 6, returns to Apple's roots with its all-in-one-box design, which avoids the mess of cables commonly found behind personal computers.

"You don't have the separate monitor, CPU, speakers," said Jim Martin, a Peoria resident who is considering switching from a Gateway PC to the iMac. "It is the compactness."

The box itself should be a selling point. People look at the box "the way they would if they were buying a car or house. . . . It's not just another beige box," said Paul Rybarczyk, who writes the newsletter for the local Mac user's club. "It looks neat."

It also has a built-in ethernet, allowing home users to network their home computers the same way businesses network their computers.

Hause estimates that one-third of households with PCs have more than one. As people upgrade, they keep their old computers or pass them along to their children.

"Connecting them is a natural and convenient thing to do," he said. "You can communicate between file sharing or playing games across the network or sharing broad-band Internet access. " All the trimmings Besides being set up for networking, the iMac also comes with an infrared port for wireless communications. "It's kinda like the remote on your TV set," Rybarczyk said. "In the future, you can just point your camera at the computer and beam it in there instead of physically downloading the pictures."

It also has a 233mhz PowerPC G3 processor that Steve Jobs, Apple's chief executive officer, touts as being faster than the Pentium chips on the market. Other features include a built-in 15-inch monitor, 32MB SDRAM (expandable to 128MB), 2MB SGRAM (expandable to 6 MB), 4GB hard drive, 24x CD-ROM drive, built-in 56k modem, Universal Serial Bus keyboard with a matching mouse and Mac Operating System 8.1. Its bundled software includes Quicken Deluxe '98, FaxSTF, MetaCreation's Kai's Photo Soap, AppleWorks 5 (formerly ClarisWorks) and Microsoft Internet Explorer. So how to get one? Plagued by slow Mac sales, Apple withdrew its personal computers in February from major national retialers, instead opting to focus on CompUSA, the biggest large-store PC chain. There also are authorized Apple dealers and mail-order companies on the Internet. The only place nearby to buy one is at Connecting Point, 7815 N. Knoxville Ave., according to a listing of authorized dealers on the company's home page (
www.apple.com). Connecting Point will carry some iMacs in its demonstration rooms, said Todd Guttschow , general manager. Bright future? The iMac alone won't solve Apple's low 3.2 percent share in the home computer market it once dominated. But Hause said, "The iMac is certainly a step in the right direction."

The company also is on a financial comeback. Apple announced profits of $101 million, or $.65 per diluted share, for the company's fiscal 1998 third quarter and a first quater profit of $55 million, or $.38 per diluted share. @ART CAPTION: Chart - entitled The iMac may be found in a separate document under the same heading.

Caption: Chart - entitled The iMac may be found in a separate document under the same heading.

 

 

 

APPLE REDUCING NUMBER OF COMPUTER OUTLETS>PEORIA WILL BE LEFT WITH ONLY ONE STORE CARRYING MACINTOSH

Journal Star (Peoria, IL) - Tuesday, February 3, 1998

Author/Byline: Valerie Lilley
Edition: ALL
Section: BUSINESS NEWS
Page: C3

PEORIA -- In about a month, it'll be nearly impossible to buy an Apple or Macintosh computer in the Peoria area.

Apple Computer Inc., battered by slow Macintosh sales, today said it was withdrawing its personal computers from major national retailers to focus on CompUSA, the biggest large-store PC chain.

The only place left in Peoria to buy the computers and accessories is Connecting Point Computer Center, according to a listing of authorized dealers on the company's home page.

That leaves a near-monopoly for the store on Knoxville Avenue.

"A lot of people order on the Web or mail order," said Todd Guttschow , general manager for both Connecting Points in Peoria and Bloomington and a Mac user himself. "There are so many products out there for the MacIntosh that any one dealership can't stock those."

He said he was not increasing his inventory or expanding to handle any additional business that might come about from the company's decision to withdraw.

Best Buy announced last week that it was dropping Apple computers from its stores because of slow sales. Apple is also phasing Macs out of Circuit City, Computer City, Office Max and Sears.

"On the national basis, we expect our inventory to last through the end of February," said Morgan Stewart, spokesman for Circuit City.

He would not comment on the Peoria store.

Best Buy will sell the remainder of computers and accessories in inventory, which is unknown how long it will last. The Peoria store will continue to sell MacIntosh software, said Heidi Geller, spokeswoman for the store.

In addition to CompUSA's 148 stores, Apple will continue to be sold in regional retail chains, specialized Apple dealers, computer dealers and catalogs.

The move is just the latest pullback by Apple, whose Macs are progressively losing share of a home computer market it once dominated. Computer buyers have instead been buying less expensive computers running on Microsoft's Windows operating system.

Apple said its sales at CompUSA have grown since the chain began more aggressively promoting its PCs last year. CompUSA focuses more on education, design and publishing, important Apple markets.

"This does not represent a retreat from retail, but instead a redefinition of what the retail buying experience will be for our customers," Apple vice president Mitch Mandich said.

Apple also is struggling to cut costs and rebound from a string of financial losses. It recently reported a $47 million first-quarter profit, but it has lost $1.8 billion in the past two years.

 

 

Connecting Point opening in larger, remodeled site

Pantagraph, The (Bloomington, IL) - Monday, August 10, 1992

Author/Byline: KATHY McKINNEY
Edition: FINAL
Section: BUSINESS
Page: D1

Connecting Point Computer began its fourth move in 10 years Friday and plans to open today at its newly remodeled location at 1306 E. Empire St., Bloomington. That is the former location of D&B Ace Hardware.

The store moved into its current location at 1228 Towanda Plaza after a fire destroyed 1226 Towanda Plaza in June 1991. At the time of the fire it was remodeling an adjacent store in Towanda Plaza for expansion. That area burned as well.

The fire June 10, 1991, destroyed the middle building of a line of three on the north side of the strip shopping center. A facility for Heartland Community College has been constructed in that spot.

Connecting Point's new building, which is across Towanda Avenue from its current location, at 9,400 square feet is only slightly larger than the old, 8,400-square-foot store, but seems much larger because of its openness, said Todd Guttschow , vice president and sales manager.

"The new building helps create a sense of space," he said. "There is a large, open sales space for display, and the office area is more integrated into the sales area."

The latter will enable people in the office to be available to help on the sales floor if needed, said Zona Guttschow, president, who started the business with her husband, Tom. "Our goal is to take care of the customers. If we can't see them, we can't do that."

The service area in the new building also is more clearly defined to help customers, said Todd Guttschow , son of the owners.

The store is all on one level, and remodeling has made it totally accessible to handicapped people, Mrs. Guttschow said, with remodeled restrooms, wider doors and ramps.

The store, which offers sales, service and support of Macintosh computers, has a full-time customer trainer for operation of the machines. The company has 23 employees in Bloomington and seven in Peoria.

It opened in August 1982 in a 1,000-square-foot store in Towanda Plaza, fronting on Towanda Avenue, Mrs. Guttschow said. Todd, who was still in school then, worked part time at the store. A daughter, Kim, is head of purchasing.

Caption: PHOTO
Todd Guttschow , left, co-owner of Connecting Point Computer, helped Mike Ward and Bob Pagoria move a service parts bin into the store's new location at 1306 E. Empire St., Bloomington, the former site of D&B Ace Hardware. Connecting Point Firday began its move from 1228 Townada Plaza, Bloomington.

 

 

 

the MOD SQUAD / Why settle for a boring gray tower when you can have a PC that's a work of art?

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, April 13, 2003

Author/Byline: KATHRYN REM STAFF WRITER
Section: SUNDAY A.M.
Page: 17

There's no need for Shawn Evans to turn on a desk lamp or overhead light when he's in his home office late at night putting in some computer time. Illumination is provided by his two personal computers, modified to allow red, green and blue lights to radiate through transparent windows fitted into the sides of the cases.

"It's cool to look at. It's going beyond having an average, everyday computer," said the Auburn man, a PC specialist and free-lance computer "modder."

Just as auto aficionados spiff up their cars with a variety of ornaments and gizmos, PC modders have taken to modifying high-performance personal computer cases into functional works of art.

Called "case modding," the hobby includes retrofitting the inner workings of PCs to include lighted fan covers, rounded light cables, cathode light sticks, black lights, water coolers with dyed water and other marvels that can be viewed through an all-Plexiglas case or a window cut into a solid case.

One of Evans' machines glows an eerie neon green, his successful attempt to achieve an "alien" look. The other has a festive appearance, with red, green and blue rays beaming from a cross-cut window.

The popularity of modding has accelerated in the past couple of years as manufacturers started selling modding accessories and cases with pre-cut panes. Prior to that, modders improvised, often with the same tools and products used to add muscle to cars.

Back then, Nick Rollins of Chatham appropriated automobile underbody neon kits to make his computers glow. And he carved his own case windows with the same type of saw used in auto body shops to cut sunroofs.

"People would say, 'Are you crazy? You're just destroying a good machine.' Now people who have never bought a computer come into the shop wanting a modified one," said Rollins, a former auto shop worker employed by Computer Deli , 2922 Constitution Drive. He also has his own service-and-repair business, Sangamon PC.

In addition to aesthetics, modders say their handiwork has practical benefits.

"There's a performance issue," said Rollins. "The faster processors become, the hotter they become. What you try to do is get a good flow of air to come in the front to cool them. You're making the inside aerodynamic so the air isn't restricted. You can do modifications inside that aren't visual."

See-through panes can alert the user to dust buildup inside the case. Dust can plug fans and heat processors.

Edward Chen of Albany, N.Y., is the co-author of "Build Your Own High-Performance Gamers' Mod PC" (McGraw-Hill/Osborne, 2003) and is a Web programmer for AOL/Time Warner. He said the popularity of modding has been spurred by LAN (local area network) parties. That's where people haul their PCs to a central location, such as a basement or rental hall, and they all hook up to a high-speed network to play games and share files.

"People looked around and found out that towers are bland," Chen said. Enhancing them can lead to the dance of one-upmanship.

Chen has seen PC cases painted with intricate patterns and seen the guts repackaged into wooden boxes and even a microwave oven. Rollins said that artists paint landscapes on cases and affix fiberglass sculptures. Some systems have sound-sensing lights that create multi-colored light shows to music. Others are done in school colors.

Nathan Donovan of Springfield has sold many modified computers after showing them off at LAN parties.

"They say, 'Wow! Nice! Where'd you get that stuff?' " said Donovan, owner of comic book shop Quick Stop Comics and PC service-and-repair business Quick Stop Custom Computer, both at 2915 S. MacArthur Blvd.

He got into modding after tearing apart a junker bought at a state auction six years ago, when he was 13. The PC he uses at his business is bathed in blue lights, an effect intended to evoke calm waters.

Donovan is planning to alter another one to reflect his favorite comic book character, The Punisher. He envisions red lights beaming from a window in the shape of a fist-shaped skull, which is The Punisher's logo.

"Whenever I do anything, I want it to have my own personal touch, my signature."

Novice modders can buy a colored fan light for as little as $15. A complete lighting system with cut-out case can run $150 to $500. PC service-and-repair companies can do the work, or accomplished do-it-yourselfers can take a stab at it.

"It's not that difficult, but you need to use a steady hand," said Evans, who works at Computer Deli in addition to running his own service-and-repair business.

Donovan cautions: "If you get condensation in there, you can fry the motherboard."

Rollins predicts the popularity of case modding will grow as computers move out of basements and bedrooms and into living rooms and kitchens. Chen agrees, adding that inventive designs by modders will spur manufacturers to market the products they need.

Modding, said Evans, signals to others that a computer is well-built and crafted with care.

"Regular computers look like a boss should be standing over your shoulder," he added. "These are not as intimidating."

Said Donovan, "Modding makes it look like your computer is from the future."

Caption: 1. Shawn Evans' Auburn home office is illuminated by the custom-installed lights in his two computers. / 2. The inner workings of Evans' computer are exposed and illuminated with red lights.

 

 

 

COMIC relief / * How one Springfield teen turned his lifelong passion into a business

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, November 5, 2002

Author/Byline: HAAMID JOHNSON and FRANCESCA JAROSZ VOICE CORRESPONDENTS
Section: VOICE
Page: 21

A hand-written poster taped on the front window of Quick Stop Comics reads, "I assure you we're open" - a line from the cult-hit movie "Clerks."

The store's owner, 18-year-old Nathan Donovan, stands behind the counter in his favorite faded black "Clerks (The Comic Book)" T-shirt.

Quick Stop Comics, adjacent to retro novelty shop Penny Lane on MacArthur Boulevard in Springfield, is marked only with a handmade wooden sign on the roof that reads "Quick Stop Comics."

But inside, the store is a treasure trove for comic nuts.

Nathan displays his comics for sale on the walls. On the back wall, there are a few valuable editions he has collected over the years, such as the first issue of "The Amazing Spider-Man," a comic book that is worth $2,000.

"That's my pride and joy," Nathan said. "I feel bad having it here, but it's a good conversation piece."

When he was 12, Nathan began using his allowance to support his comic-book addiction. As a student at Springfield High School, he worked at Best Buy, Arby's and Computer Deli .

"Pretty much all my paycheck went toward buying comics," Nathan said.

Last September, just three months after he graduated from high school, Nathan turned his passion into profit by opening Quick Stop Comics.

"I needed a place that was easily visible to be successful," Nathan said. "Right now I would say business is picking up. I mean, we got young kids and even old guys coming in."

Six months before he opened his store, Nathan was a computer salesman at Computer Deli , saving the money he earned there to finance the opening of Quick Stop. Nathan still works at the computer store part time to help offset some of the cost of maintaining his own store.

"I'm the only one investing money, but sometimes my parents give me money - only when I beg them," Nathan said.

Nathan described the stereotypical comic-book junkie as an overweight, smelly basement-dweller with severe acne. (Nathan, an avid comic-book fan since the fourth grade, does not fit the description.)

To Nathan, the people who don't read comics are an even stranger species than comic collectors.

"I know a lot of people who don't read all the comic-book material, and that's fine, but they are missing some good stuff," Nathan said.

"I try to read everything. That's the best part about comics."

In high school, Nathan said, he was always a little different from the other kids. He never really enjoyed school because there were no comic books around.

"I would pull my comics out many times in the classroom," Nathan said. "I think class curriculum based on comic books would be a good idea."

Instead of paying attention in class, Nathan dreamed of opening his own comic store. But when he shared his plans with friends and peers, they just laughed. Nobody believed that would ever be able to pull it off.

"I still get blown off, and it's hard, but I always say that I have a comic shop and you don't," Nathan said.

Business is good among those who know he's there. Most people, though, don't know his store exists, he said.

"On an average we have 15 to 20 people in here at a time, and the most busiest day of the week would probably be Wednesday in the afternoon," Nathan said. "Out of those 15 or so, I'd say I know two or three of them."

Once in a while, Quick Stop Comics draws comic professionals, such as Springfield native Scott McCullar, 31, who wrote for comic book hero Green Arrow. (His license plate reads "GRN ARO 1.")

McCuller, an art professor at Springfield College in Illinois, met Nathan when he went into Computer Deli about six months ago.

"I was wearing this Green Arrow shirt, and I was looking for something for my computer, when Nathan came up to me and noticed my shirt," McCullar said. "Then we ran into each other again in Chicago for the Wizard World Comic Book Convention, and ever since then we have stayed in touch."

McCullar said that Quick Stop is helping to revive the comic book movement.

"It's great we have this young entrepreneur," he said. "We need to promote more young people to get involved with comic books."

Nathan's store is not just about comics. Next to the comic hero posters there are numerous movie posters adorning the walls.

A TV in the upper left corner plays "Star Wars: Episode 2-Empire Strikes Back" in the background. During a discussion, Nathan pauses for his favorite scene: "Luke, I am your father."

Nathan loves movies almost as much as he loves comics. He is inspired by film directors such as George Lucas ("Star Wars") and Kevin "Silent Bob" Smith ("Clerks").

"When 'Stars Wars Episode 1: The Phamton Menace,' first came out, I went to Parkway Pointe dressed as Darth Maul," Nathan said.

Nathan's loyalty, however, remains with comics. When he was 14 Nathan stopped collecting comics for two years. That was because publisher Marvel killed off his favorite super hero, the Punisher. Nathan was devastated.

"When they killed the Punisher, I was mad because they had him commit suicide," Nathan said. "But then they brought the Punisher back after about two years after his death. You can always expect the character to come back after their death, and then I started (collecting) again."

As of now, Nathan has no plans to attend college. That's because no one offers a major in comics.

"No way, I would spend all my time skipping class and reading comics," he said. "That's why college is not for me."

Caption: Nathan Donovan, 18, looks through his prized possession, the first issue of "The Amazing Spider-Man," at Quick Stop Comics.

 

 

SEVERAL NEW RETAILERS MOVING INTO PARKWAY POINTE SHOPPING COMPLES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, October 17, 1999

Edition: M1,M2
Section: BUSINESS
Page: 59

An upscale beverage shop, a computer center and one of the nation's largest long-distance phone carriers are the latest retailers planned for the

Parkway Pointe shopping complex in Springfield.

FRIAR TUCK'S, a specialty shop featuring roasted coffees, wines, beer, cigars and other products will occupy 12,600 square feet of a new retail center at the south end of the shopping complex. The shop is tentatively scheduled to open in mid-November.

THE COMPUTER DELI , specializing in computer upgrades and service, has committed to 1,200 square feet and long-distance carrier SPRINT PCS has leased the remaining 2,000 square feet in the newest retail center. Neither of the companies has announced specific opening dates.

Though growth around the city has evened out in the past couple of years -- there have been a series of new commercial developments on the north, east and south sides of Springfield -- Parkway Pointe has remained a major draw for west-side growth.

A Walgreen drug store opened in the center earlier this year. Parkway Pointe, by the way, has just marked its 10th year. The Menards home center was the first business to open in the complex.

FRIENDLY CHEVROLET will complete the move from Stevenson Drive to the new Prairie Crossing Auto Mall as of Friday. A Honda of Illinois dealership owned by Friendly also is making the move.

The dealership becomes the second to relocate to the new auto mall at Interstate 72 and Illinois 4. Charlie Sattler Oldsmobile and Saturn of Springfield opened earlier this month.

The Landmark Automotive Group on Dirksen Parkway is scheduled to open in the auto mall early next year.

STATE FARM has been getting more attention for its auto replacement parts than its banking ventures of late.

But the Bloomington-based insurer has quietly gone about developing a virtual bank -- all the business is through agencies, over the phone or electronically -- that could set a trend for the industry.

The first banking services were introduced four months ago in central Illinois and the St. Louis market. Beginning next month, the company will roll out the products in the remainder of Illinois and Missouri.

Checking accounts previously available only to State Farm agents, employees and staff now will be open to anyone. Other services include savings accounts, certificates of deposits, loans and home mortgages.

An ATM card has been introduced, and plans are to add Internet access and a line of credit cards in the near future.

State Farm already has announced plans to expand its banking operations to Arizona, and eventually to the rest of the country.

LOST CARGO LIQUIDATORS has opened at 213 S. Fifth St., the former site of Fannie May Candies in downtown Springfield.

The business specializes in imported, reproduction furniture, accents, toys and collectibles. Some antiques also will be available. The owners are Steve and Karen Rhodes, Michael Musgrove, and Charlotte Rixner, all of Springfield.

Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Friday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. The phone number is 525-6931. Information also is available via e-mail,
lostcrgo@fgi.net.

The Fannie May shop closed in June after more than 60 years in downtown Springfield.

CHINA TOWNE, a ceramics and china shop that allows customers to decorate their own products, has moved to 1502 Wabash Ave. The business had been located on South MacArthur Boulevard.

Hours at the new location are 9 a.m. to noon and 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday; noon to 9 p.m. Wednesday and Friday, and noon to 6 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday. The new phone number is 698-8198. What a difference a year makes. ILLINOVA CORP., parent company of Illinois Power, last week reported earnings of 74 cents per share for July through September compared to 37 cents per share for the same period of 1998. Company officials said Illinova is also on target to meet the estimated earnings of $1.50 per share for the year.

At this point in 1998, Illinova was basically writing off the year as a wash because of big prices paid for extra energy during a summer heat wave. Unlike last year, the company has had more than enough generating capacity to meet this year's demand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kingtech – mike lamb – micro age – apple dlrshp

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TITLE: PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 15, 1999



KING TECHNOLOGY Inc. announces two personnel changes.

Joshua Cruickshank

has been promoted to operations coordinator of tracking systems and facilities maintenance.

 

He has been with the firm since 1998.

Sherry Miller has joined the firm as executive assistant. She will be responsible for assisting in the administration of all office functions.

 

 

 

 

TITLE: PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, January 17, 1999

 KING TECHNOLOGY Inc. in Springfield announces two promotions.

Christina Llewellyn has been named

 

supervisor of facilities management services.

(ed. Note: bullshit title, they have no facilities)

 

Her responsibilities will include client liaison and supervision of in-house staff involved with facilities management operations.

Chris McDaniel has been named technical services supervisor

 

. McDaniel will interface with tech services clients and supervise all technical staff.

Both have been with King Technology since 1995.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


TITLE: PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, October 11, 1998

 

 CARRIE CIACCIO has joined the accounting software division of King Technology Inc., 6045 N. Cotton Hill Road.

Ciaccio joins the firm with 5 years of experience in the accounting and bookkeeping fields and will specialize in Solomon accounting support and training.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TITLE: PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 18, 1999

WITH PIX JOSEPH BONANSINGA (ONLY)

JOSEPH BONANSINGA

has joined King Technology Inc. as technical consultant. He will be responsible for technical systems design and implementation, programming and business development consultation.

In addition,

Joshua Cruickshank of King Technology

has achieved the status of network cabling specialist in accordance with the guidelines established by C-Tech Associates Inc. and

Lucent Technologies.

 

 

 

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, July 31, 1997

 W. Guy Moore W. Guy Moore, 55, of Springfield died Tuesday at Memorial Medical Center.

He was born June 19, 1942, in

 

Lima, Ohio, the son of William and Elizabeth Brewer Moore.

 

He married Gerry Weidner.

Mr. Moore, a U.S. Air Force veteran, serving in Vietnam, was a computer analyst programmer consultant

 

for King Technology .

Survivors: wife, Gerry Moore; a son, Peter Moore of Springfield; and two brothers, Robert and William Moore.

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 27, 1997

 Grossner-Friel Melissa Dawn Friel of Chatham and

 

*Timothy Michael Grossner

 

of Auburn were married at 2 p.m. June 28 at St. Benedict's Catholic Church in Auburn by the Rev. Dan LaCount.

The bride is the daughter of James and Phyllis "Pam" Friel of Chatham. The groom is the son of Anthony and Susan Grossner of Auburn.

Serving as maid of honor was Shannon Udey. Bridesmaids were Amy Ihlenfeldt, Andrea Grossner, Melissa Udey and Monica Schmitt. Flower girls were Lydia Draper and Allyson Ihlenfeldt.

Best man was Casey Grossner. Groomsmen were Jay and David Richmond, Matthew Friel and David Loyd. Ushers were Donald Ihlenfeldt and Mark Fenoglio. Ringbearer was Nathan Draper.

A reception was held at the KC Hall, Virden.

The bride is a graduate of Glenwood High School and Illinois State University. She is employed by Bergner's. The groom is a graduate of Auburn High School and attended Lincoln Land Community College.

 

He is employed by King Technology .

The couple will reside in Auburn.

 

 

 

Landis: FDIC likes to slip into banks to avoid panic

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, December 27, 2009

A few finishing touches remain, but KING TECHNOLOGY INC., a consulting and technology firm, has moved into the former Buck's Hat building at 3 N. Old Capitol Plaza. The family-owned company, which is nearing its 20th year in business, had operated in a temporary facility while the renovation was completed.

 

 

Tim Landis: Technology firm to move into Buck's Building

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, September 27, 2009

Author/Byline: TIM LANDIS, THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER
Section: business

It has taken quite a bit longer than anticipated, but KING TECHNOLOGY INC. of Springfield should complete its move to one of the oldest historic buildings on the Old Capitol Plaza within a couple of weeks.

The family-owned technology and consulting company purchased the Buck's Building at 3 N. Old Capitol Plaza in the fall of 2005 after deciding to sell the

 

firm's headquarters at Cotton Hill and Toronto roads.

King Technology was founded in 1990. After selling the former headquarters to developers of a retail strip center, the business relocated to a "temporary" location on the east side of Old Capitol Plaza.

"We're really cramped, and everyone is champing at the bit to get in there,"

 

said co-founder and chairman Rich King. The company, which also has a Chicago office, has 14 employees in Springfield.



As is often the case with historic buildings, the project turned out to be quite a bit more complicated than anticipated.

Buck's Building is named after Buck's Hat Store. As the name suggests, it was a hat business founded by Fred Buck that operated at the site from 1852 to 1942. A plaque on the front of the building notes it was the first three-story structure in Springfield. The building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.

King said restoring the facade to an original "ornate metal" look turned out to be one of the more difficult jobs.

"We had to have it fabricated, cut and built. We ordered it from California, but the pieces came from six different places," said King.

The building also had been vacant for several years before King purchased it in 2005. The last tenant was a law firm.

The building's sale also was complicated by 2001 plans to construct a downtown "vista" for the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum. The plan called for leveling the block where the Buck's Building sits, but it never got much beyond a proposal.

King said he expects inspections to be completed in the next two weeks as the final touches go on the facade. The company plans to occupy the first two floors and lease space on the ground floor.

In addition to the technology and consulting business,

the company operates eGrain, an electronic farm commodities trading system, and

Identi-Check, a pre-employment screening service.

All three companies will move to the new headquarters.

Meanwhile, THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF SURVEYING next door is still shooting for an opening by the end of this year. A museum Web site indicates the final phase of the work includes designing and building exhibits.

The museum relocated to Springfield from Michigan to take advantage of a tie-in to Abraham Lincoln, who worked as a deputy surveyor in Sangamon County from 1833 to 1837. The Web site is
http://www.nationalmuseumofsurveying.org/.

 

 

PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, March 25, 2007



ISAAC KING has been promoted to vice president of operations at King Technology Inc. of Springfield. He will be responsible for internal operations, including financial, administrative, HR, Web design, geographic information systems and network services.

King also will be responsible for overseeing the design and redevelopment of the Buck Building on the Old Capitol Plaza, which was built in 1855 and purchased by King Tech last summer.

 

 

Software design company King Techonolgy buys Buck's Building

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, September 27, 2005

Author/Byline: TIM LANDIS BUSINESS EDITOR
Section: MARKETPLACE
Page: 29

Buck's Building once housed a designer of hats, gloves and capes. The new owners design software.

King Technology Inc., a family-owned software design and consulting firm at 6045 N. Cotton Hill Road, has acquired the building at 3 North Old Capitol Plaza, which has been vacant for several years. Buck's Hat Store, which operated from that location from 1852 to 1942, was founded by Fred D. Buck.

A plaque on the front of the structure notes it became the first three-story building in Springfield in 1855. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.

"I think we're going to be really happy being down there where everything is happening. We've wanted to get downtown for sometime and get better exposure," said Richard King, president of King Technology .

The firm was founded in 1990 by King and his wife, Kay, and has been at its current location since 1993.

King said the first two floors of Buck's Building would be renovated for office space. The third floor possibly will be converted for residential use.

"We're waiting for the architectural plans to come back, and we're told it then takes two to three months to complete the work," King said, adding that the facade and a basement would be renovated.

The company also operates eGrain, an electronic filing system for farm commodity contracts, and
Identi-Check, which does employment background checks. All three companies will move to the downtown location.

King Technology has 25 employees, including four in Chicago
.

 

The existing headquarters is for sale or lease.

Springfield real-estate developer Charlie Adams and a partner purchased Buck's Building in the mid-1980s and leased it as office space. The property has been vacant since the last tenant, a law firm, moved out several years ago.

Adams said sale of the property was complicated by a 2001 proposal that would have leveled much of the surrounding block to make way for a "vista" tied to the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum.

Buck's Building, also listed as 527 E. Washington St., is immediately west of the presidential library.

The vista plan eventually was dropped, and Adams said completion of the library and museum revived interest in the location.

"After the library opened, and it really looked like the museum would open, interest picked up. As well it should. It's bringing quite a few people downtown," he said.

Use of the Buck's Building also would be the final piece of an overall revival of commercial and retail development in the 500 block of East Washington. The block is anchored on the west by National City Bank and the east by a Pease's Candy Shop.

Springfield developers Bob Egizii and John Pruitt purchased the former Roberts Bros. building,

also in the middle of the block and adjacent to Buck's Building, earlier this year and plan to convert the property for commercial-retail use.

Caption: Buck's Building, 527 E. Washington St., has been bought by King Technology Inc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact Us »

Corporate Headquarters
Identi-Check, Inc.
3 West Old State Capital Plaza St. 10
Springfield, Illinois 62701

URL
www.identi-check.com

President
Micah R. King

Security Consultant
Jennifer Vossman

Telephone & Fax
217-753-4311; 217-753-3492

Email

Note proximity to dad’s apt. and move date – 4 wheeler parked running upwind outside dad’s apt – exposure to stim, sleep, headache - pain

 

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=springfield+il+6045+N.+Cotton+Hill+Road.&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=33.02306,56.162109&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=6045+N+Cotton+Hill+Rd,+Springfield,+Sangamon,+Illinois+62712&ll=39.710455,-89.634597&spn=0.007824,0.021887&t=h&z=16

 

 

POLICE BEAT

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, June 22, 2005

* A four-wheeler was stolen from the outside of King Technology Inc., 6045 N. Cotton Hill Road.

The victim told police he had the red 1999 Kawasaki KEF300 A5 for sale in the yard and parked it on the south side of the building about 5:30 p.m. Monday to leave it overnight.

When he returned at 7 a.m. Tuesday, the four-wheeler was gone.

The victim said he does not know who could have taken the vehicle, which is worth $2,000.

 

 

 

 

Jennings now dir at ilda – hartke bails, wife poisoned

 

Virtual crops / eGrain Inc. has better idea for PLCs and warehouse receipts

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, September 19, 2004

Author/Byline: TIM LANDIS Business Editor
Section: MARKETPLACE
Page: 49

Fall harvest comes in triplicate for farmers.

Two key pieces of the currency of harvest - price-later contracts and grain warehouse receipts - serve as the basis for a variety of commercial loans and federal farm programs. The documents are used in thousands of grain transactions each year involving farmers, elevators, banks, farm managers and millions of bushels of grain.

In most cases, the transactions also mean a bin full of paperwork, with copies for farmers, buyers, bankers and regulators.

A Springfield software design and consulting firm, King Technology Inc., is trying to shift that mass of paperwork to the Internet after winning approval from the state as the first provider of Web-based, electronic price-later contracts in Illinois.

The company also is seeking to become the first in the nation to win approval from the U.S. Department of Agriculture for an even more significant change - electronic warehouse receipts for grain.

"This is definitely the direction the industry is going," said Richard King, president and CEO of King Technology . The family owned company, founded in 1990, has 24 employees. King's wife, Kay, is vice president of internal and external affairs. Two sons also work at the company, Isaac as manager of internal operations and Micah as manager of business development.

Richard King said the electronic PLC and warehouse receipt network is in keeping with the firm's "strategy" in software design and management consulting. But he added it also presents unique challenges.

"This is far more complicated, because no one is doing it and there's no model to follow," he said.

King Technology has formed a new division, eGrain Inc., to manage the system, applied for a patent on the networks and hired a St. Louis consulting firm to market the program. The first elevator already has signed up for the PLC network.

King said sheer numbers convinced him of the demand for electronic PLCs and warehouse receipts based on the nearly 400 licensed grain dealers and warehouses in Illinois and more than 1,000 grain elevators.

Illinois has more grain storage capacity - 1.3 billion bushels commercial and another 1.3 billion on farms - than any other state, according to figures from the Illinois Department of Agriculture.

Price-later contracts, also known as price-delayed contracts, are basically a promise of payment at a future price agreed to between the grain buyer and the farmer. It also is a way for farmers to reduce the risk of on-farm storage.

Warehouse receipts are the "collateral" of the grain industry for commercial loans, as well as federal loan and commodity programs.

King said buyers and sellers often use 1,000 to 10,000 PLCs per season, depending on the size of their operations. And when there is a change in the state grain code, as occurred in 2003, it often requires the purchase of a new supply of contracts.

"This (eGrain) would eliminate the need to physically store those receipts," King said.

The system also is designed to speed up the process by reducing reliance on the mail to deliver contracts, provide e-mail confirmation of transactions, eliminate the need for PLC supplies at multiple warehouses and to streamline the processing of bank or government farm loans based on the contracts.

Grain elevators, warehouses and other commercial customers pay an annual $500 subscription for eGrain. Clients use a password to log in, view, print and sign price-later contracts. The network also creates a history of grain transactions and can supply information to regulators.

Bob Leach, grain program manager at King Technology , and

application developer Matt Barham

 

spent a year devising a Web-based system for 12 types of grain contracts, ranging from corn and soybeans to wheat and canola.

Leach said electronic-warehouse receipts have been used by the cotton industry since 1993. Research by eGrain found that, of approximately 20 million cotton receipts issued in 2002, only 8 percent were on paper.

Grain is a greater challenge, not only because of the variety of grains, but also because of differences in warehouse receipt and PLC requirements from state to state. King Technology eventually expects to expand electronic PLCs outside of Illinois.

Leach said the USDA is encouraging Web-based electronic transactions for a variety of federal programs, based on farm census data that shows at least 50 percent of producers have Internet access.

"They want it so that no farmer has to walk into a (USDA) office to do business,"

 

Leach said, who was bureau chief for warehouses at the Illinois Department of Agriculture before joining King Technology .

The 2003 rewrite of the Illinois grain code included authorization for electronic transactions such as those planned by King Technology , said Tom Jennings, chief of staff at the Illinois Department of Agriculture.

Changes to the grain code also came in the wake of the 2001 financial collapse of Ty-Walk grain elevator in northern Illinois. The failure, which led to prison sentences for two Ty-Walk executives, affected hundreds of farm families and emptied the Illinois Grain Insurance Fund of $5.2 million. The legislature approved $4 million in emergency funds to cover remaining claims.

Jennings said the department began pushing toward electronic transactions and audits several years ago, including through investment in new software and a pilot project on electronic warehouse receipts.

"We did provide for electronic commerce in the (2003) grain code," Jennings said.

The department attempts to audit each of the state's grain elevators and warehouses at least once a year, a paper-intensive process that often requires inspectors to physically inspect records at each of the facilities.

"It can be a very cumbersome, difficult paper trail to follow. They might have to go to eight different locations to compile records," he said.

Jennings said the goal is to shift much of the record-keeping and auditing functions online in the next four to five years.

One other significant change is needed - electronic signatures on grain contracts.

Department attorneys and representatives of the grain industry already have begun meetings on rule changes that would allow electronic signatures, though Jennings said those might require legislative approval.

He added that part of the challenge is to sell the idea of online grain transactions to farmers accustomed to paper copies.

"I would just think of it as electronic banking. I would venture to say farmers use electronic banking and don't think anything about it," he said.

The Grain and Feed Association of Illinois, representing 275 grain elevators statewide, backs the push toward electronic transactions and regulation, said executive vice president Jeff Adkisson.

Elevators also want to make sure there are adequate safeguards in the system for elevators and farmers.

"We see this as a positive step as we continue to automate and more and more people become Internet savvy," Adkisson said, who added that he was pleasantly surprised to learn a Springfield firm might lead the trend.

"A couple of years ago, we became aware of King Technology ," he said. "It oftentimes seems like it's a company far away, and we're having it happen here in our own back yard."

King said his company continues to provide information on a variety of security and access questions to USDA on the proposed system, which could be used at any federally licensed elevator nationwide.

He expects a decision within a matter of weeks.

"We're thinking the approval process should go very quickly now," he said.

Caption:

Richard King, left, president and CEO

of King Technology , and

Bob Leach, grain program manager,

says the company will be one of the first in the country to offer an online grain transaction database to its cliental.

 

 

 

 

 

ANNIVERSARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, August 5, 2003

 Leach-25th

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Leach of Springfield celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary with a dinner in June at

Damon's Restaurant in Bloomington. A biking trip on Mackinac Island is planned for a later date.

Leach and the former Leslie Fotre were married in Chicago.

Mr. Leach is employed at King Technology .

Mrs. Leach has been employed with the state Department of Human Services for 23 years.

They are parents of

two children,

David and

Eric, both of Springfield.

 

 

 

 

CITY LINK TO GOP SITE PROMPTS REVIEW

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, February 5, 1998

Edition: M1,M2
Section: EDITORIAL
Page: 7

Springfield Mayor KAREN HASARA Wednesday ordered that a computer link from the city's computer home page to the Sangamon County Republican Central

Committee's Web site be severed.

