Writing Resources and General Class Documents

Want to know if your source is CRAP?

* Currency -

o How recent is the information?

o How recently has the website been updated?

o Is it current enough for your topic?

* Reliability -

o What kind of information is included in the resource?

o Is content of the resource primarily opinion? Is is balanced?

o Does the creator provide references or sources for data or quotations?

* Authority -

o Who is the creator or author?

o What are the credentials?

o Who is the published or sponsor?

o Are they reputable?

o What is the publisher’s interest (if any) in this information?

o Are there advertisements on the website?

* Purpose/Point of View -

o Is this fact or opinion?

o Is it biased?

o Is the creator/author trying to sell you something?


Credit: http://www.workliteracy.com/pages/the-crap-test/ 




To view SMART Notebook files if you are not using a school computer (using a school computer with SMART Notebook Software is recommended but not required), follow these steps.  1. Download the file onto your computer.  2.  Go to www.express.smarttech.com.  3.  Click on "Open an existing Notebook file."  4.  Open the file that you just saved on your computer.
 
WHOPPER PARAGRAPH TEMPLATE
 
Create a powerful, well-supported, 11-sentence body paragraph that follows the point-evidence-analysis format by using the template below.  Each number below represents one sentence.  Be sure to follow MLA conventions (see vodcasts for a refresher) for introducing and citing quotes and paraphrases.  In a nutshell, this paragraph includes a topic sentence; three ideas that each feature the introduction of an idea (point), supporting quote or paraphrase (evidence), and detailed explanation of the evidence (analysis); and a transition sentence that hints at the next paragraph.  Many students find it helpful to print this template and handwrite a draft of the paragraph in the space provided.  To be clear, every sentence in the paragraph should support your topic sentence, which, in turn, directly supports your thesis statement.
 
 
            1.  Topic sentence: introduce the paragraph and what you will discuss.  You may consider including the three ideas you
            will discuss in this paragraph.
 
 
 
 
 
            2.  Introduce first idea (POINT).
 
 
 
 
 
            3.  Quote or paraphrase that supports the first idea (EVIDENCE).  Include introduction and citation.
 
 
 
 
 
            4.  Detailed explanation and analysis of the preceding quote/paraphrase related to first idea (ANALYSIS).
 
 
 
 
 
            5.  Introduce second idea (POINT).
 
 
 
 
 
            6.  Quote or paraphrase that supports the second idea (EVIDENCE).  Include introduction and citation.
 
 
 
 
 
            7.  Detailed explanation and analysis of the preceding quote/paraphrase related to second idea (ANALYSIS).
 
 
 
 
 
            8.  Introduce third idea (POINT).
 
 
 
 
 
            9.  Quote or paraphrase that supports the third idea (EVIDENCE).  Include introduction and citation.
 
 
 
 
 
            10.  Detailed explanation and analysis of the preceding quote/paraphrase related to third idea (ANALYSIS).
 
 
 
 
            11.  Conclude the paragraph and transition to the next paragraph.
 
 
 
 
Nice work!  This structured writing format has been proven effective at the high school, undergraduate, and graduate levels.
 
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Travis Macy,
Aug 22, 2011, 6:27 AM
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Travis Macy,
Aug 19, 2011, 7:25 AM
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Travis Macy,
Aug 19, 2011, 5:56 PM
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Travis Macy,
Aug 23, 2011, 8:14 AM
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Travis Macy,
Apr 25, 2011, 3:41 PM
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Travis Macy,
Jan 25, 2012, 10:43 AM
ĉ
Travis Macy,
Apr 25, 2011, 3:42 PM
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Travis Macy,
Nov 16, 2011, 7:35 AM
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Travis Macy,
Apr 27, 2011, 11:16 AM
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Travis Macy,
Apr 26, 2011, 11:56 AM
ĉ
Travis Macy,
Aug 11, 2011, 2:46 PM
ĉ
Travis Macy,
Aug 11, 2011, 2:46 PM
ĉ
Travis Macy,
Apr 10, 2012, 8:45 AM
ĉ
Travis Macy,
Apr 25, 2011, 3:42 PM
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