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The Government Building



    The Uited States Post Office and Customs House at Jacksonville, a cut of which is present, is nearing completion.  The superstructure, which was erected by the W. C. Green Company, of Chicago, is finished.  The iron work was done by Miles & Bradt, of Atlanta.  There remains to be done only the interior finishings, including flooring, ceiling, plumbing, etc.  Thee are being rapidly completed, and the building will be ready for occupancy by September.  The entire ground floor of the building will be devoted to the Post Office.  Nearly the entire west side of the building will be used for the lobby, with entrances both on that side and on the Forsyth Street end.  Entering the building from Forsyth Street, the first department will be that of the registry division, which occupies the south-east corner of the building.  Next  to this are located the vaults, then the box delivery windows, and next the Post Office boxes.  In the center of the building, opposite the Hogan Street entrance, are the ladies' and gentlemen's delivery windows.  After this comes the newspaper delivery window, and the carriers' delivery window.  The Superintendent of Mails then has an office, and occupying the entire north-east corner of the building is the Money Order Department, and a small office for the Assistant Postmaster.  In the extreme north-west forner of the building are two separate offices opening into each other, one for the Postmaster and the other for the Assistant Postmaster.  A large space is left in the centre of the building, back of the various windows, for the workig department.  The Post Office will, of course, be fitted up with all suitable conveniences for carrying on the work and handling in the best manner the lare amount of mail that passes through it.

    The second floor of the building will contain sixteen rooms, which are to be devoted to the use of the Custom House, Collector of Internal Reveue and United States Court officials.  On the third floor is the United States Court room, which occupies the northern end of the building, and is 40 x 60 feet in size.  There are also twelve more offices on this floor to be used by the Federal officers.  The baement of the building will be used for storage, and will also contain the heating apparatus.  The building will be lighted by gas, no arrangement having been made for electric lights, for soe unknown reason.  The tower will contain an elevator and also a winding staircase.  The original plans of the building called for pine finish, but these have been changed to white oak throughout.  The walls are to be of aluminate, instead of lime mortar plastering, and the windows will be of polished plate glass.  It is a pride and an ornament to the City.  It is the highest buildig in Florida, not excepting the light houses, the pinnacle being one hundred and sixty-eight fee above ground.  The building complete will have cost $275,000.  It is a substantial and enduring structure, which will serve Uncle Sam's purpose here for many years.  No better evidence of the enormous business conducted in Jacksonville can be furished than is found in the report of the business transacted in the Post Office.  It is an index, too, to the growth of the City.

    In 1879 the gross receipts at the Post Office amounted to $16,354.06.  From April 30th, 1894, to April 30th, 1895, the gross receipts were $68,046.94; an increase of $51,692.88 in sixteen years, or nearly six hundred per cent.  The total amount of mail matter handled during the last fiscal year was 23,423,149 pieces, or nearly half a million pieces a week, and only five clerks to perform the work.  It is a magnificent record of labor.  Following is the report:

STATEMENT OF BUSINESS OF JACKSONVILLE POST OFFICE, FROM MAY 1ST, 1894, TO APRIL 30TH, 1895.
H. W. CLARK, POSTMASTER.

FINANCIAL DEPARTMENT -- H. R. CLARK, ASSISTANT POSTMASTER.

Net Receipts from sale of Stamps, Stamped Envelopes, Postal Cards, Etc.
   $66,687.07
From Box Rents            
       1,359.67
     Total Cash Receipts,
  $68,046.74
Cash Deposits from other Offices,
     51,926.25
     Total Cash Received,
  $119,972.99


Actual Net Cash Business of Office, as above.
   $68,046.74
Total Gross Expenses for operating Jacksonville Post Office,
    29,405.37
     Total Cash Receipts,
  $38,641.37


MAILING DEPARTMENT -- W. J. DRISCOLL, SUPERINTENDENT OF MAILS.

Number pieces of mail handled during the year, viz:

           
   Pieces
Mail of First Class
   11,439,956
All other Classes
   11,974,772
Special Delivery  
          8,421
     Total pieces Mail handled
   23,423,149


MADE-UP MAILS DESPATCHED.

  Distributions.   Transit.
   Total.
 
Pouches.
 Sacks.
 Pouches.
 Sacks.
  Pouches. Sacks.
 31,189 19,032
 5,600
 31,870
 36,789
 50,902


MADE-UP MAILS RECEIVED.

 Distributions.
    Transit.    Total. 
Pouches.  
 Sacks.
 Pouches.
 Sacks.
  Pouches.  Sacks.
 17,807 28,779
  5,600  31,870  23,407  60,649


REGISTRY DIVISION -- N. S. DUNKLER, CHIEF.

Summary of Work From May 1st, 1894. to April 30th, 1895.

Registered Letters and Parcels Despatched.
  19,075 
Packages in Transit,
  110,870
Pouches Received.
  4,804
Registered Letters and Parcels Received.
  23,965
Registered Letters and Parcels Delivered by Carrier.
  11,351
Registered Letters and Parcels Delivered at Desk.
  2,893
Official Letters Received for Office, Etc.
  9,721



Foreign Exchange.

Registered Letters and Parcels Received.
  2,463
Registered Letters and Parcels Despatched.
  1,280


    FREE DELIVERY DIVISION -- R. W. ADAMS, SUPERINTENDENT. -- Regular force, thirteen carriers; substitutes, three.  The clerical force, exclusive of carriers, numbers fifteen men, and one special delivery messenger.  Thirty-six mails are received at, and the same number despatched from, the Post Office every day.





Brown, S. Paul
The book of Jacksonville:  a history
Poughkeepsie, N.Y.:  A.V. Haight, printer and bookbinder, 1895, pp. 121-123.
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