"I did not know it was on there," Hasara said of the link.

An out-of-town observer had noticed that under a part of the Springfield page called "Businesses in Springfield," the Sangamon County GOP's site was available via the click of a computer mouse.

ERNIE SLOTTAG, the city's director of communications, knew the Republican site was there, along with other businesses. In fact, he said he had intended to create a link as well to the Sangamon County Democratic Party's site. He said he received a request to do so from the Democrats, though he admitted misplacing it and not finding it until asked about the GOP site on Wednesday. The Democratic request came in Oct. 2, said Slottag, a Democrat serving a Republican mayor in her officially nonpartisan office.

He said the misplacement was an accident, and added that, technically, adding links to the city's Web site is "not as simple as I wish it were."

Slottag said he had been under the impression that any business in Springfield that asked to have a link to the city's site could get one.

As for a political group such as the local GOP, he said, "The feeling is that since this is such a political town, it's part of the fabric of the community."

But Hasara, informed later of the situation, disagreed.

"I told him to take it (the GOP site) off immediately," she said.

The Republican site, by the way, is apparently not a high priority to some top GOP officials. Sangamon County GOP Chairman IRV SMITH, who is also Ward 8 alderman, said he didn't even know his organization had a Web site.

The GOP site apparently got put on the city site by King Technology Inc., a Springfield data-processing and consulting firm that originally worked on setting up the city's site. JOHN POHLMAN, King's general manager, said he thinks the GOP site, also worked on by his firm, was put on as a test of such links in the early going.

The city site --
http://www.springfield.il.us -- features a variety of information, links and pictures that include Hasara and ABE LINCOLN. An update of the site that's in the works will give people more access to newly available information about Lincoln, who, of course, is a big tourist draw.

Hasara said that learning of the GOP site being linked to the city site has made her realize the city needs to develop a policy overseeing the use of the site and what links should be made available. An existing internal telecommunications committee will get the task, she said, and the city council may be asked to review policy recommendations.

"All of this is new territory," she said

 

 

PEASE'S MOVING FROM STEVENSON SITE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, September 15, 1996

 Two computer firms have merged to form KING TECHNOLOGY INC. Regulatory Management Consultants Inc. and its computer division, Clearinghouse Software Specialists, has joined Advantage Consultings Services to provide customers with a single source for their consulting and computer needs, said N. Richard King, president of the newly formed company.

Advantage Consulting was formerly known as Microage Computer Center of Springfield. Among the services offered by the company are management consulting, data processing placement, accounting systems design, computer training, network installation and support, and Internet business consulting.

King Technology now employs more than 24 data processing and management consultants at its offices in Springfield and Chicago.

 

 

 

 

G.M. ANDERSON MOVING TO MONTVALE PLAZA

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, August 11, 1996

ADVANTAGE CONSULTING SERVICES, formerly MicroAge, has merged with KING TECHNOLOGY INC., 6045 N. Cotton Hill Road. Both are in the data processing products and services business.

Mike Lamb and the rest of the staff of

Advantage Consulting have joined King Technology , which is headed by N. Richard King.

Phone for King Technology is 529-6700

 

 

 

 

 

TITLE: PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, May 8, 1992

 

 

 MICHAEL LAMB,

owner of MicroAge Computer Center in Springfield,

 

has received the President's Award for 1991 performance.

The company has been recognized as one of the top MicroAge Centers in the U.S. network. The store has been a member of the MicroAge Network since 1987.

TITLE: PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, October 2, 1991

Edition: M1,M2
Section: BUSINESS
Page: 23

MICHAEL LAMB of MicroAge Computer Centers in Springfield has been awarded the certified netware engineer designation by Novell Inc., the leading

microcomputer network software company.

The CNE designation is given to individuals possessing a high proficiency in installing and supporting Novell networks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Apple – micro-power – heminghous – Cupertino – computer deli is apple

 

HOMEWORK / THE MORNING COMMUTE IS SHORTENED CONSIDERABLY WHEN `GOING TO THE OFFICE' MEANS GOING DOWNSTAIRS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, March 3, 1996

Author/Byline: CHARLYN FARGO ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 17

Four years ago, Gay Davidson of Springfield decided to trade her office hours and business suits for something a bit more flexible.

"I had a retail (computer) store on MacArthur (Boulevard) called MicroAge ," says Davidson. "When the discount houses started coming, I decided to get out of the computer hardware business and do service."

Davidson turned her breakfast nook into a home office for her business, Computer Catalysts, that could accommodate three computers, a fax machine and separate phone lines.

"At first it was hard -- there was no one to talk to, no place to go every day, but I've always been a self-starter," she says.

Davidson is one of nearly 25 million Americans (counting part-time moonlighters) running a home business, according to the March issue of Money Magazine. T That number is expected to double in the next 10 years, predicts the U.S. Department of Labor, a result of companies down sizing and facing uncertain futures.

Common at-home businesses range from consulting practices to graphic design, reports a survey by AT&T. Others involve sales, technical and administrative support, repair services and the arts.

Money Magazine found the majority of the work-out-of-the-home crowd are career veterans, typically around 49 years old and well educated. Full-time business owners earn an average of $58,000 annually, according to the New York City market research firm IDC/Link. Many do better.

Money's list of Top 10 high-income home businesses leads with occupations of export agent, employee trainer, management consultant, commercial debt negotiator, business-plan writer, desktop video publisher, computer tutor, mailing list service provider, home inspector and temporary help provider.

Home businesses that simply don't work well include get-rich-quick schemes like servicing pinball machines, the bronzing of baby shoes or 900-numbers promoting work-at-home ventures. Money magazine warns against franchisers charging suspicious initial fees of $495. (The Federal Trade Commission requires franchisers who charge $500 or more to disclose background information, names and addresses.) "The glamorous home businesses are computer technology and they may make big money," says Barbara Brabec of Chicago, author of "Homemade Money: How to select, start, manage, market and multiply the profits of a business at home."

Most home-based business owners are happy just to earn a living.

"I'm never going to get rich as a writer -- there are 5,000 writers in the country making a living from free-lancing, but there are hundreds trying," says Brabec. "I feel fortunate I can find a niche. It all boils down to how hard you want to work."

Brabec, who will speak at a home-based business seminar April 20 in Springfield, started her own craft business in the late 1960s, having worked as a secretary in Chicago for 10 years.

"I used to do crafty (types of things) with my mother -- wood carving, painting on weathered wood. I had a whole room filled with Barbara's things. That's literally how I ended up writing `Creative Cash: How to sell your crafts, needlework, designs & know-how.' " Keeping up with technological changes is the biggest challenge facing home-based business owners, she says.

"No one knows how to make a plan for more than three weeks ahead, let alone a one-year plan," says Brabec. "Technology is changing the market, buying habits and the way we sell. Just in the last six months, this Internet is threatening to change everything."

Speaking at seminars, she talks about the realities of home-based businesses.

"It's not all glamour. It's hard work to do it all yourself, to keep yourself educated, to market yourself, to be your own boss."

It can be difficult to blend business with family.

"The family expects the routine to go on as before," says Brabec. "All of a sudden the cookies aren't baked, mom can't run errands; everyone has to learn to set priorities.

"A big part of my message is that we're all here a short time. We can waste it in crazy ways or find something helpful and satisfying to do."

She doesn't recommend buying a home-based business or signing up for already-established multi-level marketing sales (such as Amway) unless the home entrepreneur believes in the products.

"There are hundreds and hundreds out there selling business opportunities, including a lot of con artists. Instead of a franchise on how to start a cleaning business, what most people need is a course in how to manage a business."

Freida Shreck, director of Lincoln Land Community College's small business development center, hopes to offer an associate's degree. The center offers self-employment training classes over two Saturdays and an eight-week course in small business management for credit.

Shreck spends much of her time helping would-be home business people get started. "I help them pull together business plans and make sure they've done everything they need to do to be legal."

A total 278 home-based businesses have registered with the city of Springfield since 1980. All are required to register the name of the business with the city's building and zoning department. Home business owners can't alter the appearance of a home, but can have a non-illuminated sign that is not more than 2 feet square.

A common mistake made by home business people is mingling personal finances with business earnings.

"You have to think about it not as a corner of your house anymore -- it's a business," says Schreck.

She combats any perception that home-based businesses amount to someone packing cucumbers into a jar.

"My comeback is they're much more sophisticated, and where do they think some of those others started? Col. Sanders (Kentucky Fried Chicken) didn't start with franchises in every state.

"For a home-based business to be successful, it takes a lot of time, self-discipline. Although you can work in your nightgown, it may take more organization than anything else you can imagine."

Developing a detailed business plan is a big part of that, says Tom Buchanan, an Extension specialist in small business development in Springfield.

"Starting a business is a tough thing to do, and most people just don't do enough planning. If you can put your plan on paper, you can test ideas. It's easy to scrap paper because it doesn't cost much."

He urges aspiring at-home workers to ask themselves a few critical questions: Are you the entrepreneurial type? Are you mentally tough? Do you have good physical health required for the long haul? What's the real market for your service? Balancing business and family can be the down side of any home-based business, Buchanan says.

"Most people want to start one to stay at home with their kids -- that's a distraction. All of a sudden you have to be concerned about the appearance of the home -- are you exposing customers to pets and dirty diapers?" And there's the matter of working alone.

"There's no one checking you -- you just have to have that discipline," says Buchanan. "Sometimes it can be a lot tougher at home."

Working at home can be lonely. "You don't have anyone to bounce ideas off of or talk to if you have a bad day," says Davidson.

Buchanan sees two types of people attracted to home work force -- those who want to try it when they're young enough to recover if it fails and those who start a new business after they retire.

Funding for starting up a home business often comes from personal savings or family.

Davidson says she finds time spent in her home more productive than in an office setting.

"One of the things I found difficult in working in an office is people interrupting just to socialize. Sometimes you can shut the door, but sometimes that's perceived as being rude. Now I can schedule when I'm going to be sociable."

Six months ago, she helped organize Home Run, a subcommittee of the Springfield Chamber Small Business Council specifically devoted to home-based businesses. There are approximately 70 members.

There is a wide diversity of businesses ranging from consultants to accountants, equally divided between men and women.

"There's a myth that home businesses are mainly female," says Davidson. "It's the old Tupperware lady thing in some people's minds."

For some people trying it, there remains a stigma about working from home.

"I'm afraid if my cat meows in the background (of a phone call)," says Davidson. "There still is a stigma. Some get around it by using a P.O. box. In this town, you can tell what are home addresses.

"Some people even have secretarial services answer phones, and there are tapes of office noise that are available so it sounds like a busy office with other phones ringing and people talking."

Home Run members were asked in a recent survey if they hid the fact that they are working from home. Most didn't.

"There are advantages -- the one-on-one contact, the fact your client is going to be talking to you, not another employee, a higher client trust factor," says Davidson.

There can be the perception that having a home office is a first step, with a goal eventually being to locate to an office.

"It is for some people, but when I get overburdened I call in a network of others in the business. We all do that."

Billie Edson of Springfield started Page Works, a computer design business while she worked as a contract computer programmer for the state of Illinois. In January 1994, she took the plunge and went full-time into the business with her sister, Cathy Hoffman.

"The two hard things were being taken seriously (people think you're going to take the afternoon off and go shopping) and not being distracted by other things like laundry."

Hoffman found it even more difficult to juggle business and family and has cut back to part-time.

Says Edson: "I have no regrets. You've got to be disciplined and organized and know that if you doubt you can put in a good strong day, it just won't happen. You've got to be motivated beyond a 40-hour week."

Edson converted a spare bedroom into a business office and Hoffman re-did an office in the basement.

Because both had computer systems, they didn't have major start-up costs but did have additional marketing costs.

"I'd do it all again in a heartbeat," says Edson. "Our goal now is to build it larger."

Chris Camp of Springfield launched Duo Design, a computer graphics business, last April.

"It was something I'd planned to do for awhile," says Camp. "There were cutbacks at the agency I was at and I either had to look for another job or make it on my own. I have no regrets."

He says he still feels awkward bringing clients to his house where he has converted an 8-by-15-foot bedroom into an office.

"You're conscious of the dirty dishes in the sink, and sometimes I do miss the interaction of the office. I make sure I get out a couple of times a week for lunch or whatever."

He'd like to find another location, whether that is a larger house or separate office.

He tells home-based business dreamers: "Don't do it if you're not disciplined. So many think, `Hey, you can sleep in now.' I'm on the job by 7:30 or 8. "Because it's right there, it's hard to separate home from office life."

Mary Ann Moss of Springfield left the corporate world last November to begin her own CPA business.

"I just decided I wanted to do more of what I wanted to do," says Moss. "It still is scary, and I still look in the classifieds.

"I assumed I'd miss the interaction at the office, but I've been with my clients so I haven't, especially since it's tax season. It hasn't been hard to be motivated because there's so much work."

She hopes to eventually find a place in her home that is more segregated than working on her portable computer at the kitchen table.

The challenge is to keep at the job at hand rather than being tempted to spend an afternoon playing golf. "It's a matter of being focused."

For Bob Prehoda, who owns Prehoda Foil Stamping with his brother, Mike, the challenge is squeezing in personal time between his full-time job as a printer and their 10-year-old home-based business.

"It all started with my father. He was a bookbinder by trade and he bought some machinery to print on book covers," says Bob Prehoda. "He was asked to do more and more, bought another machine and then he got cancer. My brother and I took over the business."

Since then, his father has recovered and may re-join the business, which now has machinery in basements or garages of the brothers, who live down the street from each other, to do raised, shiny images on everything from greeting cards to books.

"I have no time," says Bob. "But it's not that bad. It's something we enjoy. To start out, you just have to find a niche and fill it."

A satellite seminar, "Mapping Your Marketing Future" for home-based businesses, originating from Oklahoma State University, will be held at 6:30-9:30 p.m. March 19 at nine Cooperative Extension offices.

In Springfield, a home-based business seminar, sponsored by the Sangamon County Cooperative Extension Service will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

April 20 at the Illinois State Fairgrounds.

For more information, contact the Cooperative Extension Service at 782-4617.

Caption: Springfield resident Gay Davidson works out of her kitchen, operating her computer business, Computer Calalysts, just beyond the refrigerator.

 

 

 

2 NEW BUSINESSES AIMED AT COMPUTER MARKET

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, May 31, 1992

Author/Byline: CHRIS DETTRO BUSINESS EDITOR
Edition: M1,M2
Section: BUSINESS
Page: 36

Two businesses to serve the after-purchase personal and small-business computer market have been formed by L. GAY DAVIDSON.

Davidson is former co-owner of MicroAge and past sales manager at microPOWER computer stores in Springfield.

The two new businesses are COMPUTER CATALYSTS and COMPUTER HELP! Computer Catalysts specializes in sales management and tracking software for insurance, real estate and other sales people. Productivity packages such as Act!, SalesPower, PowerTrax and TeleMagic can be customized to meet client needs on either IBM-compatible or MacIntosh hardware. The company also can help not-for-profit organizations track donations and pledges, among other things.

Computer Help! is for small businesses that want to improve productivity through group training, customization of existing software and selection of compatible software solutions.

Davidson said the PC and small-business computer market is changing, with more microcomputers being purchased from mass merchandisers that offer little, if any, support after the sale.

 

 

 

 

TITLE: PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, September 4, 1991

 DEANNA LANGHEIM, owner of The Minuteman, has been elected president of the National Association of Women Business Owners Springfield chapter.

Other officers are Tiffani Hamerlinck of Motives, vice president-program; Barbara Roberts of PEC Mobile Communications, vice president-membership; Barbara Malany of Flowers LeGrand, secretary; Lois Bloechle of Cookie Factory Bakery, treasurer; Janice Logan of jl Consul tants, corporate relations; Gay Davidson of MicroAge , national board representative; Theresa Cummings of Theresa's Kitchens, public affairs; Fran Zettler of St. George Productions, special events; and Rose Alcorn, of Rosario Personalized Boutique, international representative.

 

 

AQUALAND'S MOVE MEANS EXPANDED LINES, MORE EMPLOYEES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, April 7, 1991

Author/Byline: CHRIS DETTRO



MICROAGE COMPUTER CENTER of Springfield has become a dealer and installer for Great Plains Accounting Software.

The accounting system complements other accounting systems and services offered by MicroAge and has many other features required by higher-level accounting solutions.

 

 

 

NEW COMPUTER STORE IS SOLELY FOR BUSINESS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, January 20, 1988

Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: BUSINESS
Page: 19

A franchise computer resource center for businesses has opened at 2112 S. MacArthur Blvd.

The MicroAge Computer Store specializes in computing solutions for businesses, particularly in the areas of accounting and desktop publishing, according to Michael Lamb, president of the Springfield franchise.

"We take a consulting approach to the computer business," Lamb said.

The Springfield store, part of a network of more than 200 computer stores operated by the Tempe, Ariz.-based chain, will carry a complete line of computers, peripherals and business software, said Gay Davidson, vice president and sales manager.

"We're strictly for business -- no games or educational software," Davidson said.

Microcomputer lines include Compaq, Hewlett-Packard, and AT&T. Services will include systems consulting, hardware and software support, and a learning center offering classes on a continuing basis.

The store will provide in-house or on-site repair, installation, training and periodic seminars to let clients know about new technology, she said.

The Springfield store employs seven people.

MicroAge has several stores in the Chicago area, Davidson said, and outlets in Carbondale and Effingham downstate.

Lamb said an open house and grand opening will be held in mid-February, where hardware and software representatives will conduct special seminars and demonstrations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ciaccio is at kingtech

 

Impacts –

 

Coffey backers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CIACCIO is at kingtech –

 

sacco - campo

 

 

TITLE: PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, October 11, 1998

 

 CARRIE CIACCIO has joined the accounting software division of King Technology Inc., 6045 N. Cotton Hill Road.

Ciaccio joins the firm with 5 years of experience in the accounting and bookkeeping fields and will specialize in Solomon accounting support and training.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coffey – backers

 

 

 

Scrp - Coffey wing –

 

Denzler - ima

Baise – ima – see baise/Greco/vala @ http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneybingo

Ed peck – brady and peck – lobbyists – uis peck – itla peck

Megan stieren – community bankers – stieren kc’s -

Joseph ciaccio – il railroad assoc

Louis Giordano – Giordano consulting - kjell

Bill fleischli – il petro mktrs

 

 

 

 

 

Van meter - stieren

Stieren –

 

kc downtown –

immac –

 

2005 shg football

 

Buraski – stieren – mulcahy – golf team

 

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, April 29, 1990

Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 26

Esther V. Stieren Mrs. Esther V. Van Meter Stieren, 81, of Springfield died at 9:27 a.m.

Saturday at St. John's Hospital.

She was born in Shelbytown on July 2, 1908 the daughter of Ovyl Maurice and Ellen Marcella Nellie Dougherty Walstrom. She married John Carl Stieren in 1930 and he preceded her in death in 1978. She also was preceded by a brother, Leroy Van Meter A residence of Springfield since 1918, Mrs. Stieren was employed by Illinois Bell Telephone Co. for 38 years and retired as a supervisor in 1973. She was a member of Ss. Peter and Paul's Church, Telephone Pioneers of America and Ss. Peter and Paul's 50 and Over Club.

Surviving are one daughter, Mrs. James (Carol Lee) McEvoy of Athens; one son, John M. Stieren of Springfield; eight grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; one sister, Mrs. Marcella Schneller of Springfield; three brothers, Maurice VanMeter of Sherman, Harvey Van Meter of Fountain Valley, Calif., and Eugene Van Meter of Oak Park.; several nieces and nephews and cousins.

 

 

MULCAHY LEADS BLAZERS TO SECTIONAL GOLF TITLE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, October 14, 1992

Edition: M1,M2
Section: SPORTS
Page: 17

CHARLESTON -- Senior Kourtney Mulcahy led a strong team effort Tuesday as Sacred Heart-Griffin High School won the nine-team Charleston Sectional to

advance to the girls state golf tournament.

Mulcahy recorded an 83 to tie for third in individual competition. Petersburg Porta junior Jamie Smith finished sixth with an 84 to qualify for state individual competition, as well.

"Kourtney played about the way she always does," SHG Coach Dan Dhabalt said. "I know she finished first for us every time out. She's just so consistent."

In addition to Mulcahy, senior Jen Gronewold shot a 91 at Pleasant Grove Greens. Freshman Heather Buraski added a 99, and Laura Smith and Lisa Stieren tied for fourth on the team with 108s.

"Jen and Heather shooting that well were somewhat surprising," Dhabalt said. "We showed a lot of consistency and played well up and down."

The Blazers shot seven strokes better than second-place Alton, winning the sectional 381-388. SHG, Alton and Carbondale all advance to next week's state finals at Bloomington. o At Dunlap, senior Jason Pope shot a 9-over-par 81 at Arrowhead Country Club to lead Petersburg Porta High School to the Class A State Tournament in boys golf.

Pope's score was good for seventh overall and advanced him to the finals in the individual competition. Rochester's Cory Wells was the top area finisher, totaling a 79 at Arrowhead and finishing in a tie for third, good enough for a state berth.

Porta tied Fieldcrest High School for third in the team competition with a 346. Rochester sophomore Bret Borota, who finished eighth at 84, also advanced to the state finals next week.

Caption: Mulcahy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Denzler state farm

 

state farm -

 

 

 

Baise - Denzler

 

Mark denzler – lobbyist for baise group

 

State farm lobbyist – rust/trosino

 

Active in SCRP – possible cand for city council

 

Runs for and loses SCB 26 – panther creek – piper glen - lincolnshire

 

Davlin coy about running again / Says he will announce his decision within a week

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, December 6, 2006

Author/Byline: CHRIS WETTERICH STAFF WRITER
Section: CITY/STATE
Page: 9

As the first day to file as a candidate for citywide office approaches, Springfield Mayor Tim Davlin said Tuesday he expects to announce within a week whether he will run for a second term.

Responding to questions from reporters, Davlin said he has not yet started to circulate petitions, although "somebody" was passing them out at a meeting "unbeknownst to me."

Asked if he had already made up his mind about seeking re-election, Davlin would say only that an announcement is forthcoming.

Davlin, a Democrat, is expected to run again. No one has yet announced their intention to oppose him, although Ward 10 Ald. Bruce Strom, a Republican who is prevented by term limits from running for a fourth term as alderman, is weighing a mayoral bid.

City offices are officially nonpartisan, although the political parties usually are heavily involved in citywide and aldermanic races.

City Clerk Cecilia Tumulty, a Democrat, also is expected to announce she will run again. Tumulty, a Democrat, is in her first term and previously served a term as Ward 5 alderman. No one has yet announced that they will oppose her.

Springfield Treasurer Jim Langfelder, a Democrat and the only other citywide elected official, has already announced his bid for a second term. He, too, currently has no opponent.

In the aldermanic races:

* Ward 1 Ald. Frank Edwards, a Republican, has said he intends to run for a second term. He does not have an announced opponent. Ward 1 takes in the areas around Lake Springfield and the University of Illinois at Springfield.

* Ward 2 Ald. Frank McNeil, a Democrat, cannot run again because of term limits. He has been on the city council since 1987, the first year aldermanic government resumed.

Former Democratic county board member Darryl Harris and Charles Starks, a Democratic precinct committeeman, are eyeing the race. Ward 2 mostly takes in the near east side.

* Ward 3 Ald. Frank Kunz, a Democrat, is circulating petitions to run for a third term. No one has announced a run against him.

Kunz, who said he voted for Green Party candidate Rich Whitney for governor, has also talked about running for mayor in 2011. Ward 3 is mostly composed of Springfield's far east side and a sliver of the north end.

* Ward 4 Ald. Chuck Redpath, a Democrat, cannot run again because of term limits. Former City Water, Light and Power worker Dave Danner, Springfield Park Board member Frank Lesko and Mike Buscher, president and managing broker of Aspen Real Estate, are in the race.

Danner is a Democrat, and Lesko is a Republican. Buscher has not discussed his party affiliation in detail, although he said he supports Davlin's re-election. Ward 4 includes most of the north end.

* Ward 5 Ald. Joe Bartolomucci,a Republican, has announced a run for a second term. Former Springfield Fire Chief Bob Bartnick, a Democrat, is also running. Others eyeing the race are retiring Sangamon County Board member Sam Cahnman, a Democrat, and Clint Sabin, a Republican dissatisfied with Bartolomucci.

Ward 5 takes in part of the north end and most of downtown.

* Ward 6 Ald. Mark Mahoney, a Democrat, is circulating petitions and definitely is running. No one else has made the race. Ward 6's alderman represents part of downtown and the south side.

* Ward 7 Ald. Judy Yeager, a Republican, will also be forced into retirement by term limits. Joe Rock, a Democrat who lost to Yeager in 2003, is running.

Three others are eyeing the race: Mike Coffey Jr., who is on the Springfield Metropolitan Exposition and Auditorium Authority, Sangamon County Board member Debbie Cimarossa and state trooper Mark Beagles. Coffey and Cimarossa are Republicans, while Beagles is running as an independent, although he has voted in GOP primaries for 20 years.

Ward 7 takes in areas around Leland Grove and Jerome and parts of the near southwest side.

* Ward 8 Ald. Irv Smith, a Republican, is term-limited. George Petrilli, legislative liaison for the state Department of Financial and Professional Regulation, is seeking to succeed him. Petrilli said he is not running as a Democrat or a Republican, but he voted in Democratic primaries in 2004 and 2006.

Brian Weatherford, a customer service representative for Cingular Wireless and a waiter at the Sangamo Club, also has taken out petitions in Ward 8. Weatherford said he has always leaned toward Democratic positions but is running a grassroots campaign.

Ward 8 is a winding district including part of the west side, mostly east of Veterans Parkway.

* Ward 9 Ald. Tom Selinger, a Democrat, has not announced whether he will run for a third term, but de did have a fundraiser recently. No one else has announced a run in that ward. Ward 9 includes the northwest side, including the area south of Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport.

* Ward 10 Ald. Bruce Strom, a Republican who has served since 1995, is term-limited. Possible candidates in the ward are Mark Denzler , vice president of government affairs and membership for the Illinois Manufacturers' Association, and Republican county board member Tim Griffin, who works for the state Teachers' Retirement System.

Ward 10 takes in the west and southwest sides, mostly west of Veterans Parkway.

The top two finishers in the Feb. 27 primary will advance to the general election April 18. If there are two candidates or less in a race, there will be no primary.

Candidates can begin filing their petitions with the city clerk's office Monday. The last day to do so is Dec. 18. For more information on the election, go to the city clerk's Web site at
www.springfield.il.us/CityClerk/2007%20Elections.htm.

 

 

O'Neill defeats Denzler for county seat

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, March 17, 2004

Author/Byline: JOHN REYNOLDS STAFF WRITER
Section: ILLINOIS PRIMARY / SPECIAL
Page: 7

Incumbent Republican Sangamon County Board member John O'Neill defeated primary opponent Mark Denzler during Tuesday's election.

O'Neill beat Denzler by 439 votes to 195 or a margin of 69.2 percent to 30.8 percent.

The 26th Sangamon County Board District includes Panther Creek, Lincolnshire, Piper Glen, Irongate, the southeast portion of Westchester and a small part of Chatham Township.

The two candidates had positive things to say about each other after the results were tabulated.

"I offer (O'Neill) my best wishes and support," Denzler said. "This race was never personal."

O'Neill, first elected to the board in 2002, had similar thoughts even though he had never met Denzler face to face.

"I'm sure he's a very intelligent young man who has a lot of experience. I wish him the best," O'Neill said.

O'Neill said one of the most important county issues in the near future is holding the line on spending and not cutting services to county residents.

"Most people I've talked to are pretty conservative about property taxes," O'Neill said.

Denzler said it is possible that he might attempt another run for public office.

O'Neill, 58, is retired from the Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs and volunteers as assistant state legislative director for the VFW in Illinois. Denzler, 32, is a former House GOP staff member who works as a government affairs specialist for State Farm Insurance.

No Democratic candidate was on the ballot in the 26th.

 

 

Kolaz governor's new deputy chief for operations

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, January 19, 2006

Reljic joins Abbott

BORO RELJIC, who has been a lobbyist for the Illinois Manufacturers' Association for 20 years, has taken a new job as the multi-state regional director of government affairs for Abbott Laboratories.

The company is based near North Chicago in Abbott Park, but Reljic, 44, will continue to live in Springfield. He was vice president of government affairs at IMA.

A Chicago native with a political science degree from the former Sangamon State University, Reljic said he's excited about the new job, which begins next week. While the new post involves other Midwestern states, he'll still be lobbying at the Statehouse - where he just might run into his wife, KATY LAWRENCE, who runs her own lobbying firm, KML Consulting.

Meanwhile, MARK DENZLER , 34, a Decatur native living in Springfield, is moving from being government affairs specialist with State Farm Insurance Companies to vice president of government affairs with the manufacturers' group.

Denzler earlier worked on the House Republican staff for six years and was with IMA for four years. In 2004, he took on an incumbent member of the Sangamon County Board, JOHN O'NEILL, in the GOP primary, but lost. He said he might, at some point, consider another run for office.

Denzler, a 1993 graduate of Illinois Wesleyan University in Bloomington, said he helped produce a bit of history there because as senior class president, he helped pick a graduation speaker. Back then, he said, nobody knew much about DONALD RUMSFELD, but they do now. The current secretary of defense was by 1993 a former congressman and a heavy hitter in the business world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baise – from baise site

And see also – bingo – Greco - baise - vala

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baise –

 

 

TAVINE LINK – BURGE – BAISE WAS TAVINE CAMPAIGN MGR

 

1985 thompson campaign MGR

 

DOT = Cellini – isea – stout – IBT – madonia – and see schnapp/dot/uis/forklift

 

Thompson campaign – gray – and see Gregg durham – lee daniels – and see gonet – long et al

 

Fleischli from petro was at Thompson admin w/ durham

 

Fleischli – worked for baise (fleischli- ihpa/ dana Thomas and new salem)

 

1988 - Mike Baise, 35, = assistant director of  agriculture cousin to greg baise

 

George Christofilakos - Arena foods – Jim’s steak house owned by baise/vala/Greco D. O. and partner at arena – madonia - yannone

 

Baise – stl casino - money

 

 

 

 

VOTER TURNOUT, CONFUSION SWUNG VICTORY TO THOMPSON

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, November 6, 1986

Author/Byline: Jeff Brody
Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 3

As expected, the Illinois governor's race Tuesday was determined by voter turnout and voter confusion on the Democratic side of the ballot.

Gov. James Thompson, who won his fourth term, claimed the results showed rejection of challenger Adlai Stevenson and the negative tone of his campaign.

But Stevenson's camp claimed the numbers showed significant voter confusion over the three-punch strategy the candidate was forced to employ because of the adherents of Lyndon LaRouche on the Democratic ticket.

With 99 percent of the state's precincts counted, Thompson had 53 percent of the gubernatorial vote, 1,643,058, to Stevenson's 1,232,688, or 40 percent. "No Candidate," the spot on the top of the Democratic ticket, received 201,431 votes, about 6 percent of the total.

Official turnout figures won't be available for at least a week.

Early indications are that turnout in Chicago was about 58 percent of 1.4 million registered voters, compared with 68 percent of 1.5 million in 1982, damaging Stevenson's bid. mTurnout in the suburban and downstate areas was thought to be the same or a little higher than four years ago, a trend that worked for Republican Thompson.

Stevenson said the race would have been close, like the 1982 matchup between the same candidates, had there been an opportunity for him to win straight Democratic ballots.

But Stevenson could not count on straight Democratic ballots this year, as he did in 1982, because of the LaRouche victories in March.

There is no doubt the nomination of LaRouche supporter Mark Fairchild as the Democratic candidate for lieutenant governor took Stevenson out of the race.

To disassociate himself from the LaRouchie, Stevenson withdrew from the party and lost the benefit of straight party ballots despite the attempts to publicize a three-punch ballot strategy.

The total vote for Jane Spirgel, Stevenson's Solidarity running mate for secretary of state -- 16 percent of the ballots cast -- is perhaps the best measure of the number of three-punch votes cast. Straight Democratic ballots normally amount to about 20 percent of the statewide vote.

At the same time, there were reports statewide of a higher percentage of straight Republican votes, indicating the success of GOP efforts to convince voters that the "safe" way to avoid voting for a LaRouchie was to vote straight Republican.

But the LaRouche victories meant more than just the loss of straight party voters for Stevenson.

The primary debacle gave Thompson the most powerful campaign issue he had against Stevenson, one he used daily in the last month of the race. If Stevenson did not have the leadership ability to get his own choice nominated as his running mate, Thompson asked, how will he have the ability to lead the state? The LaRouche victories contributed to the lackluster public perception of Stevenson, and never allowed the challenger to fully focus public attention on chinks in Thompson's record.

But titular party leader Alan Dixon said Wednesday that Stevenson "demonstrated his manhood" in a "long, hard year," and helped the party survive intact the "tragic circumstances" of the primary.

Before leaving for a vacation Wednesday, Thompson said his victory came about because "I've been a good governor and I've run a good campaign."

Thompson promised to "take nothing for granted" going into his fourth term, and said he would establish a transition team to review personnel in his administration and its policies.

There could be changes in Thompson's cabinet, and the governor will be looking to find a new place in his administration for

Greg Baise ,

 

his former patronage chief and

 

secretary of transportation,

 

who ran his campaign this year.

Despite the higher turnout in the Republican areas and an opponent dogged by the LaRouche factor, Thompson received about 200,000 fewer votes than he did in 1982. Now 50, Thompson is probably starting his final term as governor. He said during the campaign that he almost did not run again this year because of his concern for his family's financial security.

A number of potential successors are already in statewide office.

With near final results, here's how the other state races looked: Alan Dixon, 59, the state's senior U.S. senator, again proved enormously popular, outpolling Republican state Rep. Judy Koehler 1,999,919 votes to 1,047,503. Secretary of State Jim Edgar, 40, easily beat LaRouche Democrat Janice Hart and Solidarity nominee Jane Spirgel. Edgar, priming for a run for governor in four years, was the state's top vote-getter Tuesday, with 2,077,497 to Spirgel's 509,552 and Hart's 469,500. Attorney General Neil Hartigan, 47, won a second term, beating Republican Bernard Carey 1,893,356 votes to 1,121,211. Comptroller Roland Burris, 49, beat Republican state Sen. Adeline Geo-Karis 1,847,363 to 1,066,735. Nearly complete returns showed Democratic candidates for the University of Illinois Board of Trustees, Nina Shepherd, Charles Wolff and Judy Calder, won election to the board.

 

THOMPSON TEAM GETTING NEW LOOK

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, November 27, 1986

Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: EDITORIAL
Page: 17

WITHOUT SAYING so directly, Gov. James Thompson has promised a new look for his administration when it begins its fourth term Jan. 12.

The publicized "transition team" effort to identify new directions for the administration is just one part of the new look. The other will be in an expected turnover in cabinet-level positions that will rival any overall change since Thompson first took office 10 years ago.

Already, cabinet members Tom Johnson of Revenue, Michael Witte of Conservation and David Hardwick of Veterans Affairs said they won't seek reappointment.

Others are rumored to be reviewing employment opportunities in private business, and rumors also abound that some agency directors will not be asked to return. While some of these rumors are undoubtedly without foundation, there is already enough potential turnover to project a new cast on the Thompson government.

THOMPSON MUST also find spots for some key administration loyalists who left their government jobs to serve in his re-election campaign. Two that come immediately to mind are former Transportation Secretary Greg Baise , who ran Thompson's campaign, and Mark Frech, like Baise a former patronage chief in Thompson's office, who was deputy campaign manager.

Transportation Secretary Harry Hanley is due to retire from state government after a long career in the Department of Transportation, capped when Thompson tabbed him to head the department when Baise left. Baise could return to his old job.

James Zagel, director of the Department of State Police and a Thompson protege -- he served under Thompson when Thompson was U.S. attorney in Chicago -- has been a member of Thompson's cabinet almost from the beginning. However, Zagel, 45, is being considered for a federal judgeship in Chicago; another former Thompson assistant, Jeremy Margolis who is now the state's inspector general, could be Zagel's replacement.

ANOTHER DIRECTOR who may be looking elsewhere is Richard Carlson of the state Environmental Protection Agency. Carlson, 42, has filled upper-level management positions in the administration since 1977. Johnson, 40, the most recent cabinet member to announce he will leave the administration, served under Thompson for 10 years, first in the Department of Local Government Affairs, then in Revenue. Generally acknowledged in state government as a true professional, Johnson headed the state's tax collection agency longer than any of his predecessors.

Johnson will move to a partnership in one of the nation's major accounting and consulting firms, Grant Thornton.

Despite the department's role in implementing many major tax changes during his tenure, in administering the successful tax amnesty program in 1984 and in stepping up enforcement efforts against tax cheats, Johnson chose the formation of a customer service bureau as his proudest accomplishment.

THAT CHANGE, he said, made the state tax bureaucracy more sensitive and accessible to taxpayers. Many would think that typical of Johnson's commonsense management approach.

"That one will hurt," said one Thompson administration official of Johnson's resignation. "It's good to have a really experienced professional in that job."

The resignation of Witte, 35, also for a position in the private sector, has prompted a raft of editorial comment. The Department of Conservation was considered a leaky ship in troubled waters when Witte took the helm two years ago.

He brought with him eight years of experience in management positions in natural resource agencies of the Thompson administration and a sense that the agency could progress. Witte worked hard to improve the reputation of the department, which has more conflicting interest groups than any other in state government. Seldom in recent years has a director of Conservation been so successful in winning support from so many of those groups.

BUT WITTE grew frustrated at times with the state patronage system, and some of his supporters learned this summer that he was considering leaving government. Witte tried to turn patronage demands to his own benefit, agreeing to hire a "referral" only if he could hire his choice for a more important job.

In the end, Witte attributed his move to a desire to enter private sector employment at a time when his youth gave him the widest options: "The prospect of staying with the governor for another four years was very attractive, but the prospect of making the transition to the private sector at 40 is not as attractive."

Hardwick, also a veteran of the Thompson administration, cited only "personal considerations" in announcing his resignation from Veterans Affairs.

Those three resignations, and the likely exodus of other agency directors, open large holes to be filled by Thompson and his transition team.

The departments of Transportation, Revenue, Conservation, State Police and Veterans Affairs and the Environmental Protection Agency together employ about 17,900 people, almost one-quarter of the total state employees outside the educational institutions.

THERE WEREN'T many new faces on the transition team Thompson appointed to help him set a new direction for the administration. But there apparently will be some new faces when some of these vacancies are filled.

 

 

TAVINE LINK – BURGE –

 

 

WHAT QUALITIES MAKE A GOOD ALDERMAN IS A BIG ISSUE IN WOODSON-TAVINE RACE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, October 29, 1987

Author/Byline: Jacqueline Price
Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: SPECIAL: ELECTION 1987
Page: 9A

Ward 10 residents will choose Tuesday between two very different candidates who nonetheless agree on many issues.

But on the issue of what makes a good alderman, Allan Woodson and Pat Tavine are on opposite sides.

Woodson says an alderman should be well-educated, have leadership ability, have fiscal management skills and have a good community service record. "My record shows that I have all those qualifications."

Tavine describes a good alderman as someone willing to listen to the concerns of the people in his ward. "I'm a common-sense person who can get things done. The people in general know they can talk to Pat Tavine," he said.

As a negotiator for the Illinois Association of School Boards, Woodson says he has learned to interact with people in sometimes confrontational atmospheres. "I have mastered the talent of being able to agreeably disagree, which will be beneficial as alderman."

Tavine said his experiences enable him to relate to both white-collar and blue-collar workers. He has unloaded trucks as a retail clerk at National Food Stores as well as owned a business. He used to own a Springfield tavern. "That's the toughest business to run."


Tavine, a Republican, has some political heavyweights in his camp –

including Greg Baise , who has been Gov. Jim Thompson's campaign manager

and has directed Republican presidential races in Illinios.

 

Finance reports also indicate he has the edge over Woodson in campaign funding.

On the other hand, Woodson -- who describes himself as an independent -- ran strongly in the Sept. 22 primary election. He led the five-candidate Ward 10 field with 1,271 votes to Tavine's 996. Ward 10 is on the leading edge of south and west side expansion. Issues such as traffic, zoning, public safety and commercial development concern both candidates.

City residents said in a recent survey that they support a traffic "channelizer" to reduce traffic in neighborhoods north of White Oaks Mall, and they want an east-west thoroughfare, Woodson says. "We support the channelizer, and we went before the city council to lobby in favor of that."

Tavine agrees that the channelizer is a good idea. But he admonishes Woodson for what he says was an attempt to take credit for it. An unsuccessful aldermanic candidate, Bruce Strom, initiated the channelizer project, Tavine said.

Tavine lists the channelizer and traffic problems on Wabash Avenue as the foremost issues in the Ward 10 race. He circulated a paper on the subject last week.

He said he intends to seek a seat on city council committees dealing with traffic and pledged to work closely with the director of public works on east-west flow of traffic near White Oaks Mall.

Woodson says zoning is a bigger issue with most Springfield and Ward 10 residents. He proposes that the new council create long-term zoning plans to avoid future problems. "Any new housing should conform to existing housing patterns," he says.

Tavine said he also would monitor the growth of the ward and make sure that future development follows current patterns.

In his paper, Tavine said he will speak out against zoning changes that affect property values in Ward 10 neighborhoods.

Woodson said widening of the underpass at Chatham Road is also a big issue. The road is narrow, with no margins for pedestrians or bicyclists, he said.

Woodson and Tavine both favor relocating the railroad tracks -- probably possible only with federal aid. Otherwise, the underpass should be widened, Woodson says. "But that would also be a major undertaking similar to what's being done to Cook Street," he said.

Tavine said the issue needs to be resolved. "Delays can only lead to an increased financial burden."

The candidates also agree on the need for more traffic lights are on Wabash Avenue. Woodson said his poll illustrated the need for traffic lights in the Kirkley Lane and Wabash Avenue intersection.

Tavine favors a detailed study of the problem.

Both candidates also say legal fees for the voting rights suit should be settled immediately.

Tavine said he hopes aldermen will vote unanimously on what to do about the $1.9 million bill.

Woodson said the issue should be handled without going to court, to avoid even more costs.

Alderman, Ward 10 Allan Woodson Age: 42. Occupation: Director of field services for Illinois Association of School Boards.

Home: 3216 Ellendale Drive.

Family: Married (Janet), two children.

Education: Graduate, Feitshans High School; bachelor's degree, Illinois State University; master's degree, University of Illinois; doctorate in education, University of Illinois.

Previous public offices: None.

Pat Tavine Age: 37. Occupation: Division chief with Illinois Department of Public Health.

Home: 90 Crusaders Road.

Family: Married (Jamie), three children.

Education: Griffin High School, attended Springfield College in Illinois.

Previous public offices: Convention center board member since 1980.

 

GOP'S ROLE NON-PARTISAN: LEONE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, November 6, 1987

Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: EDITORIAL
Page: 11

ALTHOUGH THEY lost big, Republicans in the Sangamon County organization profess not to be too unhappy with the outcome of Tuesday's city election.

At first blush, they wouldn't appear to have much to be happy about. Low, rumbling noises, in fact, have been heard among defeated candidates and rank-and-file Republicans.

For one thing, only two Republicans were elected to the new aldermanic city council -- County Chairman Irv Smith in Ward 8 and Bob Vose in Ward 5. At the same time, GOP candidates went down to defeat in four aldermanic races, despite considerable political experience behind them.

Tom Madonia's and Pat Tavine's defeats in particular raised eyebrows, since Madonia led the ticket for Springfield Park Board as recently as April and

 

Tavine had for his campaign manager Greg Baise ,

 

former campaign manager for Gov. Jim Thompson.

THE DEFEAT OF Norm Weiskopf, who lost by only 12 votes after conducting a savvy campaign in a heavily Democratic ward, was perhaps the most bitter pill of all.

In any event, the Democrats won big. Mayor-elect Ossie Langfelder is a Democrat, and seven members of the board of aldermen are Democrats of one factional persuasion or another.

But all that, according to Republican activist Tony Leone, misses the point.

The point, Leone says, is that the GOP role in Springfield's first election under the new form of government was as non-partisan as ever.

"I think that the whole Republicrat issue is dead," he said.

To Leone's way of looking at things, the issue is dead because the Sangamon County GOP organization stopped short of formal endorsements this year and got behind candidates of both parties.

"IT WAS NOT A clear Democrat victory, and Republicans and Democrats were working together," he said. "The Republicans did the responsible thing. We supported the people we thought would best serve the city."

In several wards, the GOP organization wasn't able to recruit candidates of its own and recommended Democrats who had already gotten in the race. In others, party activists ran themselves.

But Leone said the understanding was clear in most races that precinct committeemen were free to pass literature for Democrats or leave it out of their packets.

Nor did the party organization spend much money on most candidates of either party, he said.

LEONE SAID IN only a couple or three races did the organization make all-out efforts to elect candidates. Those efforts, as he described them, were pre-emptive in nature.

"In any races where there was clearly a radical, the radical lost," he said. "I can even say radical conservative -- look at (former Finance Com.

Jim) Dunham (who ran citywide against Utilities Com. Frank Madonia for utility director)." The upshot of the election, Leone said, will be a mayor and board of aldermen made up of reasonable people who will be able to work together for the city's best interest. And the GOP played a pivotal role in ensuring that outcome, he said.

"We tried to back off on that `endorsement' word, but everybody uses it," he said. "So the Republicans endorsed, the Democrats didn't. We took the responsible approach."

Footnote 1: My usual post-election analysis of the calls I missed in Tuesday's prediction column will not appear in this space today for a simple reason: I predicted them all correctly.

Footnote 2: But in all candor, I have to add that I second-guessed myself in a couple of races and lost in the office pool. It was won, by the way, by city hall reporter Jay Fitzgerald.

Modest proposal As the veto session went into its final days this week, the League of Women Voters of Illinois decided the time was ripe to urge the legislature to vote a modest tax increase.

According to state league president Mary Ellen Barry, the end-of-month balance in the general revenue fund tells the story. She said it's been below the accepted level of $200 million for the past 14 months and dipped to $17 million in August.

"This amount is much too low to ensure that the state's bills are paid in a timely fashion," she said. "That such low balances exist in relatively good times is even more troubling."

Barry said the legislature should have passed a tax increase in the spring, and that obligation hasn't gone away.

"By refusing to enact a modest state income tax increase during the spring session of the General Assembly, legislators in effect voted for a shaky fiscal situation and against better schools, against programs to meet basic human needs and against other services that would reduce depen dency, family disintegration and crime," she said.

She also said an income tax hike would enhance the state's economic development potential.

"Poor state services do not attract business development. Nor do they contribute to Illinois' quality of life," she said. "The legislature's refusal to increase revenues is penny-wise and pound-foolish."

A couple of short-term factors suggest the league's modest proposal will go unheeded, however.

For one thing, the General Assembly is expected to wind up the veto session this week.

For another, the filing period for primary candidates for seats in the General Assembly begins a month from Saturday. In brief Gary Clayton, director of the Department of Registration and Education, will leave state government next month to take a post as executive vice president of the Illinois Association of Realtors. . . . Celebrating his 50th birthday Sunday is state Sen. Denny Jacobs, D-East Moline, son of former Rep. Oral "Jake" Jacobs.

 

 

BILL FLEISCHLI, MOGERMAN GET NEW STATE POSTS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, December 30, 1988

Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: EDITORIAL
Page: 9

A FORMER PATRONAGE chief for Gov. James Thompson is moving to a top spot in the state Department of Transportation, and an assistant press secretary to

Thompson is taking his place as deputy director of the state Historic Preservation Agency.

Bill Fleischli, who joins the Transportation Department next month as director of its office of intergovernmental affairs, says the move isn't political.

"I'm going over there to do the (department's) state and federal legislation," Fleischli said. "That's what I'm hired for."

The intergovernmental affairs office deals with state and federal legislation and policy. Fleischli's salary will be $63,000 a year.

In the meantime, assistant press secretary Susan Mogerman will become deputy director of Historic Preservation at a salary of $52,000 a year. She said she looks forward to making the move from the governor's press office.

"IT'S HARD LEAVING here," Mogerman said. "It's hard leaving the center of things, but it's a job I'll look forward to going to in the morning."

Mogerman joined the governor's press office in 1983, after a stint as media coordinator of his 1982 re-election campaign. A Springfield resident, she is a journalism graduate of the University of Missouri.

At Historic Preservation, Mogerman will be responsible for policy planning and program supervision. She'll be the agency's legislative liaison and work with its office of public affairs and development.

"I'm going over at a real interesting time and building on a strong base," she said. "Bill Fleischli really laid some wonderful groundwork over there."



FLEISCHLI, A longtime member of the Springfield Metropolitan Exposition and Auditorium Authority,

 

was a teacher and coach at Griffin High School before joining state government in 1981.

 

In addition to setting up the Historic Preservation Agency's public affairs office, he said he's proudest of its contribution to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial and of working with the General Assembly to get funding for the Dana-Thomas House and an educational center at New Salem State Park.

"We also created the Heritage Preservation Fund that allows us a check-off on state income taxes," he said. "It will be used to supplement our educational programs and assist in site preservation and the historical library."

HE WORKED FOR the Conservation, Transportation and Rehabilitation Services departments before joining the governor's personnel office in 1984. From 1984 to 1987, he was Thompson's patronage chief.

Fleischli said he isn't ruling anything out regarding plans to help further secretary Greg Baise 's political ambitions
.

Those include a possible run for statewide office in 1990. "He is my boss as secretary of transportation," Fleischli said. "I'm interested in doing anything he wants to do as secretary of transportation."

Fleischli starts next week at the Transportation Department. Mogerman goes over to Historic Preservation at the end of January.

Lake II talk Springfield 2nd Ward Ald. Frank McNeil will speak next week on the Lake Springfield II project, unanimously approved earlier this month by the city council, before the League of Women Voters of the Springfield Area.

His topic is the "Next Step for Lake Springfield II." He'll speak at noon Wednesday in the Carnegie Room of Lincoln Library in downtown Springfield.

Judge lauded Federal Appellate Judge Harlington Wood Jr. is profiled in a recent issue of Sullivan's Review, a legal periodical in the Chicago area.

The 28-page story reviews the life and career of the Sangamon County native who acted as a private Springfield lawyer, U.S. attorney, assistant U.S. attorney general and U.S. district judge before joining the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in 1976. Friends and associates praise Wood in the article, including 7th Circuit Chief Judge William Bauer, who is quoted as saying, "Nobody doesn't like the guy."

Sullivan's Review is published by Sullivan's Law Directory Inc. of Barrington.

Area lawmaker State Rep. Tom Homer, D-Canton, recently got an honorable mention for legislative leadership and a 1989 calendar from the Illinois Environmental Council.

The award was for his sponsorship of H3064, legislation requiring a countywide referendum for landfill site annexation approval. The calendar features photographs by nature photographer Willard Clay.

Caption: Fleischli / Mogerman

 

 

RIVERBOAT FEES FACE PANEL INVESTIGATION

Chicago Tribune - Wednesday, December 3, 1997

Author/Byline: Ted Gregory, Tribune Staff Writer.
Edition: DU PAGE SPORTS FINAL
Section: METRO DU PAGE
Page: 2

A retired U.S. District judge, the dean of the Kellogg Graduate School of Management and a retired attorney will begin reviewing the propriety of fees totaling more than $1 million that a Downstate riverboat operator paid to a former high-ranking state official and his business partner.

Nicholas Bua, retired from the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois and a former Illinois Circuit Court and Appellate Court judge, will preside over the three-person panel, appointed by the Illinois Gaming Board.

Bua and the two other members will examine whether Greg Baise , former Illinois Department of Transportation secretary, and Lawrence Lucas, owner of a communications company,

 

collected an excessive fee from the Casino Queen, an East St. Louis riverboat.

 

Baise and Lucas "assisted in the formative stages of the company" in 1991 and 1992,

 

said Michael Belletire, Illinois Gaming Board administrator, and the panel is expected to discern whether that work was worth $1 million.

The panel is expected to have its first meeting this month, although members have not set a date, Belletire said. The panel will conduct what amounts to a trial to determine whether Baise and Lucas were paid fair market value for the work, Belletire added.

Although a preliminary review of the documents showed nothing illegal, Belletire said the panel will determine if the Casino Queen's contracts with Baise and Lucas violate Illinois Gaming Board rules.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dot= airports

 

CAPITAL AIRPORT PROJECTS IN STATE PROGRAM

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, June 18, 1988

Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 15

The state airport improvement program for fiscal year 1989 includes $2.25 million for five projects at Springfield's Capital Airport.

The state Department of Transportation is proposing to spend $97.3 million on airport work statewide during the next fiscal year, which starts July 1. Logan County Airport at Lincoln will get two projects estimated to cost $565,000. The Litchfield Airport will have one project costing $114,000. Capital Airport projects funded with 90 percent federal funds, 5 percent state funds, and 5 percent local funds include: $1.1 million to repave and mark the north-south runway. $215,000 to replace an emergency vehicle. $129,000 to acquire land for clear zones. $761,000 to construct general aviation aprons and T-hangar taxiways in the south section of the airport.

A fifth project, construction of a parking lot to serve the general aviation area, would cost $40,000, 80 percent covered by the state and 20 percent from local funds.

The Logan County Airport will repave and mark its northeast-southwest runway at a cost of $513,000, with 90 percent federal financing, and install a perimeter fence and security gate at a cost of $54,000, funded with 80 percent state and 20 percent local funds.

The Litchfield Airport will replace its runway lighting system and install pilot controls for the system at a cost of $114,000, with 90 percent federal funding.

This year's program is up 90 percent over last year's $50 million program, Transportation Secretary Greg Baise said. About $60 million of the 1989 program will go for projects at large commercial airports, including Springfield.

Baise also released the state's proposed five-year airport improvement program, which outlines $500 million in projects, including another $8.25 million in proposed projects at Capital Airport and $1.18 million to construct a new taxiway at the Litchfield Airport.

 

 

THOMPSON SHUFFLES CABINET

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, January 24, 1987

Author/Byline: Jeff Brody
Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 1

Gov. James Thompson shuffled his Cabinet Friday, appointing two new agency directors and firing two others.

Thompson nominated his former deputy campaign manager, Mark Frech, to head the Illinois Department of Conservation.

Gwen Martin, a leader in the state AFL-CIO, was named to direct the Department of Labor.

Thompson did not reappoint Brad Evilsizer as head of the Department of Mines and Minerals or Mervin Bachman as chairman of the Illinois Industrial Commission, which hears workers compensation cases.

The governor also announced the reappointments of 22 current members of the Cabinet.

Thompson spokesman Jim Bray said the governor believes Evilsizer and Bachman "have done a good job, but it's time for a change in both departments."

Both agencies have been under fire in recent months.

The Department of Mines and Minerals is being stripped of its power to enforce some oil and gas drilling regulations. The federal Environmental Protection Agency says the state has not properly enforced the regulations.

EPA audits of the department's oil and gas division showed permit applications were approved without vital information, and reports were missing from department files. The audits also found a lack of on-site inspections.

The oil and gas division is being investigated by the Illinois State Police after its head, George Lane, resigned amid allegations he accepted gifts from companies the department regulates.

The industrial commission has been under fire for an inability to reduce the backlog of pending workers compensation cases.

The workers compensation system is supposed to give workers relatively quick compensation for work-related injuries, but cases often take more than two years to be resolved.

Despite legislation expanding the commission and allowing it to meet in concurrent panels, Bachman's agency has not put a significant dent in the backlog.

Improving the workers compensation system is one of the major goals Thompson cited in his Jan. 12 inaugural speech.

Frech, 36, of Springfield, replaces Michael Witte, who resigned as director of conservation to accept a job inthe private sector.

Frech served as director of personnel for the governor -- patronage chief -- from December 1983 to November 1985, when he left the administration to serve on the governor's re-election committee. He was deputy campaign manager of Citizens for Thompson.

He previously was assistant personnel director in Thompson's office.

Frech also has served on Thompson's Conservation Advisory Board. His appointment won support from environmental and sportsmen's groups.

"We appreciate Mark Frech's longstanding interest in Illinois habitat and wildlife issues," said Virginia Scott of the Illinois Environmental Council. "We hope that he will maintain high standards of professionalism with his staff and that he will work to bring sportsmen and environmentalist groups closer together with a common conservation agenda."

Fred Kirkpatrick, president of the Illinois Sportsmen's Legislative Coalition, said, "We are impressed with Mark Frech's credentials and his knowledge of conservation. He is concerned about the environment and the condition of our wildlife habitat in Illinois."

Martin, vice president of the Illinois State AFL-CIO since 1978, has been employed by the Communications Workers of America since 1972. She has recently served as CWA representative for a five-state Midwest region.

She replaces Al Bernardi of Springfield, who is retiring from state government.

Bob Gibson of the AFL-CIO and Robert Healey of the Illinois Federation of Teachers praised Martin's appointment and said she would be an asset to the Cabinet.

Frech will be paid $65,835 annually; Martin $60,349. Thompson also reappointed the following directors: Janet Otwell of Aging; Larry Werries of Agriculture; William Atkins of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse; Michael Tristano of Central Management Services; Gordon Johnson of Children and Family Services; Jay Hedges of Commerce and Community Affairs; Michael Lane of Corrections; Sally Ward of Employment Security; Don Etchison of Energy and Natural Resources; Richard Carlson of EPA; Michael Fryzel of Financial Institutions; Tom Bestudik, the state fire marshal; Joyce Tucker of Human Rights; John Washburn of Insurance; Rebecca Paul of the Lottery; Ann Kiley of Mental Health; Gen. Harold Holesinger of the Military and Naval Department; Terry Lash of Nuclear Safety; Bernard Turnock of Public Health; Gary Clayton of Registration and Education; Susan Suter of Rehabilitation Services; and

Greg Baise of Transportation.

Thompson still must find nominees for Revenue, Veterans Affairs, Public Aid and the Illinois State Police, where Director James Zagel has been nominated for a federal appointment, as well as for Mines and Minerals and the Industrial Commission.

All Cabinet appointments require Senate confirmation.

 

NEW COMMERCIAL BUILDING HAS DIFFERENT LOOK

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, August 12, 1988

Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: BUSINESS
Page: 17

A recently completed west side commercial building with a "different look" will begin receiving tenants next month.

The 8,200-square-foot, one-story building at 993 Clock Tower Drive is owned by Pat Newman and Mike Suhadolnik and was built by their construction firm, Construx of Illinois.

Mattoon-based Consolidated Communications Co. will occupy about 4,800 square feet on the west end of the building, which backs up to Veterans Parkway. Another 2,400 square feet will be leased by the Illinois Beef Council, which currently has its offices in the Westgate office complex on West Monroe Street.

Newman said the all-brick building "is a different look for Springfield," with its purple-colored brick, gray trim and gray-tinted, solar-reflective windows. The building also has a 40-space parking lot, a premium in the Clock Tower area.

Consolidated Communications, a telecommunications company whose subsidiaries include Central Communications Co. and Illinois Consolidated Telephone Co., will open its demonstration and showroom for business telephone systems in the building around the middle of September, according to Mel Brunink, division manager for Springfield.

The space also will house sales personnel as well as installation and maintenance people for the phone systems, he said.

Central Communications, currently at 300 E. Monroe St., will operate under its parent-company name at the expanded facility.

The Illinois Beef Council, the statewide trade association for beef producers, plans to move into its offices on the east end of the building by Sept. 6. About 1,200 square feet of the building remains to be leased, Newman said.

Around town Springfield Recycling Co., the recycler formerly at 3301 Terminal Ave., has been sold and relocated.

New owners

Greg Baise ,

Sonny Greco and

Frank Vala

have moved the business, which takes in aluminum, glass and paper for recycling, to 1900 E. Moffat St. on the north side of

Victory Hall bingo parlor.

The trio also owns Victory Hall.

Hours and staff will remain the same for Springfield Recycling, which was purchased from Harry Alton.

Woody Smith of Remax Professionals real estate handled both ends of the business sale and purchase. . . .

 

 

NEW STATE NATURAL RESOURCES DIRECTOR NAMED

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, August 26, 1988

Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 11

Karen Witter, an assistant to the governor for natural resources issues, was appointed Thursday to replace Don Etchison as the director of the state

Department of Energy and Natural Resources.

Gov. James Thompson, Witter's boss since March 1985, said Witter "has a deep commitment to both the development and protection of our state's abundant natural resources." "She brings with her a thorough understanding of state government and the critical issues that face ENR. Her skills will be put to good use as ENR leads the state's efforts to become the site of the superconducting super collider," Thompson said.

"Working within government as an active supporter of environmental causes, Karen has been instrumental in mediating conflicts that have arisen between competing interests on environmental issues and helped develop legislative initiatives, including the Illinois Groundwater Protection Act."

Etchison will leave the post in mid-October to become president of a consulting group specializing in U.S.-Canadian business and government affairs.

Witter has served as Thompson's liaison with eight state agencies, including ENR, has assisted in developing policies and agency budgets, and has advised Thompson on legislation affecting natural resource issues.

Witter, 34, of Springfield, was director of the Illinois Nature Preserves Commission from 1982-85, and served as a resource planner with the Department of Conservation from 1978-82. She has a master's degree in ecology from the University of Wales and a bachelor's degree in zoology from Iowa State University.

Witter's appointment, subject to Senate confirmation, brings with it a $57,057 annual salary.

Also Thursday, a state Department of Agriculture official was appointed to fill the department's number two spot.

Thompson appointed Mike Baise, 35, as assistant director of the agriculture department, replacing Mike Williams, who resigned earlier this week.

Baise, of Jacksonville, has served as the department's superintendent of the marketing division since 1986.

He was Agriculture Director Larry Werries' executive assistant from 1983 to 1986.

 

Baise is the cousin of Greg Baise , the state Department of Transportation secretary and manager of Thompson's 1986 re-election campaign.

Werries said earlier this week that replacing Williams was "going to be my toughest challenge to date." "It was a tough decision," Werries said Thursday. "I had many candidates for the position. But I decided to stay in house."

Baise will move into the job on Oct. 1 at an annual salary of $54,862. He was raised on a Morgan County livestock and grain farm. He graduated from Illinois College in Jacksonville in 1975 and received a master's degree in agricultural economics from the University of Illinois in 1982. He worked with the federal Department of Health, Education and Welfare for the Chicago region.

Baise is on a state advisory committee for the Department of Agriculture and Economics at the University of Illinois

 

 

 

MACMURRAY TO HONOR BUNN

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, May 14, 1987

Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 16

JACKSONVILLE -- MacMurray College will confer honorarydegrees Sunday on Springfield industrialist George Bunn, Jacksonville Mayor Helen Foreman,

and Dr. B.G. Stephens, a former MacMurray president who will deliver the commencement address.

Kingman Brewster, former president of Yale University, will be the Illinois College commencement speaker May 24. Stephens was the MacMurray president from 1980 to 1986 and introduced several programs for gifted children.

He is director of institutional advancement at Wofford College in his native Spartanburg, S.C. Stephens' son, Todd, will be among the MacMurray graduates.

An honorary doctor of laws degree will be given to Bunn, who was a member of the MacMurray College Board of Trustees from 1965 to 1973. Foreman will receive an honorary doctor of public administration degree. Stephens will be conferred an honorary doctor of humane letters.

MacMurray will confer 17 bachelor of science in nursing degrees in pinning ceremonies Saturday. Featured speaker will be Dr. Philip Kalisch, professor of history, politics and economics of nursing at the University of Michigan. Kalisch is an author and authority on the image of nursing.

Brewster, currently an attorney in London, was president of Yale from 1964 to 1977 when the university increased the number of public school graduates, black students and admitted undergraduate women.

In 1977, Brewster was appointed by President Jimmy Carter to be ambassador to Great Britain. He served until 1981 at which time he returned to practicing law, first in New York and since 1984 in London.

Illinois College was founded by a group of Yale graduates in 1826. The Illinois College Alumni Association will award its Young Alumnus of the Year citation to Greg Baise , Illinois secretary of transportation. Baise graduated from I.C. in 1974 and began his political career as an aide to Gov. James Thompson in 1977.

 

 

ECONOMY KEY PART OF BAISE 'S STRATEGY IN BID FOR TREASURER

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, August 29, 1989

Author/Byline: Pete Ellertsen
Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 6

JACKSONVILLE -- State Transportation Secretary Greg Baise recalled his Morgan County roots Monday as he announced his candidacy for state

treasurer on the Republican ticket.

Most of Baise 's campaign pledges had to do with economic development, a statewide issue that the treasurer's office deals with through its linked deposit program.

But Baise departed from his prepared text to speak to the 200 family members, friends and political supporters who gathered in the Central Park Plaza amphitheater to hear his announcement.

"I promise you one thing," he vowed, "I'll try never to let you down."

With that, the red-white-and-blue balloons were released over the town square, and Baise 's candidacy was official. It was a moment for which he spent 10 years preparing, he said.

The announcement ceremony was well scripted, and Baise 's formal statement dealt with such matters as linked deposits and the contribution the entire GOP ticket can make to Illinois.

But he said his remarks about his home town, and the debt he owes to his parents and early mentors in the Triopia school system and Jacksonville's Illinois College, were heartfelt.

"I was an alderman here, and when you're a local official like that, you're on the firing line," he said. "You get to know a lot of people and their problems."

Baise said his platform has the statewide goal of furthering economic development in concert with other Republican elected officials.

"It will be my goal to maximize the interest earned on funds invested while continuing to improve the economy throughout the state, through such programs as the linked deposit program which aided Chrysler Corp.," he said.

And with a background in rural Morgan County, Baise said, he will be especially interested in the treasurer's agricultural production loan program.

Baise said he decided to run for treasurer, after considering a bid for secretary of state, because he believes the treasurer's office can make a real contribution to the state's economic well-being.

He said he intends to do more than previous treasurers -- Democrats in recent years -- because he will work with GOP gubernatorial candidate Jim Edgar and other statewide GOP officials if elected.

"Illinois is strong today because of the proven Republican leadership of the past decade," he said. "The Republican Party has consistently provided common-sense solutions to everyday problems. We have worked to create an environment for economic growth for the '90s and beyond."

Baise said he will run with the support of Gov. James Thompson and Edgar. But he said he'll raise his own money -- about $1 million -- and do his own campaigning.

"It is not as high a visibility office as governor or secretary of state," he said. "So you have to go out and get your name known. I'm not a household name."

Baise recently abandoned his nearly yearlong plans to run against Lt. Gov.

George Ryan for the GOP nomination for secretary of state. But he said he intends to go all-out for the treasurer's office.

"Any job that handles $2.6 billion a day is not a consolation prize by any means," he said.

Several Democrats have been mentioned as general election opponents. State Rep. Thomas Homer, D-Canton, announced his candidacy last month, and state Rep. Peg McDonnell Breslin, D-Ottawa, is considering a bid. Also mentioned are Chicago lawyer Michael Howlett Jr. and state Sen. Howard Carroll, D-Chicago.

Treasurer Jerry Cosentino announced in July that he would seek the Democratic nomination for secretary of state.

Baise has served as transportation secretary since 1984, with time off to manage Thompson's 1986 re-election bid. He says he will step down this fall in order to run for treasurer.

A Thompson protege, Baise worked in Thompson's first campaign in 1976 and joined the administration the following year. He was a member of the Jacksonville City Council from 1975 to 1977.

Caption: State Transportation Secretary Greg Baise announces his candidacy for state treasurer Monday on the Jacksonville town square.

 

 

 

TOP GOP OFFICE HOLDERS AMONG SECOND-DAY FILERS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, December 11, 1985

Edition: M1,M2,E1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 13

Petitions nominating Gov. James Thompson and his running mate Lt. Gov.

George Ryan for re-election to their posts were filed Tuesday at the State

Board of Elections.

The top state Republican office holders led the list of second-day filers in the period for candidates to declare their intent to seek party primary endorsements for public office.

Ryan, and

Thompson's campaign director Greg Baise ,

filed petitions containing 8,400 signatures to put the two candidates on the March 18 Republican primary ballot.

Other candidates filing Tuesday in statewide and central Illinois races were: Republican Michael Tate of Decatur in the 102nd Illinois House District; and Democrat Michael Brown, candidate for regional school superintendent of the Brown, Cass and Schuyler Educational Service Region.

Two candidates who filed Monday seeking the Republican nomination for the 45th Illinois Senate District seat were Ralph Klopfenstein of Gridley and Robert Madigan of Lincoln. Their names were inadvertently left out of a list naming the area candidates in Tuesday's editions of the State Journal-Register.

In local races, one additional candidate for Sangamon County sheriff also filed petitions Tuesday with the county clerk's office.

Carl Greenwood, of R.R. 7, Springfield, filed to run in the Republican primary. He will face Sheriff Bill DeMarco, the Republican who was appointed to replace former Sheriff Jim Purdon.

Two Democrats also have filed to run for sheriff. They are former Greene County Sheriff Ben Picou and Chatham police officer Mark Gleason.

The period for filing petitions for next spring's primary election runs through Monday.

 

GUBERNATORIAL REMATCH HAS CLASSIC RING

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, December 22, 1985

Author/Byline: Jeff Brody
Edition: M1,M2,E1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 1

The 1986 Illinois gubernatorial contest will have the traditional feel of a race matching an incumbent and a challenger if it follows the scenario

mapped out by campaign officials.

The main theme will be leadership: Which candidate has the leadership qualities to move the state toward the 1990s? Three-term incumbent Republican James Thompson will try to show that his record is a prologue to what can be done in the future, says Citizens for Thompson campaign manager Greg Baise .

On the other hand, the campaign of Adlai Stevenson will attempt to magnify the holes in the Thompson record and paint Stevenson as the kind of visionary the state needs, campaign spokesman Bob Benjamin says.

Independent candidate James Nowlan will be a dark horse. His only hope of becoming a major factor in the election is if the voters, by next fall, become disgusted with the tactics of the other two.

Nowlan's campaign approach has been to portray himself as a literate man with governmental experience who refuses to simplify his message to fit into 30-second campaign commercials.

Since the Thompson-Stevenson contest is a rematch from 1982, one would expect the candidates will have honed to a fine edge their campaign strategies and rhetoric.

By its very nature, Stevenson's campaign will be negative. He must be critical of the Thompson record to show why voters should turn their backs on a leader they have already elected three times.

However, Benjamin says the Stevenson campaign will only have to highlight the underlying concern that the state of the state has not improved during the last decade.

"We are going to assist in the process of pinning this tail on the governor. Anyone who can remember 10 years back, when Illinois was a healthy state, is certainly going to say, `This guy has been in office since then, and we're not in as good a shape. It's time for a change. Jim Thompson's had his chance, and he blew it.' " Baise says the Thompson campaign in 1986 will be "more aggressive in pointing out the differences in their records." "We want to show that Thompson will lead us better than the alternative. Adlai Stevenson has a record. Can anyone point to oneparticular thing he did that had a positive impact on the state of Illinois? He has to answer to that; that sets a tone, from our standpoint."

But Baise said the general tenor of the re-election effort will be more self-centered.

"The governor is better served by pointing to his own record and his beliefs about where the state can go. I don't think you will see us trying to decry Adlai Stevenson's record or abilities. He has shown he can appeal to a large segment of the state -- we won't try to deny that."

The 1982 gubernatorial campaign, which was expected to be a clash of titans, was full of surprises.

Stevenson, a veteran of several statewide campaigns and generally regarded as a thoughtful political leader, was disorganized and inept. He was unable to communicate his positions and ideas and unable to avoid foot-in-mouth disease.

His low point came when he managed to call himself a "wimp" while complaining that Thompson had used that characterization. Thompson never had -- and, thanks to Stevenson, never had to thereafter -- but the wimp label stuck.

Thompson, on the other hand, went into high gear as the 1982 campaign neared election day. His rhetoric was fiery; his campaign ads masterful. But the country was in the depths of recession, and the enthusiasm for incumbents was not there.

A lackluster campaign rally on the Capitol steps the day before the election signaled that the polls, which showed Thompson leading by 20 percentage points, could be wrong. The final margin was one-tenth of 1 percent, 5,074 votes out of 3.67 million cast in the race.

The two candidates draw different conclusions from the results three years ago.

Baise claims vote fraud in Chicago added as many as 100,000 votes to Stevenson's 1982 totals, although the well-publicized convictions of election officials stemming from the 1982 race involved a relatively small number of votes.

But Baise also acknowledges that Republicans were not prepared in 1982 to turn out the vote.

"I don't think the polls were that far off in 1982. But our turnout was lower. The polls hurt us. People believed the election was won.

"Historically, there has been a tre mendous off-year dropoff in Republican areas. Our job will be to make sure our voters turn out. We want to assure that the Thompson households come out to vote.

"We proved in 1984 (Baise organized the Reagan campaign apparatus in Illinois) that we could turn out our voters."

Baise says Citizens for Thompson will use their experience from the presidential campaign to help organize a "labor-intensive," precinct-level effort for 1986. "On our side, you will have a better organized effort to deliver the governor's vote."

On the other side, Benjamin admits that there were major organizational problems in the 1982 campaign. "Adlai Stevenson did not exploit the enthusiasm there was for his campaign in 1982." This time, Stevenson will start with one of the best political organizers in Illinois on his payroll. Gary LaPaille, chief of staff for House Speaker Michael Madigan, will officially join the Stevenson campaign in January to organize a statewide network of "Stevenson clubs" in Illinois communities.

Those clubs, in turn, will organize coffees and community fund-raisers.

But Benjamin says there is another important difference in the rematch.

"Thompson had the personal credibility to offset the Stevenson challenge in 1982. But too much has happened since then. He prevailed by telling people Stevenson was wrong to say the state was in bad shape. The people believed him. But two weeks later, Thompson declared a state of emergency and then asked for a $2 billion tax increase.

"He hopes people have short memories, but they don't."

There has been much speculation about the impact of the longevity issue on the upcoming race.

Stevenson is counting on some people feeling that three terms is enough for any governor to show what he can do. Thompson, Benjamin says, refuses to take responsibility for the negative things that have happened in Illinois during the past 10 years, even though other states weathered the same national recession and now are in better shape.

And there has been a lot of political water under the bridge since Thompson first ran for governor as a crusading "white knight" who was above politics.

Baise admits that, after signing or vetoing more than 1,000 bills every year for 10 years, the governor has disappointed his share of voters.

But Baise also sees polling data showing that Thompson's approval rating remains relatively high, especially for a three-term incumbent.

"The natural inclination of people would be to say maybe we should have someone else. But Stevenson must make a strong case that he is a good alternative. Thompson is still basically a well-liked individual. People think he's honest and that he does a good job."

Baise and Citizens for Thompson expect to have $6 million to make their case to the voters. The Stevenson campaign is hoping to raise $3 million. Nowlan probably will have no more than $100,000 to fund his effort.

Thompson is unopposed in the GOP primary; Stevenson has token primary opposition from Peter Bowen, a follower of Lyndon LaRouche, and Larry Burgess, both of Chicago.

 

 

HAY HOMES RESIDENTS, STATE OFFICIALS TO TALK ABOUT MADISON STREET

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, September 10, 1985

Author/Byline: Doug Finke
Edition: M1,M2,E1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 9

State highway officials Monday promised to talk further with John Hay Homes residents to see if they can lessen the impact of the Madison Street

extension on the housing project's residents.

The Springfield City Council may also be hearing from the residents who apparently will try to have the city formally oppose construction of the street.

After a series of three meetings with John Hay Homes representatives Monday, transportation officials said they will meet further to see if residents' concerns can be accommodated in the project. James Slifer, District 6 highway engineer, said meetings will be scheduled with Hay Homes representatives to see what can be done.

"Some changes can be accommodated," Slifer told about two dozen residents Monday night. "The project was developed through normal channels. We felt we had (citizen) input."

But some residents, like Dwyane Readus, said the state never listened before to the residents' complaints.

"You asked for our input, but you didn't want to hear what we said," Readus said.

Hay Homes residents have been complaining about the Madison Street extension at least since 1979 saying the four-lane street will isolate the housing project. They were especially concerned that the road would be located between the Hay Homes and the Neighborhood Facilities Center, which is heavily used by Hay Homes residents.

Public complaints about the extension had largely died down until recently when construction machinery moved into the area to build the Clear Lake Avenue overpass and some related street work. The overpass is part of the plan eventually linking Clear Lake with Madison and Jefferson streets.

Slifer told the residents that plans have not been completed for the portion of Madison Street between 11th and 16th streets. He said district planners will work with Hay Homes residents to try to minimize the road's impact on the area. "We will consider changes," Slifer said. "We will have to take a look and see what can be done. One objective we have, of course, is to not do any more damage to the area than is necessary."

Most residents said they did not want the road in their neighborhood at all.

"How would you feel if we put this road through your front yard?" asked Jacqueline Readus.

James Craven, an attorney representing some of the residents, said the extension probably never would have been considered if the east side had a representative on the city council. Craven is also the attorney for three east side community leaders who are suing the city to stop at-large elections to the city council.

"If you had a voice on the city council it wouldn't have ever gotten off of the drawing board," Craven said. "There have always been people who said there should be an east/west street and South Grand Avenue should be extended west. Do you think South Grand Avenue will ever go through the Illini Country Club or Washington Park? The Madison Street corridor is just a symbol of the problem."

Craven noted that work on the Central Illinois Expressway was held up for several years because of concerns it would disrupt bald eagle nesting areas.

"If you can stop a project because of bald eagles, you can reexamine one that will affect 2,000 people," Craven said.

Craven and several Hay Homes representatives met Monday morning with state transportation director Greg Baise . Craven said he was encouraged by the meeting.

"He said that even if it cannot be stopped, he would be willing to have input into the design," Craven said.

State Rep. Mike Curran attended one of the Monday night meetings and said he will make sure transportation officials follow through on their promise to meet with Hay Homes representatives.

"I will let (Baise) know I am concerned about this," Curran said. He added that his support for the project in the General Assembly "depends on how reasonable the department is. I don't want to have a couple of meetings and then have them forget about it."

Curran said he was not aware of the Hay Homes residents' complaints about the project, but "now that I am aware, I'm not surprised they are upset."

Just how much the Hay Homes residents will be able to change the project remains in question. The Clear Lake overpass will be completed by the end of next year. Bids will be let this month on construction of Madison Street from the Hay Homes to Martin Luther King Drive, another part of the overall project. Slifer acknowledged that with those sections completed, there will be limits to changing the alignment of the remaining portion of Madison Street from 11th Street to 16th Street.

Final plans for the Madison Street extension should be completed in January, Slifer said.

In addition to the street itself, residents complained about a proposed pedestrian overpass that they contend would be dangerous. Plans for the overpass are not completed and also will be discussed by transportation officials with Hay Homes residents

 

 

 

 

LAWSUIT FILED CHALLENGING STATE GOP PATRONAGE SYSTEM

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, July 2, 1985

Author/Byline: Sandy Hoefler
Edition: M1,M2,E1
Section: NEWS
Page: 5

A class-action lawsuit challenging the patronage system used by Gov. Jim Thompson and the Republican Party was filed Monday in federal court in

Springfield.

Among other things, the suit says the system discriminates against people who do not politically or financially support the Republican Party. Not only are applicants for jobs, promotions and other patronage appointments evaluated for their loyalty to the GOP, but so are their relatives, the suit claims.

"The system is totally outside procedures and practices of the Personnel Code of the state of Illinois," the suit says. It allows the governor "to coerce and enlist and reward" political supporters, although the Democratic Party in Cook County is under a federal court order banning similar practices, the suit says.

More than $2 million in tax money has been spent to support the patronage system, and more than $500 million has been channeled to those politically hired, the suit alleges.

The suit was filed by Springfield attorney and Democratic activist Mary Lee Leahy specifically on behalf of five people. The suit says the number of people affected statewide is so large that it would be difficult to list everyone who has been denied promotions or transfers, who have been laid off and not rehired, and who have not been hired because they are not Republicans or active Republicans.

The five plaintiffs listed in the suit are: Cynthia Rutan, an employee of the Department of Rehabilitative Services who says she has been denied a promotion since May 1974 because she is not active in the Republican Party; Franklin Taylor, who says he was passed up for a promotion with the Department of Transportation in favor of a person with less seniority and qualifications because the other person received approval from the Fulton County Republican Party. Taylor also is seeking a transfer from Fulton County to Schuyler County, but has been denied one because the party chairmen in those counties oppose the transfer, the suit says; Ricky Standefer, who says he was laid off from a temporary position with the state garage in November; the suit says others also laid off have been rehired because of support from the Republican Party; Dan O'Brien, laid off from the Lincoln Developmental Center in April 1983 after working there for 12 years; he says he was hired by the Department of Corrections in February -- with the help of the Logan County Republican Party chairman -- but at a lower salary and at the cost of his seniority; James Moore, who has sought a state position since 1978 but was told he needed signatures from two top Republicans in Pope County, where he lives. In the meantime, the suit says, three family members of Victor English, the Pope County GOP chairman, have been hired.

Defendants are: Thompson; Don Adams, chairman of the Republican State Central Committee; Irv Smith, Sangamon County Republican Central Committee; Jim Reilly,

 the governor's chief of staff; Greg Baise ,

the governor's former personnel office director, who now is Thompson's secretary of transportation; and Mark Frech, William Fleischli, Randy Hawkins, and Kevin Wright, all assistant directors in Thompson's personnel office.

"These defendants have and do spend a substantial part of their time in pursuit of this venture, and their salaries and the expenses of running the governor's office of personnel are paid for by tax dollars," the suit says.

On Nov. 12, 1980, Thompson issued an executive order requiring his approval of potential employees and promotions, the suit says. The governor's office of personnel oversees all aspects of employment. Employees of that office, the suit says, "are substantially motivated by political considerations." "Such political considerations include whether the individual under consideration is Republican or a relative or friend of a Republican, (or) is sponsored by an influential Republican," the suit says.

Those considered for positions are reviewed to see if they have supported Thompson or if a legislator supporting them has supported Thompson, the suit says.

The personnel office checks voting records of the applicant and the applicant's relatives in considering a person for employment, as well as the person's financial support of the Republican Party, the suit alleges.

Department employees bearing the titles of administrative assistant and assistant to the director act as liaisons with the governor's office, letting the governor's office know when positions become open, the suit says.

The system limits state employment and benefits by those who are not politically favored and forces people to contribute to the campaigns of Thompson and other Republicans, the suit says.

"This system thereby creates a significant political effort in favor of the `ins,' Thompson and his political allies and against the `outs,' those who may wish to challenge in elections," the suit says.

The suit seeks more than $500 million in compensatory damages and $500 million in punitive damages to be shared among the plaintiffs, and $2 million in damages to be paid to the state treasury as compensation for spending public funds to operate the patronage system.

 

 

 

BAISE TAKES FIRST STEP IN STATEWIDE OFFICE BID

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, December 9, 1988

Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: EDITORIAL
Page: 9

STATE TRANSPORTATION Secretary Greg Baise says he won't let his politicking for statewide office interfere with his governmental duties.

Baise, of Springfield, has formed a campaign finance committee and says the time is right for him to make a bid for the Republican nomination to statewide office -- preferably secretary of state, although that remains to be determined.

But he says he's been balancing the demands of politics and government right along.

"I've been obviously viewed as one of the more political members of the Thompson administration," Baise said. "But I have certainly tried to draw the line. The demands of this office are heavy."

Baise filed papers last week with the State Board of Elections naming Republican ward committeeman Ron Gidwitz of Chicago, a Helene Curtis Corp. executive, as his chairman. Baise said it's a timely first step toward a statewide bid in 1990. "I FELT THAT in all my years of politics and counseling people, I've been saying that guys who come in and start talking two weeks before the filing period doom their candidacy to failure," he said. "I did not want to be in that position."

Baise, 36, has been in politics since he was elected an alderman in Jacksonville in 1975. He stepped down from that post in 1978 to join Republican Gov. James Thompson. He since has managed campaigns for politicians ranging from President-elect George Bush to unsuccessful Springfield aldermanic candidate Pat Tavine.

A high-ranking Thompson protege and ally for 10 years, Baise thinks the time is right now for him to seek office for himself.


"I think 1990 has the potential to be a real watershed year in politics for the Republican Party, one way or the other," he said.

Like everyone else in Illinois politics, Baise is waiting to see whether Thompson runs for a fifth term in 1990. He insists he has no inside knowledge.

"Well, I don't want to speculate on that," he said.

IF HE HAD his pick of offices, Baise would prefer the secretary of state's office. In addition to its sizable payroll, the post would involve him with some of the same interests he's worked with as transportation secretary.

"It's a high-profile office, of the secondary offices, and it's a challenging job," he said. "I think my background fits."

But he isn't limiting himself to the one office or specifying which office for which he's likely to run. That comes later, certainly after Thompson and Secretary of State Jim Edgar make their decisions at the top of the GOP ticket.

At least for the moment, Baise's interest in statewide office is best described as exploratory. The hard-and-fast decisions come later.

"If I decide to make a run, probably I would leave the office in about a year," he said. "I don't think I could do justice to the job here and also do the things I would need to do in order to run statewide."

SINCE HE STILL has the transportation department to administer, he said he'll lean over backward to avoid conflicts of interest.

"I'm in a bit of a unique position, being a sitting cabinet officer," he said. "Therefore, I will not accept contributions from highway contractors or others who do business with the department. My chairman is with Helene Curtis, and I'm not sure there's anything I can do for him as DOT secretary."

Job on hold The planned appointment of Gary Tinervan, 37, of Springfield, to a top job in the Veterans Affairs Department has been placed on hold, according to a spokesman for the governor's office.

Thompson in mid-November named Tinervan, an assistant personnel director in the governor's personnel office, to the $47,182-a-year post of assistant director of Veterans Affairs. The post is subject to Senate confirmation.

But a few days before the General Assembly returned for the second week of the veto session, a published report alleged that Tinervan had written a DuPage County judge urging bond reduction for a relative awaiting trial on charges of sexual assault. Tinervan reportedly enclosed his business card in the communication.

Rumblings in the Senate were that if Tinervan's appointment were presented to the Executive Appointments Committee, which met Nov. 30, it wouldn't be called. But it didn't get that far.

Before proceeding with the appointment, according to a spokesman for the governor's office, Thompson asked counsel Bill Ghesquiere to determine the accuracy of the newspaper account and assess what improprieties, if any, Tinervan may have committed. His report is still pending.

 

CHRISTOFILAKOS IS MANAGING PARTNER OF JIM'S STEAKHOUSE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, May 10, 1989

Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: BUSINESS
Page: 24

George Christofilakos, a face familiar to the Springfield restaurant business, has surfaced at Jim's Steakhouse, 2242 S. Sixth St., these days.

Christofilakos, who operated the Top of the Arch restaurant for nine years and owned it for another 11, has become managing partner of Jim's.

Christofilakos, who has been behind the scenes in the food business for the past three years as director of operations and partner in

 

Arena Food Service,

 

said no changes are planned for the popular steak and seafood house, whose trademark is its dry-aged beef.

"I'm coming into a successful operation," he said. "To change anything would be foolish. I'm just going to stand at the door and shake hands with a lot of old friends."

The building housed the Black Angus Steak House for many years until Peorian Jim Comfort began operating Jim's Steak House there in July 1987.

 

The restaurant was purchased by Sonny Greco, Greg Baise , and Frank Vala late last year.

 

 

ATTENTION TURNS TO THE BELLWETHER - DELEGATES COULD PUT DOLE OVER THE TOP

Chicago Tribune - Wednesday, March 13, 1996

Author/Byline: Thomas Hardy, Tribune political writer.
Edition: NORTH SPORTS FINAL
Section: NEWS
Page: 10
Column: ELECTION '96.

With the presidential nominations virtually sewn up by the Super Tuesday results, Sen. Bob Dole embarks on a weeklong primary campaign in the bellwether Midwest region that promises to be more interesting as a preview for the general election than as a test of his now-solid GOP standing.

Three of the four states holding primaries next Tuesday, including Illinois, will be pivotal in the November contest, and issues that have arisen during the nominating season will be vital in the Rust Belt come fall

"These states could well decide the outcome of the general election," Democratic National Committee co-chairman Don Fowler said Tuesday. "And the candidates themselves will spend a lot of time here battling it out."

The four Midwestern states holding primaries next Tuesday are Illinois, Ohio, Michigan and Wisconsin, representing a cache of 229 convention delegates that will come close to putting Dole over the top for the GOP nomination. Fowler said Democratic primaries on the same day will clinch a renomination for President Clinton.

Moreover, the four states' combined 72 electoral votes account for a quarter of the total needed for a general election victory, and the big three--Illinois, Ohio and Michigan--are political prizes that don't fall reliably into either party's presidential column.

Illinois has carried every presidential winner except two during this century and has provided Democratic nominees with biggest Midwestern margins.

Ohio's presidential vote usually mirrors the national average to the exact percentage point, and no Republican has ever been elected without carrying it. (Ohio got more 1992 campaign visits by members of the national tickets than any other state.)

Michigan has gone with the presidential winner for three elections in a row.

"This is the start of Bob Dole's quest for putting together the 290 electoral votes needed to win. . . . Those three big states are absolutely critical for a Republican presidential candidate," said

 

Greg Baise , who managed President Reagan's Illinois re-election campaign in 1984.

Republicans voiced different opinions about themes Dole should emphasize during the coming week.

In a campaign year dominated by discussions of economically anxious voters--and in a region where the unemployment rate is lower than the national average--most recommended an upbeat economic theme.

Illinois Gov. Jim Edgar said Dole should spend the next six days stressing the importance of free trade in an area where agriculture and manufacturing remain dominant.

State Comptroller Loleta Didrickson recommended that Dole emphasize his foreign-relations experience and strategies for balancing the budget and reducing the deficit.

"Jobs and the economy are on Illinoisans' minds," offered Baise, president of the Illinois Manufacturers Association. "And character is where you start to define the real differences between Bill Clinton and Bob Dole."

Democratic Party chief Fowler said the presidential election in the Midwest will turn on partisan differences over "the standard issues" such as health care, education, environmental protection, tax policy and leadership.

"Polls indicate that the people are on (Clinton's) side," Fowler said. But he cautioned that, "Politics are uncertain, and other things could happen."

Fowler acknowledged that the Clinton-Dole race will tighten before November, but he predicted that the traditional post-convention "bump" from the Democratic nominating extravaganza staged in Chicago--immediately before the Labor Day kickoff of the fall campaign--will be especially effective for the president's Midwestern campaign.

Beginning Thursday, Dole will begin six days of campaigning in all four primary states.

Clinton, however, has decided not to make the kind of high-profile campaign trips that stole the Republican candidates' thunder in Iowa and New Hampshire last month. The president traveled to Michigan last week and is scheduled for a trip to Ohio later in the month.

Given those circumstances, Edgar said, "We can talk a lot more about Bill Clinton and kind of zero in on the president, rather than worry or have to dwell on what Sen. Dole's Republican opponents are saying."

Nevertheless, Dole's two main Republican primary foes, Pat Buchanan and Steve Forbes, indicated no willingness to abandon their campaigns and rally behind the eventual nominee, despite the defeat he handed both in the Super Tuesday primaries.

"Even though some people say there's a certain candidate who has it all wrapped up, it's my belief that it's important to get the issues before the voters," Forbes told a Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce audience Tuesday.

"The Republican Party itself, I don't think, yet recognizes the importance of having something to say to the American people. When they say `unify,' my answer is `unify for what?' "

Buchanan promised again to "battle for the party" all the way to the GOP convention in San Diego in August.

DePaul University political scientist Michael Mezey said the size of the Buchanan vote remains the only issue for Dole to confront for the remainder of the primary season.

"Because Dole already has the nomination in the bag, the size of that vote is an index of the trouble Dole will have when he gets to the convention and the power that Buchanan and his folks will have over the platform," Mezey said.

In his 1992 Republican primary challenge to President George Bush, Buchanan received 22 percent of the vote in Illinois; 25 percent in Michigan and 17 percent in Ohio and Wisconsin. All four states have popular, moderate governors who have rallied behind Dole

Caption: PHOTO GRAPHIC
PHOTO: Steve Forbes and his wife, Sabina, greet well-wishers Tuesday morning after speaking at the Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce. Tribune photo by Carl Wagner. GRAPHIC: Great Lakes Primaries. Wisconsin. Primaries in the industrial states of the Midwest take center stage March 19, with races in Illinois, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin. Sources: World Almanac, U.S. Census Bureau, University of Wisconsin--extension Wisconsin Survey Research Laboratory. Chicago Tribune

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Timeline –

 

Bloomington and normal chiefs both bail –

 

2009 – same time -

 

 

 

 

 

Two fire chiefs resign

Pantagraph, The (Bloomington, IL) - Tuesday, April 21, 2009

Author/Byline: Mary Ann Ford and Roger Miller;mford@pantagraph.com;rmiller@pantagraph.com
Edition: Main
Section: News
Page: A1

NORMAL - The fire chiefs for both Bloomington and Normal announced Monday that they plan to retire after a combined service of almost 70 years to the Twin Cities.

Bloomington Chief Keith Ranney, 54, plans to step down May 1 after 30 years with his department. His colleague in Normal, Jim Watson , 60, will retire in July after 37 years of service to the town.

Bloomington Deputy Fire Chief Mike Kimmerling will step in as interim chief, but Normal officials still are discussing how to fill Watson's position.

“It was time,” Ranney said of his retirement. “I can't imagine anyone anywhere having a more satisfying career than I've had. … Now it is time to do something else.”

Ranney said it was “just incredible coincidence” that he and Watson made their announcements independently on the same day. Their actual retirement dates are spread out enough to minimize any issues of cooperation between the departments, he said.

Jim Watson

“Typically firefighters retire with no more than 25 years,” said Normal City Manager Mark Peterson. “He has a tremendous record and certainly has demonstrated amazing commitment to the town.”

Peterson said Watson originally planned to retire two years ago but agreed to stay on while the fire department transitioned to paramedic service.

Normal Fire Department started transporting all emergency patients and charging for the service in June 2006 after Lifeline Mobile Medics, which was operated by BroMenn Regional Medical Center and OSF St. Joseph Medical Center, announced plans to end all emergency ambulance service.

Three paramedic-level ambulances hit Normal streets in mid-December 2008.

Peterson said the shift to paramedics was a complicated process and he was grateful Watson agreed to stay on during the transition.

Besides transitioning to paramedic service, Watson also was at the helm when the town opened its third fire station on Raab Road in north Normal.

“In hindsight, I'm disappointed we put Station Three where we did,” Watson said. “If we would have known they were building a high school out there (on the far east side of Normal), we would have looked harder (at the fire station placement).”

But, he said, at the time there was no indication construction would go so far east or beyond Ironwood to the north.

Watson said highlights of his career include revamping the vehicle replacement program that allows staggered replacement of fire engines and ambulances and the start of a technical rescue team that specializes in rescues from confined spaces.

Watson's last day will be July 17 but accrued days off and sick time allow him to remain on the payroll until the first of October.

Peterson said town officials will evaluate replacement options in the coming weeks.

Watson started as a firefighter in 1972 and was named lieutenant in 1975, assistant fire chief in 1986 and fire chief in 1997.

Keith Ranney

While Ranney's announcement came with only a few days' notice, he said he, his department and city officials have been planning and training for a changeover in the department's top job for three years.

“We are well set to continue into the future,” he said. “These guys (in the fire department) have a good mindset.”

Ranney said he's had his 30th anniversary with the department last week, so it was time to go.

“I'm leaving the second love of my life to spend time with my first love: my wife and my family,” he said.

Ranney, who has a real estate broker's license, said he plans to help his wife, Cindy, with her real estate business. He said he plans to help relieve her workload “so we can go play golf an afternoon or two.”

They have two grown children and four grandchildren, and Ranney said he plans to spend more time with them.

Ranney started with the department as a firefighter/emergency medical technician. He was promoted to lieutenant in 1986, captain in 1989, training officer in 1992, assistant chief in 1995 and chief in 1998.

He said he's pleased how the city has allowed the department to grow along with the community. It has gone from three to six stations, although opening the latest station has been put off until October because budget cuts have delayed hiring staff, he said.

He said he's especially pleased the city achieved emergency services and disaster agency certification, becoming one of only eight to 10 cities in the state so rated.

Like Watson, Ranney also said he was happy to see the city make the transition to paramedic-level service. “These guys can do rings around what I used to do (as an EMT),” he said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USAREC

 

 

 

Dirksen

 

DIRKSEN PARKWAY

  2510 N. DIRKSEN PARKWAY

  

  SPRINGFIELD IL, 62702

 

 

Recruiters at RSID 5H4P


Rank

Name

SFC

Charles Lovingood

 

SSG

Mark White

 

SSG

Kevin Hudson

 

SGT

Stephen Gosch

 


 

veterans

 

SPRINGFIELD

  3169 S VETERANS PKWY

  SOUTHWEST PLAZA 1

  SPRINGFIELD IL, 62704

 

Recruiters at RSID 5H4R


Rank

Name

SFC

David Goad

 

SGT

Christopher Wardell

 

SSG

James Heskett

 

SSG

William Mccabe

 

SSG

Jeffrey Dubasik

 

SGT

Jeffrey Lee

 

 

RCTG CO SPRINGFIELD

  2600 FARRAGUT DR STE 410B

  

  SPRINGFIELD IL, 62704

 

 

Recruiters at RSID 5H4


Rank

Name

CPT

Agustin Valerionunez

 

MSG

Jason Curry

 

Racine Freeman

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, November 24, 2002



Downen-Petrilli

Alana Marie Petrilli and Joshua Matthew Downen, both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. Sept. 7, 2002, at Blessed Sacrament Church by the Rev. Kevin Vann.

The bride is the daughter of Mark and Mary Petrilli of Springfield. The groom is the son of Chris and Patsy Downen of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Lisa Petrilli. Bridesmaids were Jill Giacomini, Colleen Cloonan and Karen Roney. Flower girl was Alayah Morgan.

Best man was Brad Downen. Groomsmen were George Petrilli, Kyle Kother and Bo Downen. Ring bearer was Anthony Petrilli. Ushers were Brad Books,

 

Jason Curry ,

 

Doug Lally, Nick Naumovich and Brian Ruot.

A reception was held at the Sangamo Club.

The bride is a 1997 graduate of Sacred Heart-Griffin High School and a 2001 graduate of Eastern Illinois University. She is employed as a software consultant for Levi, Ray and Shoup Inc. The groom is a 1996 graduate of Sacred Heart-Griffin High School. He is employed as a webmaster for Illinois Office of Educational Services.

The couple will live in Springfield

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, June 8, 1997



Feger-Miller Lori Jean Miller and Thomas Michael Feger Jr., both of Springfield, were united in marriage at 11 a.m. May 10 at St. Aloysius Catholic Church by the Rev. John Titus.

The bride is the daughter of Charles and Grace Miller of Springfield. The groom is the son of Thomas Feger Sr. and Carol Harper, both of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Monica Davis, with Heather Harper, Dana Nichols and Angela Saunders as bridesmaids. Flower girl was Sarah Kincaid.

Serving as best man was Robert Marinelli, with Brett and Bryan Feger and Alan and Barry Miller serving as groomsmen. Serving as ushers were

Jason Curry

and Mark Marinelli. Ringbearer was Richard Davis.

A reception was held at the DAV at Lake Springfield.

The bride is a graduate of Lanphier High School, Lincoln Land Community College and Sangamon State University. She is employed by Doctors Hospital. The groom is a graduate of Lanphier High School and the University of Illinois. He is employed by Phillips Brothers Printers.

The couple will reside in Springfield

 

 

BINGO

 

Feger works for Farley at CVB

 

Note redpath at 183 police –

 

New caci guy – natsec –

 

Ald redpath – city – sc dems

 

Plug in redpath impacts here

 

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, December 17, 2006



Feger -Redpath

Colleen Marie Redpath and Joshua Stephen Feger , both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. Sept. 23, 2006, at St. Aloysius Church by the Rev. John Ossola.

The bride is the daughter of Bambi and Charles Redpath Sr. of Springfield. The groom is the son of Sue and Craig Feger of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Carrie Redpath. Bridesmaids were Lindsey Feger , Megan Clark, Tracy Jacobs, Kristin Bivins, Erin Osterholt and Brianne Weaver. Junior bridesmaids were Hannah Hyde and Lilly Bredemeier. Flower girls were Sarah Birkeland and Laura Bredemeier.

Best man was Lee Aaron Schwartz. Groomsmen were Joe Priepot, Brandon Keys, Eric Glaub, Chris Parrack, Josh Schroeder, Chris Doerfler and Charles Redpath Jr. Ring bearer was Alex Feger . Ushers were Todd Pulliam, Brett Feger and Bryan Feger .

A reception was held at The Rail Golf Course in Sherman.

The bride is a graduate of Ursuline Academy and Lincoln Land Community College. She is employed by the

city of Springfield, Information Systems Division.

The groom is a graduate of Southeast High School and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. He is employed by the

Convention and Visitors Bureau.

The couple resides in Springfield.

 

pubworks

CITY CREWS REPAIR LEAKING SANITARY SEWER

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, February 10, 1990

Author/Byline: Bill Bush
Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 5

Springfield Public Works crews Friday morning repaired a sanitary sewer that may have been sending raw sewage into a stream in Washington Park for

months.

The sewage was flowing up from the ground in a wooded area just south of the intersection of Chatham and Old Jacksonville roads.

Public Works crews Friday morning removed three basketball-size rocks that someone apparently dropped down a manhole,

 

said Tom Feger ,

chief sewer engineer for Public Works.

The large rocks, along with baseball-size rocks, sticks and other debris blocked the 8-inch sanitary line. The manhole cover had been thrown into the stream.

As a result, sewage backed up and leaked through a buried manhole, Feger said.

"It's been like this a couple of months," Feger said, judging from how the sewage had soiled the rocks. "Usually, if it was just a few days, they (the rocks) would be clean."

The sanitary sewer serves the Fairway Oaks and Country Club Manor subdivisions north of Chatham Road, Feger said. The sewage was leaking into the creek at a rate of about 10 to 15 gallons a minute or greater, Feger said.

About a 100-yard stretch of the creek, which empties into the slightly larger Jackson Branch Creek, had turned a milky white. Some of the sewage probably got into the lagoons in Washington Park, Feger said. The area around the stream smelled strongly of sewage, although it had been diluted by rain, Feger said.

A person walking through the park discovered the leak Thursday afternoon and informed a park police officer. The officer informed Public Works Thursday, but crews had to quit Thursday night before fixing the leak.

Workers used straps to remove the rocks and highly pressurized water to blast through the other debris between 7:30 and 10:30 a.m. Friday. The blocked manhole was in a woods that borders Illini Country Club and Chatham Road along the southwest corner of the park.

Feger said there is no way to ensure that the vandals who blocked the sewer will not do it again.

"If we went to that expense, and tried to bolt down every lid and manhole cover, we'd spend a lot of money," Feger said.

 

 

 

 

Redpath quitting state job as part of bid for 99th post

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, October 6, 2005

Section: EDITORIAL
Page: 9

Springfield Ward 4 Ald. CHUCK REDPATH is quitting his state job to make sure he's not violating any laws when he launches his campaign for state representative in the 99th House District.

Redpath, 49, said he recently discovered that at least part of the funding that pays for his job as deputy chief of the conservation police at the Department of Natural Resources comes from the federal government. And the federal Hatch Act doesn't allow federal employees to run for partisan offices.

"I am fully committed to run for and win this office," Redpath said. "And so I will be submitting my resignation at the end of the month, and I will be going to work full time to run and win this office."

Redpath said he expects to announce his campaign for the seat now held by state Rep. RAYMOND POE, R-Springfield, about Nov. 1 - the day after his resignation takes effect.

Based on Poe's earlier decision not to seek re-election and to run for lieutenant governor, the 99th, which includes most of Springfield, is considered an open seat. There have been rumblings that Poe might be persuaded to seek a sixth two-year term in the House, but there are no late developments to report.

Redpath could be involved in a primary, as Springfield lawyer SAM CAHNMAN, who represents District 18 on the Sangamon County Board, has said he's also a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 99th.

Redpath spent 21 years with the attorney general's office and a year ago switched to DNR, where he makes $71,292 annually.

Redpath's post with the conservation police brought him a tough assignment and, as it turned out, a lot of publicity. He was among state workers sent to New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, and part of his work using a boat to help rescue survivors ended up with him pictured on the front page of The State Journal-Register.

But it was also during that mobilization that Redpath - who has talked of the legislative race for a long time - first heard that federal funding might be part of his pay.

"I had to figure out what I'm going to do," he said, to avoid being in possible violation of the Hatch Act. "This is the best option. It's the cleanest option."

He said being off a regular job will also give him more time to campaign.

Redpath will remain on the city council, an officially nonpartisan job that pays $13,011 annually. His wife, BAMBI, also works for the state as an account technician with the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency, making $38,028 annually.

Given that the general election isn't until November 2006, and if he wins, he won't take office until January 2007, Redpath said he thinks he'll have to get another job between now and then, but nothing is lined up.

As for a possible electoral confrontation with Cahnman, Redpath said Cahnman has run "for a lot of different offices," and "I'm not the kind of guy to badmouth any of my opponents."

"I'm going to beat him," Redpath said. "That's the bottom line."

He also claims support from prominent Democrats. A spokesman has said that House Speaker MICHAEL MADIGAN, D-Chicago, is backing Redpath.

Feger gets city post

Meanwhile, a future member of the Redpath family has a new job with the city of Springfield.

JOSH FEGER , 27, a Springfield native with a bachelor's degree in business management from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, began Aug. 22 as a convention sales manager for the Springfield Convention and Visitors Bureau. He's making $40,016 annually.

Feger , who played baseball at Lincoln Land Community College after graduating from Southeast High School, said that while there are four sales managers, his job keys on sporting events - luring new ones to Springfield and keeping the ones already in the capital city.

He's also been named assistant secretary of the Capital Area Sports Commission, an independent group seeking to bring more sports activities to Springfield.

Feger is engaged to COLLEEN REDPATH, 26, who is an elected member of the board that oversees the Prairie Capital Convention Center. She is also an account technician with City Water, Light and Power, making $31,385 annually.

 

Her father is

 

Ald. Redpath.



Feger 's mother is also a first cousin of Mayor TIM DAVLIN, and Feger is a nephew of TOM FEGER , who was the

 

city's chief sewer engineer before taking early retirement in 1999.

Josh Feger said he was a commission-only insurance agent for three years after college, and spent the next 31/2 years with Corporation Service Co., which was called LexisNexis Document Solutions when he started. He worked in the area of managing and housing documents, such as titles and registrations, for corporate vehicle fleets. He said some sales of that service was involved.

He said the sports market has been "an area kind of ignored," and he is "contacting various sporting events - high school, college, bowling" and others, "trying to convince them to consider Springfield as a host site."

Events that increase hotel bookings are a key target, he said.

At his past job, he said, "there was really nowhere to go unless someone quit or passed away," and the city job, which he found advertised on the Web, pays more than he was making.

"I asked Chuck what he thought," Feger said. "He said it looked like a good position."

Ald. Redpath said he knows Feger has been "scanning the city Web site" but also said he did not put in a good word for him. "Sure didn't," the alderman said. "I'm real careful about that."

The Redpath- Feger wedding is planned for September 2006. Congratulations to them

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

State farm –

 

callis – baise

 

 

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneybaise

 

http://sites.google.com/site/dwdelaneybingo

 

 

 

TITLE: PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, May 19, 1996



KEVIN CALLIS , an agent of State Farm Insurance Company, has been elected to the board of directors of Prevent Child Abuse -- Illinois, the state chapter of the National Committee to Prevent Child Abuse

 

 

TITLE: PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, July 17, 1992


KEVIN CALLIS has been named an agent for State Farm Insurance Co. in Springfield. His office is in Capital City Shopping center on Dirksen Parkway.

Callis previously worked for the state Department of Conservation and with the political campaigns of George Bush, Jim Thompson and Greg Baise .

 

 

DOC CONTEST A CHALLENGE TO OUTDOOR SKILLS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, September 25, 1991

Author: KEVIN McDERMOTT STAFF WRITER

If a real man -- a calloused, salt-of-the-earth, genuine Daniel Boone type -- were compelled for some reason to fix a cup of tea, how would he go

about it? Maybe he would grab a big log, split a handful of kindling wood from it with an ax, tear up the rest of it to hold the tea kettle and feed the fire, which he would light with just one match.

Or maybe not.

But 10 contestants will attempt to do just that Saturday, when they compete for Illinois' first annual Sportsman of the Year award.

Those 10 will be narrowed from a field of up to 50, through trials involving trapshooting, archery, wildlife knowledge and other assorted outdoorsy challenges. Despite the sex-specific title of the competition, women are welcome. But quiche-eaters need not apply.

"It's almost like a decathlon" for outdoorsmen, said Kevin Callis of the Illinois Department of Conservation. "It takes a different breed."

The DOC is conducting the contest as part of the fourth annual celebration of National Hunting and Fishing Day, to be held in Conservation World at the Illinois State Fairgrounds. The celebration runs throughout the weekend, with the Sportsman of the Year contest starting Saturday morning.

There's more than just machismo at stake; the top sportsman will take home $1,500 and a trophy, with $500 and $250 awards for second and third place, respectively, and medals for the winners in each of the 10 categories.

"National Hunting and Fishing Day is designed not only to honor sportsmen, but also to encourage people to utilize our natural resources," said Callis. "We're hoping the Sportsman of the Year contest will become the showcase" of the annual celebration.

Contestants will pay a $10 fee to enter. Up to 50 slots are available, some of which already have been reserved.

The contest will begin at 8:30 a.m. Saturday with the five "knowledge" categories. Contestants will have to identify various types of animals, fish, waterfowl, and trees, and will be quizzed on conservation law.

"They will be tested with a variety of procedures -- slides, recordings, physical samples, tracks, sounds," Callis said. "The skill portion is where the fun begins."

For the skill portion of the contest, participants will shoot clay traps, use bows and arrows on wildlife silhouettes, and cast fishing lines for accuracy (floating rings in a pond will be the targets). They also will compete in a game-calling contest, which will mimic a different type of animal each year. This year, it's a duck.

In each of the first nine categories, the top 10 winners will be assigned points (10 points for 10th place, 100 points for first place). For the final event, the top 10 point-getters from all of those competitions combined each will be given a 4-foot log, an ax, a tea kettle full of water and one (count 'em, one) match.

Then they will be sent into a gravel clearing with one objective: to boil water. Everything needed to accomplish that task -- the light kindling wood, the heavier firewood and some kind of apparatus for propping up the tea kettle -- has to come from the four items provided.

"That part should be the crowd-pleaser," said Callis.

The trophies, plaques, medals and cash awards for the competition are being provided by Valco Awards & More Inc. of Springfield.

"We've been familiar with some of the programs of the Department of Conservation, and we wanted to help the sportsmen," said company owner Linda Vala. "This is something new."

Celebrations of National Hunting and Fishing Day are conducted throughout the country, but officials believe Illinois' is the only one with such a varied contest.

DOC organizers "have been kicking around the idea for the past three years," Callis said. "I think people will be drawn by the variety of the competition."

People interested in entering should contact Callis or Ron Allen at the Department of Conservation, 524 S. Second St., or call 785-9371. Contestants are encouraged to bring an assistant to keep track of their fishing gear and other possessions.

Other activities at Conservation World this weekend will include the first Midwest Wild Turkey Calling Contest Saturday, and a chili cookoff, craft show and an auction of outdoor items on Sunday.

Activities for children include catch-and-release fishing (one tagged fish will be worth a $500 savings bond), archery ranges and a BB-gun range.

Wildlife artists, gun displays and field dog demonstrations also will be included. Public admission is free.

 

 

 

STATE FARM AND RAIL CLASSIC TEAM UP

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, August 31, 1993

Author: DAVE KANE

Brenda Hurt downplays her role as a matchmaker. But she cannot deny that a suggestion she made several years ago apparently has turned into a

promising marriage: the State Farm Rail Classic.

"I planted the seed, but everyone else nourished the plant," said Hurt, who first suggested that the LPGA Rail Charity Classic approach Bloomington-based State Farm Insurance about sponsoring the golf tournament.

Hurt, a member of the tournament's board of directors for many years, is a Bloomington resident whose husband, Glen, is an executive at State Farm.

In conversations with Rail Classic Executive Director Sandra Dehner-Wheeler, Brenda said gaining a corporate title sponsor like State Farm could take the tournament -- now in its 18th year -- to the next level.

"Everybody involved with the tournament -- the board, the volunteers the sponsors -- had done so much work over the years," Hurt said. "We were sitting around saying, `Gee, we've sold everything to raise money.' "So many of the ladies' events were falling upon hard times. You really need an infusion of corporate money to keep you going. Otherwise, you're kind of rolling the dice every year."

A title sponsor was something tournament officials had pursued over the years, but the "right fit" never had materialized. How many corporations were willing to make a major financial commitment to a women's golf tournament in Springfield, Ill.? And if there was such a corporation, would the tournament risk losing its identity? So the tournament continued with the help of dozens of central Illinois businesses.

But Hurt finally arranged a meeting between officials from the tournament and State Farm three years ago.

"We got a letter from State Farm a few weeks later, saying they couldn't commit themselves at that time," Hurt said. "We were disappointed, but I told Sandy, `They didn't really say no, so we're not going to give up.' State Farm did come aboard as one of the tournament's many sponsors in 1991. But tourney officials, led by Dehner-Wheeler, remained persistent and had subsequent meetings about a title sponsorship.

"Sandy would go in there and have answers for just about any question (State Farm) had about what they would get for their dollar," Hurt said. "She's always been great about that. If she doesn't have an answer right then, she'll get it for you."

The answers finally were sufficient for State Farm to say yes late last year. The company agreed to a three-year contract, with a two-year option, to serve as title sponsor.

The financial terms have not been disclosed beyond a "low six-figure" commitment by State Farm. The agreement did allow the purse to be boosted to $500,000 from the $450,000 of last year. Television coverage also was made possible, not to mention national advertising.

Tournament officials felt comfortable with State Farm for several reasons. There wouldn't be wholesale changes in the way the event was run. In addition, State Farm was a national company rooted in central Illinois.

 

Bruce Callis ,

executive vice president for State Farm,

 

said the company felt comfortable with the Rail Classic as well. This is State Farm's first time as primary sponsor of a nationally televised sports event.

"The reason we did this goes beyond the conventional things such as exposure and advertising," Callis said. "It has allowed us to make a statement about the support of women's sports. That has attracted more response than we expected.

"Another aspect of it is, the tournament is played on a public golf course. We felt that was very important as well."

Callis said State Farm also liked the tournament because it was an established event and it was charity-oriented. He added that the feedback has been positive ever since the announcement was made just before last Christmas.

"I think the long history of the volunteer-oriented nature of the event made it attractive," he said. "We've had volunteers from Bloomington who've worked the tournament for years and years. I think people have a proprietary feeling for it.

"It's been a super experience working with their staff and their board of directors. They're get-it-done people."

Dehner-Wheeler said the feeling is mutual.

"If you have about two hours, I'll tell you how great it is," she said. "We have enjoyed a marvelous working relationship with a mutual goal: the biggest and best tournament in our history.

"There have been many opportunities this year to ask for their assistance, and as the commercial says, `Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.' I can speak from experience. They are."

 

 

 

Josh Kornfeld had the apt in the basement on second st – jurkanin –

 

perfunctory

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, May 22, 1990



Kornfeld- Callis Kendra Leigh Callis and Christopher Jay Kornfeld, both of Bloomington, were united in marriage on April 28 at St. Agnes Catholic Church. The Rev.

Patrick Wright performed the ceremony.

The bride is the daughter of John and Linda Curtis of Springfield. The groom is the son of Ralph and Carol Kornfeld of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Jean Kapp, with Lynnette Hindman and Mary Ticknor serving as bridesmaids.

Best man was Todd Kapp. Groomsmen were Jeff Hindsman and Phil Schumer. Ushers were Jeff Kornfeld and Josh Kornfeld.

The bride is employed as assistant manager at Jeffrey Alans. The groom is employed as manager at Toys R Us.

The couple will reside in Bloomington.

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, December 22, 1991



Megginson-Fuchs Cynthia Fuchs and Steven Megginson, both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. Nov. 23 at Church of the Blessed Sacrament.

The Rev. Hugh Cassidy performed the ceremony.

The bride is the daughter of Ron and Carolyn Fuchs of Franklin. The groom is the son of Merle and Martha Megginson of Jacksonville.

Serving as matron of honor was Angie Fuchs. Bridesmaids were Cheryl Terwische, Cheryl Cors, Tonya Bourn, Dana Fortado and Sarah Megginson. Flower girls were Amanda Stevens, Jenny Prochazka and Emily Callis .

Best man was Gordon Lashmett. Groomsmen were Will Whalen, Phil Megginson, Ed Nelson, Craig Clancy and Pat Phalen. Ushers were Tom Lonergan, Jason Fuchs, Brian Sheehan and John Murray. Ringbearer was Brian Fuchs.

A reception was held at IBEW. The bride is a graduate of Routt High School and is attending St. John's School of Nursing. The groom is a graduate of Routt High School and the University of Illinois. He is employed as a civil engineer for Collins and Rice.

The couple will live in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, November 26, 1989



Hindman--Watts Lynnette M. Watts and Jeffrey S. Hindman, both of Indianapolis, Ind., were married at 12:15 p.m. Oct. 28 at St. Aloysius Church in Springfield by the Rev. Victor Kaltenbach.

The bride is the daughter of Mrs. Richard Watts, R.R. 7, Springfield. The groom is the son of Dr. and Mrs. Travis Hindman, 412 Clipper Road.

Maid of honor was Lisa Watts. Bridesmaids were Jean Kapp, Kendra Callis , Terri Lutz and Noel Chambers. Flower girl was Marsha Tweedt.

Best man was

 

Greg Midden.

 

Groomsmen were Lance Sheley, Chris Kornfeld, Mike Crumley and Sean Hindman. Ushers were Todd Kapp, Mike Cutler and Gary Kroeschel.

A reception was held at the Artisans Building on the Illinois State Fairgrounds.

The bride is a graduate of Sacred Heart Academy, the Undergraduate School of Cosmetology and attended Butler University in Indianapolis. She is employed by the Indianapolis Airport Authority. The groom is a graduate of Griffin High School and Southern Illinois University. He is employed by Frank's Nursery and Crafts in Indianapolis.

The couple will reside in Indianapolis.

 

 

 

CHARITY PUTS TOURNAMENT IN PERSPECTIVE MUCHA: GIVING BACK IS WHAT IT'S ALL ABOUT

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, August 29, 1995

Author: DAVE KANE

When Barb Mucha visited Springfield about a month ago, the experience put several things in perspective for her.

It reminded Mucha that life can provide hurdles much greater than making a putt or making the 36-hole cut at a golf tournament.

It also reminded her about the primary purpose of the State Farm Rail Classic.

"As players, we tend to get a little self-centered out there," said Mucha, the defending champion at The Rail this week. "We look at the money list and our scoring average and where we finished last week and the list can go on and on forever.

"But this tournament really comes down to the charities. I know our tour gives millions of dollars to charities each year, as do the PGA and Senior tours."

As part of her trip to Springfield, Mucha visited several of the charitable organizations that will benefit from the State Farm Rail Classic this year, including the Gateway Foundation, United Celebral Palsy of Land of Lincoln, Memorial Medical Center's Burn Unit and St. John's Hospital's Pediatric/Neo-Natal Unit.

The tournament has three other "primary charities" this year: the Child Advocacy Center, the Rape Information and Counseling Service, and the St.

Jude Children's Hospital Midwest Affiliate located in Peoria.

Last year, the State Farm Rail Classic raised a total of $98,892.14 for charity, including amounts ranging from $6,000 to $16,500 for each of seven primary charities. Since 1981, the tournament has raised $796,063.47 for various charities.

Many other organizations benefit from the tournament through various means. The American Business Club, for example, operates the tournament's concessions stands. Last year, ABC raised $6,271.64 for its charities.

Other organizations, including several area high school golf teams, take part in the pro-am caddie program. That generated a total of $3,700 last year.

And the Ansar Shrine Hospital Unit raised $2,438.50 by selling tournament programs last year.

The State Farm Rail Classic is part of a larger charity focus of the LPGA tour. Charity contributions from LPGA tournametns totaled nearly $6 million in 1994. The cumulative amount raised from LPGA events since 1981, when the LPGA started keeping such records, was almost $71 million through 1994. The dollar amounts speak for themselves. But Mucha said the charity aspect of the tournament doesn't hit home until you visit some of the organizations that benefit.

"To walk through that burn unit (at MMC) and see some of the people who'd been burned. . . . I'd been complaining about missing short putts, and here are people trying to survive and get their lives back in order.

"Or to go to the neo-natal center and hold those little babies. You're looking at them and you think `This thing is alive and it doesn't seem real.' "So things like that put it back in perspective for me. I know when I leave here, I'll have time to think on that airplane. Hopefully, it'll make me a better person.

"Reaching out to people and giving back, that's what it's all about."

Caption: The Pediatric/Neo-Natal Unit at St. John's Hospital is one of the many organizations benefitting from the State Farm Rail Classic. Defending tournament champion Barb Mucha (holding the baby) visited several of the tournament's major charities, including St. John's, earlier this summer. Accompanying Mucha were: (standing from left) State Farm executive Melissa Paschold, State Farm Executive Vice President Bruce Callis and tournament Chairman Anita Muench; and (in front) tournament Executive Director Sandra Dehner-Wheeler and tournament board of directors President Curtis Tillett.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MIKE ELSTON AT USDOJ

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

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dateWed, Mar 7, 2007 at 2:43 PM

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hide details 3/7/07

 

 

Prosecutors Describe Contacts From Higher Up

 

 

 

By DAVID JOHNSTON

Published: March 7, 2007

WASHINGTON, March 6 — Six ousted United States attorneys told Congressional panels Tuesday new details about lawmakers' intrusions in sensitive investigations and possible efforts by the Justice Department to squelch their public protests over their firings.

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Stephen Crowley/The New York Times

From left, Carol C. Lam, David C. Iglesias, John McKay and H.E. Cummins III, former United States attorneys, at a Senate hearing yesterday.

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Graphic

Prosecutors Dismissed

In testimony at hearings in the Senate and House, the prosecutors spoke of intrigue over their dismissals and their surprise last December that they had been asked to resign but were given no explanation.

Democrats said the testimony raised more questions about the Justice Department's motives for the removal of eight prosecutors. "Federal prosecutors are supposed to be bedrock neutral servants of the law, not temporary tools in the service of some political end," said Senator Charles E. Schumer, Democrat of New York and a member of the Judiciary Committee.

H. E. Cummins III, who was removed last summer as a United States attorney in Arkansas, said that in late February, Michael Elston, chief of staff to the deputy attorney general, Paul J. McNulty, told him by telephone that any prosecutor who spoke to reporters could face retaliation.

In an e-mail message to several dismissed prosecutors that was disclosed at the hearing, Mr. Cummins wrote of senior Justice Department officials, "They feel like they are taking unnecessary flak to avoid trashing each of us specifically or further, but if they feel like any of us intend to continue to offer quotes to the press, or to organize behind the scenes Congressional pressure, then they would feel forced to somehow pull their gloves off."

In a letter on Tuesday addressed to Mr. Schumer, Mr. Elston responded that he was "shocked and baffled" by Mr. Cummins's portrayal of their past discussions.

"I do not understand how anything that I said to him in our last conversation in mid-February could be construed as a threat of any kind," Mr. Elston wrote, "and I certainly had no intention of leaving with that impression. At no time did I try to suggest to him what he or any other former U.S. attorney should or should not say about their resignations."

Under questioning by Senator Arlen Specter , Republican of Pennsylvania, Mr. Cummins said it was possible Mr. Elston had not intended to threaten anyone and had been offering friendly advice.

A Justice Department official acknowledged to the House Judiciary Committee that the dismissals could have been handled better. The official, William E. Moschella, a top aide in the deputy attorney general's office, told the committee: "These U.S. attorneys could have been informed at the time that they were asked to resign about the reasons for the decision. Unfortunately, our failure to provide reasons to these individual U.S. attorneys has only served to fuel wild and inaccurate speculation about our motives, and that is unfortunate because faith and confidence in our justice system is more important than any one individual."

The department said recently that the prosecutors had been fired for performance problems or for failure to carry out department policies. But some Democrats have charged that the dismissals were intended to squelch corruption investigations or replace independent-minded prosecutors.

Much of the testimony on Tuesday focused on what the prosecutors said were disconcerting calls they received in prominent inquiries.

David C. Iglesias, who was removed as the United States attorney in Albuquerque, provided new details about phone calls he received from Senator Pete V. Domenici and Representative Heather A. Wilson, two Republicans from New Mexico.

Mr. Iglesias said he felt "sick" after a phone call from Mr. Domenici and his chief of staff several days before the 2006 elections. He said it was the first time he had received a call at home from Mr. Domenici, whom Mr. Iglesias described as a one-time political mentor.

He said that Mr. Domenici had inquired about a corruption case involving a courthouse construction contract and Democrats in the state. Mr. Domenici asked whether charges were "going to be filed before the election," Mr. Iglesias said.

Mr. Iglesias said he had replied, "I don't think so." In response, he said, Mr. Domenici hung up. "I had a sick feeling in the pit of my stomach that something bad had just happened," Mr. Iglesias said. "I felt leaned on, I felt pressured to get these matters moving."

After the testimony Mr. Domenici said in a statement that he still regarded the call as nonthreatening.

Two weeks earlier, Mr. Iglesias said, he had received a brief phone call from Ms. Wilson, who was locked in a tight race in which the corruption inquiry was a hotly debated topic.

Mr. Iglesias said he was surprised when she asked him about the inquiry and whether there had been sealed indictments filed in the case. When he responded that he could not discuss the subject, he testified, she was "not happy about it" and told him, "I guess I'll have to take your word for it."

Ms. Wilson said Tuesday in a statement that her call had been an effort to alert Mr. Iglesias about rumors that he was intentionally delaying indictments. "I did not ask about the timing of any indictments," she said, "and I did not tell Mr. Iglesias what course of action I thought he should take or pressure him in any way."

Another prosecutor, John McKay of Seattle, said he received a call in late 2004 from Ed Cassidy, a former chief of staff to Representative Doc Hastings, Republican of Washington.

At the time, Mr. McKay was weighing whether to convene a grand jury to investigate accusations of voter fraud in a close election for governor. He said Mr. Cassidy called to inquire about the status of the investigation.

Mr. McKay said he cut off the conversation, telling Mr. Cassidy that he was certain he would not want to ask about confidential prosecution matters. "I was concerned and disconcerted by the call," Mr. McKay said.

In a statement, Mr. Hastings said that the call was appropriate. "It was a simple inquiry and nothing more — and it was the only call to any federal official from my office on this subject either during or after the recount ordeal," he said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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hide details 3/20/07

 

 

New E-Mail Gives Details on Attorney Dismissals

 

 

 

By DAVID JOHNSTON and JOHN M. BRODER

Published: March 20, 2007

WASHINGTON, March 19 — Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales was "extremely upset" that his deputy told Congress last month that a federal prosecutor had been fired for no reason, according to e-mail released Monday by the Justice Department.

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Related

Changes Sought in Naming of Prosecutors (March 20, 2007)

G.O.P. Criticizes Schumer's Dual Roles in Investigation (March 20, 2007)

Documents Regarding the Department of Justice Firings From the House Judiciary Committee Web Site

Mr. Gonzales believed that the prosecutor, H. E. Cummins III, the United States attorney for Arkansas, was dismissed for performance reasons, the e-mail suggested. But his deputy, Paul J. McNulty, testified that Mr. Cummins had been replaced to create a vacancy for J. Timothy Griffin, a political ally of the White House political adviser Karl Rove.

The e-mail messages, among more than 3,000 released by the Justice Department, reflect the tensions at the highest levels of the agency as officials tried to contain the political brushfire set off by the dismissals of eight federal prosecutors last year.

Agency officials said the documents showed the dismissals had been over performance, not politics, as critics have charged.

After scrambling all day to prepare the e-mail for release, the Justice Department turned them over to Congress Monday night.

The House Judiciary Committee posted them one by one on the Web, and hundreds of pages remained to be posted early Tuesday morning.

The new e-mail provided fresh details about the internal administration deliberations and the at times clumsy handling of the dismissals.

In one case, Margaret M. Chiara, a United States attorney in Michigan, pleaded for a few extra weeks on the federal payroll while she looked for a job. In another case, a top Justice Department official who oversaw the dismissals said he had never even reviewed the performance of a prosecutor who was summarily removed, Daniel K. Bogden of Nevada.

A sarcastic internal e-mail message from one top Justice department official to another appears to confirm that personal and policy differences drove the termination of Carol C. Lam, the San Diego prosecutor who initiated investigations of Randy Cunningham when he was a Republican representative from California and Representative Jerry Lewis, as well as some defense department officials.

After a colleague said in a July 8 e-mail message that he was "sad" about something, Bill Mercer, a top Justice Department official, jokingly suggested some reasons.

"That Carol Lam can't meet a deadline," he wrote, "or that you'll need to interact with her in the coming weeks or that she won't just say, 'O.K. You got me. You're right, I've ignored national priorities and obvious local needs. Shoot, my production is more hideous than I realized.' "

The e-mail messages show Justice Department officials, who themselves had only an incomplete account of events, scrambling to prepare Mr. Gonzales and other senior officials for Congressional testimony that turned out to be inaccurate.

Brian Roehrkasse, a spokesman for the Justice Department, said Mr. Gonzales was upset about Mr. McNulty's remarks to lawmakers. "He believed Bud Cummins' removal involved performance considerations and it was that aspect of the D.A.G.'s testimony the attorney general was questioning," the spokesman said, referring to Deputy Attorney General McNulty.

One e-mail message released showed that even top officials were not certain of the rationale for some firings. In a December 5 Mr. McNulty admitted that he had not even reviewed the record of Mr. Bogden and appeared to have mixed feelings about removing him.

"I'm still a little skittish about Bogden," Mr. McNulty wrote to D. Kyle Sampson, then Mr. Gonzales's chief of staff, noting that Mr. Bogden had never worked outside of government and was counting on a longer tenure.

"I'll admit have not looked at his district's performance," Mr. McNulty added.

The documents are the second installment of e-mail messages that the Justice Department has turned over to Congressional investigators in a week.

The department has already disclosed messages showing that the White House was deeply involved in discussions, beginning early in 2005, to remove United States attorneys considered to be either weak or not aggressively enforcing administration policy.

In one note, Ms. Chiara urged Mr. McNulty to quickly revise the explanation the department was offering for the dismissals.

"The legal community in Grand Rapids and organizations throughout Michigan are outraged that I am being labeled a 'poor performer,' " she wrote in a March 4 message to Mr. McNulty. "Know that I am considered a personification of ethics and productivity."

She also wrote that she had heard she was being removed to make way for a member of Congress who was expected to lose his seat in the November election.

Patrick J. Fitzgerald , the United States attorney in Chicago who recently led the successful prosecution of I. Lewis Libby Jr., who was a top aide to Vice President Dick Cheney, was on a list of prosecutors whose performance was ranked as "not distinguished" on a list Mr. Sampson sent to the White House in March 2005, Justice Department officials say.

The list was released last week by the department, but the names of most United States attorneys were deleted, except for some of those who were dismissed.

Mr. Fitzgerald was never seriously considered for removal, say Justice Department officials, who said the list represented the thinking of Mr. Sampson, who resigned last week as Mr. Gonzales' top aide.

The documents also show that department officials were concerned Mr. Cummins, the dismissed Arkansas prosecutor, might testify before Congress. On Feb. 1, Michael Elston, a senior Justice Department official informed Mr. Sampson that two Democratic senators had requested that he do so.

Mr. Elston said Mr. Cummins had declined, "but wanted to know if we wanted him to testify."

Mr. Sampson responded: "I don't think so," explaining that he could be asked all kinds of questions, including: "Did you resign voluntarily?" and "Were you told why you were being asked to resign?"

Mr. Sampson also said it could be troublesome if Mr. Cummins were asked about his knowledge of his successor. "Did you ever talk to Tim Griffin about his becoming U.S. Attorney?" was one possible question he mentioned, as well as whether Mr. Griffin had talked about getting the job by avoiding Senate confirmation.

David Kirkpatrick, Neil A. Lewis, Eric Lipton, Jim Rutenberg and Scott Shane contributed reporting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

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dateFri, Mar 30, 2007 at 10:37 AM

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Attorney General Alberto Gonzales former Chief of Staff Kyle Sampson testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, March 29, 2007, before a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the Justice Department firings of U.S. Attorneys. (AP Photo/Dennis Cook) (Dennis Cook - AP

 

White House Backs Attorney General

 

The Associated Press

Friday, March 30, 2007; 11:30 AM

 

WASHINGTON -- The White House said Friday it believes embattled Attorney General Alberto Gonzales can survive the uproar over the firing of eight federal prosecutors, a day after his one-time chief of staff undercut Gonzales' account of the firings.

"I can tell you that the president has confidence in him," said Deputy White House press secretary Dana Perino. President Bush "believes the attorney general can overcome the challenges that are before him," she said.

Perino said the White House is not interviewing prospective candidates to replace Gonzales and said Bush is satisfied with his and the department's efforts so far to be responsive to Congress. Asked again if Gonzales can hang into his job, she replied: "Yes."

"The president recognizes that reaching out to members of Congress and making sure that you answer those legitimate questions, it's an ongoing process, and that we're certainly satisfied that the Justice Department has been working very hard to be fully responsive in the large part of the request, which was for documents," Perino said.

On Thursday, former Gonzales aide Kyle Sampson told a Senate hearing that rather than merely signing off on the firings, as Gonzales has repeatedly stated, Gonzales was in the middle of things from the beginning.

"I don't think the attorney general's statement that he was not involved in any discussions of U.S. attorney removals was accurate," Sampson told a Judiciary Committee inquiry into whether the dismissals were politically motivated.

"I remember discussing with him this process of asking certain U.S. attorneys to resign," Sampson said.

Sampson also told the panel that the White House had a large role in the firings, with one-time presidential counsel Harriet Miers joining Gonzales in approving them. And under questioning from Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., Sampson said that looking back, he should not have advocated the firing of one prosecutor in particular, New Mexico's David Iglesias.

Congress began its spring break Friday, but there were intense activities taking place behind the scenes.

Michael Elston, chief of staff to Deputy Attorney General Paul McNulty, and three other Justice Department officials arrived on Capitol Hill Friday morning for what aides said would be a five-hour closed meeting with House and Senate Judiciary Committee officials.

McNulty in early February testified before Congress that seven of the U.S. attorneys were fired for performance reasons, and that one, Bud Cummins in Little Rock, Ark., was being moved out so that he could be replaced by a former aide to White House political adviser Karl Rove.

Gonzales was upset with McNulty's testimony afterwards and would have preferred that he said all eight were fired for performance reasons, according to Justice Department e-mails forwarded to the two committees. Bush has since criticized the department for not giving Congress an accurate account of the firings.

The administration maintains that the firings were appropriate because the prosecutors serve at the pleasure of the president.

Sampson's account of the firings of eight U.S. attorneys over the past year lent weight to some of the most damaging Democratic criticism about the matter: that Gonzales was at the heart of the firings despite ever-changing Justice Department accounts of how they were planned; that some of the prosecutors were fired for political reasons; and that White House officials _ including presidential counselor Karl Rove _ played more than a limited role in the firings.

Afterward, one of the two Senate Republicans who are key to Gonzales' professional fate said he found Sampson credible and left the hearing with more questions about the attorney general and the firings than he had to begin with.

"He has many questions to answer," said Sen. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, the panel's ranking Republican. Sampson's conflicting account with Gonzales' pose "a real question as to whether he's acting in a competent way as attorney general," Specter said.

Gonzales has said, repeatedly, that he was not closely involved in the firings and largely depended on Sampson to orchestrate them.

Justice Department spokesman Brian Roehrkasse said that Gonzales has clarified his statements.

"His discussions with Mr. Sampson were focused on ensuring that appropriate people were aware of and involved in the process," Roehrkasse said. "He directed Mr. Sampson to lead the evaluation process, was kept aware of some conversations during the process, and that he approved the recommendations to seek the resignations of select U.S. attorneys."

Sampson resigned March 12. A day later, Gonzales said he "never saw documents. We never had a discussion about where things stood" in the firings.

Gonzales is not scheduled to appear publicly on Capitol Hill until April 17 in front of the same Senate committee. More and more Democrats and Republicans have called for him to step down, but Roehrkasse said the attorney general has no plans to resign.

The grim-faced Sampson, a longtime and loyal aide to Gonzales, said other senior Justice Department officials helped to plan the firings, which the White House first suggested shortly after Bush won a second term in 2004.

Sampson said he was never aware of any case where prosecutors were told to step down because they refused to help Republicans in local election or corruption investigations. He also said he saw little difference between dismissing prosecutors for political reasons versus performance-related ones.

-- By LAURIE KELLMAN

___

AP Special Correspondent Dave Espo contributed to this report.

 

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

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Gonzales Offers Defense on Prosecutors' Dismissals

 

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By DAVID JOHNSTON

Published: March 31, 2007

WASHINGTON, March 30 — Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales on Friday defended his statements about the dismissals of eight United States attorneys as his aides prepared for his Congressional testimony that they regard as crucial to his survival.

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Stephan Savoia/Associated Press

Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales is set to testify before Congress in an appearance officials say is as important as a confirmation hearing.

Mr. Gonzales spoke in Boston a day after his former chief of staff testified that he regularly talked to Mr. Gonzales about the dismissals, even though the attorney general had said his involvement in the matter was very limited.

"I know what I did," Mr. Gonzales said, "and I know that the motivations for the decisions that I made were not based upon improper reasons."

His comments appeared to reflect a new strategy to confront more directly questions about his role and what are apparently contradictions in his past statements.

Some Republicans said Mr. Gonzales could preserve his position only if he better explained the removals last year.

The White House restated President Bush's support for Mr. Gonzales. The deputy press secretary, Dana Perino, said Mr. Bush had "100 percent confidence in the attorney general."

But even as Ms. Perino spoke, there was a sense in the Justice Department that the White House believed that it would be up to Mr. Gonzales to redeem himself when he testified at a Senate hearing.

Dan Bartlett, counselor to Mr. Bush, said the White House was not directing the preparations.

"We are not directly involved in his preparations, but are glad he is eager to provide his side of what happened," Mr. Bartlett wrote in an e-mail message.

A Republican close to the White House characterized the views of Mr. Bush's aides this way: "We're going to give him an opportunity to clean up this mess. We'll give him two weeks' time to come up to speed on the facts. Let him go out and defend himself vigorously, and let's see how he does."

The Republican added, "He will have to do really well, and he has to be perceived as doing really well."

Mr. Gonzales is planning to cut his public schedule to prepare his testimony, which is scheduled for April 17.

Justice Department officials said the hearing would be comparable in importance to a confirmation hearing. The preparation is to will include mock question-and-answer sessions that will most likely involve outside lawyers experienced in combative Congressional hearings.

Mr. Gonzales's aides said he realized that his position was in serious jeopardy and that only he could save it.

"It's all going to come down to him," a Justice Department official said. "It comes down to his ability to articulate the facts as clearly as possible and send a signal to Congress and the public that he is in control and can manage the Justice Department."

In another development, Congressional investigators interviewed Michael J. Elston, chief of staff to Deputy Attorney General Paul J. McNulty. Mr. Elston took part in several important discussions as the department prepared to remove the prosecutors.

The details of his interview were not made public.

Mr. Gonzales's more aggressive defense follows testimony to the Senate Judiciary Committee by his former top aide, D. Kyle Sampson. Mr. Sampson said he briefed Mr. Gonzales about the removals over two years, in 2005 and 2006.

Mr. Sampson's testimony was damaging, particularly among Congressional Republicans on whose support Mr. Gonzales has depended. Another Republican close to the White House said Mr. Bush was "pretty dug in" about keeping Mr. Gonzales and added that Mr. Sampson's testimony "was very damaging to him with Republicans on the Hill."

Senator Jeff Sessions, Republican of Alabama and a member of the Judiciary Committee, said Mr. Sampson's testimony made clear that Mr. Gonzales had misspoken in his public comments.

"I think the attorney general was in error in public comments when he minimized his role in this matter," Mr. Sessions said, "and I think that was a serious misstatement."

Mr. Gonzales, speaking after a meeting with Massachusetts law enforcement officials about an initiative to protect children from Internet predators, said in a brief news conference that he had asked Mr. Sampson to coordinate an effort in the department to evaluate the performance of the prosecutors to see whether changes would be a good idea.

"From time to time," Mr. Gonzales said, "Kyle would tell me things that would tell me that this effort was ongoing. I don't recall being involved in deliberations involving the question of whether or not a U.S. attorney should or should not be asked to resign."

Mr. Gonzales said he was not involved in choosing whom to remove. Mr. Sampson testified that Mr. Gonzales was inaccurate to say that he as the head of the department had no role in identifying prosecutors to be replaced.

"I didn't focus on specific concerns about individuals," Mr. Gonzales said. "My primary focus was ensuring that the White House was kept advised of what we were doing and that Kyle was consulting with the appropriate D.O.J. senior officials who knew about the performance of the U.S. attorneys."

Pam Belluck contributed reporting from Boston, and Sheryl Gay Stolberg and Michael Luo from Washington.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Machesney park – ING – MI HQ

 

On 6/28/07, infoweb@newsbank.com < infoweb@newsbank.com> wrote:

Paper: Rockford Register Star (IL)

Title: Barbara Elston Emanuel, 64 (Rockford)

Date: August 18, 2006

 

BARBARA ELSTON EMANUEL, 64 ROCKFORD - Barbara Elston Emanuel, 64, of Rockford died at home Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2006, following a long illness. Born March 15, 1942, in Aurora, she was the oldest child of Fred and Rose Vigna Fross. She graduated from West Aurora High School in 1960 and the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana with a bachelor of science in accounting in 1964. She was president of the Iota Chapter of Delta Gamma Fraternity. After graduation, she served as a field auditor for the Internal Revenue Service for three years, first in Chicago and later in Rockford, where she was the first female field auditor. She joined the private accounting firm owned by William A. Fuller in 1967, and Bill and Ella Fuller became like second parents. Around this time, she adopted her trademark signature - BarBara with "the two big Bs." She later owned her own accounting business for nearly two decades while raising her two boys. In 1986, she joined the Rockford office of a na!

tional accounting firm. In 1988, she accepted an offer to serve as controller of Viking Chemical Company in Rockford, where she continued to work until her death. Barbara married Gerald W. Emanuel on June 18, 1977. They spent 29 wonderful years together walking, biking, playing tennis, going to local theater productions and traveling the world. A life-long Lutheran, she served as treasurer of St. Mark Lutheran Church for more than a decade in the late 1970s and 1980s. For the past 11 years, she was an active charter member of Christ Lutheran Church in Bel-videre. In recent years, she was an active member of the Red Hat Society. Barb enjoyed many close friendships, tutoring grade-school children, and spoiling her granddaughter. Her spaghetti sauce was legendary. She is survived by her husband, Gerald, of Rockford; her children, Michael Julie Elston of Woodbridge, Va., and Richard Melanie Elston of Machesney Park; her granddaughter and step-grandchildren, Emily, Kyle, Garrett!

and Zabrina; her sister, Lonetta Frank Krawczyk of Largo, Fla.; her husband's children, Steve Emanuel and Kristine Mark Robertson; and her first husband's parents, LaVerne and Kathryn Elston. She was preceded in death by her first husband, James L. Elston, in 1974. Funeral will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 19, in Christ Lutheran Church, 425 Riverside Blvd., Belvidere, with the Rev. Dr. Timothy V. Olson officiating. Visitation will be from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday and from 12 to 1 45 p.m. Saturday in the church. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Christ Lutheran Church. Arrangements by Olson Funeral &amp; Cremation Services Ltd., 1001 Second Ave. To share a memory or send a condolence, visit   www.olsonfh.com  .

 

On 6/28/07, Dennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com> wrote:

She is survived by her husband, Gerald, of Rockford; her children, Michael Julie Elston of Woodbridge, Va.,and

Richard Melanie Elston of Machesney Park;

her granddaughter and step-grandchildren, Emily, Kyle, Garrett!

 and Zabrina; her sister, Lonetta Frank Krawczyk of Largo, Fla.; her h

usband's children, Steve Emanuel and Kristine Mark Robertson; and her first husband's parents, LaVerne and Kathryn Elston. She was preceded in death by her first husband, James L. Elston, in 1974.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

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dateWed, Mar 7, 2007 at 10:55 AM

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Former U.S. attorney David C. Iglesias of New Mexico, with former U.S. attorney Carol S. Lam of San Diego, testifies on Capitol Hill. (By Lauren Victoria Burke -- Associated Press)

 

Prosecutors Say They Felt Pressured, Threatened

Hill Republicans, Justice Dept. Cited

 

By Dan Eggen and Paul Kane

Washington Post Staff Writers

Wednesday, March 7, 2007; A01

 

Six fired U.S. attorneys testified on Capitol Hill yesterday that they had separately been the target of complaints, improper telephone calls and thinly veiled threats from a high-ranking Justice Department official or members of Congress, both before and after they were abruptly removed from their jobs.

In back-to-back hearings in the Senate and House, former U.S. attorney David C. Iglesias of New Mexico and five other former prosecutors recounted specific instances in which some said they felt pressured by Republicans on corruption cases and one said a Justice Department official warned him to keep quiet or face retaliation.

Iglesias's allegations of congressional interference have prompted a Senate ethics committee inquiry. Yesterday he offered new details about telephone calls he received in October from Sen. Pete V. Domenici (R-N.M.) and Rep. Heather A. Wilson (R-N.M.), saying he felt "leaned on" and "sickened" by the contacts seeking information about an investigation of a local Democrat.

Another former prosecutor, John McKay of Seattle, alleged for the first time that he received a call from the chief of staff to Rep. Doc Hastings (R-Wash.), asking about an inquiry into vote-fraud charges in the state's hotly contested 2004 gubernatorial election. McKay said he cut the call short.

Ed Cassidy, a former Hastings aide who now works for House Minority Leader John A. Boehner (R-Ohio), said yesterday that the call was routine and did not violate "permissible limits" on contact with federal prosecutors. Hastings, the ranking Republican on the House ethics committee, also said that the exchange was "entirely appropriate."

In remarks after the hearings, McKay said that officials in the White House counsel's office, including then-counsel Harriet E. Miers, asked him to explain why he had "mishandled" the governor's race during an interview for a federal judgeship in September 2006. McKay was informed after his dismissal that he also was not a finalist for the federal bench.

White House spokesman Scott Stanzel declined last night to respond to McKay's comments.

Yesterday's testimony featured new allegations of threatened overt retaliation against the prosecutors, as former U.S. attorney Bud Cummins of Little Rock said a senior Justice Department official warned him on Feb. 20 that the fired prosecutors should remain quiet about their dismissals. Cummins recounted in an e-mail made public yesterday that the official cautioned that administration officials would "pull their gloves off and offer public criticisms to defend their actions more fully."

"It seemed clear that they would see that as a major escalation of the conflict meriting some kind of unspecified form of retaliation," Cummins wrote in the e-mail, which he sent as a cautionary note to fellow prosecutors .

The senior official, Michael J. Elston, chief of staff to Deputy Attorney General Paul J. McNulty, wrote in a letter to the Senate that he never intended to send a threatening message in his talks with Cummins. Justice Department spokesman Brian Roehrkasse said that "a private and collegial conversation" was "being twisted into a perceived threat by former disgruntled employees grandstanding before Congress."

The six U.S. attorneys who appeared yesterday had declined to testify voluntarily. They were subpoenaed by a House Judiciary subcommittee and threatened with subpoenas in the Senate. Their testimony marked the latest twist in the U.S. attorneys saga, which began quietly on Dec. 7 with a spate of firings, but has prompted concern among current and former federal prosecutors that the firings -- and the Justice Department's evasive and shifting explanations -- threaten to permanently damage the credibility of U.S. attorney's offices nationwide.

"The whole series of events has been remarkable and unprecedented," said Mary Jo White, who served for nine years as the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York during the Clinton and Bush administrations. "It's not a matter of whether they have the power to do it; it's a matter of the wisdom of the actions taken. It shows a total disregard for the institution of the U.S. attorney's offices and what they stand for."

Arlen Specter (Pa.), the ranking Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee, said during the testimony that "if the allegations are correct, there has been serious misconduct in what has occurred."

The Justice Department said initially that the prosecutors had "performance-related" problems, but more recently it asserted that they had not adequately carried out Bush administration priorities on immigration, the death penalty and other issues. The department has also acknowledged that Cummins, the Little Rock prosecutor, was asked to resign solely to provide a job for a former aide to presidential adviser Karl Rove.

"In hindsight, perhaps this situation could have been handled better," Assistant Attorney General William E. Moschella said in prepared testimony yesterday in the House. " . . . That said, the department stands by the decisions."

Moschella said Justice did not intend to evade Senate oversight of U.S. attorneys, who under a new law can be appointed on an interim basis indefinitely by Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales.

For the first time, Moschella detailed in public the department's rationale for each of the dismissals (although most of the claims had previously been aired through anonymous comments and documents leaked to reporters). All but one of the fired prosecutors had received positive job evaluations, but Justice officials say those reports do not include all possible performance problems.

Moschella also said it is "dangerous, baseless and irresponsible" to allege that the firings were linked to unhappiness over public corruption probes, as Iglesias and some Democrats have alleged.

In addition to Iglesias, four other fired prosecutors were conducting political corruption investigations of Republicans when they were dismissed. Carol S. Lam of San Diego, for example, oversaw the guilty plea of former Republican representative Randy "Duke" Cunningham, and brought related indictments against a former CIA official and a defense contractor.

Iglesias testified that Wilson called him while he was visiting Washington on Oct. 16 to quiz him about an investigation of a state Democrat related to kickbacks in a courthouse construction project.

"What can you tell me about sealed indictments?" Iglesias said Wilson asked him.

Iglesias said "red flags" immediately went up in his mind because it was unethical for him to talk about an ongoing criminal investigation, particularly on the timing of indictments.

"I was evasive and unresponsive," he said of his conversation with Wilson. She became upset, Iglesias testified, and ended the conversation.

"Well, I guess I'll have to take your word for it," she said, according to Iglesias.

About 10 days later, Iglesias said, Domenici's chief of staff, Steve Bell, called Iglesias at his home in New Mexico and "indicated there were some complaints by constituents." Domenici then got on the phone for a conversation that lasted "one to two minutes," Iglesias recalled.

"Are these going to be filed before November?" Domenici asked, Iglesias testified, referring to the kickback case. Unnerved by the call, Iglesias said he responded that they were not.

"I'm sorry to hear that," Domenici replied, according to Iglesias, who added that the senator then hung up.

"I felt sick afterward," Iglesias said, acknowledging that he did not report the calls to Washington as required under Justice rules. "I felt leaned on. I felt pressured to get these matters moving."

Domenici stressed in a statement issued yesterday that Iglesias "confirmed" that the senator never mentioned the November election and that he had no idea why the prosecutor felt "violated." In a separate statement, Wilson said she was only passing on complaints from unidentified constituents and apologized for any "confusion" about the call.

In the e-mail released yesterday, Cummins wrote that Elston called him after a Feb. 18 Washington Post article, which quoted Cummins as criticizing Justice officials for blaming the firings on performance problems. He said that he defended his remarks, and that he made a point of noting that the prosecutors had declined invitations to testify before Congress.

"He reacted quite a bit to the idea of anyone voluntarily testifying," Cummins wrote, adding later: "I don't want to stir you up . . . or overstate the threatening undercurrent in the call, but the message was clearly there and you should be aware before you speak to the press again if you choose to do that."

Cummins testified that he did not feel threatened by the conversation, but others, including Iglesias and McKay, said they took it as such.

Former U.S. attorneys Daniel Bogden of Las Vegas and Paul Charlton of Phoenix also testified.

 

 

 

 

 

fromDennis Delaney <dwdelaney@gmail.com>

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dateMon, Sep 15, 2008 at 11:56 AM

subjectosc - whistleblowers - wh - doj - elston - bloch - rove - partisanship - see goodling - bush admin

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July 2, 2008

New Scrutiny of Hiring at Justice Department

By ERIC LICHTBLAU

WASHINGTON — A federal watchdog agency has decided to open a new examination into political hiring practices at the Justice Department, and the department is facing the first in what could be a series of lawsuits from lawyers who say they were rejected for elite jobs because of their liberal politics.

The developments were prompted by a major report last week by the Justice Department inspector general, which concluded that department officials illegally used "political or ideological" factors in picking lawyers for nonpartisan positions.

The Office of Special Counsel, an agency that investigates political interference in the federal workplace, let the Justice Department know this week that it would be examining the issues raised in the report "to discuss what our next step should be," said James P. Mitchell, a spokesman for the office.

The special counsel has offered to work with the department "to determine whether disciplinary action is warranted," Mr. Mitchell said. The inspector general's report noted that two department officials who it said were largely responsible for the abuses in 2006, Michael Elston and Esther Slater McDonald, could not face disciplinary action because both had left the department.

But Mr. Mitchell said: "That doesn't rule out others — those who considered political affiliation in making decisions as well as those who let them do that. This is a prohibited practice, and this is an area that we enforce."

The Office of Special Counsel has itself been the subject of controversy because of a continuing F.B.I. investigation into accusations that its chief, Scott J. Bloch, may have illegally destroyed evidence related to his own treatment of workers. Critics have said that questions about Mr. Bloch's own ethics make him unable to independently investigate wrongdoing by other political arms of the Bush administration.

The inspector general is continuing to investigate other issues related to accusations of politicization at the Justice Department, including the central question of why at least eight United States attorneys were fired in late 2006 in a scandal that forced the resignation of then-Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales.

Meanwhile, a former Justice Department law clerk who was rejected for a position in the department's elite honors program in 2006 filed a lawsuit on Monday in United States District Court seeking damages of up to $100,000. The former clerk, Sean M. Gerlich, asserts that the department violated his rights.

The lawsuit seeks to establish a class action on behalf of other applicants who also believe they were rejected for political reasons. Daniel Metcalfe, a longtime lawyer at the Justice Department who is representing Mr. Gerlich, said the inspector general's report indicated that as many as 359 applicants for the department's honors and intern program might have been wrongfully rejected in 2006 alone.

In addition to violations of civil service law, which prevents the use of political affiliations in hiring for nonpolitical jobs, the lawsuit charges that Justice Department officials — in particular, Ms. McDonald — violated the privacy rights of applicants by searching the Internet for material about their political philosophies. The inspector general found, for instance, that one applicant was rejected in part because his MySpace page had an unflattering cartoon of President Bush.

The Justice Department declined to comment on the lawsuit, saying officials had not yet reviewed it. A lawyer for Ms. McDonald declined to comment.

Several other lawyers rejected for honors spots said they were also considering lawsuits.

Brett Freedman, who clerked in the general counsel's office at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and was rejected for an honors spot, said the inspector general's findings were "a slap in the face." Mr. Freedman said he suspected that his work for a Democratic congressman had hurt him.

"What they've done in the long run is a disservice to the Justice Department," Mr. Freedman said. "These positions are obviously not positions in which political decisions should be made."

 

 

 

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mike sauer

Scso

State farm

 

 

County sheriff's office honors officers, citizens

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Author/Byline: Staff Report, THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER
Section: homepage

More than two dozen people were honored at the Sangamon County Sheriff's Office awards dinner Tuesday.

Two citizens were recognized for assisting the sheriff's office. Tracy Dees was given an award for helping deputies in an incident that involved an intoxicated person and several young children. Troy Hogarth was recognized for helping deputies with a young girl who was left by her parents at a liquor store.

Medals of Merit were awarded to court security officer Kenny Downs, superintendent Terry Durr and correctional officer Amber Green. They were also given to

correctional officers

Lt. Candice Cain, Lt. William Smith, Sgt.

 

 Todd Guy,

 

Rob Berola, Amy Sommer, Kevin Furlong,

 

 Mike Sauer ,

 

Tracy Snider, Rob Redpath, Cathy Hagstrom, Brad Martin, and nurse Lucy Ramsey for lifesaving efforts during a suicide attempt in the jail.

Unit citations were awarded to the Sangamon County Sheriff's Office Honor Guard and third shift correctional officers for thwarting a suicide attempt.

A Medal of Valor was awarded to civil process officer Bob Meacham for unarming a woman with a knife. Medals of Valor also were awarded to Lt. Brian Bressan, Sgt. Joe Rath, Deputy Andy Danes, Deputy Nancy Ealey, Deputy Derek Guernsey, Deputy Jeff VanHoos, Deputy Cliff Jones, civil process server Cole Powell and civil process server Gary Dougherty for their actions dealing with a mentally ill person who was wielding two spears and two butcher knives.

The civilian employee of the year is Lynn Evans, the correctional officer of the year is Officer Brad Clark and court security officer of the Year is Officer Michelle Bartolazzi. Deputy of the year is Deputy Nancy Ealey and Capt. Debra Brown was awarded the Sgt. James Campbell Award.

 

 

 

Gina larkin – CACI –

hasara HR dir -

 

 

TITLE: PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, August 21, 1991



STATE FARM Insurance agents Donna Barbian of Sherman and

 

Mike Larkin,

 

Ron Mays, Pam Mizeur and Marcia Peterson, all of Springfield, have been named recipients of the company's Legion of Honor Award.

Ed Blasius, Jeff Elston , Ralph Folkerts, Mike Sauer, Larkin, Peterson and Barbian have been named Millionaire Award recipients.

 

 

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, December 28, 1985



Urban Sauer Urban Henry Sauer, 70, of Winchester died at 12:50 p.m. Thursday at Passavant Hospital, Jacksonville.

He was born Aug. 22, 1915, in Kilbourne, the son of the late Andrew and Sophia Lussenhop Sauer. He was preceded in death by one daughter, Carolyn Sansone, a sister and a brother. He married Dorothy Lumsden June 7, 1942, in Winchester.

Mr. Sauer was a member of St. Mark's Catholic Church, president of St.

Mark's Cemetery Board, Winchester Library Board, and past precinct committeeman of Scott County A.S.C.S. Surviving are his wife, Dorothy; three sons,

Edward and

Michael Sauer of Springfield, and

John Patrick Sauer of Effingham;

seven grandchildren; one great-grandchild; and one brother, Andrew Sauer of Winchester

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

jeff elston at state farm

 

Sauer – mizeur – larkin – elston – state farm – spi –

 

TITLE: PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, August 21, 1991



STATE FARM Insurance agents Donna Barbian of Sherman and Mike Larkin, Ron Mays, Pam Mizeur and Marcia Peterson, all of Springfield, have been named recipients of the company's Legion of Honor Award.

Ed Blasius, Jeff Elston , Ralph Folkerts, Mike Sauer, Larkin, Peterson and Barbian have been named Millionaire Award recipients.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Possible link to caci gina larkin –

 

hasara HR dir larkin

 

ssu soccer – gonulsen – krohe – eck – sci - wharton

 

(Sauer – mizeur – larkin – elston – state farm – spi – )

 

 

TITLE: PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, August 21, 1991



STATE FARM Insurance agents Donna Barbian of Sherman and Mike Larkin, Ron Mays, Pam Mizeur and Marcia Peterson, all of Springfield, have been named recipients of the company's Legion of Honor Award.

Ed Blasius, Jeff Elston , Ralph Folkerts, Mike Sauer, Larkin, Peterson and Barbian have been named Millionaire Award recipients.

 

 

Mike larkin?

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 9, 2000



Larkin-Marshall

Gina Carol Marshall and Scott Michael Larkin , both of Springfield, were married at 5 p.m. May 20 at First Presbyterian Church by the Rev. Eugene Bilotti.

The bride is the daughter of Ted and Lindy Marshall of Williamsville. The groom is the son of Mike and Linda Larkin of Hennepin.

Serving as maid of honor was Michelle Walsh. Bridesmaids were Kendra Wilson, Stacy Cook, Tracie Newton, Suzanne Cowman and Sarah Gripper.

Best man was John Hartnett. Groomsmen were Jim Kirby, Tad Allen, Andy Peterson, Clete Winklemann and Jeff Johnson. Ushers were Fari Gharamany, Jeff Hunt and Brian Stocker.

A reception was held at the Artisans Building.

The bride is a graduate of Williamsville High School and Eastern Illinois University. She is employed as the director of human resources for the city of Springfield. The groom is a graduate of Putnam County High School, Western Illinois University and Sangamon State University. He is employed as the

 

director of

 

labor relations

 

for the

 

Central Illinois

 

Builders Association.


The couple will reside in Springfield

 

 

 

 

PRAIRIE STARS SURVIVE OVERTIME TIE AGAINST NO. 6 BAKER

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, October 25, 1992

Author/Byline: RON DICKERSON STAFF WRITER
Edition: M2.
Section: SPORTS
Page: 57

It was not a good Saturday evening for Sangamon State University. The only positive to the night was the Prairie Stars did not lose.

SSU was within 46 seconds of winning its 16th game, but couldn't hold on -- at least for the victory. But the Prairie Stars did survive the overtime for a 3-3 tie at Kiwanis Field against sixth-ranked Baker College of suburban Kansas City, Kan.

The tie could be costly. Perhaps more important to Sangamon State than the result was the condition of several players who took some hits that took them out of the game, including goalkeeper Marvin Cassler.

After losing Cihan Uslu and John Krohe to injuries -- and John Ostrander to ejection (he will miss the last regular-season game and the first playoff game) -- Cassler went down in a collision and reaggravated a hip pointer with 4 minutes 58 seconds left in regulation and the Stars up 3-2. That put backup goalie Mike Hampson in a tough situation: coming in cold with his team playing a player short and the Wildcats trying to capitalize on the advantage one goal down.

Despite the situation, John Lochbaum, also playing hurt after seeing his legs take a beating that resulted in him coming out of the game for awhile, hit a beautiful shot from around 8 yards that appeared to dip behind reserve goalie Sean Hurley and cross the line before spinning back out with 3:35 remaining.

But the officials didn't see it that way, at least the referee.

"That was a goal," Lochbaum said. "No doubt. The linesman acknowledged it but the referee didn't acknowledge the linesman. Oh, yeah, it was in. I saw it. It was in by a good ball's length."

There was no question that

 

Michael Larkin 's

 

tying shot with :46 left into an open net was in with Hampson on the ground.

"I heard the cheers from their bench as I was burying my face into the ground," said Hampson.

"They made a cross from about 8 yards that I thought I had a bead on," Hampson said in describing the play. "I hit it with my right hand. I dove and deflected the shot straight up to his foot. I knew then I was in trouble."

Krohe, who exited the game about 1 1/2 minutes before Cassler did, was sitting on the sidelines icing his deeply bruised right thigh when Larkin scored. He immediately ripped off the tape holding the ice bag and got ready to re-enter the game in overtime.

"That was courageous of Krohe to play the overtime periods," said SSU Coach Aydin Gonulsen. "He's tough. He's solid. He knows his value to our team and despite being hurt he still wanted to contribute."

Krohe had already contributed mightily. He provided the Prairie Stars with a 1-0 lead with 34:07 left on a diving header to the far post from 8 yards on a cross into the box from Bobby Bell.

But Baker came back with 12:55 left in the half when Cassler came out to make the stop but didn't get to the ball. After a scramble in front of the Stars' net, Rian Watts scored off a flick from Larkin, who played against Bell and the rest of the "Yavapai Five" while at Mesa (Ariz.) Junior College.

In between goals, the Stars saw two great scoring opportunities erode. The first was with 23:17 left when Jose Corona made a run down the left side of the field and played the ball to Krohe, who drove the ball hard off the far post.

Less than 2 minutes later, Francis Jallah found himself face-to-face with starting goalie Jevan Muenzer (who evenutally left the game with a bruised thigh, too), who was too far out of the goal. Jallah's chip shot to an open net was wide right.

Less than 4 minutes into the second half, Krohe, stopping and starting in the far corner and finally bringing Muenzer out to challenge, crossed the ball on the ground to Ostrander in the box, who sent the shot to the near post for a 2-1 SSU lead.

Baker tied it with 28:53 left when San Diego native and junior captain Nate Houser put the ball into the upper right corner of the net from 6 yards.

Five minutes later, SSU's Dave Vega broke the deadlock with a shot on the ground that trickled through several players and finally into the net.

"I have several concerns now," said Gonulsen after the game. "First is Marvin's injury. Second is Krohe's injury. Third is playing without Ostrander. He had four yellows coming into this game and got his fifth, which meant he sits out Wednesday night.

"Then he banged into the keeper and got a red card, which is an automatic ejection. That means he missed the first playoff game.

"Another thing that disturbs me is we're giving up too many goals. You can't win the title giving up this many goals. There's a trend that we have to score two to three goals to win.

"You know we only have two shutouts all season? We may have to rework some things," Gonulsen said. "I hate to do that this late into the season. This was a tough game, in a lot of ways."

 

 

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, October 5, 1991



Kurt A. Kelly LINCOLN -- Kurt A. Kelly, 22, of Lincoln died at 3:43 a.m. Friday at his residence.

Services will be at 2 p.m. Monday at Holland and Barry Funeral Home, Lincoln, with burial in Zion Cemetery, Lincoln.

Surviving are his mother, Mary Elston of Lincoln; two brothers, Shawn and Shannon, both of Lincoln; two sisters, Dawn Wells and Jennifer Kelly, both of Lincoln; and two stepbrothers, Gene Elston of Wheaton and Jeff Elston of Bloomington

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, October 20, 1996



Ruffner-Ramsey Mary Ellen Ramsey and Carey W. Ruffner, both of Springfield, were united in marriage at 1:30 p.m. Sept. 14 at St. Patrick's Church by the Rev. John Eck.

The bride is the daughter of B.J. and Mary Ann Ramsey of Springfield. The groom is the son of Don and Marilyn Ruffner of Danville and Linda and Jim Miller of Savoy.

Serving as maid of honor was Madonna Ramsey, with Angie Zanetello and Lisa Duffey as bridesmaids.

Serving as best man was Don Ruffner, with Jeff Elston and Roy Duffey as groomsmen. Ushers were Tom Dietrich and Ed Titsworth.

A reception was held at the Elks Lodge.

The bride is a graduate of Sacred Heart Academy. She is employed by Clifton Gunderson LLC. The groom is a graduate of Catlin High School. He is employed by Tharaldson Employee Management Inc.

The couple will reside in Springfield

 

 

 

FOR THE RECORD

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, November 20, 1999



Toni and Jeff Elston , Springfield, a son Thursday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sauer – police – FOE

Sauer’s father – Edward sauer –

 

police – animal control –

 

county jim stone - jett

 

Petersburg City Council enlists Menard County for animal control

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, June 16, 2006

Author/Byline: ANN GORMAN CORRESPONDENT
Section: CITY/STATE
Page: 11

PETERSBURG - Misty Rodda has considered putting up a privacy fence to keep dogs out of her yard.

"We seemed to have several dogs that came around that were large and unfriendly," she said. "Anytime we saw them, we had to go back in the house. I didn't feel safe or feel that my kids were safe."

Rodda, the mother of two young boys, was pleased to learn this week that the Petersburg City Council has agreed to contract with Menard County for animal control service.

"I'm very happy," she said. "In the past, there was no one to call - you just had to deal with it."

Petersburg Ald. Chris Hinton said the council decided two years ago not to renew its animal control contract "due to the city's dissatisfaction with their (the county's) performance.

"We felt the money could be put to better use," he said Tuesday.

However, Hinton said, he knew when the service was discontinued that "we were going to have a dog issue."

He was right. The Petersburg Police Department has received numerous complaints about dogs. But without a contract, Menard County State's Attorney Ken Baumgarten said the county was allowed to respond only to reports of vicious animals within Petersburg city limits.

The council discussed other options, including having dog control handled by police or someone hired specifically for the job, before turning back to the county.

Menard County Board Chairman Louie Leinberger met with Mayor Diane Kube about the situation.

"I thought it was important to take the initial step to make (the council) feel that we were wanting to provide the service and felt the service that (Petersburg) was entitled to was the same as other municipalities in the county," Leinberger said. "We had a very good discussion."

Kube brought the county's animal control agreement before the council last week and asked new Police Chief Charlie Cox if he thought the service, which will cost the city $4,278 annually, would be "worthwhile."

"I think it's a necessity. I don't think you can wait," Cox said. "Everyone is complaining about the dogs."

The council voted 4-1, with Hinton out of town, in favor of giving county service another try.

Cox said he's glad the council renewed the contract.

"This will make everything better and safer."

Hinton thinks that as soon as "a handful of dogs are picked up, and the word is out there, everyone else will keep a better handle on their dog."

"Obviously, the best outcome would be that the county lives up to its promises," Hinton said. "Let's keep our fingers crossed."



Menard County Health Department administrator Alicia Davis, who oversees animal control, said Ed Sauer was hired 18 months ago as the full-time animal control officer,

 

and she's searching for people interested in a part-time position.

"We've been working to make sure the needs of all the municipalities in the county are met," Davis said. "I'm confident that's going to happen."

 

Pet problems continue at Second Street house

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, October 4, 2001

Author/Byline: SARAH ANTONACCI STAFF WRITER
Section: NEWS
Page: 1

Animal control officers seized three more dogs Wednesday morning from a woman living in the 1800 block of South Second Street after they allegedly tried to attack a man walking to work.

It was the third such incident in the past four days involving the same woman's dogs. Two other dogs were seized by authorities Tuesday night.

Their owner, Rosemary Sugent-Fox, said she believes the animals were taken from her illegally and denies neighbors' claims that her dogs have been running loose and trying to bite passers-by.

"They had no right to come in my yard and take my dogs. It's theft. They haven't been out that much," she said. "It's typical and normal for dogs to be mischievous. They dug a hole and got out (Tuesday night)."

She said she's "been falsely accused" and her "dogs have been falsely incarcerated."

But several of her neighbors who watched Wednesday as animal control officers used snares to capture the dogs - one white pit bull, one brindle pit bull and a black one - disagreed and said they've battled for years to get authorities to recognize the problems at the house. "This has gone on way too long, and someone's going to get hurt. The dogs are getting bolder," said Sandra DeVaney, who lives nearby and heard the latest ruckus.

"I heard all the barking and yelling, and the neighbor said they were chasing (another neighbor)," she said.

That neighbor apparently was able to fend off the dogs by using his lunchbox. DeVaney said he was putting the lunch items back in it when she saw him, shaken, on the street. "He said, 'They didn't even want my ham sandwich. They just wanted me.'"

That incident, coupled with another Wednesday morning where the dogs allegedly cornered a man and forced him to seek refuge in his car, again brought Sugent-Fox's animals to the attention of authorities.

About 8 p.m. Tuesday, animal control seized two of Sugent-Fox's pit bulls after they allegedly chased a pair of women who were walking in the area.

On Sunday, three of the dogs were blamed for chasing two neighbors. Police who responded to that complaint reported finding unsanitary conditions at Sugent-Fox's home.

The dogs have not yet bitten anyone, authorities said.

Sugent-Fox, who also has numerous cats, contends her neighbors are killing them because she once had 27 and now has only 15. She also said she believes the animal control officers are taking her dogs to use in animal "sacrifice to bring themselves good luck," and that the neighbors are causing problems because "my government check comes today and they want the money."

On Wednesday, Sugent-Fox refused to talk to police or health department personnel. A year ago, inspectors deemed her house unsafe due to the conditions inside, though she has continued to live there.

In a telephone call to The State Journal-Register, Sugent-Fox said she refused to open her door for anyone Wednesday because she wanted to talk to her attorney first and he was out of town.

She is awaiting sentencing on a contempt-of-court charge for failing to obey a judge's orders to pay fines and get her property into compliance with city standards. The city is pursuing that angle of the problem, said Ernie Slottag, spokesman for Mayor Karen Hasara.

The city is also checking to see if Sugent-Fox's animals are properly inoculated and registered.

"We are looking at several options, but we are moving forward in these two aspects," Slottag said.

Rick "Doc" Dobson, director of veterinary health at Sangamon County's animal control facility, was at Sugent-Fox's house Wednesday morning. He said her dogs will likely be declared "vicious."

To get them back, he said, "She would have to construct closures that are outlined in the law, and they would have to spend 24 hours a day, seven days a week inside those closures," unless they are being taken to the veterinarian. In that case, the dogs would have to be muzzled and leashed.

Sugent-Fox said she intends to retrieve her dogs.

Most of the neighbors who gathered to watch Wednesday said they are dog lovers. In fact, most have dogs. They said they are tired of feeling like they can't walk down their own street.

Bernadette Marr said her 16-year-old mixed breed is at the vet for age-related problems. She said the dog is blind and deaf and was chained outside their house recently when one of Sugent-Fox's dogs jumped her fence and tackled it.

"Thank God we were at the back door watching and could do something," she said.

Caption: Andy Wilkins, left,

and Leroy Jett of the Sangamon County Animal Control capture one of three dogs taken from the 1800 block of South Second Street Wednesday.
Memo: ON WEB SITE

 

 

 

 

Orville H. Cannedy

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, August 8, 2008

Section: LOCAL
Page: 13

Orville H. Cannedy

SPRINGFIELD – Orville H. Cannedy, 80, of Springfield died at 4:28 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 6, 2008, at Memorial Medical Center.

He was born Dec. 1, 1927, in Pekin, the son of Kent and Henrietta Rapp Cannedy. He married Margaret Sheppard on Jan. 27, 1951.

He was preceded in death by his parents.

He is survived by his wife, Margaret Cannedy; a daughter, Julie (husband, Edward) Sauer of Springfield; two sons, Carl (wife, Janet) Cannedy of Taos, N.M., and Richard Cannedy of Chicago; five grandchildren, Cade and Cora Cannedy and Stephen, Erica and Madison Sauer; two sisters, Eva Faye Zeisset of East Alton and Patricia (husband, Norman) Provow of Holt, Mo.; two brothers, Jack (wife, Hazel) Cannedy of St. Louis and Kenneth Cannedy of Wood River; and several nieces, nephews and cousins.

He was a resident of Springfield since 1953.

He worked as an engineer at Fiat Allis, retiring after 30 years.

He was a member of the Unites States Army during World War II and the Korean conflict. He also was a member of Knox Presbyterian Church, Masonic Lodge 500, Gideon International and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers.

He was an avid golfer and sank a hole in one twice: one at Lincoln Greens and one at Bunn Park.

 

 

 

 

Man crashes car, dies after medical episode

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, October 24, 2007

Author/Byline: AMANDA REAVY STAFF WRITER
Section: LOCAL
Page: 18

A 73-year-old man died Tuesday afternoon when he apparently suffered a medical problem that caused him to run his minivan into a tree just down the street from his home.

Edward Sauer , a retired Springfield police officer, was pronounced dead at St. John's Hospital at 4:06 p.m., Sangamon County Coroner Susan Boone said.

Sauer suffered from several serious medical problems, she said.

"He had no injuries from his crash," Boone said, adding that there will be no autopsy.

The incident occurred about 3:40 p.m. in the 2100 block of South 10th Street.

Police said Sauer pulled out of his driveway and started to head north on 10th. Witnesses reported seeing the minivan he was driving veer off the side of the road, sustaining minor front-end damage when it hit the tree.

A portion of 10th Street was closed for more than an hour as crash-reconstruction officers investigated.

Sauer was a 31-year veteran of the police department when he retired in May 1988, according to State Journal-Register archives.

In November 1969, he helped an elderly man and woman escape from an apartment next to a burning building. The winter before he retired, Sauer also was credited with rescuing a 6-year-old boy from high surf in Kona, Hawaii, while he vacationed there.

 

 

 

 

 

CAREER COP / EDDIE SAUER SAYS GOODBYE TO THE FORCE AFTER 31 YEARS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, May 15, 1988

Author/Byline: Judy Miller
Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 45

Eddie Sauer was the kind of cop people love to hate. People always want cops like him to catch the other guy.

Sauer chased speeders and ticketed parking violators for many of his 31 years with the Springfield Police Department.

And, if your vehicle was towed or abandoned in Springfield in the last five years, you probably talked to Sauer before getting it back.

Sauer's wife of 31 years, Nancy, has a scrapbook of yellowing newspaper articles, faded certificates and crinkled photographs documenting her husband's career.

But Sauer doesn't like saying much about his experiences. He'd rather not talk about Nov. 29, 1969, when he helped an elderly man and woman to safety from an apartment next to a burning building. He'll only briefly mention being involved in a stabbing investigation or the time he jumped a safecracker at a filling station.

He's not likely to dwell on the night he drew his revolver but let the fleeing suspect escape rather than shoot him when, in that decision-making instant, he saw that "the man with a gun" was really only a boy with a screwdriver.

"I was relieved," Sauer said.

No, Sauer would rather talk about fishing -- he's hooked on crappie and bluegill -- and gardening -- he plants three plots.

"You name it, I raise it," he said.

He plans to do a lot of both now that he's retired. He also wants to start a lawn maintenance business and eventually become partners with his 24-year-old son, Eddie.

He and his wife also have two daughters, Patti, 21, and Toni, 16, and a grandson, Stephen, 18 months. Baby-sitting and home repair also figure prominently in his retirement plans.

No high-tech whiz kid he, Sauer saw the handwriting on the wall when the department's administration changed in December. For the last five years he'd been behind a desk. When he learned he was going to be put back on the street, he decided to retire on May 2 at age 53. "I'm too old to hit the streets," he said.

Sauer is philosophical about his career and his retirement, which came earlier than he'd planned.

"I always enjoyed my job -- in fact, I'm going to hate to leave it," he said. "I stayed out of politics. That may be one reason I got passed over for promotions. I always figured if I had to get promoted through politics, I'd leave it alone.

"I can't say I have any regrets about not playing politics," he said. "To the victor belong the spoils."

Sauer, gray-haired and somewhat rotund, was a slim, fresh-faced 22-year-old when he donned the blue uniform and silver badge.

He'd never really thought about being a cop,

 

but his cousin, John Sauer, was a policeman

 

and encouraged Sauer to take the civil service test. m"I worked for Weaver Manufacturing on the iron-straightening table," Sauer said. "I swung a 16-pound sledge all day long, and this sounded like a pretty good job."

Sauer joined the force in June 1956 along with eight other men, bringing the force to 99. Many of the officers came from blue-collar neighborhoods, and few had college degrees. There were no women on the force then and few minorities. Many of the men who signed up were following in their father's or grandfather's bootsteps.

The "old-timers" were, and still are, a tight-knit group. They're a family of sorts although their numbers are dwindling. With their leaving, an era ends.

Sauer was a motorcycle beat cop who wrote speeding tickets and stopped to chat with anyone who had time to pass and a story to share.

"When I saw neighbors out, I'd stop and talk," he said, "whereas, today, officers have so much paperwork they don't have time to talk to the citizens."

Sauer remained unflappable on the job and applied his down-home technique when it came to violators, too.

"I figured you're getting into their wallets so you had to let them sound off a little bit," he said. mIn those days cops were given much more leeway in handling people, especially suspects, Sauer said. Now it appears to cops like him that the criminals have more rights than police officers do.

In the old days violators were immediately taken before a judge or magistrate who held court upstairs in the police department.

"There wasn't any ticket-writing then," Sauer said.

Speeding fines, now $50, were $15. Back then the crime language was clear if not precise -- a rape was a rape, not an aggravated criminal sexual assault, he said.

In the old days cops like Sauer provided escort duty to visiting dignitaries during parades and even, for a brief period, at funerals.

Most of the time the dignitaries breezed in and out of town without knowing who was on that motorcycle. But when former President Richard Nixon visited the city, Sauer had his photograph taken with him.

"I always said, `Of all the presidents I escorted, it had to be him I have a picture of,' " Sauer said with a grin.

At times there might have been only two or three cars available to patrol the entire city, Sauer said. Many officers walked their beats. He was given a motorcycle and told to go after speeders and parking violators. His assignment seemed a bit ironic to Sauer, who was a stock-car driver on the side.

"When I joined they said `no more racing,' and then they put me on a motorcycle chasing speeders."

He dismounted a few times during his career -- he walked the beat on "the levee" for about a year, rubbing elbows with gamblers, winos, bookies, and hookers and their victims. Most of the problems he encountered were caused by drunks fighting, he said.

"It wasn't a bad job," he said. "I sort of enjoyed it."

He took a turn in the detective bureau, but technology of sorts was his downfall.

"We had to do all our own typing," he said. "I didn't care for that, so I asked to come back to traffic."

He'd found his niche. He was a street cop.

Sauer has seen many cops -- and 11 chiefs -- pass through the department's doors in 31 years. He watched morale peak and drop like a barometer in the tropics. He's been around for the seemingly constant remodeling of the department's building on East Jefferson Street. He's seen policy and prodcedural changes come and go in blizzards of paperwork. He's observed and tried to keep up with the technological changes that modernized the department and steamlined the system.

He saw the transition from street cop to patrol officer -- officers who cruise the streets in air-conditioned cars and rarely offer anything but a passing nod to people on the street.

But in Sauer's mind nothing can beat a street cop -- the kind people love to hate.

Caption: Former Springfield police officer Ed Sauer retired May 2 after 31 years of service.

 

 

 

 

TITLE: PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, June 21, 1990



Ed Sauer , a volunteer for the Springfield and Sangamon County ESDA Rescue Squad, also completed the EMT-Paramedic program at St. John's.

 

 

 

Leadership problems force Eagles to reorganize

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, June 23, 2004

Author/Byline: SARAH ANTONACCI STAFF WRITER
Section: LOCAL
Page: 14

"Leadership problems" led the national Eagles club organization to replace the governing body of Springfield Eagles Aerie 437 within the past month.

"We're still fact finding," Allen Maki, assistant to the grand worthy president-elect of Fraternal Order of Eagles International, said Tuesday.

"There were some problems, some leadership problems. The new leadership was put into place within the last month. It was basically officers not doing their duties properly."

None of the problems involved mishandling of money or anything else that would be criminal in nature, Maki said, adding that the changes were strictly "duty related."

According to newspaper records, the local board appointed last year included: Keith Anderson, president; John Kjellquist, vice president; Richard Lawson, secretary;

 

Frank Cimarossa,

 

treasurer; Don Ryan, chaplain; Floyd McKinney, conductor; Bill Ward, outside guard; and Adam Sockel, Wayne Russell, Wes Fishburn, Alvie Fishburn and Roy Kline, trustees.

A newsletter being sent to Eagle Aerie 437 members reportedly indicates the new trustees include Bill Ledferd, Harold England,

 

Ed Sauer ,

 

Herb Hayes and Howard Hines. The new secretary is Jerry Nation.

Aerie 437's headquarters is at 2700 E. Ash St.

There are about 1,800 Eagles affiliates throughout the country, Maki said, and the national organization has had to involve itself with about 50 of them. He said an Eagles agent from Indiana is working with the local Eagles and reporting to the national organization.

The Eagles Web site indicates the philanthropic organization raises money to help combat heart disease, cancer, kidney disease and diabetes. It also raises money for children's charities as well as other local pet charities.

The organization was formed in 1898 in Seattle. There now are more than 1 million members throughout the United States and Canada.

Aerie 437 celebrated its 100th anniversary last year.

Illini disp – jaronske – garbage

 

Eagles lodge elects officers

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, July 5, 2005

Section: LOCAL
Page: 15

The Fraternal Order of Eagles, Aerie 437, 2700 E. Ash St., has elected officers for 2005-06.

Aerie officers are

Rex Jaronske, president; Keith Anderson, junior past president; Don Ryan, vice president; Bill Ward, chaplain; Mike Metzger, conductor; Bill Livingston, secretary;

Frank Cimmarosa, treasurer; Dick Pile, inside guard; and Raymond Packingham, Harold "Kookie" England, Bill Ledferd,

Ed Sauer and Andy Vollmer, trustees.

Auxiliary officers are M. Mickey Coutu, president; Nita Ledferd, junior past president; Shirley Sennings, vice president; Mary Rapp, chaplain; Ruth Sinclair, conductor; Ethel Stephens, secretary; Judy Lowery, treasurer; Phyllis Zoll, inside guard; Theresa McWhinnie, outside guard; and Helen McAuley, Gerry Hullman and Sandra Bradley, trustees.

 

 

Fraternal Order of Eagles aerie elects officers

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, June 14, 2006

Section: LOCAL
Page: 36

The Fraternal Order of Eagles Aerie 437, 2700 E. Ash St., has elected officers for 2005-06.

Aerie officers are Don Ryan, president; Rex Jaronske, junior past president; Bill Ward, vice president; Mike Metzger, chaplain; Joe Ross, conductor; Bill Livingston, secretary; Frank Cimarrosa, treasurer; Gary Lomelino, inside guard; and Andy Volmer, Ed Sauer , Bill Ledferd, Harold "Kookie" England and Ray Packingham, trustees.

Auxiliary officers are M. Mickey Coutu, president; Suzie Rothenberg, junior past president; Nita Ledferd, vice president; Nina Lawson, chaplain; Ruth Sinclair, conductor; Ethel Stephens, secretary; Judy Lowery, treasurer; Phyllis Zoll, inside guard; Sherry Dixon, outside guard; and Gerry Hullmann, Carolyn Uffellman and Marcia Cass, trustees.

 

 

 

TITLE: PERSONNEL FILE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, February 15, 1998



A. EDWARD SAUER , president of Central Illinois Insurance Group, has qualified to attend a spring sales conference in Reno, Nev. by being rated the No. 1 regional sales manager in the nation for Jefferson Pilot Insurance Co. for the month of December.

Central Illinois Insurance Group has offices in Springfield and Quincy.

 

 

Moughan builders –

sahba –

voice recorders –

24/7

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, September 22, 1985

Sauer-Cannedy Julie Ann Cannedy and Edward William Sauer, both of Springfield, were united in marriage at 5 p.m. Sept. 7. The Rev. Gerald Boutelle officiated the ceremony at the Knox Presbyterian Church.

Mr. and Mrs. Orville Cannedy, 3104 Woodward, are the parents of the bride.

Parents of the bridegroom are

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Sauer , 2160 S. 10th St.

Serving as maid of honor was Debbie Perrine, and Laura James,

Diana Moughan and

Patti Sauer served as bridesmaids. Flower girl was Dayna Morris.

Best man was

Bruce Britt, and groomsmen were

Mike Moughan, Darin Pitchford and Kirk Slowe. Ushers were Carl and Richard Cannedy, with Mike Hurley serving as ringbearer.

The reception was held at the Knights of Columbus Hall in Chatham.

The bride, a graduate of Lincoln Land Community College, is employed as a registered nurse at Abraham Lincoln Memorial Hospital, Lincoln. The bridegroom, a graduate of LLCC, is

 employed by Custom Mowing and Yard Service.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

TITLE: BIRTHDAYS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, April 2, 1996


Sauer-95th Edith M. Sauer of Springfield will celebrate her 95th birthday on Wednesday.

She was born April 3, 1901, in Sangamon County. She married Edward Sauer in 1930; he died in 1964. Mrs. Sauer, a homemaker, is the mother of three children, Clara Wright, Edward Sauer and Edith A. Hooper, all of Springfield. There are nine grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PATRICK GIORDANO=

 

GRANDVIEW PD CHIEF

(SEE ALSO CARLOCK)

 

 

 

Sauer -

Aux police

maggio

 

 

Sauer – maggio -

 

 

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, August 13, 2005



John E. Sauer Sr.

DIVERNON - John E. Sauer Sr., 86, of Divernon died Thursday, Aug. 11, 2005, at his home.

He was born Feb. 13, 1919, in Springfield, the son of Jack and Marguerite Schewe Sauer . He married Mary E. Roberts in 1969; she died in 1997. A daughter, Sandra Kaye Sauer , two sons, Jackie Eugene Sauer and William Allen Sauer , and a stepdaughter, Kathleen Kidd, preceded him in death.

Mr. Sauer retired from the Springfield Police Department, where he had been an officer and detective. He was a lifelong member of the Police Benevolent Association and the Springfield Auxiliary Police.

Survivors: two daughters, Marguerite Beemer of Riverton and Glenda (husband, James) Snyders of Lawrence, Kan.; two sons, John Andrew Sauer of Divernon and John E. (wife, Lynn) Sauer Jr. of Springfield; five stepdaughters, Anita (husband,

Patrick) Giordano

and Cindy (husband, Charles) Bland, both of Springfield, Vicki (husband, Dan) Bouknight of Texas, Lori (husband, Gary) Pshak of Athens and Tina (husband, Keith) Price of Florida; several grandchildren and great-grandchildren; and many nieces, nephews and cousins.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, March 3, 1997

Mary E. Sauer

Mary E. Sauer , 60, of Divernon, formerly of Springfield, died Sunday at St.

John's Hospital.

She was born May 10, 1936, in Waverly, the daughter of James and Grace Lambert Roberts. She married John E. Sauer Sr. in 1969. A Springfield resident most of her life, Mrs. Sauer worked as a medical assistant/consultant -- long-term care for the state for 15 years.

Survivors: husband, John E. Sr.; six daughters, Mrs. Patrick (Anita) Giordano , Mrs. Don (Kathleen) McCracken, Mrs. Gary (Lori) Pshak and Cindy Miller, all of Springfield, Mrs. Dan (Vicki) Bouknight of Liberty, Texas, and Mrs. Keith (Tina) Price of Bridgeport; a son, John A. Sauer of Divernon; two stepdaughters, Marguarite Beemer of Springfield and Glenda Snyder of Lawrence, Kan.; two stepsons, John E. Jr. and William A. Sauer , both of Springfield; 21 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; two sisters, Mrs. Joseph (Doris) Maggio of Springfield and Mrs. Raymond (Barbara) Reynolds Sr. of Rochester; two brothers, Maurice Roberts of Springfield and Paul Richard Roberts of Missouri; several nieces, nephews and cousins.

 

 

 

 

TITLE: ANNIVERSARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, December 11, 1990

Maggio-45th Mr. and Mrs. Joe Maggio of Springfield recently celebrated their 45th wedding anniversary at a party at Gatsby's Restaurant hosted by their children.

Maggio and the former Doris Roberts were married Dec. 1, 1945.

 

Mr. Maggio is retired as a policeman for the city of Springfield and is presently employed as a security guard at Marine Bank.

 

Mrs. Maggio is retired from City Water, Light and Power.



They are the parents of five children,

 

Jim,

Sam,

Joe and

Steve, all of Springfield,

and Anna Marie of Santa Ana, Calif.

 

 

 

ILLINOIS POLICE GROUP INSTALLS OFFICERS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, November 20, 1985

Edition: M1,M2,E1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 11

The Mid-State Division of the Illinois Police Association has installed new officers.

Elected to two-year terms were Chairman Neil Williamson; 1st Vice Chairman Bob Nadalini; 2nd Vice Chairman Loren Larsen; Secretary-Treasurer Tim Franke; and Sergeants at Arms Charles Palazzolo, George Murphy, Jack Clifford, Alice Bartello and Joe Maggio .

The Illinois Police Association has the largest membership of any police organization in the U.S., over 15,000 members.

The Mid-State Division serves Sangamon, Menard, Morgan, Cass, Logan and Christian counties.

 

Maggio – Wilkerson – (cravens – muench)

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, August 9, 1993

Anna Maggio Anna Maggio, 105, of Springfield died at 7:50 p.m. Saturday at Memorial Medical Center.

She was born Feb. 27, 1888, in Palermo, Italy. She married Jasper Maggio in 1908 in Palermo, and he died in 1951. Also preceding her in death were four sons, Sam, Tony, Jasper and Joe Maggio .

Mrs. Maggio was a member of Ss. Peter and Paul Catholic Church.

Surviving are a son, Pete of Springfield; a daughter, Mrs. Frances Wilkerson of Springfield, 10 grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren; and a great-great-grandchild.

 

 

 

 

Older generations share interest in model trains with children

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, November 30, 2009

Author/Byline: RHYS SAUNDERS, THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER
Section: homepage

Elijah Jones peered over the edge of a model train layout, reaching toward the foam mountain where a locomotive had just disappeared into a tunnel.

The three-dimensional layout detailed to look like a desert landscape - complete with cattle, cacti, a western town and two trains traveling in opposite directions - captivated the 3-year-old Springfield resident at the annual railroad swap meet held Sunday at the Sangamon County Fairgrounds in New Berlin.

More than 100 tables, selling everything near and dear to the train collector's heart, were featured at the five-and-a-half-hour event.

And many of those model railroad enthusiasts who brought collectibles to buy and sell say their love for the hobby began when they were about Elijah's age.

"I've had trains since I was five years old," said Frank Herman, 79, of Springfield. "You can have it as toy-like or realistic as you want it. I don't know what it is that makes it fascinating."

Herman's booth featured two five-piece model train sets dating to the 1930s and selling for approximately $275 each.

"I probably got them at one of these swap meets," he said. "Sometimes in magazines you'll see an ad, something that interests you."

Others, like Joe Maggio , a member of the Sangamon County Central Railroad Club, said it's a chance for an older generation to share its love of model trains with younger children.

"I think it's something you never grow out of," he said. "It's just a fascination that we all have with trains. We have to get the younger kids involved, or this hobby will die out when we start dying off."

An official attendance count was not available Sunday, but Maggio said there was a mailing list of more than 600 people. Although most vendors were from the Springfield area, the swap meet drew model-train enthusiasts from as far as Missouri, Iowa and Indiana.

And most vendors also are operators, meaning they have functioning model railroads on personalized three-dimensional layouts, he said. Often the swap meets provide the model train collectors a chance to sell their duplicates.

Trains and accessories available were categorized by scale, from larger, G-scale trains to smaller trains that are O, S, HO and N scale.

One attendee, Art Wiseman, 74, of Athens said it can take months to put the working displays together, but in the end, it's worth it.

"It helps the kids realize trains are interesting," he said.

 

 

 

Weddings, added July 17

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, July 17, 2009



Kohlbecker-Robertson

Allison Dee Rose Robertson and Joshua Cooper Kohlbecker, both of St. Petersburg, Fla., were married at 7 p.m. May 3, 2009, in Longboat Key, Fla., by Gerry Kohlbecker, uncle of the groom.

The bride is the daughter of Joe and Janeece Robertson and Carol Robertson, all of Springfield. The groom is the son of Charles and Joanne Kohlbecker and Pat Kohlbecker, all of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Bree Robertson. Bridesmaids were Missi Searcy, Kristen Slead and Kittie Kohlbecker. Flower girl was Kylinn Wood.

Best men were Andy Kmett and Jeff Arison. Groomsmen were Daron Searcy, Joe Maggio , Steve Leitch and Nick Robertson.

A reception was held at Marina Jacks in Sarasota, Fla.

The bride is a 2001 graduate of Glenwood High School. She is employed by Cardiac Surgical Associates as Vein Center coordinator. The groom is a 1998 graduate of St Aloysius and a 1998 graduate of Ursuline Academy, and received his bachelor's degree in environmental science and policy from the University of South Florida. He is employed as an environmental science consultant with CH2M Hill.

The couple resides in St. Petersburg.

 

 

 

 

 

FOR THE RECORD

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, March 12, 2007



Gina Marie and Randall G. Siddens, Divernon, a son, Dalton Anthony Samuel Siddens, Saturday, March 3, 2007. Grandparents are Joe Maggio and Bobbie Maggio, both of Springfield, Donald Siddens of Rochester and the late Rhondda Siddens.

 

 

 

All aboard: Model railroad event scheduled for Sunday

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, December 6, 2004

Section: LOCAL
Page: 14

NEW BERLIN - A Model Railroad Open House and Swap Meet, sponsored by the Sangamon Central Railroad Club and the Sangamon County Fair Association, is scheduled for 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday at the Sangamon County Fairgrounds.

Displays will be featured, as well as items for swap and sale. Food will be available. Admission is $2 for adults. Children younger than 12 get in free.

Tables are $7 each. For more information, call Joe Maggio at 544-6797.

 

 

 

Maggio= SHG booster

 

 

ARE YOU READY FOR SOME FOOD? / Sacred Heart-Griffin fans bond over pre-game feasts

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, October 12, 2003

Author/Byline: KATHRYN REM Staff Writer
Section: SUNDAYAM
Page: 13

Although it's common practice for fans to feast on brats and barbecue in stadium parking lots before pro and college football games, tailgating hasn't been a part of game day at most high school competitions. But that's changing.

At Springfield's Sacred Heart-Griffin High School, parents and supporters of the state-ranked Cyclones plan their pre-game galas - down to each menu item for home and road games - before the season ever begins.

"It started out as a way to make money for the football team," said Gary Nevins, who heads the Tailgaters Association, a group of SHG gridiron regulars who arrive about an hour before each game to share a meal and chat with friends. "Now it seems to be getting bigger every season."

The Tailgaters Association, an informal group not officially affiliated with the Catholic school, was started four years ago by Rob Miller when his son Justin played for the Cyclones.

"There were eight or nine couples who we were close to, and we talked about getting together before the games. I bought a tent and assigned people to do the cooking. Then we put out a coffee can for donations and other people started pitching in," said Miller, a sales manager for phone book publisher DonTech.

"Every week, more and more people started coming and soon we raised enough money for the tunnel," he said, referring to the 20-foot portable black entrance tunnel through which the Cyclones take the field when playing home games at Memorial Stadium. Corporate sponsors helped raise the $3,700 price of the tunnel.

"We didn't start the group to make money, but if we do, we put it back into the team," said Miller. Donations are used to rent a storage shed for the tunnel, purchase paper goods and extra food for the meals and feed the cheerleaders and pom squad before the games.

It's believed that American tailgating began in the 19th century, when fans who traveled long distances to football games took to cooking near their carriages out of necessity. Its popularity took a leap in the late 1970s when college alumni hosted parking-lot parties as a way to socialize with old friends.

National Football League fans embraced the concept, as did major companies like Coca-Cola, Masterfoods USA (M&M's, Snickers), Sara Lee and Jack Daniels, which reach millions of Americans with tailgating-themed advertising and promotions.

At last weekend's game against the Lanphier Lions, about 250 SHG tailgaters dined on a menu of mostaccioli, sloppy joes, sausage and sauerkraut, meatball sandwiches, chili, baked beans, potato chips, cookies, cupcakes and soft drinks.

On other days, entrees have included fried chicken, red beans and rice, shredded pork, barbecued beef, ham and beans, jambalaya, deep-fried turkeys and linguine with clams.

"Each entree feeds 40 to 50 people," said Nevins, a manager at parking lot management company System Parking Inc. "People often bring food that we didn't anticipate. We don't refuse anything."

Prior to the start of the football season, the tailgaters meet to plan their activities. A sign-up sheet is posted; volunteers fill in game dates with the foods they plan to provide.

"Some people bring food; some throw a few coins in the can," said Nevins. "Everyone is welcome to come and pick up a plate. There is no real membership and no dues."

Most of the tailgaters prepare the food at home, but some fire up in the parking lot.

Joe Maggio and Henry Manci are among a group of alumni who occasionally haul a Weber grill and roasters to the stadium to cook up some on-site Italian sausage.

"Not just any sausage will do," said Maggio, who buys it at a meat shop in the Chicago area. "It's the best there is. I took vacation time to go up there and get it."

The buddies arrive about four hours before the game to cook the sausage with green peppers, onions and red sauce.

High school tailgating is becoming more popular, said P.J. O'Neil, vice president of sales and marketing for Chicago-based American Tailgater Co. (www.americantailgater.com), a firm that sells tailgating supplies and equipment.

"Usually you see it in areas where teams travel hundreds of miles for Friday-night games, places like Texas, Nebraska, Oklahoma." He added that tailgating has branched out beyond football. Some baseball stadiums - including U.S. Cellular Field, home of the White Sox - allow it, as do facilities that host events such as NASCAR races and figure skating and Little League finals.

O'Neil estimates that more than 20 million Americans tailgate at least once a year. A survey sponsored by Ragu found that more than half prefer the party to the actual game.

"It's getting a little more notoriety because a lot of companies are beginning to recognize tailgating as a marketing tool. Companies want products associated with an activity that is fun. You never hear about people going to a bad tailgating party," said O'Neil about the increasing number of businesses that sponsor pre-game bashes.

His company sells football-shaped grills, one-minute beverage coolers, beer-can chicken racks, Buffalo wing pots, team-logo steak branding irons, turkey fryers, college team flags, portable toilets, two-way radios, pickup truck dog ramps, NFL logo flasks and helmet-shaped snack bowls.

The $6,000 "ultimate tailgating system" includes a 50,000 BTU Ducane gas grill, refrigerator, freezer, stainless steel sink, city hose connection and hand pump, locking drawers, food prep area, patio umbrella, electric lift system and power inverter to accommodate a slow cooker, blender and TV.

You can save $200 if you choose the model with only one, instead of two, beer taps.

"There's a very large competition between tailgaters," said O'Neil. "We see people who have been tailgating next to each other for 20 years and everyone wants to one-up each other. If one guy has a blender, the next guy has a gas-powered blender."

The Sacred Heart-Griffin tailgate parties are more about connecting with friends and alumni.

"There's something about SHG football that brings people together. It's a long tradition," said Michele Nevins, who helps her husband, Gary, with the Tailgaters Association.

The couple's son A.J., now at Lincoln Land Community College, played for the Cyclones; their son, Tony, is on the roster now. Daughter Cristina, an eighth-grader at Little Flower School who will be an SHG freshman next year, helps her parents set up the tables, tent and school flag before each game. After the meal, she hauls the black-and-gold flag into the stadium so the team can carry it onto the field.

Michele Nevins, a graduate of Sacred Heart Academy with brothers who played football for Griffin High School, didn't attend her alma mater's games after graduation until 1995.

"It was like old home week. It was so much fun seeing everyone again." She couldn't get her husband, a graduate of Springfield High School, to attend the games until A.J. started playing.

"He didn't convert till the last possible moment," said Michele, who works for the Illinois Department of Public Aid.

Tailgating regulars include parents of students and graduates, alumni and people who simply enjoy SHG football.

"Everyone likes a winner, and at Sacred Heart-Griffin, they expect to win," said tailgater Terry Montalbano, a Southeast grad whose daughter went to SHG. "Most games we go to on the road, we have a bigger crowd than the home team."

Said Manci: "When we went to school at Griffin, it was all guys and we've kept up those friendships for 30 and 40 years. Tailgating has given me a chance to meet people who were there before me and after me."

Karen Sronce is new to SHG tailgating. Her son John, a Cyclones player, transferred to the school this year from Springfield High.

"There was a dinner for varsity moms and there was a (tailgate party) sign-up sheet. I'm sitting there in total awe by the number of mothers there. The amount of parental involvement at this school is amazing. I was an outsider, but they were so welcoming."

Like other parents of players, she wears a big button with a color photo of her son in uniform to the tailgating party and game.

"About 10 percent of the SHG people who go to the games are in the parking lot with us," said Gary Nevins. "It's turned into quite an extravaganza."

Caption: Jim Van Leer, right, and other Sacred Heart-Griffin football fans enjoy the offerings while tailgating before the game against Lanphier. The menu included mostaccioli, sloppy joes, sausages and sauerkraut, meatball sandwiches, chili, baked beans, potato chips, cookies, cupcakes and soft drinks (top of page).

 

 

 

 

ANNIVERSARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, June 11, 2002

Maggio-25th

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Maggio of Springfield celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary with a trip to Jamaica in February.

Maggio and the former Monica Ramirez were married June 11, 1977, at St. Cabrini Church by Monsignor Dirksen.

Mr. Maggio has been employed in the mailroom department of The State Journal-Register for 27 years. Mrs. Maggio has been employed by St. Aloysius School for the past year.

They are parents of three children, Philip, Joseph and Sarah, all of Springfield.

 

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, September 26, 1999



Siddens-Maggio

 

Gina Marie Maggio of Springfield and Randall G. Siddens of Divernon were married at 2 p.m. July 24 at St. Aloysius Catholic Church by the Rev. John Titus.

The bride is the daughter of

Joseph S. and Bobbie A. Maggio of Springfield.

The groom is the son of Donald and Rhondda Siddens of Rochester.

Serving as matron of honor was Dana Duke. Bridesmaids were Kim Maggio,
Brenda Staab, Lori Marinelli, Angela Antonacci, Elaine Ayers, Shelby Rae Siddens and Casey Shelae Siddens. Flower girls were Morgan Elise Duke and

Erin Nicole Staab.

Best man was Bradley Siddens. Groomsmen were

Joe Maggio ,

Mark Staab, Rob Briney, Jay Sweeney, Rick Burris and Bradley Chase Siddens. Ushers were

Jeff Dorr, Chris Garner and

Kent Keiser.

Ringbearer was

Mark David Staab II. A reception was held at the Eagles Club.

The bride is a graduate of Ursuline Academy and Illinois State University. She is employed by the state Department of Revenue. The groom is a graduate of Rochester High School. He is employed as a union ironworker with Local 46. The couple will reside in Divernon.

 

 

 

 

 

MINI-JACKPOTS AWAIT SOME STATE RETIREES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, May 7, 1994

Author/Byline: DAVID HOWELL STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 1

Some former state workers may be sitting on a nest egg -- and not even know it.

The State Employees Retirement System of Illinois wants thousands of ex-state workers to know they have mini-jackpots just waiting to be claimed.

About 5,000 former state employees are entitled to between $5 and thousands of dollars that now is sitting unclaimed in the 50-year-old state pension fund,

 

said Joe Maggio ,

manager of the services and refunds division of the state employee retirement system.

"These are people who have moved over the years and haven't told us their change of address," Maggio said. "(Other) people didn't realize the money was coming out of their paychecks, I guess."

So now the state is trying hard to locate such people and hand out the cash, according to Maggio, who first hatched the idea to track down people two or three years ago.

After looking at similar programs in Alaska and Indiana, he decided to recommend introducing a similar plan in Illinois this year.

Co-workers, friends and relatives are being urged to contact the retirement system if they know the whereabouts of the 880 people who are owed more than $100 each. Their names have been published in two agency newsletters.

A January newsletter for retired employees and an April newsletter for active employees both contained pages titled "Do you know where they are?" Any state worker who is over the age of 60 and served the state for at least eight years is eligible for a pension, Maggio said.

At present, Illinois has nearly 80,000 state workers. They tend to be more aware and informed about benefits than some of their predecessors, he said.

So far, the agency has received 60 responses to names on the lists, and some people have already been sent their money, according to Maggio.

The agency hasn't received many hoax callers, although a few people with common names, "like John Smith," have made bogus inquiries.

"We're careful to make sure the real people get the money," Maggio said. "Anything we find is gravy. We're not spending a lot of money (to trace ex-workers), but we're still finding people."

Locating people after making arduous checks with credit bureaus, the secretary of state's office, the Internal Revenue Service and the Social Security Administration can be hard work, but it's good when it pays off, he added.

"I ran down one guy who is a priest and he was in a monastery somewhere," said Maggio, who's been with the retirement system since 1977. Although the majority of missing recipients still live in Illinois, some on the list have ended up a long way from the Prairie State.

"One woman is now living in Australia," Maggio said. Others have been tracked down in Alaska, California, Florida, Texas, Arizona and North Carolina.

There's even one ex-state worker living in the nation's gambling mecca, Las Vegas. "He could probably use the (money)," Maggio said with a chuckle.

How do people react when told they've got unexpected money coming to them? "Some people are really happy, and they think they're going to win thousands of dollars," Maggio said. "But it's usually smaller amounts. Sometimes they say `I don't want (the money), it's not worth it.' But most are genuinely appreciative."

Any eligible recipients should get in touch quickly, Maggio warned, because future federal regulations may require former state workers who are now over the age of 70 to pay half their unclaimed pension money to Uncle Sam.

And that's never good news.

 

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, October 10, 1993



Tober-Stewardson Elizabeth Ann Stewardson and William Keith Tober, both of Springfield, were married at 7 p.m. Sept. 11 at Kumler United Methodist Church by the Rev. Jack Cramer-Heuerman.

The bride is the daughter of Barbara and Keith Cripe and Doug and Ginny Stewardson, all of Springfield. The groom is the son of William and Jacqueline Tober of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Molly Stewardson. Bridesmaids were Leigh Ann Gobble, Alexandra Finkle, Tamara Olander, Michelle Herrick and Glenda Millhouse.

Best man was Brian Tober. Groomsmen were Kevin Tober, Dave Baker, Jim Shures, Dave Eilering and Joe Maggio . Ushers were Timothy Olander, Roy Walker and Andrew Young. Ringbearer was David Gobble.

A reception was held at the VFW Post 755. The bride is a graduate of Western Illinois University. The groom is a graduate of Illinois State University and is employed by GTech Corporation.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAUER - Maggio –

BUNN  EMPLOYEE

 

*SECURITY  GUARD

“AUXILIARY POLICE”

 

Sauer – maggio – SPD – aux police

 

Police unions – maggio at Il police assoc

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, August 13, 2005



John E. Sauer Sr.

DIVERNON - John E. Sauer Sr., 86, of Divernon died Thursday, Aug. 11, 2005, at his home.

He was born Feb. 13, 1919, in Springfield, the son of Jack and Marguerite Schewe Sauer . He married Mary E. Roberts in 1969; she died in 1997. A daughter, Sandra Kaye Sauer , two sons, Jackie Eugene Sauer and William Allen Sauer , and a stepdaughter, Kathleen Kidd, preceded him in death.

Mr. Sauer retired from the Springfield Police Department, where he had been an officer and detective. He was a lifelong member of the Police Benevolent Association and the Springfield Auxiliary Police.

Survivors: two daughters, Marguerite Beemer of Riverton and Glenda (husband, James) Snyders of Lawrence, Kan.; two sons, John Andrew Sauer of Divernon and John E. (wife, Lynn) Sauer Jr. of Springfield; five stepdaughters, Anita (husband, Patrick) Giordano and Cindy (husband, Charles) Bland, both of Springfield, Vicki (husband, Dan) Bouknight of Texas, Lori (husband, Gary) Pshak of Athens and Tina (husband, Keith) Price of Florida; several grandchildren and great-grandchildren; and many nieces, nephews and cousins.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, March 3, 1997

Mary E. Sauer

Mary E. Sauer , 60, of Divernon, formerly of Springfield, died Sunday at St.

John's Hospital.

She was born May 10, 1936, in Waverly, the daughter of James and Grace Lambert Roberts. She married John E. Sauer Sr. in 1969. A Springfield resident most of her life, Mrs. Sauer worked as a medical assistant/consultant -- long-term care for the state for 15 years.

Survivors: husband, John E. Sr.; six daughters, Mrs. Patrick (Anita) Giordano , Mrs. Don (Kathleen) McCracken, Mrs. Gary (Lori) Pshak and Cindy Miller, all of Springfield, Mrs. Dan (Vicki) Bouknight of Liberty, Texas, and Mrs. Keith (Tina) Price of Bridgeport; a son, John A. Sauer of Divernon; two stepdaughters, Marguarite Beemer of Springfield and Glenda Snyder of Lawrence, Kan.; two stepsons, John E. Jr. and William A. Sauer , both of Springfield; 21 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; two sisters, Mrs. Joseph (Doris) Maggio of Springfield and Mrs. Raymond (Barbara) Reynolds Sr. of Rochester; two brothers, Maurice Roberts of Springfield and Paul Richard Roberts of Missouri; several nieces, nephews and cousins.

 

 

 

 

TITLE: ANNIVERSARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, December 11, 1990

Maggio-45th Mr. and Mrs. Joe Maggio of Springfield recently celebrated their 45th wedding anniversary at a party at Gatsby's Restaurant hosted by their children.

Maggio and the former Doris Roberts were married Dec. 1, 1945.

 

Mr. Maggio is retired as a policeman for the city of Springfield and is presently employed as a security guard at Marine Bank.

 

Mrs. Maggio is retired from City Water, Light and Power.



They are the parents of five children,

 

Jim,

Sam,

Joe and

Steve, all of Springfield,

and Anna Marie of Santa Ana, Calif.

 

 

 

ILLINOIS POLICE GROUP INSTALLS OFFICERS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Wednesday, November 20, 1985

Edition: M1,M2,E1
Section: LOCAL
Page: 11

The Mid-State Division of the Illinois Police Association has installed new officers.

Elected to two-year terms were Chairman Neil Williamson; 1st Vice Chairman Bob Nadalini; 2nd Vice Chairman Loren Larsen; Secretary-Treasurer Tim Franke; and Sergeants at Arms Charles Palazzolo, George Murphy, Jack Clifford, Alice Bartello and Joe Maggio .

The Illinois Police Association has the largest membership of any police organization in the U.S., over 15,000 members.

The Mid-State Division serves Sangamon, Menard, Morgan, Cass, Logan and Christian counties.

 

Maggio – Wilkerson – (cravens – muench)

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, August 9, 1993

Anna Maggio Anna Maggio, 105, of Springfield died at 7:50 p.m. Saturday at Memorial Medical Center.

She was born Feb. 27, 1888, in Palermo, Italy. She married Jasper Maggio in 1908 in Palermo, and he died in 1951. Also preceding her in death were four sons, Sam, Tony, Jasper and Joe Maggio .

Mrs. Maggio was a member of Ss. Peter and Paul Catholic Church.

Surviving are a son, Pete of Springfield; a daughter, Mrs. Frances Wilkerson of Springfield, 10 grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren; and a great-great-grandchild.

 

 

RR’

 

Older generations share interest in model trains with children

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, November 30, 2009

Author/Byline: RHYS SAUNDERS, THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER
Section: homepage

Elijah Jones peered over the edge of a model train layout, reaching toward the foam mountain where a locomotive had just disappeared into a tunnel.

The three-dimensional layout detailed to look like a desert landscape - complete with cattle, cacti, a western town and two trains traveling in opposite directions - captivated the 3-year-old Springfield resident at the annual railroad swap meet held Sunday at the Sangamon County Fairgrounds in New Berlin.

More than 100 tables, selling everything near and dear to the train collector's heart, were featured at the five-and-a-half-hour event.

And many of those model railroad enthusiasts who brought collectibles to buy and sell say their love for the hobby began when they were about Elijah's age.

"I've had trains since I was five years old," said Frank Herman, 79, of Springfield. "You can have it as toy-like or realistic as you want it. I don't know what it is that makes it fascinating."

Herman's booth featured two five-piece model train sets dating to the 1930s and selling for approximately $275 each.

"I probably got them at one of these swap meets," he said. "Sometimes in magazines you'll see an ad, something that interests you."

Others, like Joe Maggio , a member of the Sangamon County Central Railroad Club, said it's a chance for an older generation to share its love of model trains with younger children.

"I think it's something you never grow out of," he said. "It's just a fascination that we all have with trains. We have to get the younger kids involved, or this hobby will die out when we start dying off."

An official attendance count was not available Sunday, but Maggio said there was a mailing list of more than 600 people. Although most vendors were from the Springfield area, the swap meet drew model-train enthusiasts from as far as Missouri, Iowa and Indiana.

And most vendors also are operators, meaning they have functioning model railroads on personalized three-dimensional layouts, he said. Often the swap meets provide the model train collectors a chance to sell their duplicates.

Trains and accessories available were categorized by scale, from larger, G-scale trains to smaller trains that are O, S, HO and N scale.

One attendee, Art Wiseman, 74, of Athens said it can take months to put the working displays together, but in the end, it's worth it.

"It helps the kids realize trains are interesting," he said.

 

 

 

Weddings, added July 17

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Friday, July 17, 2009



Kohlbecker-Robertson

Allison Dee Rose Robertson and Joshua Cooper Kohlbecker, both of St. Petersburg, Fla., were married at 7 p.m. May 3, 2009, in Longboat Key, Fla., by Gerry Kohlbecker, uncle of the groom.

The bride is the daughter of Joe and Janeece Robertson and Carol Robertson, all of Springfield. The groom is the son of Charles and Joanne Kohlbecker and Pat Kohlbecker, all of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Bree Robertson. Bridesmaids were Missi Searcy, Kristen Slead and Kittie Kohlbecker. Flower girl was Kylinn Wood.

Best men were Andy Kmett and Jeff Arison. Groomsmen were Daron Searcy, Joe Maggio , Steve Leitch and Nick Robertson.

A reception was held at Marina Jacks in Sarasota, Fla.

The bride is a 2001 graduate of Glenwood High School. She is employed by Cardiac Surgical Associates as Vein Center coordinator. The groom is a 1998 graduate of St Aloysius and a 1998 graduate of Ursuline Academy, and received his bachelor's degree in environmental science and policy from the University of South Florida. He is employed as an environmental science consultant with CH2M Hill.

The couple resides in St. Petersburg.

 

 

 

 

 

FOR THE RECORD

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, March 12, 2007



Gina Marie and Randall G. Siddens, Divernon, a son, Dalton Anthony Samuel Siddens, Saturday, March 3, 2007. Grandparents are Joe Maggio and Bobbie Maggio, both of Springfield, Donald Siddens of Rochester and the late Rhondda Siddens.

 

 

 

All aboard: Model railroad event scheduled for Sunday

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, December 6, 2004

Section: LOCAL
Page: 14

NEW BERLIN - A Model Railroad Open House and Swap Meet, sponsored by the Sangamon Central Railroad Club and the Sangamon County Fair Association, is scheduled for 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday at the Sangamon County Fairgrounds.

Displays will be featured, as well as items for swap and sale. Food will be available. Admission is $2 for adults. Children younger than 12 get in free.

Tables are $7 each. For more information, call Joe Maggio at 544-6797.

 

 

 

Maggio= SHG booster

 

 

ARE YOU READY FOR SOME FOOD? / Sacred Heart-Griffin fans bond over pre-game feasts

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, October 12, 2003

Author/Byline: KATHRYN REM Staff Writer
Section: SUNDAYAM
Page: 13

Although it's common practice for fans to feast on brats and barbecue in stadium parking lots before pro and college football games, tailgating hasn't been a part of game day at most high school competitions. But that's changing.

At Springfield's Sacred Heart-Griffin High School, parents and supporters of the state-ranked Cyclones plan their pre-game galas - down to each menu item for home and road games - before the season ever begins.

"It started out as a way to make money for the football team," said Gary Nevins, who heads the Tailgaters Association, a group of SHG gridiron regulars who arrive about an hour before each game to share a meal and chat with friends. "Now it seems to be getting bigger every season."

The Tailgaters Association, an informal group not officially affiliated with the Catholic school, was started four years ago by Rob Miller when his son Justin played for the Cyclones.

"There were eight or nine couples who we were close to, and we talked about getting together before the games. I bought a tent and assigned people to do the cooking. Then we put out a coffee can for donations and other people started pitching in," said Miller, a sales manager for phone book publisher DonTech.

"Every week, more and more people started coming and soon we raised enough money for the tunnel," he said, referring to the 20-foot portable black entrance tunnel through which the Cyclones take the field when playing home games at Memorial Stadium. Corporate sponsors helped raise the $3,700 price of the tunnel.

"We didn't start the group to make money, but if we do, we put it back into the team," said Miller. Donations are used to rent a storage shed for the tunnel, purchase paper goods and extra food for the meals and feed the cheerleaders and pom squad before the games.

It's believed that American tailgating began in the 19th century, when fans who traveled long distances to football games took to cooking near their carriages out of necessity. Its popularity took a leap in the late 1970s when college alumni hosted parking-lot parties as a way to socialize with old friends.

National Football League fans embraced the concept, as did major companies like Coca-Cola, Masterfoods USA (M&M's, Snickers), Sara Lee and Jack Daniels, which reach millions of Americans with tailgating-themed advertising and promotions.

At last weekend's game against the Lanphier Lions, about 250 SHG tailgaters dined on a menu of mostaccioli, sloppy joes, sausage and sauerkraut, meatball sandwiches, chili, baked beans, potato chips, cookies, cupcakes and soft drinks.

On other days, entrees have included fried chicken, red beans and rice, shredded pork, barbecued beef, ham and beans, jambalaya, deep-fried turkeys and linguine with clams.

"Each entree feeds 40 to 50 people," said Nevins, a manager at parking lot management company System Parking Inc. "People often bring food that we didn't anticipate. We don't refuse anything."

Prior to the start of the football season, the tailgaters meet to plan their activities. A sign-up sheet is posted; volunteers fill in game dates with the foods they plan to provide.

"Some people bring food; some throw a few coins in the can," said Nevins. "Everyone is welcome to come and pick up a plate. There is no real membership and no dues."

Most of the tailgaters prepare the food at home, but some fire up in the parking lot.

Joe Maggio and Henry Manci are among a group of alumni who occasionally haul a Weber grill and roasters to the stadium to cook up some on-site Italian sausage.

"Not just any sausage will do," said Maggio, who buys it at a meat shop in the Chicago area. "It's the best there is. I took vacation time to go up there and get it."

The buddies arrive about four hours before the game to cook the sausage with green peppers, onions and red sauce.

High school tailgating is becoming more popular, said P.J. O'Neil, vice president of sales and marketing for Chicago-based American Tailgater Co. (www.americantailgater.com), a firm that sells tailgating supplies and equipment.

"Usually you see it in areas where teams travel hundreds of miles for Friday-night games, places like Texas, Nebraska, Oklahoma." He added that tailgating has branched out beyond football. Some baseball stadiums - including U.S. Cellular Field, home of the White Sox - allow it, as do facilities that host events such as NASCAR races and figure skating and Little League finals.

O'Neil estimates that more than 20 million Americans tailgate at least once a year. A survey sponsored by Ragu found that more than half prefer the party to the actual game.

"It's getting a little more notoriety because a lot of companies are beginning to recognize tailgating as a marketing tool. Companies want products associated with an activity that is fun. You never hear about people going to a bad tailgating party," said O'Neil about the increasing number of businesses that sponsor pre-game bashes.

His company sells football-shaped grills, one-minute beverage coolers, beer-can chicken racks, Buffalo wing pots, team-logo steak branding irons, turkey fryers, college team flags, portable toilets, two-way radios, pickup truck dog ramps, NFL logo flasks and helmet-shaped snack bowls.

The $6,000 "ultimate tailgating system" includes a 50,000 BTU Ducane gas grill, refrigerator, freezer, stainless steel sink, city hose connection and hand pump, locking drawers, food prep area, patio umbrella, electric lift system and power inverter to accommodate a slow cooker, blender and TV.

You can save $200 if you choose the model with only one, instead of two, beer taps.

"There's a very large competition between tailgaters," said O'Neil. "We see people who have been tailgating next to each other for 20 years and everyone wants to one-up each other. If one guy has a blender, the next guy has a gas-powered blender."

The Sacred Heart-Griffin tailgate parties are more about connecting with friends and alumni.

"There's something about SHG football that brings people together. It's a long tradition," said Michele Nevins, who helps her husband, Gary, with the Tailgaters Association.

The couple's son A.J., now at Lincoln Land Community College, played for the Cyclones; their son, Tony, is on the roster now. Daughter Cristina, an eighth-grader at Little Flower School who will be an SHG freshman next year, helps her parents set up the tables, tent and school flag before each game. After the meal, she hauls the black-and-gold flag into the stadium so the team can carry it onto the field.

Michele Nevins, a graduate of Sacred Heart Academy with brothers who played football for Griffin High School, didn't attend her alma mater's games after graduation until 1995.

"It was like old home week. It was so much fun seeing everyone again." She couldn't get her husband, a graduate of Springfield High School, to attend the games until A.J. started playing.

"He didn't convert till the last possible moment," said Michele, who works for the Illinois Department of Public Aid.

Tailgating regulars include parents of students and graduates, alumni and people who simply enjoy SHG football.

"Everyone likes a winner, and at Sacred Heart-Griffin, they expect to win," said tailgater Terry Montalbano, a Southeast grad whose daughter went to SHG. "Most games we go to on the road, we have a bigger crowd than the home team."

Said Manci: "When we went to school at Griffin, it was all guys and we've kept up those friendships for 30 and 40 years. Tailgating has given me a chance to meet people who were there before me and after me."

Karen Sronce is new to SHG tailgating. Her son John, a Cyclones player, transferred to the school this year from Springfield High.

"There was a dinner for varsity moms and there was a (tailgate party) sign-up sheet. I'm sitting there in total awe by the number of mothers there. The amount of parental involvement at this school is amazing. I was an outsider, but they were so welcoming."

Like other parents of players, she wears a big button with a color photo of her son in uniform to the tailgating party and game.

"About 10 percent of the SHG people who go to the games are in the parking lot with us," said Gary Nevins. "It's turned into quite an extravaganza."

Caption: Jim Van Leer, right, and other Sacred Heart-Griffin football fans enjoy the offerings while tailgating before the game against Lanphier. The menu included mostaccioli, sloppy joes, sausages and sauerkraut, meatball sandwiches, chili, baked beans, potato chips, cookies, cupcakes and soft drinks (top of page).

 

 

 

 

ANNIVERSARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Tuesday, June 11, 2002

Maggio-25th

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Maggio of Springfield celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary with a trip to Jamaica in February.

Maggio and the former Monica Ramirez were married June 11, 1977, at St. Cabrini Church by Monsignor Dirksen.

Mr. Maggio has been employed in the mailroom department of The State Journal-Register for 27 years. Mrs. Maggio has been employed by St. Aloysius School for the past year.

They are parents of three children, Philip, Joseph and Sarah, all of Springfield.

 

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, September 26, 1999



Siddens-Maggio

 

Gina Marie Maggio of Springfield and Randall G. Siddens of Divernon were married at 2 p.m. July 24 at St. Aloysius Catholic Church by the Rev. John Titus.

The bride is the daughter of

Joseph S. and Bobbie A. Maggio of Springfield.

The groom is the son of Donald and Rhondda Siddens of Rochester.

Serving as matron of honor was Dana Duke. Bridesmaids were Kim Maggio,
Brenda Staab, Lori Marinelli, Angela Antonacci, Elaine Ayers, Shelby Rae Siddens and Casey Shelae Siddens. Flower girls were Morgan Elise Duke and

Erin Nicole Staab.

Best man was Bradley Siddens. Groomsmen were

Joe Maggio ,

Mark Staab, Rob Briney, Jay Sweeney, Rick Burris and Bradley Chase Siddens. Ushers were

Jeff Dorr, Chris Garner and

Kent Keiser.

Ringbearer was

Mark David Staab II. A reception was held at the Eagles Club.

The bride is a graduate of Ursuline Academy and Illinois State University. She is employed by the state Department of Revenue. The groom is a graduate of Rochester High School. He is employed as a union ironworker with Local 46. The couple will reside in Divernon.

 

 

 

 

 

MINI-JACKPOTS AWAIT SOME STATE RETIREES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, May 7, 1994

Author/Byline: DAVID HOWELL STAFF WRITER
Edition: M1,M2
Section: LOCAL
Page: 1

Some former state workers may be sitting on a nest egg -- and not even know it.

The State Employees Retirement System of Illinois wants thousands of ex-state workers to know they have mini-jackpots just waiting to be claimed.

About 5,000 former state employees are entitled to between $5 and thousands of dollars that now is sitting unclaimed in the 50-year-old state pension fund,

 

said Joe Maggio ,

manager of the services and refunds division of the state employee retirement system.

"These are people who have moved over the years and haven't told us their change of address," Maggio said. "(Other) people didn't realize the money was coming out of their paychecks, I guess."

So now the state is trying hard to locate such people and hand out the cash, according to Maggio, who first hatched the idea to track down people two or three years ago.

After looking at similar programs in Alaska and Indiana, he decided to recommend introducing a similar plan in Illinois this year.

Co-workers, friends and relatives are being urged to contact the retirement system if they know the whereabouts of the 880 people who are owed more than $100 each. Their names have been published in two agency newsletters.

A January newsletter for retired employees and an April newsletter for active employees both contained pages titled "Do you know where they are?" Any state worker who is over the age of 60 and served the state for at least eight years is eligible for a pension, Maggio said.

At present, Illinois has nearly 80,000 state workers. They tend to be more aware and informed about benefits than some of their predecessors, he said.

So far, the agency has received 60 responses to names on the lists, and some people have already been sent their money, according to Maggio.

The agency hasn't received many hoax callers, although a few people with common names, "like John Smith," have made bogus inquiries.

"We're careful to make sure the real people get the money," Maggio said. "Anything we find is gravy. We're not spending a lot of money (to trace ex-workers), but we're still finding people."

Locating people after making arduous checks with credit bureaus, the secretary of state's office, the Internal Revenue Service and the Social Security Administration can be hard work, but it's good when it pays off, he added.

"I ran down one guy who is a priest and he was in a monastery somewhere," said Maggio, who's been with the retirement system since 1977. Although the majority of missing recipients still live in Illinois, some on the list have ended up a long way from the Prairie State.

"One woman is now living in Australia," Maggio said. Others have been tracked down in Alaska, California, Florida, Texas, Arizona and North Carolina.

There's even one ex-state worker living in the nation's gambling mecca, Las Vegas. "He could probably use the (money)," Maggio said with a chuckle.

How do people react when told they've got unexpected money coming to them? "Some people are really happy, and they think they're going to win thousands of dollars," Maggio said. "But it's usually smaller amounts. Sometimes they say `I don't want (the money), it's not worth it.' But most are genuinely appreciative."

Any eligible recipients should get in touch quickly, Maggio warned, because future federal regulations may require former state workers who are now over the age of 70 to pay half their unclaimed pension money to Uncle Sam.

And that's never good news.

 

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, October 10, 1993



Tober-Stewardson Elizabeth Ann Stewardson and William Keith Tober, both of Springfield, were married at 7 p.m. Sept. 11 at Kumler United Methodist Church by the Rev. Jack Cramer-Heuerman.

The bride is the daughter of Barbara and Keith Cripe and Doug and Ginny Stewardson, all of Springfield. The groom is the son of William and Jacqueline Tober of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Molly Stewardson. Bridesmaids were Leigh Ann Gobble, Alexandra Finkle, Tamara Olander, Michelle Herrick and Glenda Millhouse.

Best man was Brian Tober. Groomsmen were Kevin Tober, Dave Baker, Jim Shures, Dave Eilering and Joe Maggio . Ushers were Timothy Olander, Roy Walker and Andrew Young. Ringbearer was David Gobble.

A reception was held at the VFW Post 755. The bride is a graduate of Western Illinois University. The groom is a graduate of Illinois State University and is employed by GTech Corporation.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sauer – donley

 

Sauer – donley

 

SEE “DONLEY” SITE

 

Donley trucking –

 

MTA – chamber – jasmon –

 

gray – scrp –

 

coal trucks – and see landes – gonet – cwlp – curry – lippold/Arnett –

 

sauer – giordano – pat G.=Grandview pd chief

 

 

 

Vicki Bouknight

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, April 7, 2008

Section: LOCAL
Page: 19

Vicki Bouknight

DIVERNON – Vicki Bouknight, 53, of Divernon died Saturday, April 5, 2008, at Memorial Medical Center.

She was born March 2, 1955, the daughter of Melvin and Mary Roberts Kyle.

Surviving are her fiance,
Dave Chamness;

 

a son,

Bill Donley;

a grandson,

Cody Donley;

father, Melvin Kyle; five sisters,

 

Anita Giordano ,

 

Tina Price, Lori Pshak, Cindy Bland and Audrey Higgs;

 

three brothers,

John A. Sauer

 

and Ray Kyle and Roy Kyle; and several stepbrothers, stepsisters, aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by her mother and stepfather, Mary and John Sauer Sr., and a sister, Kathie Kidd.


 

 

 

 

SAUER= AUX POLICE

 

OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, August 13, 2005



John E. Sauer Sr.

DIVERNON - John E. Sauer Sr., 86, of Divernon died Thursday, Aug. 11, 2005, at his home.

He was born Feb. 13, 1919, in Springfield, the son of Jack and Marguerite Schewe Sauer . He married Mary E. Roberts in 1969; she died in 1997. A daughter, Sandra Kaye Sauer , two sons, Jackie Eugene Sauer and William Allen Sauer , and a stepdaughter, Kathleen Kidd, preceded him in death.


Mr. Sauer retired from the

Springfield Police Department,

where he had been an officer and detective.

He was a lifelong member of the

Police Benevolent Association

and the Springfield Auxiliary Police.



Survivors: two daughters,

Marguerite Beemer of Riverton and

Glenda (husband, James) Snyders of Lawrence, Kan.;

 

two sons, John Andrew Sauer of Divernon and

 

John E. (wife, Lynn) Sauer Jr. of Springfield;

five stepdaughters, Anita (husband, Patrick) Giordano and

 

Cindy (husband, Charles) Bland, both of Springfield,

 

Vicki (husband, Dan) Bouknight of Texas,

 

Lori (husband, Gary) Pshak of Athens and

 

Tina (husband, Keith) Price of Florida; several grandchildren and great-grandchildren; and many nieces, nephews and cousins.

 

 

 

 

 

TITLE: OBITUARIES

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, March 3, 1997

Mary E. Sauer

Mary E. Sauer , 60, of Divernon, formerly of Springfield, died Sunday at St.

John's Hospital.

She was born May 10, 1936, in Waverly, the daughter of James and Grace Lambert Roberts. She married John E. Sauer Sr. in 1969. A Springfield resident most of her life, Mrs. Sauer worked as a medical assistant/consultant -- long-term care for the state for 15 years.

Survivors: husband, John E. Sr.; six daughters, Mrs. Patrick (Anita) Giordano , Mrs. Don (Kathleen) McCracken, Mrs. Gary (Lori) Pshak and Cindy Miller, all of Springfield, Mrs. Dan (Vicki) Bouknight of Liberty, Texas, and Mrs. Keith (Tina) Price of Bridgeport; a son, John A. Sauer of Divernon; two stepdaughters, Marguarite Beemer of Springfield and Glenda Snyder of Lawrence, Kan.; two stepsons, John E. Jr. and William A. Sauer , both of Springfield; 21 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; two sisters, Mrs. Joseph (Doris) Maggio of Springfield and Mrs. Raymond (Barbara) Reynolds Sr. of Rochester; two brothers, Maurice Roberts of Springfield and Paul Richard Roberts of Missouri; several nieces, nephews and cousins

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drew sauer

Vespa

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drew sauer

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, June 18, 1995

Sauer-Paul Barbara Jean Paul and

Jeffrey Edward Sauer,

both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. May 20 at St. Agnes Church by the Rev. David Paul.

The bride is the daughter of

Dr. and Mrs. Glennon Paul of Springfield.

 

The groom is the son of

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Sauer of Springfield.

Serving as matron of honor was Sheryl Ungashick, with Sally Paul serving as maid of honor. Ginger and Mia Paul, Shelly Graupner, Angela Tobler, Gina McLaughlin and Gail Grant were bridesmaids. Flower girl was Allie Siebert.

Serving as best men were

Drew Sauer and

Jeff Swaney.

Andrew Paul,

Rod Davis,

Vincent Madonia,

Jeff Dodd,

Brett Diamond and

Dave Saladino were groomsmen.

Ushers were Charles and Marty Paul. Ringbearer was

Bradley Sauer.

A reception was held at the Springfield Hilton.

The bride is a graduate of Sacred Heart Academy and St. Louis College of Pharmacy. She is a pharmacist. The groom is a graduate of Griffin High School and Southern Illinois University. He is employed by the secretary of state.

The couple will live in Springfield.

 

 

Wedding, added July 13

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, July 13, 2009

Author/Byline: THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER
Section: announcements

Frisina-Vespa

Jessica Vespa and Vincent Frisina, both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. May 9, 2009, at St. Aloysius Church by the Rev. Mark Schulte.

The bride is the daughter of Art and Sandy Vespa of Springfield. The groom is the son of Joe and Barb Frisina of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Caitlin Reynolds. Bridesmaids were Dana Vespa, Gina Vespa and Andrea Shafer. Flower girls were Mallory Vespa and Grace Vespa.

Best man was Drew Sauer . Groomsmen were Chris Reynolds, Chad Bigelow and John Mikels. Ring bearer was Gavin Shafer. Ushers were Mike Vespa and Steve Vespa.

A reception was held at the Artisan's Building at the Illinois State Fairgrounds.

The bride is a graduate of Sacred Heart-Griffin High School and Benedictine University. The groom is a graduate of Lutheran High School and attended DeVry University.

The couple resides in Springfield.

 

 

ON CAMPUS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, August 8, 2002


DREW SAUER (Lutheran) played in three games and earned a varsity letter in baseball at MacMurray College. Sauer, an infielder, was hitless in five at-bats, walked once and scored one run. He recently completed his sophomore year.

 

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, October 16, 2005



Matzke-Mesenbring

Airin Rae Mesenbring of Norwood, Minn., and Jeffrey Michael Matzke of Springfield were married at 4 p.m. June 18, 2005, at St. John's Lutheran Church in Norwood, Minn., by the Rev. David Winter and the Rev. Marvin Matzke, grandfather of the groom.

The bride is the daughter of Larry and Marsha Mesenbring of Norwood, Minn. The groom is the son of Michael and Marsha Matzke of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Tyra Panning. Bridesmaids were Sonja Mesenbring, Amy Matzke, Christie Hanson and Amber Jennings. Flower girl was Leah Wroge. Candle lighter was Stephanie Hensel.

Best man was John Matzke. Groomsmen were Andy Mesenbring, Daryl Werner, Kyle Wooster and Drew Sauer . Ring bearers were Ethan and Jared Roland.

A reception was held at the OK Corral Restaurant is Jordan, Minn.

The bride is a graduate of Lutheran High School in Mayer, Minn., Concordia University in Seward, Neb., with a Bachelor of Arts in math and attended graduate school at the University of Nebraska. She is employed as a marketing analyst with Supervalu Corp. in Chanhassen, Minn. The groom is a graduate of Lutheran High School, Concordia University in Seward, Neb., with a Bachelor of Arts in geography and a graduate of the University of Akron, Ohio, with a Master of Arts in urban planning. He is a city planner in Prior Lake, Minn.

The couple resides in Chanhassen, Minn.

HEARTLAND CLASSIC

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, July 15, 2000



* SPRINGFIELD REDS 6, ROCHESTER 5: Back-to-back doubles by Jake Herr and Drew Sauer sparked a three-run sixth inning to rally the Reds. B.J. Halford earned the victory.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jeff sauer –

 

 

SAUER IS SHG BASEBALL -

SWANEY –

BORSKI –

SALADINO -

 

 

AND SEE “SHGFOOTBALL” SITE –

SOMMER

BORSKI

STEIL

BONANSINGA –

 

SALADINO AS COACH 

@ “SHGCOACHES” & “SALADINO”

 

 

 

 

Jeff Sauer

 

– shg baseball 1988  - saladino – borski – minder -

 

GRIFFIN ARMS ITSELF FOR TITLE DEFENSE

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Thursday, June 9, 1988

Author/Byline: Dave Kane
Edition: M1,M2,S1
Section: SPORTS
Page: 27

En route to the Class AA state baseball championship last year, Griffin High School relied on the one-two pitching punch of seniors Jeff Borski

and Tim Hull. As they prepare for a repeat appearance at Lanphier Park, the Cyclones don't have such a Big Two, but Coach Ron Wojcicki isn't fretting.

"Last year, it was pretty much a case of us going as far as Jeff and Timmy could take us," said Wojcicki. "We don't have anybody of their caliber this year, but I think we have more people who can throw. We've been going with whoever's hot."

Griffin certainly has gotten hot at the right time. The Cyclones entered last year's tourney at 33-4. Today, they'll take a 20-19 mark into an 11:30 a.m. quarterfinal against Chicago Marist (31-8). Griffin ended its regular season with six straight losses -- four coming to Joliet Catholic. In fact, Griffin enters with the second-most losses by a quarterfinalist. In 1982, Edwardsville finished 23-24. In 1981, Chicago Brother Rice was 32-17 in finishing second.

But the Cyclones have allowed just 10 runs in their five post-season games. That's Wojcicki's main reason for optimism.

"Our pitching has been outstanding," said Wojcicki, in his third year as head coach. "If you can hold your opponent to two runs, you know you're going to be in the game. That's all we look for."

Wojcicki will look for more of the same today from junior right-hander Chris Stapleton (2-5). Marist Coach Don Kuehner said his likely starter will be senior left-hander Frank Vlk (9-2). Vlk is one of three lefties in Marist's rotation.

Stapleton, a hard thrower, was winless in the regular season with a couple of tough-luck losses along the way. But he has won two tournament contests and has a 3.72 earned-run average over 53 innings, with 73 strikeouts 48 walks.

If Stapleton would falter, it would be sophomore J.J. Borski out of the bullpen. In the Cyclones' five tourney games, Borski has saved three and won one. For the year, he carries a 1.81 ERA with 30 strikeouts and 15 walks in 39 innings.

Senior right-hander Dave Saladino (5-4) got the complete-game victory Monday against Lincoln in the Springfield Sectional.

"You knew whoever threw Monday wouldn't throw Thursday," Wojcicki said. "Saladino gave us a big lift Monday, and I think it helped his confidence."

While Stapleton, Saladino and Borski have formed Griffin's post-season staff, Wojcicki sees several others with a chance for tournament work. Among them is junior right-hander Craig Jones, who worked three innings of relief in last year's quarterfinal win over Chicago Vocational.

"We haven't used Jones in post-season, but we're confident enough in him from last year," Wojcicki said. "We'd have no problem pitching him. We haven't thrown (senior right-hander) Dan Patterson in a while, or (senior left-hander) Jeff Sauer ."

Offensively, Griffin has had various post-season heroes. Leadoff man Terry Williams drove in the game winner in the regional opener against Chatham Glenwood and belted a two-run homer in the sectional win over Normal.

And against Lincoln, No. 6 man Brad Rotherham went 3-for-3 while No. 7 man Greg Bernet delivered a key bases-loaded triple. In defeating the Railers, the Cyclones' top three batters went hitless. The bottom six combined for nine hits.

"If you'd told me that was going to happen, I would've said our chances would've been pretty slim," Wojcicki said. "But the bottom of our lineup came through. We don't rely on that one person."

Only a few Cyclones saw substantial action on last year's state championship team: Williams, second baseman Dennis Kracik and catcher Jeff Swaney. That, combined with an up-and-down regular season, casts the Cylcones as a heavy underdogs -- just as theywere in the regional and sectional.

"Oh, sure, we're the underdog," Wojcicki said. "You look at our record and everything else. But we don't feel any pressure at all. You hear people say, `It's great just to be here,' and it is great. But we're playing our best ball now.

"Our record reflects we didn't always play our best. But the kids are confident now."

 

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, October 19, 1997

Gerger-Donaldson Wendy Elaine Donaldson and Brett Alan Gerger, both of Springfield, were united in marriage at 2 p.m. Sept. 20 at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church by the Rev. John C. Burnett.

The bride is the daughter of Thomas and Donna Donaldson of Springfield. The groom is the son of Bert Gerger and Lynn Gerger, both of Springfield.

Serving as matron of honor was Barbie Sauer. Bridesmaids were Sarah Newbury, Katie Hansen, Peri Gonulsen, Angie White and Alyssa Williams. Flower girl was Aleandra Kutz. Junior attendants were Molly Donaldson and Nicholas Valentine.

Serving as best man was David Peters. Groomsmen were Eric Harbauer, Andy Seck,

Jeff Sauer

and Brian and Dan Donaldson. Ushers were Steve Rose, Jeremy Huffstedler and Paul Rayhill. Ringbearer was Alexander Palmer.

A reception was held at St. John Vianney Activity Center, Sherman.

The bride is a graduate of Ursuline Academy and the University of Wisconsin at Madison. She is employed as an occupational therapist at Memorial Medical Center. The groom is a graduate of Southeast High School and attends Lincoln Land Community College. He is employed by the state Department of Insurance and is also a wrestling coach for Springfield High School.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, December 24, 1995



Saladino-Rohrig Michele Lee Rohrig and David Matthew Saladino, both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. Nov. 11 at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church by the Rev.

Patrick Gibbons.

The bride is the daughter of Richard and Sharon Rohrig of Springfield. The groom is the son of Carl and Nancy Saladino of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Ann Reynolds, with Kim Robinson, Maria Sakowicz, Karen Miller and Karen Saladino as bridesmaids. Flower girl was Kara Gallagher.

Serving as best man was John Saladino, with Pat Sullivan, Vince Madonia,

 

Jeff Sauer

 

and Tim Kell as groomsmen. Ushers were Jeff Beccue, Jim File and Jim Tresouthick. Ringbearer was Greg Gallagher.

A reception was held at the Northfield Center.

The bride is a graduate of Southern Illinois University and the University of Illinois, where she earned a MS degree. She is employed as an advertising account executive with Professional Images. The groom is a graduate of SIU. He is employed as an environmental scientist with Andrews Environmental Engineering.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, September 6, 1992

Swaney-Douglas Jena Marlene Douglas and

 

Jeffrey Martin Swaney,

both of Springfield, were married at 11 a.m. Aug. 1 at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception by the Rev. Michael Mullink.

M. Kae Douglas of Springfield and Kenneth and Linda Douglas of Mechanicsburg are parents of the bride. Larry and Sue Misinay of Staffordville, Ky., are parents of the groom.

Serving as matron of was Robin Kae Hayes. Bridesmaids were Mindy Maynard, Shannon Frederick, Kelli Kopmann and Michelle Misinay. Flower girls were Lindsey and Lesley Douglas and Erin Hayes.

Best man was Barry Jordan. Groomsmen were

 

Jeff Sauer ,

 

Paul Rayhill, Chad Supp and Jonathan Fritz. Ushers were Troy White and Michael Fritz. Ringbearer was Stuart Seymour.

A reception was held at Knights of Columbus Hall, New Berlin.

The bride is a graduate of Springfield High School and Western Illinois University. She is employed as an assistant to an architect. The groom is a graduate of Griffin High School and attended Western Illinois University. He will attend Florida Atlanta University in the fall.

The couple will reside in West Palm Beach, Fla.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHIP SMITH

SAUER - VESPA

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scrp – IRV - sauer

 

Chip smith (Irv’s kid)

 

Links to:

sauer –

VESPA

albanese

 

 

Chip smith – steve vespa – albanese

 

 

ALBANESE ALSO DOES COMPUTERS

 

 

Steve vespa – drew sauer

 

Albanese dev – S. macarthur extension

 

See esp – CMS property leases – madonia – NF/cellini

 

 

Sangamon County farmland review committee meeting set for Tuesday

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, June 2, 2008

Section: LOCAL
Page: 11

The Sangamon County Farmland Assessment Review committee will examine 2009 farmland assessments for taxes payable in 2010 during a public meeting at 9 a.m. Tuesday.

The meeting will be in Room 210 of the Sangamon County Complex, located at 200 S. Ninth St.

The committee also will hold a public hearing on the 2009 farmland values at 9:15 a.m. Tuesday in room 210.

The meeting and hearing are open to all interested parties.

The Farmland Assessment Review committee consists of Joe Lindley, supervisor of assessments, chairman; Chip Smith , chairman of the Sangamon County Board of Review; and members Paul Stout, John Irwin and Francis Knepler.

 

 

 

 

 

CHIP IS IRV’S KID

 

Trustee Chip Smith announces bid for re-election to SMEAA board

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Saturday, March 22, 2003

Section: LOCAL
Page: 16

Chip Smith , who was appointed a trustee of the Springfield Metropolitan Exposition and Auditorium Authority in 1995 and won election in 1999, is seeking re-election April 1.

As a lifelong Springfieldian, Smith says in a prepared statement, "It's an exciting time to be involved with the Prairie Capital Convention Center. With the revitalization of the downtown area and the opening of the Abraham Lincoln Library and Museum, we have a tremendous opportunity to take advantage of a new influx of tourism to Springfield."

He sees the PCCC, which is overseen by the SMEAA board, as an anchor of the downtown revitalization effort, adding: "We have always had a lot to offer in Springfield, but now with the addition of the new Lincoln complex, we have a world-class facility that will make Springfield even that much more attractive."

During Smith's tenure, the center has added a new heating and cooling system, new roof, lighting in the meeting rooms, a new basketball floor and new telescopic risers to increase seating capacity and comfort.



Smith, 40, has been a public service administrator for the state of Illinois since 1986. He is an assistant division manager at the Department of Central Management Services, where he oversees capital building programs and is supervisor of building managers throughout the state.

Smith and his wife, Sasha, have two children.

The SMEAA board consists of 11 unpaid trustees. Smith is running in District 5, which encompasses areas from Springfield's north end along the eastern edge of the city and south to Lake Springfield and Laketown areas.

Three seats are up for election in District 5. In addition to Smith, Dick Schofield, Scott Sanders, Billy Earl and Colleen Redpath are vying for the seats.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is keyIRV/Albanese

 

Xa – toni davis – san diego – cohen – albanese – Mueller dist – mcgraw/albanese – off duty cops – hotels –

 

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, June 23, 1996

Vespa-Dorich Jennifer Nicole Dorich and Nicholas L. Vespa, both of Springfield, were married at 2:30 p.m. June 8 at St. Aloysius Church by the Rev. Kevin B. Sullivan.

The bride is the daughter of Janie Turner of Springfield and Frankie Dorich of Farmersville. The groom is the son of Gerald and Sherri Vespa of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Stephanie Dorich. Jodi Baker, Peggy Brown, Lisa Cicciarelli, Alicia Genetti and Angie and Sarah Vespa were bridesmaids.

Best man was Todd Altpeter. Matt Lahood, Dan Kazlauski, Tom McCarthy, Joe and Tony Vespa and Pat Paden were groomsmen. Ushers were Mike and Steve Vespa , Dennis Albanese and Don Murphy.

A reception was held at the Artisans Building.

The bride is a graduate of Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville and attends the University of Illinois at Chicago. The groom is a graduate of Illinois State University. He is employed by the state Department of Transportation.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

Wedding, added July 13

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Monday, July 13, 2009

Author/Byline: THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER
Section: announcements

Frisina-Vespa

Jessica Vespa and

Vincent Frisina,

both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. May 9, 2009, at St. Aloysius Church by the Rev. Mark Schulte.

The bride is the daughter of Art and Sandy Vespa of Springfield. The groom is the son of Joe and Barb Frisina of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Caitlin Reynolds. Bridesmaids were Dana Vespa, Gina Vespa and Andrea Shafer. Flower girls were Mallory Vespa and Grace Vespa.

Best man was

Drew Sauer.

Groomsmen were Chris Reynolds, Chad Bigelow and John Mikels. Ring bearer was Gavin Shafer. Ushers were Mike Vespa and Steve Vespa .

A reception was held at the Artisan's Building at the Illinois State Fairgrounds.

The bride is a graduate of Sacred Heart-Griffin High School and Benedictine University. The groom is a graduate of Lutheran High School and attended DeVry University.

The couple resides in Springfield.

 

WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, July 9, 2000

Vespa-McKenna

Dana Elizabeth McKenna and Michael Edmund Vespa, both of Springfield, were married at 2 p.m. June 3 at St. Aloysius Catholic Church by the Rev. John Titus.

The bride is the daughter of Jerald and Sandra McKenna of Springfield. The groom is the son of Arthur and Sandra Vespa of Springfield.

Serving as maid of honor was Nita Vellody. Bridesmaids were Jennifer Moore, Kim Allee, Sheila Truax, Cara Puckett and Deanna Brockman. Junior bridesmaid was Jasmyn McKenna. Flower girls were Rosa McKenna and Caitlin Reynolds.

Best man was Steve Vespa . Groomsmen were Andy Danner, Mark Sams, Nick Zummo, Andy Wells and Joe LaChica. Junior groomsman was Chris Reynolds. Ushers were Patrick Small and Tony Vespa.

A reception was held at the Artisans Building.

The bride attended Lincoln Land Community College. She is employed by CCB Credit Services. The groom is a graduate of Sacred Heart-Griffin High School and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is employed by the state of Illinois.

The couple will reside in Springfield.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Irv link to vespa – fd -

 

TITLE: WEDDINGS

State Journal-Register, The (Springfield, IL) - Sunday, November 6, 1994

Vespa-Schilpp Margot Marlene Schilpp and

 

John "Jack" Joseph Vespa,

both of Salt Lake City, Utah, were married Sept. 3 at Touch of Nature in Carbondale by Rev. Dr. John F. Hayward.

The bride is the daughter of Madelon Schilpp and the late Paul Arthur Schilpp of Carbondale. The groom is the son of the late John Joseph and Jeanne Vespa of Springfield.

Serving as matron of honor was Beckie Flannagan. Kathy Beyer, Diann Depper and Anita J. Stoner were bridesmaids.

Best man was Steve Vespa .

Chip Smith, Tim Moore and Jeff Vallender were groomsmen. Ushers were Karl Kageff, Robert York, Jeff Skeels and Neil Steffey. A reception was held in the Friends' Room.

The bride and groom are both graduate students studying for their doctorates at University of Utah.

The couple will reside in Salt Lake City, Utah.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

vespa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blessed sacrament – newsletter – october 19th – (27th Sunday)

 

 

 

 

Madonia is a priest at blessed sacrament

 

 

Along w/ ushman and vespa

 

See also – other eucharistic ministers – patrick wright chose them

 

 

 

 

 

Perrin is judge perrin’s kid – sd –

 

Ticket fixing

 

See sd links –

 

Site at: “eckufcwperrin”

 

 

 

CELEBRATING THE DAYS

Monday, October 19

X Confessions before 8:00 AM Mass

X 8:00 AM Helen Spence

Brian Joseph Madonia

 

 

Saturday, October 24, Anthony Mary

X 7:00 AM Monica Vespa (LATIN MASS)

X 7:30-8:00 AM Confessions

X 3:00-4:00 PM Confessions

X 4:30 PM Thomas P. O’Connor

 

 

Sunday, October 25, 8:30 AM

Lectors: Tom Karaianis

Servers: Joel Henderson, Mallary Lemme, Abby Ralph

Eucharistic Ministers: Thomas Schmidt, Anne Capestrain, Mark Ushman,

Hannah Perrin, Marge O’Keefe, Scott Reimers, Pat Sheehan, Clara Ushman

 

 

 

 

Janet Vespa, Accounting Manager

E-mail: jvespa@dio.org This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Extension: 176

 

Osd= Stewardship and Dev and oc= office of chancellor

 

Furkin, Cathy

117

OSD/OC

cfurkin@dio.org

 

 

DORIS GRIESSER

Journal Star (Peoria, IL) - Sunday, September 6, 1992

Edition: ALL
Section: OBITUARIES
Page: C15

Doris Griesser, 92, of Lutheran Home died at 8:45 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 3, 1992, at her residence.

She was born Feb. 11, 1900, in Peoria to Alfred E. and Kate Espy Griesser.

Surviving are one niece, Mrs. Robert E. ( Janet) Vespa Sr. of Peoria, two nephews, Garry Griesser of Fresno, Calif., and David Griesser of Aspen, Colo. Two sisters and two brothers preceded her in death.

She was a sales clerk for Block & Kuhl and later for Carson Pirie Scott & Co. for many years.

She was a member of First Federated Church and the church service guild.

A graduate of Bradley University, she was a member fo the Bradley Alumni Association, Pi Beta Phi Sorority and Carson Pirie Scott & Co. Retiree Association.

Cremation will be accorded. Memorial services will be held at a later date with burial of ashes in Parkview Cemetery.

Memorials may be made to her church or to a charity of the donor's choice. @ART CAPTION: Doris Griesser